C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S


#110 Friday, November 19, 2004


CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for
Bicycling & Walking. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news
and information you can use to create more walkable and
bicycle-friendly communities.


F-E-A-T-U-R-E-S
  NCBW Begins Round 3 of Walkable Community Workshops
  San Juan Pueblo (NM) Demonstrates Powerful Vision
  MassBike Scores Major Transit Victory
  Winnebago Tribal Member Pushes Ped-Friendly Development
  What if We Built Our Cities around Places?
  Access to Walking Security Index Pilot Study Report


I-N--T-H-E--N-E-W-S
  Rising Obesity Rates Holding Back US Health Gains
  New York City Ahead of Philly in School Traffic Calming
  Portsmouth (NH) Developer Talks Up New Walkable Project
  Oakland (CA) Gets Country's 2nd Biggest "Bike Repository"
  New Mexico Developer Campaigns for Walkability
  Pittsford (NY) Looks at Slowing Drivers Down
  Malvern (PA) Works to Bring Downtown Back to Life
  Missoula (MT) Kids Use GPS in Safe Routes Project



F-E-A-T-U-R-E-S

NCBW BEGINS ROUND 3 OF WALKABLE COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS

-> Fourteen coordinators from eleven regions participated in NCBW's
orientation to the third year of its Walkable Community Workshop
program. Described by Bob Chauncey, WCW Program Manager as "boot camp,
sort of," the three-day training session involved very long days
compensated by visits to several very appealing places. The group began
with a tour of San Jose, led by local bike-ped coordinator John Brazil.
John pointed out fine examples of in-fill and mixed use development,
and San Jose's expanding light rail system.

Pete Lagerwey then led a sample Walkable Community Workshop in Salinas
-- in the heart of John Steinbeck country -- with a dozen members of
the local community in attendance. The workshop was immeasurably
enhanced by two wheelchair-using participants, providing a perspective
lacking in many workshops. Thanks go to Chris Moss of the Salinas
public health department and James Serrano from the Salinas
transportation department for organizing the workshop. Moss's public
health perspective was especially instructive to the coordinators,
driving home the utility of gaining the cooperation of the local public
health community to further the success of the workshops.

After Lagerwey's workshop debrief, the group was rewarded with a visit
to Monterey and Pacific Grove. Next on the list was Morgan Hill -- a
town caught between suburban sprawl and a desire to retain its
agricultural roots. Dan Burden joined the group here to lend his
perspective and provide an impromptu course on photography and creating
memorable PowerPoint presentations. The group then traveled up the
Santa Clara Valley for a bike tour of Stanford University and the city
of Palo Alto, led by John Ciccarelli from Bicycle Solutions and Joe
Kott , Palo Alto's Chief Transportation Official. Bicycling along the
nation's first bike boulevard was a highlight of the day, as was
Ciccarelli's estimate that one-third to one-half of Palo Alto middle
school students bike to school.

The group's final stop was Mountain View to explore the Castro Street
area -- containing one of the best road diets in the nation, great
infill development, several new urbanism treatments, and many
traffic-calmed streets. The by-now-bleary-eyed group found their way to
the airport early the following morning for their flights home, filled
-- by all reports -- with the knowledge and enthusiasm to coordinate a
series of outstanding Walkable Community Workshops in their
communities. Chauncey praised the contributions of Sharon Roerty, NCBW
Director of Community Programs, for augmenting the program with her
insights into Safe Routes to Schools and other grassroots efforts to
effect community change; and Mark Plotz, NCBW Program Manager for much
of the logistical support required to make this complex endeavor run
smoothly.

Chauncey reserved special thanks to the workshop participants for their
insights, enthusiasm, suggestions and camaraderie: Aaron Bartlett
(Kansas City, MO), Lisa Bollinger (Spartanburg, SC), Jamie Bridges
(Baltimore, MD), Maurizia Chapman (Fayetteville, NC), Heather Dunigan
(Wilmington, DE), Eric Fredericks (Dayton, OH), Mark Gallagher
(Medford, OR), Amy Inman (Indianapolis, IN), Kathleen McCune (Los
Angeles, CA), Jean Parlow (Daytona, FL), Ava Perrine (Dover, DE), James
Rojas (Los Angeles, CA), Peter Smith (Bakersfield, CA), and Gena Torres
(Tampa, FL).

For more information, contact Bob Chauncey at <chauncey@dmv.com>.
<back to top>


SAN JUAN PUEBLO (NM) DEMONSTRATES POWERFUL VISION

-> According to a Nov. 17th EPA news release, "San Juan Pueblo received
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) 2004 National Award
for Smart Growth Achievement during a ceremony today in Washington,
D.C. The award recognizes innovative approaches to development that
strengthen a community's identity and protect the environment. 'San
Juan Pueblo has demonstrated a powerful vision while maintaining a
holistic environmental management approach. Moreover, the Pueblo has
gone the extra mile to map this vision and begin implementing it,
making the Pueblo a more healthy, attractive, and enduring place to
live, work, and play,' EPA Regional Administrator Richard E. Greene
said. 'I congratulate San Juan Pueblo for its outstanding achievements
and challenge others to follow its example.'

