C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

Issue #11 February 2, 2001

 

F-E-A-T-U-R-E-S

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Advocacy Groups and City Staff
Biking to Work Truly is Healthy

The Season of Wacky Bills
And One Positive Bill
Mustn't Ride Wheels to School

 

I-N--T-H-E--N-E-W-S

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It's Hard to Walk in the 'Burbs
Trail Planned in St. Paul

Pedestrians Make a Downtown

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ADVOCACY GROUPS AND CITY STAFF
In an article titled, Advocacy and Agency, Don Burrell,
(an MPO bicycle/pedestrian coordinator and a board member
of the Ohio Bicycle Federation) summarized some of the key
points made at the ProBike/ProWalk 2000 conference in a
session on 'Bicycle Advocacy Groups and City Bicycle Staffs
- Friends or Foes?' The suggestions presented by agency and
advocacy group staff from Chicago and San Francisco are so
sound, we thought we'd pass them along (Thanks, Don!):

With regard to the relationship between advocates and
agency staff,

- Accepting advocacy criticism is part of the process.
- Recognize the bike coordinator can't set policy -
advocates need to do this through the elected officials.
- Achievable projects need to be defined to have some
victories for the advocates.
- The bike coordinator should not serve as an advocate of
defender of advocates.
- Bike advocacy is about power.
- Public support of bike policies needs to be build through
the advocacy groups.
- City government is the only mechanism to get things done.
- Praise loudly, correct softly.
- Instead of trying to change official's minds, partner
with them to sell concepts to community groups.
- Advocacy groups can decentralize to carry out their
programs inn the suburban communities.

Source: Ohio Bicycle Communicator, Vol., 28, Number 4,
September-December 2000.
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BIKING TO WORK TRULY IS HEALTHY!
Dr. Lars Bo Andersen recently sent us a copy of a Danish
study entitled "All-cause mortality in 13,375 women and
17,265 men, followed for 433,000 person-years, associated
with physical activity in leisure time, at work, sport and
cycling" (Andersen LB, Schnohr P, Schroll M, Hein,HO), a
version of which was published last June in the Journal of
the American Medical Association (Vol. 160 No. 11, June 12,
2000).

Here's part of the discussion:

"The present study analyzed self-reported physical activity
at baseline and subsequent all-cause mortality. The major
findings of this large scale epidemiological study were
that in both sexes and in all age groups, there was a lower
mortality in the physically active compared to the
inactive. Those who used the bicycle as transportation to
work experienced a lower mortality rate even after
adjustment for leisure time physical activity, and sports
participation discriminated mortality rates even among the m
ore physically active subjects. Physical inactivity at work
was only a risk factor in women."

To see the abstract of the JAMA article, go to:
http://archinte.ama-assn.org/issues/v160n11/abs/ioi90593.html
For a copy of the study in WordPerfect for Windows format,
send an email to the editor at: john@montana.com ... If
you need another format, we will try to accommodate you.
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THE SEASON OF WACKY BIKE BILLS
Every year or two, it seems that some state legislature
cooks up a bicycle bill that seems just too outrageously
anti-bicycle that you just have to shake your head in
wonder. Here are two picks from Winter 2001's wacky bike
bills...

Bill #1:
This year, an odd bill was introduced in the Montana
Legislature to require bicyclists to ride against traffic
when riding outside town. Introduced at the request of a
woman who's husband was killed while riding on a country
road, Montana House Bill 212 is an example of something
that inadvertently attempts to turn one tragedy into many.
Luckily, at the bill's first hearing, anti-HB212 speakers
outnumbered pro-HB212 speakers nine to one. Word is it will
be tabled.

To track MT HB212, visit:
http://data.opi.state.mt.us/bills/2001/billhtml/HB0212.htm

Bill #2:
According to the League of American Bicyclists, the second
bill, Texas Senate Bill 238, is "a measure that would
severely curtail the rights of cyclists in Texas. The Bill,
which could take effect September 1, would prohibit groups
of three or more cyclists on many of the best country roads
in Texas (essentially making group riding illegal on rural
roads), prohibit riding two abreast, and require cyclists
to wear 'slow-moving-vehicle' emblems."

"Sen. Jeff Wentworth, R-San Antonio, who introduced the
measure, told the Austin American Statesman that farmers
find groups of cyclists on farm-to-market roads both
'dangerous and exasperating.' He said, 'I don't have
anything against bicyclists, but I've talked to farmers in
the Hill Country I represent who are traveling along a
narrow, two-lane highway and they top a hill and find three
bicyclists spread across the road.'"

