C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S


------------------------------------------------------------

H-A-P-P-Y--E-A-R-T-H--D-A-Y-!

#121 Friday, April 22, 2005

------------------------------------------------------------


CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for
Bicycling & Walking. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news
and information you can use to create more walkable and
bicycle-friendly communities.

F-E-A-T-U-R-E-S
  Sen. Harkin Pushes for Safe, Complete Streets
  The Consequential Value of Getting Together
  New York City: Bicyclists Gather to Support Budnick
  St Louis Officials Cut Ribbon on 20-Mi Bike Routes
  Guidelines: Analysis of Bicycle Facilities Investments
  Institute of Transportation Engineers and SR2S
  WCWs to visit Medford, OR and Fayetteville, NC



I-N--T-H-E--N-E-W-S
  New Guidelines on What Makes City Child-Friendly
  Fenton Leads Lawrence (KS) NCBW Walkable Workshop
  Pocatello (ID) Unveils 10-Year "Old Town" Vision
  Georgia DOT Works on Bike Plans with Regional Centers
  Vital Core Key to Restoring N. Kentucky River Cities
  Keller Promotes Walking Throughout Wisconsin
  New Urbanist Villages Slated for Davidson Co. (TN)
  Bridgewater (NJ) Students Watch Ped Bridge Built


F-E-A-T-U-R-E-S

SEN. HARKIN PUSHES FOR SAFE, COMPLETE STREETS

-> According to an April 14th news release, "As part of his effort to
promote safer, healthier activities in communities, Senator Tom Harkin
(D-IA) today introduced Safe and Complete Streets Act of 2005 to help
create more sidewalks and bike paths, and improve pedestrian and
bicycle safety. The bill would encourage federal, state, and regional
agencies that receive federal transportation funding to incorporate
pedestrian and bicycle safety measures when communities are built or
modernized.

"The bill also commits additional resources to the 'Safe Routes to
School' program. 'A community with sidewalks and bike paths encourages
people to get outside and live more active lives,' said Harkin. 'We can
do more to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety, and make it easier
for Americans to walk or use bicycles for work, errands, exercise and
enjoyment. This initiative will not only create safer streets but it
will also promote healthier lifestyles, encourage interaction in
neighborhoods and improve the quality of life for communities across
the nation.'..."

For more on Senator Harkin's bill, go to:
http://harkin.senate.gov/news.cfm?id=236521

For the complete text of the bill, go to:
http://thomas.loc.gov/
and enter S.794 in the Search window
<back to top>


THE CONSEQUENTIAL VALUE OF GETTING TOGETHER

-Bill Wilkinson, NCBW

Recently, some of the NCBW staff has been involved in various local,
state, and national meetings: Bob Chauncey and Sharon Roerty helped the
City of Louisville organize a very successful Bicycle Summit; Mark
Plotz and I took part in the League of American Bicyclists' National
Bicycle Summit; I joined about 200 of Florida's best and brightest for
the Pro Bike/Pro Walk Florida conference; and I spent a couple of days
last week in Madison, Wisconsin, planning Pro Bike/Pro Walk 2006, our
biennial conference. All of this activity -- the people, the groups,
the topics, the discussions, the time spent sitting around airports and
on air planes -- gave me time to think about this affliction we seem to
share: getting together.

It takes a lot of time and effort to organize a conference, and it
requires that a good number of people take more time and expend real
money to attend. Then, there is all the effort that goes into
developing the program and, for the speakers, organizing their
presentations. Is it worth it?

The NCBW is in a pretty good position to address this question. After
all, we've organized 13 biennial Pro Bike (and Pro Walk) conferences
over the past 25 years; two additional national pedestrian conferences;
11 regional ISTEA conferences; 10 Federal Lands transportation planning
conferences; and helped organize and/or attend most of the statewide
bike and ped conferences since 1977.