"In 2001 San Juan Pueblo adopted a Pueblo-wide Master Land Use Plan
that reflects the same commitment to community, environmentally-sound
designs, and pedestrian-oriented villages that have long been a part of
the tribe's 700-year heritage. The first of its kind for a Native
American community, the plan and process by which it was developed
provide valuable models for other tribes and communities around the
country. The plan includes design guidelines that preserve the
architectural heritage of the Pueblo, fostering a distinctive sense of
American Indian heritage. It provides a long-term growth strategy,
coordinates existing infrastructure with housing and commercial
development, preserves the walkable historic plazas and encourages
retail and commercial uses in a 'main street' style..."

Source: http://yosemite.epa.gov/r6/press.nsf/name/SanJuan

For more on the San Juan Pueblo project, go to:
http://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/sg_awards_publication_2004.htm#small_communities

For more on the National Award for Smart Growth Achievement and this
year's winners, go to:
http://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/awards.htm
<back to top>


MASSBIKE SCORES MAJOR TRANSIT VICTORY

-> According to an article in the Nov. 17th MassBike Update, "Today,
MassBike won a major victory for MBTA riders when the agency announced
its decision to increase bicycle access on the subway. The T's new
policy, which is effective immediately, will allow bikes on the Red,
Orange, and Blue Lines at all times except for weekday morning rush
hours (7:00-10:00 a.m.) and weekday evening rush hours (4:00-7:00
p.m.). Additionally, two bikes will now be allowed per subway car, as
opposed to the previous policy only permitting two bikes on the entire
train.

"The new policy will be implemented on a 'trial basis' which the T has
said they will evaluate after six months. The MBTA's previous bike
regulations were among the most restrictive in the country with regard
to weekday access, only permitting bikes between the hours of 10:00
a.m.-2:00 p.m., and after 7:30 p.m. MassBike has previously won
important victories for cyclists who use the MBTA. In 1985, MassBike
won the right for cyclists to bring their bikes on the T, which had not
been previously permitted. In 2000, MassBike successfully encouraged
the T to eliminate the 'special pass' requirement in order to carry
one's bike on the subway."

For more info, go to:
http://www.massbike.org/
<back to top>


WINNEBAGO TRIBAL MEMBER PUSHES PED-FRIENDLY DEVELOPMENT

-> According to an article in the Nov. 17th Active Living Network
Update, "Winnebago Tribe member Lance Morgan, founder of the $95
million tribe-run corporation Ho-Chunk, Inc, has been featured in
Fortune magazine and dubbed by Inc. magazine as among 'America's 25
most fascinating entrepreneurs.' He's also the force behind the design
and development of a pedestrian-friendly, New Urbanist-style village on
a reservation where 70% of people are overweight. Morgan acknowledges
that health issues such as diabetes and obesity disproportionately
affect Native Americans and present one of his community's greatest
challenges. He also sees that this is a problem that can be solved. 'We
just need to be health-oriented,' says Morgan. 'This is not some great
giant innovation of genius. It simply just makes sense.'

"'I met Kate Kraft from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She
recommended that I read a book Suburban Nation that talks about urban
planning and that kind of stuff. And I thought that the dense
environment really was helpful on the infrastructure-cost side, and it
was a great idea to deal with some of our health issues. So it went
from 'never heard of it,' to 'hey this is interesting,' to 'this makes
a lot of sense.' The number one issue is diabetes, and everything else
relates to that almost. And diabetes, for the Native-American
population, is really almost a genetic issue. We're very predisposed to
obesity and our problem with diabetes.'..."

Source: http://www.activeliving.org/index.php/It_Takes_a_Village/234
<back to top>


WHAT IF WE BUILT OUR CITIES AROUND PLACES?

-> According to an article in the Nov. issue of Project for Public
Spaces' Making Places newsletter, "One of the joys for all of us
working at PPS is learning from people all around the world about how
they'd like to make their communities better. No two answers are the
same, but listen long enough and the degree to which people share
similar desires is remarkable. 'Downtown would be a better place if I
felt comfortable walking there,' is a common sentiment. Or we'll often
hear someone tell us, 'There should be a place close to home where I
can take my kids to play.' Though the specifics vary, a steady current
runs beneath the surface of what people say. It's the same desire for
shared, public places that has shaped human settlements since the first
cities were built.

"The architect and author Christopher Alexander coined a phrase (and
authored a book by the same name), 'The Timeless Way of Building,' that
touches on these common yearnings and how people have intuitively used
them to build congenial places to live. The process of building cities
today has become so institutionalized, however, that people seldom have
an outlet to put their intuition to use anymore. At PPS, we believe
this timeless way of building can be reinvigorated, and we offer a
common-sense way to do it: by empowering people to initiate
improvements to their local neighborhoods place by place. These small
steps to enliven streets, parks, and other public spaces are the
building blocks of a thriving city..."