The text of the bill may be found at:
http://tlo2.tlc.state.tx.us/cgi-bin/tlo/textframe.cmd?LEG=77&SESS=R&CHAMBER=S&BILLTYPE=B&BILLSUFFIX=00238&VERSION=1&TYPE=B
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AND ONE POSITIVE BILL...
According to Bicycle Colorado, the bicycle safety bill
they are sponsoring, "SB 01-59, modifies the state traffic
code. It provides additional protection against turning
vehicles, establishes a safe passing distance of 3 feet,
simplifies the single file rule, clarifies that bicyclists
on paths can ride through crosswalks and legalizes
signaling a right turn with the right hand. The Senate
Transportation Committee is scheduled to vote on the bill
on February 6th. If the Committee supports it, the bill
goes to the full Senate for a vote.
Read the bill at http://www.bicyclecolo.org .
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MUSTN'T RIDE WHEELS TO SCHOOL
There are a great many things in this world that appear
to be a little bit hazy and uncertain, but the following,
republished form the 'New York Sun', conclusively and
emphatically indicates the spot where the blue ribbon prize
chump belongs:

"COLLEGE POINT, L.I., June 14 - The teachers in the public
schools here, especially those who ride bicycles, are
aroused over an order issued by the board of education
forbidding them to ride their bicycles to school. the board
declares that the minds of the teachers are concentrated
more upon their wheels that upon their work at school. They
further declare that wheeling tends to create immorality.

"Justice of the Peace William Sutter, who introduced the
resolution at the meeting of the board, said to-day: 'We,
as the trustees are responsible to the public for the
conduct of the schools, and, in a great measure, guardians
of the morals of the pupils. I consider that for our boys
and girls to see their women teachers rider up to the
school door every day and dismount from a bicycle is
conducive to the creation of immoral thoughts, and will
sooner or later cause the boys and girls to lose the
respect for the teachers and terminate in the complete
inability of the young women to maintain discipline.

"'In the first place, I don't consider it to be a proper
thing for any young woman to rider a bicycle, and in the
person of a school teacher it is particularly out of place.
As far as the question of riding before or after school
hours and when away form the school is concerned we have no
authority, but we will not permit them to rider bicycles to
or from the school. If the teachers ride the scholars will.'

"Dr. A. F. W. Reymer, another member of the board, said 'It
is not the proper thing for the women to rider the bicycle.
They wear skirts, of course, but if we don't stop them now
they will want to be in style with the New York women and
war bloomers. They how would our school-rooms look with the
women teachers parading about among the boys and girls
wearing bloomers? they might just as well wear men's
trousers. I suppose it will come to that, but we are
determined to stop our teachers before they go that far.'"

"The teachers were notified of the passage of the order
to-day, and they are very indignant."

Source: The L.A.W. Bulletin and Good Roads, Vol. XXII,
Number 2, July 12th, 1895, Boston, pp. 18
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I-N--T-H-E--N-E-W-S

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NOTE: Thanks to Bob Morgan of Cedar Falls, IA, for letting
us know that many of our links in this section get broken
as newspapers archive their stories. This is the last
section of each issue that we put together in hopes of
keeping that from happening, at least in the short term.
However, with this issue, we'll start providing the
published titles, authors, and archive address so readers
can more easily find the articles if the links break.
Sadly, you may have to pay for access to some stories.
--JW

IT'S HARD TO WALK IN THE 'BURBS
According to a Jan. 30th story in the Seattle Times, "
an examination of transportation data in Seattle found that
a person's activity level can be affected by the year his
or her home was built. For example, people living in
communities developed before 1947 traveled on foot or by
bike more than three times every two days. People living in
areas developed after 1977 got out of the car barely once.

The same study found that people in older neighborhoods
traveled less than four miles, on average, to reach a park
or other recreation area. In the newest communities, people
had to drive more than eight miles...."
For the rest of the story: http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com:80/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=feafat30&date=20010130
Alt. search info: Source:
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/web/
Title: "Life in the 'burbs: Lack of good walking sites can
weigh heavily", Author: Lori Montgomery
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$15 MILLION TRAIL PLANNED IN ST. PAUL/MINNEAPOLIS METRO AREA
According to a Jan. 26th St. Paul Pioneer-Press story,
"White Bear Lake residents soon will get their chance to
sound off on a proposed $15 million to $20 million trail
that would connect Ramsey County's largest lake with 12
communities and other metro-area trails.