Bottom line Yes, if you can do it, it is worth the effort! The
Louisville meeting gave a huge boost to that community's new initiative
to support bicycling. It made clear to all who attended -- and to the
broader community through media coverage -- that the leadership of the
City is taking bicycling seriously and taking action. In Florida, old
hands joined with new to share successes and challenges, to reminisce
(how about that "Bicycle Boot Camp" and was that '84, '86' or '88?). At
both events, old relationships were renewed, and new players were
welcomed to the cause. Perhaps more importantly, new insights and
understanding came as we sat down and talked with each other, away from
the office, the desk, the email, and the never-ending list of "to-dos."

From the beginning in 1980, with the first Pro Bike conference, we
realized that such meetings not only grow the profession, they renew
and restore the professionals. Notwithstanding the Internet, email, and
listservs, there is unique value in the social exchange that takes
place at these conference on so many levels. For some in Florida, it
took the form of the shared experience of trying to cross the street in
front of the host hotel (10 lanes of urban arterial -- with all the
restaurants on the other side).

So, if you're in a position to consider organizing a local, regional,
or statewide meeting, make it work: it will be worth the effort. And,
when the opportunity comes along to attend such an event, grab it:
offer to make a presentation, share your experiences, listen and learn
from others, make new contacts and friends. Ours is not a solitary
pursuit; it is an exercise in community building. Practice the process.

And, feel free to give us a shout if you have questions, need
assistance, or just want to toss ideas around. We're here to help.

And, see you in Madison in 2006!
<back to top>


NEW YORK CITY: BICYCLISTS GATHER TO SUPPORT BUDNICK

AND DEMAND SAFER EAST RIVER BRIDGE ACCESS

-> According to an April 18th Park Slope Courier article, "[Noah]
Budnick, projects director for Transportation Alternatives (TA) and a
longtime champion of cyclists' rights, suffered a traumatic brain
injury in an incident on March 29 as he was pedaling on Sands Street,
near the bike ramp from the Manhattan Bridge into Brooklyn...He was
rushed, in critical condition, to Bellevue Hospital. He was wearing a
helmet at the time. He has come out of intensive care and is
recuperating. And while doctors do expect a full recovery, it will take
a long time and a lot of rehabilitation.

"Budnick's girlfriend, Amanda Hickman tearfully said he is relearning
motor skills, such as how to walk on his own, and that he is alert but
suffers from some memory loss. He does not remember the accident
clearly. 'I'm stuck somewhere between exhausted and furious,' Hickman
said, charging that it's 'absolutely preposterous' for TA to have to
'tell the city to do its job and make the streets safe for
everybody.'...

"The group drew scores of cyclists to the entrance to the Manhattan
Bridge bike lane and awarded many with 'Bravery While Bicycling' faux
Olympic medals. Spokesman Paul Steely White called Budnick, 27, New
York City's leading bicycle advocate and said that between 1995 and
2001, seven bicyclists have been killed in the immediate vicinity of
the Brooklyn approaches to the East River crossings. 'Today, more New
Yorkers are bicycling than ever before,' and demanding that the streets
be made safe for bicycling, White said. 'The city should take the
reality of everyday bicycling as seriously as it takes the fantasy of
Olympic bicycling,' he charged..."

Source:
http://www.transalt.org/press/media/2005/050418parkslope.html
<back to top>


ST LOUIS OFFICIALS CUT RIBBON ON 20-MI BIKE ROUTES

-> According to a March 29, 2005 news release, "In his first official
act following the April mayoral election, Mayor Francis G. Slay, along
with Alderman Lewis Reed, will cut the ribbon to open Bike St. Louis'
new 20-mile continuous on-road bicycle route connecting downtown St.
Louis to local neighborhoods, parks and activity centers.

"Coinciding with the first week of Daylight Savings Time, the event
also is intended to remind citizens throughout the region that longer
days provide more opportunities to enjoy outdoor exercise and fitness
activities as part of the 'Hooked on Health' regional health and
fitness initiative formed last year by Mayor Slay and County Executive
Charlie Dooley..."