Source:
http://www.pps.org/info/newsletter/november2004/november2004_feature
<back to top>


ACCESS TO WALKING SECURITY INDEX PILOT STUDY REPORT

-> According to a recent note from Dr. Barry Wellar, who heads up the
University of Ottawa's Walking Security Index Project, "My apologies to
PW/PB colleagues who encountered a link problem when looking for WSI
information or documents. It was selfish of me to let the fascination
of my sabbatical research cause me to let the webpage updating
task slide, and slide, and...Fortunately, there is a Plan B. For direct
access to the report Walking Security Index Pilot Study, click on:
http://aix1.uottawa.ca/~wellarb/toc_pilot.htm . Once there, go down to
the coloured line of text, third paragraph, and click on the 'here'. As
of 30 seconds ago, the link was fully activated and operational."
<back to top>


Q-U-O-T-E-S--R--U-S

"What are the unique qualities of urbanity? Scale, material,
accessibility, diversity and surprise are key. A city is more than an
assemblage of buildings. It is the connections between them, the
quality of the street, the sidewalk and plaza. The design and material
of a city's buildings and public spaces differentiates the great from
the ordinary."
- Susan Barnes-Gelt, Denver Post Columnist
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~29123~2541516,00.html


I-N--T-H-E--N-E-W-S

RISING OBESITY RATES HOLDING BACK US HEALTH GAINS

-> According to a Nov. 8th WebMD story, "Rapidly rising obesity rates
and a startling increase in child mortality are holding back gains in
Americans' overall health, concludes an annual 50-state survey
conducted by nonprofit public health groups Monday. The survey has
documented steady improvements in a host of health indicators across
the country since 1990 in areas including deaths from infectious
diseases, motor vehicle accidents, and violent crime. But experts now
warn that gains seen up until 2000 have leveled off to near stagnation.
'We're not really making progress year over year,' says Reed Tuckson,
MD, vice president of the United Health Foundation, one of three groups
releasing the study.

"Tuckson cites a near-doubling in national obesity rates since 1990 as
a major drag on what could otherwise be an improving health picture for
Americans. While death from violent crimes, cancer, infectious
diseases, and car accidents are down, those gains appear to be at least
partially erased by a 23% obesity rate in the adult population. Obesity
is associated with a variety of health problems, including diabetes,
pregnancy difficulties, and cardiovascular disease. A study published
earlier this year in the Journal of the American Medical Association
predicted that by next year obesity could overtake smoking as the
leading preventable cause of death in the U.S..."

Source: http://my.webmd.com/content/article/96/103897.htm
Archive search: use "Search" window
Cost: No
Title: "Obesity, Infant Mortality Hurt Health Gains"
Author: Todd Zwillich

For more on the study, go to:
http://www.unitedhealthfoundation.org/shr2004/index.html
<back to top>


NEW YORK CITY AHEAD OF PHILLY IN SCHOOL TRAFFIC CALMING

-> According to a Nov. 18th Philadelphia Daily News article, "New York
- Nothing is privileged about Public School 90. The K-4 school is in
one of New York's most disadvantaged neighborhoods, the Morrisania
section of the South Bronx, surrounded by spare, brick apartment
buildings and corner bodegas. Most of the school's more than 1,300
students live in poverty. Nearly all of the children, some as young as
5, must cross streets jammed with zooming cars, SUVs, trucks and buses
to get to and from class. But even a school as poor as PS 90 has a
simple and effective traffic safety device you won't find outside any
public school in Philadelphia. A speed hump.

"Last year, before a parent campaign for the speed hump, at least four
children were hit by cars and five crossing guards quit after either
being run over or frightened away by the frenzied traffic. The speed
hump -- a 4-inch-high asphalt platform that covers about a 12-foot
length of street -- has dramatically slowed traffic. Since it was
installed, no children have been hit. 'It made a big difference,' said
parent coordinator Ruby Santana, who with other parents lobbied city
transportation officials for the speed hump. The speed hump crusade at
PS 90 is part of a growing transportation movement called traffic
calming, which is being embraced across urban America from the poor
city neighborhoods of New York to the affluent suburban main streets of
Doylestown in suburban Philadelphia..."

Source: http://www.philly.com/mld/dailynews/10210644.htm?1c
Archive search: use "Search" window
Cost: Yes
Title: "Philly's 'Behind Curve' Calming School Zones"
Author: Myung Oak Kim
<back to top>


PORTSMOUTH (NH) DEVELOPER TALKS UP NEW WALKABLE PROJECT

-> According to a Nov. 14th Sea Coast Online article, "When Eric
Chinburg moved to Exeter in 1993, he was thrilled to be able to leave
his house, walk down the sidewalk and promptly have his morning coffee
and newspaper in hand. His closest neighbor lived 10 feet away. But as
one of the most prominent home developers in the Seacoast, Chinburg has
been frustrated by the challenges to creating self-contained spaces
where standard amenities don't require a car. 'I've seen the emerging
awareness of planners of what the zoning of 40 years ago did to
landscaping in the form of sprawl,' said Chinburg, president of
Chinburg Builders. 'You know you're going to go in and have to use an
entire piece of land.'