"The proposed Lake Links Trail would run around White Bear
Lake and join a network of trails for cyclists, joggers,
dog walkers and other nature devotees. A consultant, hired
by Ramsey and Washington counties, has completed a master
plan or concept for the 15-mile trail.

"'We're basically retrofitting quite a few miles of trails
together in existing and built communities,' said Jeff
Schoenbauer, principal with Brauer and Associates, a
landscaping and design firm in Hopkins. The company is now
making the rounds of the affected communities with the
concept. 'The real charm of it is the opportunity to have a
loop trail around the lake.'..."
For the rest of the story:
http://www.pioneerplanet.com:80/seven-days/fri/news/docs/018698.htm
Alt. search info: Source: http://www.pioneerplanet.com/
Title: "Plan would link lake, trails, towns", Author:
Marisa Agha
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IT TAKES PEDESTRIANS TO MAKE A DOWNTOWN
According to a Jan. 26th story in the Detroit Free
Press, "Sammi Toumas figured he wouldn't be able to make
the coney dogs fast enough to feed the thousands of hungry
workers coming from the office buildings surrounding his
new restaurant. He was wrong. Toumas opened Vinnie's Coney
Island -- named for his 9-year-old son -- in a corner of
the new Oakland Commons, a development that is supposed to
become the heart of Southfield's new downtown.

"City officials, like those in other metro Detroit
communities, yearned for the kind of nostalgia that
downtowns offer. But the boutiques, coffee shops,
bookstores and cafes that were expected to follow haven't.
Neither has the stampede of customers
...
"'I figured I couldn't go wrong with so many people here,'
Toumas said. 'I figured they all have to eat sometime.' But
there are no sidewalks in this young downtown, making it
difficult for employees of office buildings outside the
Oakland Commons complex to walk to his restaurant. There
are no retailers next door to help attract customers..."
For the rest of the story:
http://www.freep.com/news/locoak/nconey26_20010126.htm
Alt. search info: Source:
http://www.freep.com/Architext/AT-freepquery.html
Title: "Southfield: Building a town center -- from
scratch", Author: Marsha Low, Key words: Sammi Toumas
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R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S

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"A DIFFERENT ROUTE TO HEALTH: IMPLICATIONS OF
TRANSPORT POLICIES"

A British Medical Journal article by Carlos Dora that says,
in part, "Estimates of the health impacts and costs of
transport strategies do not include the health effects of
increased walking and cycling and the savings associated
with increased walking and cycling for a population..."
Downloadable as a pdf from:
http://www.bmj.org/cgi/reprint/318/7199/1686.pdf

"PITTSBURGH STREETSCAPE COMPONENTS CATALOG -
THE WALKABLE CITY PROJECT"

Part of the 1998 Pittsburgh Downtown Plan, this catalog
proposes a new set of pedestrian wayfinding signs that
could be integrated with a modular system of street
furniture. It also compiles and consolidates the set of
Downtown Streetscape Construction Standards for curbs,
sidewalks, lights, etc. developed by the City of Pittsburgh
and other stakeholders over the last ten years.
Downloadable as a pdf from:
http://www.city.pittsburgh.pa.us/downloads/documents/StScpCat.pdf .

"INFLUENCE OF CHANGING TRAVEL PATTERNS ON CHILD
DEATH RATES FROM INJURY: TREND ANALYSIS"

Interesting British paper by DiGuiseppi, Roberts, and Li,
points out that "Child mortality from accidental injury
declined by 34% between 1985 and 1992, while children
walked and cycled less distance and traveled substantially
more by car in 1992 compared with 1985. Substantial
decreases in deaths from road traffic accidents for
pedestrians and cyclists were at the expense of walking and
cycling activities. Car travel became safer for children,
but the effect on mortality was largely nullified by large
increases in the distances children travel by car. Although
these changes are in accordance with government targets to
reduce child mortality from accidental injury, the
associated decline in children's physical activity may lead
to future health problems..."
http://www.bmj.org/cgi/content/full/314/7082/710