For more information, contact Todd Antoine, AICP, Senior Planner, Great
Rivers Greenway District at <tantoine@greatrivers.info> or go to:
http://www.bikestlouis.org/
<back to top>


GUIDELINES: ANALYSIS OF BICYCLE FACILITIES INVESTMENTS

-> In a recent note, David Loutzenheiser of Planners Collaborative
invited readers to field test a new web tool -- "Guidelines for
Analysis of Investments in Bicycle Facilities." The guidelines are the
culmination of 18 months of research by the University of Minnesota,
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Planners
Collaborative of Boston, Mass. The aim is to provide planners,
engineers, and project managers with estimates of costs, demand (use),
and benefits for a proposed bicycle facility investment. To date, the
team has identified bicycle facility costs, created a methodology to
determine demand, and identified six benefits of cycling. They have
translated this research into a web-based tool and now need help in
field testing the guidelines.

The online tool provides instructions for its use, including data needs
and a glossary of terms. Users are asked to enter information about the
goal of their inquiry (costs, demand, and/or benefits), spatial and
demographic data about the area surrounding the proposed facility, and
physical information about the facility itself. David asks readers to
apply this tool to an existing facility in your area (or a proposed
facility). For more information, contact David Loutzenheiser at
<drl@thecollaborative.com>.

Check out the tool at:
http://www.bicyclinginfo.org/bikecost/
<back to top>


INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERS AND SR2S

-> "Transportation Professionals Get Involved with Safe Routes to
School" was the title and subject of an article published in the March
issue of the ITE Journal. The article written by David Parisi and
Brett Hondorp provides a brief history of the SR2S movement, guidance
on setting of an SR2S task force and conducting community audits. It
underscores that children should be active participants in the planning
process and it provides several examples of immediate and low-cost
engineering solutions.

In another move to promote SR2S, ITE has engaged a team of
transportation and engineering professionals to author a Guidebook on
Safe Routes to Schools. The team is being led by David Parisi and it
includes Peter Lagerwey, Seattle's Pedestrian and Bicycle Coordinator;
Jackie Kennedy, Green Communities / Active & Safe Routes to School;
Michael Ronkin, Oregon Department of Transportation; Sharon Roerty of
NCBW; and many others. The Guidebook is intended to be a field resource
for school administrators as well as transportation, engineering and
planning professionals. It is expected to be completed later this year.

For more information on ITE, go to:
http://www.ite.org/
<back to top>


WALKABLE COMMMUNITY WORKSHOPS TO VISIT MEDFORD, OR AND FAYETTEVILLE, NC

We are on the road once again for the Walkable Community Workshops series.
Next week, Bob Chauncey and Mark Plotz of the NCBW will be in Medford,
Oregon to convene 3 days of workshops. The Medford workshops will mark
the second time this year Chauncey and Plotz have teamed-up. When asked
how he felt about the dynamic-duo reuniting Plotz told CenterLines
“I’m doing it because I really believe that people deserve great places
to live.” He added: “Bob’s just in it for the frequent-flier miles.”
See the City of Medford’s website for information on workshop times
and locations.
http://www.ci.medford.or.us/

The following week Charlie Gandy and Mark Plotz will visit Fayetteville,
North Carolina for an 8 workshop series. The primary focus of the week in
Fayetteville will be on how greater walkability can enhance
quality-of-life, and spur economic development in downtown areas. For more
information on the North Carolina workshops, please go to the
Fayetteville Area MPO’s website.
http://www.fampo.org/

The general public is invited to attend these free workshops.
<back to top>


Q-U-O-T-E-S--R--U-S

"Current zoning codes in most areas allow only the development of
single-use, auto-dependent housing subdivisions, shopping centers and
office parks. New Urbanists have found that there is a strong market
demand for traditional towns, and that towns should not face regulatory
obstacles greater than conventional suburbia."
--John Norquist, Exec. Dir., Congress for the New Urbanism
http://www.ocregister.com/ocr/2005/04/17/sections/commentary/READER%20REBUTTALS/article_483319.php