"But Chinburg has joined an architectural movement to regenerate
planned communities of old that include the modern phenomenon of
mixed-use buildings. And he wants to try the experiment in Portsmouth.
Once the Planning Board finalizes the city's 10-year master plan --
which currently includes a slew of zoning changes -- Chinburg will be
able to present his proposal for Islington Woods, an arrangement of
condominiums, townhouses, artist and retail spaces, office complexes
and nearly two miles of hiking trails, all along the Islington Street
corridor...The concept is to go back to the way communities were
developed, where there was a mix of uses,' Chinburg said from his
offices in Durham. 'There were offices, housing and retail all in the
same area, that was typically walkable.'.."

Source: http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/11142004/news/48380.htm
Archive search: http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/zarchive.htm
Cost: No
Title: "Ushering in era of New Urbanism"
Author: Joe Adler
<back to top>


OAKLAND (CA) GETS COUNTRY'S 2ND BIGGEST "BIKE REPOSITORY"

-> According to a Nov. 16th San Francisco Chronicle article, "BART
riders will be able to park their bicycles for free at the Fruitvale
station beginning Wednesday at what will be the nation's second-largest
bike repository, a BART spokesman said. Spots for 240 bicycles will be
made available from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, said BART spokesman Jim Allison.

"Two full-time mechanics will also be on hand to repair bikes under a
contract between the Unity Council, a community nonprofit group, and
Alameda Bicycles, which will set up shop at the BART station on East
12th Street. The largest bike station is in Chicago, with 300 spots,
Allison said."

Source:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/11/16/BAEBDIGEST3.DTL
Archive search: http://sfgate.com/search/
Cost: No
Title: "Fruitvale BART boosts bike parking"
Author: Henry K. Lee
<back to top>


NEW MEXICO DEVELOPER CAMPAIGNS FOR WALKABILITY

-> According to a Nov. 17th Baltimore Sun article, "Christopher B.
Leinberger is a man on a mission -- a real estate developer who is
building to reclaim the past. When not spearheading an ambitious
redevelopment of downtown Albuquerque, N.M., he crisscrosses the
country, trying to sell builders, planners and the public on converting
the nation's sprawling, car-addicted suburbs into more compact,
walkable communities -- like the neighborhood he grew up in outside
Philadelphia. At stake, contends the silver-haired, Santa Fe,
N.M.-based developer, is nothing less than our personal health, and
that of the planet.

"'The way we're building our suburbs presents such difficult problems,'
Leinberger said yesterday, as he prepared to speak in Towson to a group
of area developers, bankers and local officials. 'Our kids walk about
one-tenth of what we used to, and that explains a lot of our obesity,'
he said, recalling that he must have trudged 3,000 miles to and from
school while growing up in Drexel Hill, just west of Philadelphia. The
car-dependent suburbs built over the past 50 years must share the blame
for our national weight gain, Leinberger says. They also are helping to
bring on global warming, he contends, as car and truck tailpipes emit
the gases research has linked to climate change..."

Source:
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/bal-md.leinberger17nov17,1,7981824.story?coll=bal-local-headlines
Archive search: http://www.baltimoresun.com/search/
Cost: Yes
Title: "Developer builds case to end sprawl"
Author: Timothy B. Wheeler
<back to top>


PITTSFORD (NY) LOOKS AT SLOWING DRIVERS DOWN

-> According to a Nov. 16th Democrat & Chronicle article, "One
afternoon last June, Ali Putney was pulling her son, nearly 2 years
old, in a little red wagon as she walked along Wood Street in the
village of Pittsford. She planned to cross South Street and continue
her walk on Locust Street. 'I looked left and right, and it was clear,'
Putney recalled. 'To the left is the curve that people take way too
fast. I had started to cross the street in the crosswalk. Two seconds
later this driver was on top of me, and I bolted back to the corner.
This guy was going 40 miles an hour at least. He saw me and kind of
slammed on his brakes.' The speed limit in the village is 30 mph.

"Putney's South Street experience is just one example of the traffic
and speed-related problems in the village. Two consultants, hired by
the village, have explored the community and are preparing a report on
possible remedies and ways to reduce the problem. Village officials
want 'a comprehensive look at current conditions and how to address
them in phases,' said Mayor Robert Corby. The purpose is to 'encourage
drivers to travel at safe and prudent speeds in a pedestrian-oriented
community like the village.'..."