"INFLUENCE OF TRAVEL PATTERNS ON MORTALITY FROM
INJURY AMONG TEENAGERS IN ENGLAND AND WALES,
1985-95: TREND ANALYSIS

According to this companion study to the above, "The 32%
decline in mortality from unintentional injury among people
aged 15-19_since 1985_is largely due to falling mortality
among motorcyclists, pedestrians, and cyclists. These
declines correspond to large decreases in motorcycling,
walking and cycling. Mortality among car occupants has not
declined, despite a 27% decrease in deaths per km traveled
by car, because of the large increases in the distance
traveled by car. Transport patterns are an important
determinant of adolescent health. Strategies to influence
transport patterns could substantially reduce mortality
from road crashes."
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/316/7135/904

"THREE LESSONS FOR A BETTER CYCLING FUTURE"
According to Malcolm Wardlaw , author of this article from
the British Medical Journal (23_Dec., 2000), "Cyclists were
the only group of road users in Britain whose death rate
increased sharply during the 1990s, yet cycling was in
decline throughout the decade. How could this happen, when
attention on casualties was the most intense in the history
of the bicycle? Perhaps a vision of the near future will be
instructive..." Available to read online or for download as
a pdf file.
http://www.bmj.org/cgi/content/full/321/7276/1582

"RAILS-WITH-TRAILS: DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND
OPERATING CHARACTERISTICS ALONG 61 ACTIVE
RAIL LINES"

The Rails to Trails Conservancy's Nov. 2000 report,
produced in cooperation with the National Park Service
Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program.
The main report is downloadable as a pdf from:
http://http://www.trailsandgreenways.org/TAG_Documents/OnlineReferences/6-1.pdf The Appendix is at:
http://http://www.trailsandgreenways.org/TAG_Documents/OnlineReferences/6-2.pdf

"STATE OF THE PRACTICE: RAILS-WITH-TRAILS"
Alta Transportation Consulting recently released a revised
draft of "State of the Practice," a report on
rails-with-trails. This report is sponsored by the U.S.
Department of Transportation (Federal Railroad
Administration, Federal Highway Administration, Federal
Transit Administration, and National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration).
To see a copy:
http://www.altaplanning.com/fhwa/index.html
To request a hard copy, contact Christopher Douwes of FHWA
at: Christopher.Douwes@fhwa.dot.gov

"INJURY PATTERNS IN CYCLISTS ATTENDING AN ACCIDENT
AND EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT: A COMPARISON OF
HELMET WEARERS AND NON-WEARERS"

According to this 1994 article about a helmet study
published in the British Medical Journal, "The findings
suggest an increased risk of sustaining head injury in a
bicycle accident when a motor vehicle is involved and
confirm protective effect of helmet wearing for any bicycle
accident."
To read the full text:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/308/6943/1537

And now for something completely different...

"CAR CRASHES THOUGH NAIL SALON WINDOW...
NO PED-ESTRIANS HURT

According to a Jan. 27th story in the Bergen County (NJ)
Record, "The nail polish was drying on Stephanie Doerner's
toenails when a car came flying through the window of Magic
Nails Salon late Friday morning.

"Hustling out of the way, Doerner ended up stepping on some
glass. But police are thankful that hers was the most
serious injury in what could have been a very serious
accident, said Capt. Donald Keane.

"Barbara Jiminez, 18, of Fairview thought she was pulling
out of her parking spot on Anderson Avenue and into the
street. But her wheel was turned all the way to the right
and, instead, the 1990 Hyundai careened across the sidewalk
and into the storefront window of Magic Nails.

"'It was one of those real lucky ones because no pedestrian
was walking through,' Keane said. Nor was anyone sitting at
the drying table next to the front window of the salon, he
added."
Source:
http://www.bergen.com:80/bse/salonlk200101275.htm

 

C-A-L-E-N-D-A-R

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February 20-22, 2001: Australia: Walking the 21st Century:
An International Walking Conference, Perth, Western
Australia. Info: John Seaton, Metropolitan Div., Dept. of
Transport, PO Box 7272 Cloisters Square, Perth, W.
Australia - 6850, voice: +61 8 9313 8680 fax: +61 8 9320
9497 e-mail: jseaton@transport.wa.gov.au
website:
http://www.transport.wa.gov.au/conferences/walking/index.html

March 4-8, 2001: 29th International Conference on
Making Cities Livable, Savannah, Georgia. Info:
Suzanne H. Crowhurst Lennard Ph.D.(Arch.), IMCL
Conferences, P.O. Box 7586, Carmel, CA 93921,
voice: (831) 626-9080, fax: (831) 624-5126
website: http://www.livablecities.org/savannah2.html