I-N--T-H-E--N-E-W-S

NEW GUIDELINES ON WHAT MAKES CITY CHILD-FRIENDLY

-> According to an April 14th Raise The Hammer article, "Our society
makes a show of being child friendly, from playgrounds at fast food
restaurants and furniture warehouses to the vast array of
child-protection devices available to consumers. At the same time, our
actual built environment is extremely hostile to children's most basic
needs. Richard Gilbert and Catherine O'Brien, writing for the Centre
for Sustainable Transportation, have surveyed a huge body of research
on how our built environment affects children, coming up with a list of
27 guidelines for creating safer, healthier communities.

"According to 'Child- and Youth-Friendly Land-Use and Transport
Planning Guidelines,' children need fresh air, exercise, time to run
and play, and a chance to move through neighbourhoods and interact with
others. Instead, they are strapped into car seats and shuttled from
destination to destination, missing exercise, breathing poisonous
exhaust, and isolated from their communities. The low density
development of 'family friendly' subdivisions all but guarantees that
parents must drive their children anywhere they need or want to go..."

Source: http://www.raisethehammer.org/index.asp?id=073
Archive search: use "Search" window
Cost: No
Title: "Child Friendly Cities"
Author: Ryan McGreal

Ed. Note Co-author Catherine O'Brien was the keynote speaker at
Pro Walk/Pro Bike 2004 in Victoria, BC. The 'Child- and Youth-Friendly
Land-Use and Transport Planning Guidelines' (1.2mb) may be
downloaded here:
http://www.cstctd.org/english/docs/Guidelines.pdf
<back to top>



FENTON LEADS LAWRENCE (KS) NCBW WALKABLE WORKSHOP

-> According to an April 12th Journal-World article, "If your kid is
fat, Mark Fenton says, blame the car. 'We've built such an autocentric
world, it's possible to expend no calories while going about the
routines of daily life,' Fenton told a Lawrence audience Monday,
showing them a picture of a car rolling past a fast-food drive-through
window. That inactivity has far-reaching health consequences, he said.
Too many people fail to get the 30 minutes of exercise a day
recommended by federal health officials. 'We're raising a generation of
kids,' Fenton said, 'who are so physically inactive that their life
spans will be 2 to 5 years shorter than their parents.' His solution:
Hit the sidewalks and start hoofing it.

"Fenton, host of the PBS program 'America's Walking' and a former
member of the national racewalking team, was in Lawrence for a Walkable
Community Workshop sponsored by the National Center for Bicycling &
Walking. Two dozen people attended -- mostly city planning and traffic
officials, but also several representatives from development firms.
Fenton led a 'walking audit' through downtown and Old West Lawrence to
get a sense of the city's 'walkability.' He paused at a planter in the
700 block of Massachusetts that was flanked by benches, a water
fountain, newspaper machines and a bike rack. 'Does this not say we'd
love you to walk downtown?' he asked..."

Source: http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/201720
Archive search: use "Search" window
Cost: No
Title: "Get out and walk"
Author: Joel Mathis
<back to top>


POCATELLO (ID) UNVEILS 10-YEAR "OLD TOWN" VISION

-> According to an April 21st Idaho State Journal article, "The Old
Town of the future should be more pedestrian friendly and could have
new parks, better lighting, much more housing, an open-air marketplace
and better infrastructure. It's all part of a 10-year vision for the
downtown area, drafted by Old Town Pocatello with input from an
assortment of community groups and leaders. Thirty-two members of a
community task force created to give feedback on the plan offered
insight during a Tuesday night meeting. Old Town will use that feedback
to make revisions and will then present the plan to the City Council,
Bannock County Commissioners, School District 25 and Pocatello
Development Authority...