Source:
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041116/NEWS01/411160332/1002/NEWS
Archive search:
http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archives?s_site=democratandchronicle&p_product=RDCB&p_theme=gannett&p_action=keyword
Cost: Yes
Title: "Village of Pittsford looks at new ways to curb speeders"
Author: Dolores Orman
<back to top>


MALVERN (PA) WORKS TO BRING DOWNTOWN BACK TO LIFE

-> According to a Nov. 18th Ardmore Main Line Life article, "For the
past year, it's been the recurring question at Malvern Borough Council
meetings: How does the borough jump start the King Street business
district? Merchants have asked for help. Presentations were made. A
committee was formed. And there it stopped. Meanwhile, more storefronts
went empty. Since the summer, half a dozen businesses have closed or
are getting ready to shut their doors. Several had been in town barely
a year. That instability has council president Henry Briggs worried.
Two weeks ago, he ratcheted the dialogue up a notch. For the first
time, the council seems ready to take a direct role in improving the
business climate. And that could include adding taxpayer dollars to the
equation. At Briggs's invitation, development consultant Midge McCauley
of Downtown Works outlined how the company, a division of
Philadelphia-based Dranoff Properties, could work with the borough to
analyze its downtown and its potential.

"Downtown Works specializes in helping communities - big and small, new
and old - 'make their downtowns better,' McCauley said. Across the
country, she said, there is 'a huge influx of people going back into
downtowns.' Young professionals and empty-nesters alike are drawn to
walkable communities, where they can find a mix of shops and services,
restaurants and residential development. Malvern already has the
groundwork for that. Unlike nearby successes like Wayne, its main
street is not a major thoroughfare. Many other towns 'will never have
the human scale, the pedestrian scale, you have in Malvern,' McCauley
told the council..."

Source:
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13395044&BRD=1597&PAG=461&dept_id=188818&rfi=6
Archive search:
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?brd=1597&pag=628&cat_id=402
Cost: No
Title: "Empty storefronts raise alarm in Malvern"
Author: Cheryl Allison
<back to top>


MISSOULA (MT) KIDS USE GPS IN SAFE ROUTES PROJECT

-> According to a Nov. 18th Missoulian article, "With Global
Positioning System technology in their hands and Sentinel High School
drafting students at their sides, small groups of fifth-graders from
Russell Elementary School walked their neighborhoods Wednesday to begin
mapping out safe routes their classmates can take to school. When they
came across a hazard -- an unmarked intersection, a busy thoroughfare,
a poorly lit corner -- they called up coordinates on their GPS units
and logged them and details about the location on a clipboard.

"Jordan Cummings, 10, noted his street -- 38th -- lacks sidewalks, so
kids walking or riding bicycles drift into the street as they are
forced to navigate around parked cars. Cummings said dune buggies and
all-terrain vehicles also often race up and down the road. Alex
Regnier, 10, led the group to a stretch of 36th Street near his home on
Belle Lane, where he's observed motorists traveling at high speeds. He
also pointed out an irrigation ditch along Paxson Street that holds
stagnant water in late spring and summer, expressing concern that
swarms of mosquitoes which can carry West Nile virus tend to
concentrate there.

"At the recently redesigned 39th Street, students pointed out positive
aspects of the reconstruction: bike lanes, crosswalks, medians and
pullouts at bus stops. Jeff Crews, assistant director of the University
of Montana's Earth Observing System education project, a NASA-funded
program in UM's School of Education, tagged along for the lesson. Crews
noted two federally funded grants helped support the effort, which aims
to create safer communities for kids..."

Source:
http://www.missoulian.com/articles/2004/11/18/news/mtregional/news06.txt
Archive search: http://www.missoulian.com/archives
Cost: Yes
Title: "Route to safety: Sentinel teens, Russell fifth-graders map
safest ways to walk to school"
Author: Jane Rider
<back to top>


O-U-R--J-U-S-T-I-C-E--S-Y-S-T-E-M

NYC BILL: 15 DAYS IN SLAMMER FOR LACK OF BIKE LICENSE

-> According to an article in the Nov. 16th Transportation Alternatives
E-Bulletin, "A draconian anti-bicycling bill, Int. No. 497, was
recently introduced to the New York City Council by Councilmember
Madeline Provenzano. If passed, Int. No. 497 would require every
bicycling New Yorker over sixteen years old to obtain bicycle license
tags from the NYC Department of Transportation. The bill stipulates
that those who do not display such tags on their bicycles would be
subject to up to 15 days imprisonment in addition to hefty fines and
bicycle confiscation. Practically speaking, Int. No. 497 would
criminalize bicycling, create more incentives to drive, and erect yet
another obstacle for those seeking to do their part to reduce
congestion, clean our City's polluted air and stay healthy.

"If passed into law, Int. No. 497 would reduce the number of people who
bike by as much as 50%, erode the 'Safety in Numbers' effect, and make
biking more dangerous. Research in multiple cities has shown that
tripling the number of bike riders on the street cuts
motorist-bicyclist crashes in half. Conversely, reducing the number of
bikers will increase crashes. Indeed, as biking has grown in New York
City over the past ten years, annual motorist-bicyclist crashes have
decreased--in 2003, 13 bicyclists were killed by motorists. Int. No.
497 would turn back the clock a decade to the days when 20-30 NYC
cyclists were killed by motorists each year..."