March 25-28, 2001,17th Annual ITE Spring Conference:
Improving Transportation Performance and Productivity,
Monterey, CA. Info: ITE, 525 School Street, SW, Suite 410,
Washington, DC 20024 USA , voice: (202) 554-8050 fax:
(202) 863-5486, email: ite_staff@ite.org
website: https://www.ite.org/conference2001/sixdays.asp

March 28-30, 2001: National Bike Summit 2001, Washington,
DC. Info: Paul Weiss, League of American Bicyclists, 1612 K
Street NW, Suite 401, Washington, DC 20006-2082 voice:
(202) 822-1333 fax: (202) 822-1334 email:

paul@bikeleague.org

website: http://www.bikeleague.org

July 3-6, 2001,Environmental Design Research Association
(EDRA) Annual Meeting, Edinburgh, Scotland. Info: EDRA,
P.O. Box 7146, Edmond, OK 73083-7146, voice: (405)330-4863
fax: (405)330-4150, email:edra@telepath.com
website: http://www.telepath.com/edra/home.html

August 3-5, 2001, Bikefest 2001 - LAB's National Rally,
Altoona, PA. Info: League of American Bicyclists, voice:
(202) 822-1333, email: bikeleague@bikeleague.org
website: http://www.bikeleague.org/rallies/rallies.html

August 16-18, 2001, First National Congress of Pedestrian
Advocates, Oakland, CA. Info: AmericaWalks, email:
info@americawalks.org
website: http://americawalks.org/news/congress/

September 17-21, 2001, Velo-city 2001, Edinburgh/Glasgow,
Scotland. Info: Meeting Makers Ltd, Jordanhill Campus, 76
Southbrae Drive, Glasgow G13 1PP, Scotland, voice: 0141 434
1500 fax: 434 1519, e-mail: Velo_city@meetingmakers.co.uk
website: http://velo-city2001.org/

September 26-29, 2001, TrailLink 2001: the 3rd International
Trails and Greenways Conference, St. Louis, MO. Info: Rails-
to-Trails Conservancy, voice: (202) 974-5152,
email: rtcconf@transact.org
website: http://www.railtrails.org

J-O-B-S--G-R-A-N-T-S--A-N-D--R-F-P-S

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JOB > BIKE/PED PLANNERS
Alta Transportation Consulting has immediate openings in
their San Rafael (San Francisco Bay Area) and Seattle
offices. The ideal candidate will have project
management experience, knowledge of bikeway, trail
and pedestrian planning/design, be well organized, be
able to work under schedules and budgets, work well with
public agencies and the public, be a good writer, and be
proficient in basic computer programs (Word, Excel).
Degree and experience in transportation planning,
traffic/civil engineering, environmental analysis, urban
design, landscape architecture, or other related fields.
For more information, visit their website at
http://www.altaplanning.com or email Michael Jones
at mgjones@pacbell.net (San Rafael) or Phil Miller
at alta.seattle@gte.net (Seattle).

GRANT > WALKABLE COMMUNITY GRANTS ANNOUNCED
The six successful applicants for the FHWA-sponsored
Walkable Community grant program for MPOs were announced
recently. Winners were the MPOs in Chicago IL, Nashville
TN, Charlotte NC, Orlando FL, Seattle WA, and Pittsburgh
PA. Each will receive a matching grant to provide eight 1/2
day walkable community workshops taught by two seasoned
instructors (instructor corps includes Peter Lagerway, Dan
Burden, and Charlie Gandie). Twenty four MPOs applied for
the grants and, according to Dan Burden, "Selections were
made based on the amount and quality of work shown in the
grant application, and indicators for organization,
applications intent, community support and success." Each
MPO's project coordinator will attend a 3-day training
program in the San Jose area this March and the first
series of workshops will be scheduled for later this year.
For more information, contact John Williams, project
coordinator, at john@montana.com

 

H-O-U-S-E-K-E-E-P-I-N-G

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Contributors: Bill Wilkinson, Peter Moe, Peter Jacobsen,
Martin Guttenplan, Dr. Lars Bo Andersen
Editor: John Williams Send news items john@montana.com  
Director: Bill Wilkinson

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National Center for Bicycling & Walking 1506 21st St NW,
Suite 200, Washington D.C. 20036 Voice: (202) 463-6622
Fax: (202) 463-6625
Email: ncbw@bikefed.org
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