"Stephanie Palagi, executive director of Old Town Pocatello, said the
task force suggested that a downtown park be created and concrete
channels be removed from the Portneuf River through the city, among
other things. 'We wanted to have a community vision for the downtown
area for the projects in the revitalization effort. We didn't want to
limit ourselves to just the scope of Old Town Pocatello, Inc.,' Palagi
said. 'The meeting was so positive and there seems to be so much
community support.'..."

Source:
http://www.journalnet.com/articles/2005/04/21/news/local/news09.txt
Archive search:
http://www.idahostatejournal.com/shared-content/search/index.php?search=advanced
Cost: No
Title: "Old Town's future coming into sharper focus: Task force
provides feedback on plan"
Author: John O'Connell

Ed. Note Check out the controllable Old Town webcam!
http://www.journalnet.com/webcam
<back to top>



GEORGIA DOT WORKS ON BIKE PLANS WITH REGIONAL CENTERS

-> According to an April 20th Macon Telegraph editorial, "The carnival
atmosphere of the Tour de Georgia and its racers have come our way and
gone for another year. Gone, too, are the frenzied fans who will follow
the cyclists on to the finish in Rome. Left behind are an excited group
of amateur cyclists as well as a growing number of moms, dads and
children who would love to safely pedal their way to fun and health.
The problem is neither our urban or suburban streets are very bicycle
friendly. Without the safety nets provided by police escorts,
designated bike routes and stopped traffic that helped ensure the
safety of the professional riders, local cyclists are left to fend for
themselves on congested streets.

"The much-maligned Georgia Department of Transportation, most often a
whipping boy for a public weary of the ribbons of concrete continually
being widened or repaved, is now working with Regional Development
Centers to improve cycling conditions throughout the state. It is
requiring the centers to produce regional bicycle/pedestrian plans. The
mission is not only improved safety for cyclists, but also reducing
auto congestion and pollution and improving overall health by
encouraging walking and bicycling. The Middle Georgia plan, released in
December, starts with a detailed analysis of existing bicycle friendly
routes. It's a short list. As the plan notes, the Middle Georgia region
is 'littered with local bicycle/pedestrian plans that have not been
implemented.'..."

Source: http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/news/opinion/11435271.htm
Archive search: http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/archives/
Cost: Yes
Title: "Bicycle path planning a good starting point"
Author: Editorial board
<back to top>


VITAL CORE KEY TO RESTORING N. KENTUCKY RIVER CITIES

-> According to an April 20th Kentucky Post article, "Julie Olberding
isn't being facetious when she cites the fantastically popular sitcom
'Friends' as one reason condo complexes and loft apartments are popping
up in the downtown areas of Northern Kentucky's river cities. The NBC
show, which went off the air last year after 10 years, featured six
friends who lived, worked and hung out in the city. Because the urban
environment was so much a part of the weekly plot, 'Friends' gradually
changed popular culture so that now 'it's cool to live in the city and
fun to live in the city,' said Olberding, who teaches in the master's
of public administration program at Northern Kentucky University.
'Going to the coffee shop and walking upstairs to get to your apartment
seemed like a fun way to live.'

"That message has especially resonated with people in their 20s and 30s
who grew up in a 'homogenous subdivision environment' and now want
something different, she said. The challenge, of course, is not just
attracting those would-be city dwellers but also attracting the people
willing to invest in establishing the coffee shops, bars, bookstores,
art galleries, restaurants and food stories that keep them downtown. In
short, that synergy between residents and retail is what creates and
maintains vitality in inner cities. Figuring out how to achieve that
vitality is the chief goal of the Urban Renaissance Action Team, one of
five panels meeting as part of the Vision 2015 long-range planning
initiative under way in Northern Kentucky..."