Source: http://www.transalt.org/press/askta/041116bikebill.html


AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

SOUND SOLUTION TO THE PISTACHIO PROBLEM

"Lovers of pistachio nuts will know there is nothing more frustrating
than finding their tasty snack locked inside a completely closed shell.
But now, a gadget that listens to the distinctive pings made by open
and closed nuts when they bounce is providing a sound solution. Its
microphone detects the shorter ping of a closed-shell nut when it drops
onto a steel plate and a jet of air blasts it off the production
line..."

Source: http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996675


Q-U-I-CK--H-I-T-S

JIM SAYER TAKES OVER AT ADVENTURE CYCLING ASSN.

-> "After three and a half years as the Sierra Business Council's
president, Jim Sayer is leaving to head the Missoula, Montana-based
Adventure Cycling Association, one of the nation's largest cycling
organizations..."
http://www.sierrasun.com/article/20041109/News/111090006

PUSHING BOSTON MAPPERS TO GET PED/BIKE STUFF RIGHT
-> "A Rand McNally map of the Alewife section of Cambridge shows the
Red Line station a quarter-mile from where it actually is; a rail line
is shown nearby despite having been converted to a bike path years
ago..."
http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2004/11/15/cyclist_pushes_mapped_bike_paths/

UK PUBLIC HEALTH WHITE PAPER WILL PROMOTE CYCLING

-> "Cycling will be lauded as key way of getting about and keeping fit,
but the mainstream media will likely major on 'traffic light' food
labelling, junk food ads bans, and 'free' training by 'lifestyle
gurus', anything but suggesting people get out of their cars..."
http://www.bikebiz.co.uk/daily-news/article.php?id=4899

CHINA ABANDONS 'BICYCLE KINGDOM,' EMBRACES CAR

-> "Beijing this month cancelled its bicycle registration requirements,
a move viewed by the state press as highlighting the nation's full
fledged entry into "car society" and the demise of the bicycle as a
'transportation tool.'..."
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2004-11/11/content_390685.htm

PRAIRIE VILLAGE (KS) FOLKS BALK AT NEW SIDEWALKS

-> "The Prairie Village City Council recently canceled plans to build
several new sidewalks in residential neighborhoods because of public
outcry and protest petitions. Now, City Council members are wondering
whether they have compromised their policy of making Prairie Village a
'walkable community.'..."
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13386176&BRD=1459&PAG=461&dept_id=155725&rfi=6

MARIN CO. (CA) WELCOMES WALKABLE DEVELOPMENT

-> "East Garrison, to be built on a bluff along Reservation Road,
promises to be a dense, walkable community on a site that housed
soldiers for decades. The inclusion of an artists' community there has
won applause for the development team..."
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/news/local/10213359.htm

EVOLUTION MADE HUMANS MARATHON RUNNERS

-> "According to new research, our bodies are highly evolved for
running long distances, an ability that allowed our ancestors to
conquer the African savannahs...."
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996681

GLENDALE (WI) BECOMING "GEM OF THE NORTHSHORE"

-> "[City Administrator Dick] Maslowski says each of the city's 14
neighborhoods is pursuing its own redevelopment plan. 'We're asking the
residents 'What is it that you want in your neighborhood? Streets,
sidewalks, lighting, landscaping?' These homeowners are actually
planning for the future of their neighborhoods and we're implementing
those plans...."
http://www.gmtoday.com/content/NSL/2004/October/90.asp

MERIDIAN CO. (MI) LOOKING AT NEW STREETSCAPE IDEAS

-> "'Everything (now) is oriented toward the automobile where you zip
from here to there,' Rauhe said. 'We're making the mall an area for
people to enjoy on foot. Right now it says don't walk here, look but
don't walk.'..."
http://www.lsj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041118/NEWS01/411180337/1001/news

METRO DENVER VOTERS WANT TRANSIT, SMALL CENTERS

-> "With the approval of FasTracks and the resulting development of
stations along its lines, small centers will develop. These communities
-- well-designed, walkable and diverse -- will become destinations
offering attractive alternatives to the center city for jobs, housing,
culture and recreation..."
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~29123~2541516,00.html


R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S

-> "KANSAS ROUNDABOUT GUIDE..."
"...A supplement to FHWA's 'Roundabouts: An Informational Guide';"
Kansas DOT; Oct. 2003. (17mb)
http://www.ksdot.org/burtrafficeng/Roundabouts/Roundabout_Guide/KDOTMaster_100803.pdf

-> "CHOOSING HEALTH: MAKING HEALTHIER CHOICES EASIER"
A Public Health White Paper; UK Department of Health; 11/16/04.
(download as PDFs of individual chapters)
http://www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidanceArticle/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4094550&chk=aN5Cor

-> "OBESITY: THIRD REPORT OF SESSION 2003-04"
Volume I; UK House of Commons Health Committee; May 2004
http://www.bikebiz.co.uk/downloads/MPsObesityReportMay04.pdf

-> "OUR BUILT AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS"
Subtitled, "A Technical Review of the Interactions between Land Use,
Transportation, and Environmental Quality," US EPA, Environmental
Protection Agency; Jan. 2001.
http://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/pdf/built.pdf