Source:
http://news.kypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050420/NEWS02/504200372/1014
Archive search: http://www.kypost.com/search/
Cost: No
Title: "Vitality in the inner core"
Author: Dan Hassert
<back to top>


KELLER PROMOTES WALKING THROUGHOUT WISCONSIN

-> According to an April 19th Waukesha Freeman article, "The inviting
bench in Kit Keller's front yard says many things. Neighbors walking by
signify her current focus: Kit Keller is working very hard to promote
something that most people don't think much about -- walking. As
organizer of Wisconsin Walks, a nonprofit organization, Keller is
becoming involved with communities statewide dealing with pedestrian
safety issues, safe routes to school, the benefits of walking for
health and to encourage a sense of community. 'The car has contributed
to a lack of community camaraderie,' notes Keller. 'We don't relate to
our neighbors when we live our lives in and out of our garage.'

"Keller also notes that with childhood obesity so prevalent, walking is
important for children. Keller had worked extensively with pedestrian
and bicycle safety issues as a consultant before moving to Cedarburg
with her husband in 1993. 'Cedarburg was built before cars,' she notes,
and has found it to be a good place to promote the benefits of walking.
Keller notes that an accident in 1999 which resulted in two pedestrian
fatalities spurred the city to form a committee to look at pedestrian
and bike safety. She notes that in any community, walking can be
promoted with what she calls the 'four E's: engineering, education,
encouragement and enforcement.' Enforcement tends to be emphasized, she
said, but what is needed is for the other areas to be reinforced..."

Source:
http://www.gmtoday.com/news/local_stories/2005/April_05/04182005_05.asp
Archive search: use Google search window
Cost: No
Title: "Walking attracts lively Keller"
Author: Ann Brownfield
<back to top>


NEW URBANIST VILLAGES SLATED FOR DAVIDSON CO. (TN)

-> According to an April 20th Nashville City Paper article,
"Transformation of 511 acres in southeast Davidson County -- and an
adjoining 92 in Rutherford -- from empty farmland to a network of four
villages may begin with a country-cooking restaurant. Developers Don
Smithson and Ed Richey envision their project -- Carothers Crossing --
as a self-contained, walkable community whose commercial activity will
be limited mostly to locally owned shops and restaurants. The project
will start, hopefully, with the restaurant, a grocery store, and, in a
confined space, a few houses, cottages, townhomes and mixed-use
buildings with offices or shops on their first floors and flats above,
according to Smithson.

"If all goes according to plan, Carothers Crossing will expand over 20
years and across more than 600 acres, mostly in Davidson County with
about 92 acres in Rutherford County. The total project would cost more
than $100 million, Smithson said. The land sits southwest of Interstate
24 and east of Burkitt Road where the road turns northward. The
Carothers family, which still owns the property, settled there in the
1860s and farmed it through the early 1990s. If the blueprint drafted
by Smithson and Richey and submitted recently to Metro Planning is
approved, about 56 percent of the land would be left rural, while four
villages -- traditional planned neighborhoods -- would be constructed
adjacent to one another, influenced by the neighborhood designs of
Franklin, East Nashville and the Belmont area, Smithson said..."

Source:
http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/index.cfm?section_id=9&screen=news&news_id=40857
Archive search:
http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/index.cfm?screen=archives
Cost: No
Title: "600-acre New Urbanism community slated for southeast Davidson"
Author: Bill Harless
<back to top>


BRIDGEWATER (NJ) STUDENTS WATCH PED BRIDGE BUILT

-> According to an April 21st Courier News article, "There it was
Wednesday morning -- another pale, graceful stalk that had sprouted
from the soft spring earth seemingly overnight. Under cover of darkness
beginning late Tuesday, that curving stem, the main arch of the
pedestrian bridge connecting the Bridgewater Commons with Mountain
Avenue in Somerville, had been hoisted into place by a towering
crane...'It was really interesting, noticing how they supported the
structure,' said Alex Chien, an eighth-grader at Branchburg Central
Middle School...At the urging of teacher Maggie Emmons, who coaches his
mathematics team at the school, Chien and a few other students stayed
up late into Wednesday morning, to watch the construction from nearby
lawn chairs.