C-A-L-E-N-D-A-R

Note Additional training opportunities are available on the National
Center for Bicycling & Walking web site. Readers are encouraged to add
their own items as long as they pertain to training in the bicycle,
pedestrian, or livable community fields. Go to:
http://www.bikewalk.org/technical_assistance/training_resources/training_calendar.htm

January 9-13, 2005, 84th Annual TRB Meeting, Washington DC. Info:
Transportation Research Board, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC
20001; phone: (202) 334-2934; fax: (202) 334-2003; email:
<TRBWeb4@NAS.edu>
http://www.trb.org/meeting/

January 24-25, 2005, Solving Neighborhood Traffic Problems, Las Vegas,
NV. Info: Keith Knapp, Program Director, University of
Wisconsin-Madison, 432 N. Lake Street, Madison, WI 53706; phone: (608)
263-6314; fax: (608) 263-3160; e-mail: <knapp@epd.engr.wisc.edu>
http://epdweb.engr.wisc.edu/emaG138

January 27-29, 2005, 4th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth, Miami
Beach, FL. Info: Michele Kelso Warren, Senior Program Manager, Local
Government Commission, 1414 K Street, Suite 600, Sacramento CA 95814;
phone: (916) 448-1198; fax: (916) 448-8246; e-mail: <mkelso@lgc.org>
http://www.outreach.psu.edu/C&I/SmartGrowth/

February 25-26, 2005, 2nd Annual Active Living Research Conference, San
Diego CA. Info: Kevin Reese, Active Living Research, phone: (619)
260-5538; email: <kreese@projects.sdsu.edu>
http://www.activelivingresearch.org/index.php/Conference/7

March 14-15, 2005, Solving Neighborhood Traffic Problems, Madison, WI.
Info: Keith Knapp, Program Director, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
432 N. Lake Street, Madison, WI 53706; phone: (608) 263-6314; fax:
(608) 263-3160; e-mail: <knapp@epd.engr.wisc.edu>
http://epdweb.engr.wisc.edu/emaG138

March 16-18, 2005, National Bike Summit, Washington DC. Info: League of
American Bicyclists, 1612 K Street NW, Suite 800, Washington, DC
20006-2850; phone: (202) 822-1333; fax: (202) 822-1334
email: <bikeleague@bikeleague.org>
http://www.bikeleague.org/events/index.html

April 28 - May 1, 2005, 3rd Southeastern Foot Trails Conference,
Pickens, SC. Info Jeffrey Hunter, Southern Appalachians Initiative,
American Hiking Society, 175 Hamm Road - Suite C, Chattanooga, TN
37405; phone: (423) 266-2507; email: <jhunter@americanhiking.org>
http://www.americanhiking.org/alliance/sai.html

May 2-4, 2005, Bicycle Education Leaders Conference, New York, NY.
Info: League of American Bicyclists, 1612 K Street NW, Suite 800,
Washington, DC 20006-2850; phone: (202) 822-1333; fax: (202) 822-1334
email: <bikeleague@bikeleague.org>
http://www.bikeleague.org/events/index.html

May 24-27, 2005, Health Promotion and Education at the Crossroads,
Minneapolis, MN. Info: DHPE, 1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 601,
Washington, DC 20005; phone: (202) 659-2230; fax: (202) 659-2339;
email: <director@dhpe.org>
http://www.dhpe.org/nationalconference/

May 31-June 3, 2005, Velo City 2005, Dublin, Ireland. Info:
http://www.velo-city2005.com

June 5-8, 2005, Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers annual
conference, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Info:
http://www.cite7.org/saskatoon/

June 17-18, 2005 New York Statewide Trails and Greenways Conference,
New Paltz, NY. Info: Fran Gotcsik, Parks & Trails New York; phone:
(518) 434-1583; email: <fgotcsik@ptny.org>

July 26-27, 2005, Mid America Trails and Greenways Conference, St. Paul
MN. Info: Rory Robinson
Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance, IN Projects Manager, 2179
Everett Rd., Peninsula, OH 44264; phone: (330) 657-2951; fax: (330)
657-2955; email: <Rory_Robinson@nps.gov>
http://www.railtrails.org/

July 27-30, 2005, TrailLink 2005, Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN. Info: Katie
Magers, RTC media coordinator; phone: (202-974-5115); e-mail:
<katie@railtrails.org>
http://www.railtrails.org

September 22-23, 2005, Walk 21 (VI), Zurich, Switzerland. Info: Walk21,
Diddington House, Main Road, Bredon, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, GL20
7LX, United Kingdom; phone: 00 44 (0) 1684 773 94; email:
<info@walk21.co>
http://www.walk21.com/


J-O-B-S--G-R-A-N-T-S--A-N-D--R-F-P-S

-> JOB -- SR2S PROGRAM MANAGER -- CBF
The Chicagoland Bicycle Federation (CBF) is now hiring for a Program
Manager for a Safe Routes to School program. This program is run by CBF
for the Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT).