"'They started moving the bridge -- it was almost imperceptible when
they made the first move,' Emmons said. The more than 45-ton steel span
was carefully maneuvered into place over the ramp leading from Route 22
West to Route 202-206 North, she said. Bright construction lights
illuminated the scene, and the ramp was closed to traffic. Construction
officials paused during the work to answer a few questions from the
inquisitive students, who are involved in the Math Counts team Emmons
coaches at the school. 'The kids got such a walking, working math
lesson. I never could have achieved that in my classroom,' she said.
The $2.6 million pedestrian bridge was conceived to make the walk from
Somerville to the Bridgewater Commons safer, said John Kendzulak,
principal engineer for Somerset County..."

Source:
http://www.c-n.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050421/NEWS/504210301
Archive search:
http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archives?s_site=c-n&p_product=BCNB&p_theme=gannett&p_action=keyword
Cost: Yes
Title: "Workers maneuver span into place to link Bridgewater commons,
Somerville"
Author: Chad Weihrauch
<back to top>


O-U-R--J-U-S-T-I-C-E--S-Y-S-T-E-M

LEAVENWORTH (KS) DRIVER WON'T FACE CHARGES

-> According to an April 21st Leavenworth Times article, "The driver
who struck a pedestrian over the weekend in Leavenworth will not face
any charges or traffic citations, according to a police spokesman said.
'It was just a tragedy,' Maj. Pat Kitchens said the accident that
resulted in the death of Gair Sloan. He said the driver, who's been
identified as 41-year-old Troy Smith, told police he did not see Sloan
crossing Fourth Street Saturday morning before the accident. Kitchens
said Smith was not impaired and had not been driving recklessly. 'He
just didn't see him,' Kitchens said.

"The accident was reported around 9 a.m. in the area of Fourth and
Shawnee streets. Sloan was said to have been crossing closer to the
middle of the block than the corner intersection when he was struck by
a 1996 Chevrolet full-size pickup that had turned south from Shawnee
Street. Sloan died Sunday..."

Source:
http://www.leavenworthtimes.com/articles/2005/04/21/news/news05.txt
Archive search:
http://www.leavenworthtimes.com/shared-content/search/index.php?search=advanced
Cost: No
Title: "Driver won't face charges"
Author: Staff


AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

ROGUE BULL CHECKS OUT LANSING (KS) WALKABILITY

-> "Lansing police officers spent part of their Monday morning chasing
after a bull that was running loose down city streets and through
residential yards. 'He just trotted like he owned Main Street, right
down the middle of it,' said Police Chief Steve Wayman. The bull
ultimately was corralled into a pen on property just west of
Lansing..." [includes photo!]
http://www.leavenworthtimes.com/articles/2005/04/20/news/news04.txt


Q-U-I-CK--H-I-T-S

NEW JERSEY BILL: FINE DRIVERS, FUND PED SAFETY

-> "A.2605, a law increasing the fine for drivers violating crosswalk
laws by $50 and dedicating the revenue to a new pedestrian safety fund
was passed by the NJ Senate on March 21. The bill, approved by the
Assembly last year, awaits only Acting Governor Codey's signature
before becoming law."
http://www.tstc.org/bulletin/20050404/mtr49504.html

BULLDOZING AWAY A PLACE CALLED HOME

-> "When I ask my students to write about landscapes that they know
best, almost always they write about places where they played as
children -- ditches, vacant lots, field edges, 'waste' places. When I
ask them to write about landscapes they've lost, almost always they
write about the same places..."
http://www.capitolhillblue.com/artman/publish/article_6603.shtml

LAKE WORTH (FL) ONE OF 20 "BIKETOWNS USA"

-> "Bicycling magazine recently designated Lake Worth one of 20
BikeTown U.S.A. cities. Next month, the magazine will give away 50
Schwinn bicycles to city residents and track their progress during a
three-month period..."
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/lakeworth/content/neighborhood/lake_worth/epaper/2005/04/20/npl1_biketown_0420.html
For more on the BikeTown 2005 and Bike-To-Work Cities programs, go to:
http://www.bicycling.com/biketown