The Program Manager of the Safe Routes to School program will: hire,
train, schedule and supervise a part-time and seasonal team of
employees that will work exclusively in Chicago schools; market the
program to public and private school administration city-wide; train
additional CBF/CDOT staff on school safety education delivery; manage
content and dissemination of all program publications and website;
evaluate the program and recommend improvements on an on-going basis.

Applicants should have program management and supervisory experience,
as well as a commitment to bicycling and pedestrian advocacy. For a
full job description, see www.biketraffic.org/jobs. Please send cover
letters and resumes to Eve Jennings, email: eve@biketraffic.org or fax:
(312)-427-4907.


-> JOB -- MANAGER OF TRAIL DEVELOPMENT -- RTC
Rails-to-Trails Conservancy is a national nonprofit organization
creating a nationwide network of public trails. RTC is headquartered in
Washington, D.C., with state and regional offices in California,
Florida, Michigan, Ohio and the Northeast.

Responsibilities manage RTC's trail planning team; identifying project
prospects, marketing services; managing projects, and in-depth project
work; oversee the Trails and Greenways Clearinghouse, RTC's premier
trail building technical assistance website, and the Trails and
Greenways Program; Manage RTC's technical assistance and training
programs in identified regions of the country; oversee our GIS mapping
program; identifying potential funding sources and developing
proposals; delivery of technical assistance to trail builders and
advocates; assist with other program duties as assigned. Must be
available for occasional long-distance travel. Salary is commensurate
with experience.

Requirements/Qualifications: The successful candidate must have a B.S.
or B.A. degree from a college or university in urban and regional
planning, environmental studies or related field, master's degree
preferred; a minimum of three years experience in urban and regional
planning or related field; three years of management experience
(non-profit background a plus); excellent GIS mapping skills; database
management; experience developing and managing budgets and raising
revenue; excellent written and oral skills, plus excellent
interpersonal and leadership skills. Compensation: $47,500 - $50,000
per year.

How to Apply Send a cover letter and resume via mail, fax or e-mail
detailing your interest and your qualifications by the C.O.B. on
Friday, December 3, 2004 to (choosing one form of transmitting your
resume. no phone calls please): Elton A. Clark, Manager, Human
Resource, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, 1100 17th St., NW, 10th Floor,
Washington, DC 20036; email: <elton@railtrails.org>; fax: (202)
466-3742.

-> JOB -- MEMBERSHIP/MKTG MGR -- BICYCLE COLORADO
We are currently seeking a Membership and Marketing Manager to work
from our offices in Denver. This is a great opportunity to be part of
the movement to improve and expand cycling in Colorado. Full job
description and application process is posted at
http://www.bicyclecolorado.org/to/Jobs


-> JOB -- TRANSPORTATION PLANNER -- E-W GATEWAY COG
The East-West Gateway Council of Governments has an opening for a
position as a Transportation Planner. This professional position
reports to the Division Manager of Planning and Programming and has
general responsibility for alternative transportation activities
including: Bicycle and Pedestrian planning, Accessibility and
Paratransit planning, Environmental Justice and ADA activities as they
relate to various agency initiatives and work program activities. The
successful candidate must possess a working knowledge of principles and
practices of urban and regional transportation planning, related to one
or more of the following disciplines: transportation policy analysis,
transportation system and project evaluation, transportation project
programming, traffic engineering, and socioeconomic and environmental
impact assessment. Experience with GIS and other computer-based
analytical tools is required, and familiarity with TEA-21 metropolitan
planning requirements is highly desirable.

The successful candidate for this position will have graduated from an
accredited four-year college or university, with major course work in
Transportation Planning, Urban Planning, Civil Engineering, or in a
directly related field, and will have one (1) year of directly related
professional experience or an equivalent combination of directly
related education and professional experience. Advanced degrees may be
substituted for one year of experience. The salary range for this
position starts at $31,548 per year. Starting salary will be based upon
qualifications and experience. The Council offers a competitive benefit
package. Interested individuals should submit a resume and letter of
interest to East-West Gateway Council of Governments, Attn: Human
Resources, One Memorial Drive, Suite 1600, St. Louis, MO 63102.
http://www.ewgateway.org/aboutus/jobads/jobads.htm#TransPlanner


H-O-U-S-E-K-E-E-P-I-N-G

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of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking."


Contributors: John Williams, Bill Wilkinson, Corey Twyman, Gary
MacFadden, Mark Plotz, Sharon Roerty, Bob Chauncey, Ross
Trethewey, Linda Tracy, Heather Fenyk, Elton Clark, Eve Jennings, Bob
Foster, Steven Bowman, Rory Robinson, Barry Wellar.

Editor: John Williams
Send news items to: <john@montana.com>
Director: Bill Wilkinson


National Center for Bicycling & Walking 1506 21st St NW,
Suite 200, Washington D.C. 20036; Voice: (202) 463-6622;
fax: (202) 463-6625; e-mail: <info@bikewalk.org>
Web: http://www.bikewalk.org