STREET TREES SPROUT IN PHILLY-REGION COMMUNITIES

-> "[Over] the next three years the neighborhoods selected each will
receive 150 large shade trees to be planted along pedestrian-oriented
streets and in parks. Brenda Brinton, who is Downingtown Borough
council president, is chair of the borough's Shade Tree Commission..."
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=14389823&BRD=2247&PAG=461&dept_id=453366&rfi=6

BOONE CO. (MO) DEPUTIES TO PEDAL NEIGHBORHOODS

-> "'With our regular patrol deputies, we have a very difficult time
doing the direct one-on-one contact with people that live in different
subdivisions because their primary responsibility is running calls,'
Carey said..."
http://www.columbiatribune.com/2005/Apr/20050420News003.asp

SAN DIEGO ST. UNIV. CREATING $332M URBAN VILLAGE

-> "On April 5, the university took a major step toward bulldozing it
all and erecting in its place a $332 million college-oriented urban
village. San Diego State University's plans call for building a
combination shopping area-office complex, with restaurants and movie
theaters that can double as classrooms..."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20050417-9999-1m17paseo.html

HAMILTON (VA) WANTS WALKABLE, BIKEABLE, HEALTHY FUTURE

-> "The citizens of Hamilton have a vision -- what they would like their
little town to look like. It's walkable. It's bikeable. It's healthy.
It's got a few more small businesses to serve the 1,800 people who live
in the town and nearby. It's teenager friendly. It's still a
community..."
http://www.timescommunity.com/site/tab1.cfm?newsid=14377746&BRD=2553&PAG=461&dept_id=506040&rfi=6

MICHIGAN STUDY: CITIES AND FARMS NEED EACH OTHER

-> "'I'm sure you've heard of the doughnut hole of our cities, where
cities are emptying out while the surrounding counties are developed,'
Bennett said. 'It kind of illustrates the hollowing out of our
cities.'...'We're not accommodating a lot of people. We're
accommodating the desire to spread out.'..."
http://www.mlive.com/news/kzgazette/index.ssf?/base/news-13/1114010427149010.xml

ROAD PROJECTS RECAST AS "SECURITY MEASURES"??

-> "The I-66 widening is one of billions of dollars' worth of stalled
or contentious road and transit projects - some that were conceived of
decades ago and others far from dense population centers - that state
officials and highway advocates across the region are reselling in part
as evacuation routes..."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A40440-2005Apr9.html

BROWARD CO. (FL) MAYOR PUSHES LIVABLE AGENDA

-> "[Broward County Mayor Kristin Jacobs] is the author or mover of
projects that create a balance of traffic flow and area schools,
commercial areas, parks and cultural facilities thus creating a 'sense
of place,' which we Broward residents -- most born elsewhere --
desperately need..."
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/entertainment/weekend/11407732.htm

$1.3M PIMA CO. (AZ) TRAIL PROJECT MOVES AHEAD

-> "Construction of the entire 12-mile, $1.3 million Anza project,
including two trailheads, two pedestrian bridges, signs and the trail,
is supposed to start this summer and finish in mid-2006..."
http://kvoa.com/Global/story.asp?S=3241946

PENN STATE PROF: CONSIDER HEALTH WHEN SITING SCHOOL

-> "Moving to a more remote location would mean fewer students would
walk to school and miss out on the benefits of physical activity and
the impact it has on their health..."
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/news/opinion/11414842.htm

LONDON (UK) SPEED CAMERA NETS $2M IN 2 MONTHS

-> "The limit was reduced from 70mph (112kmh) to 40mph, trapping about
12,5000 drivers who failed to slow down..."
http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3255633a4560,00.html

USDA'S JOHANNS: PICK A FOOD PYRAMID, GET MOVING

-> "The steps, which match the new slogan, 'Steps to a Healthier You,'
are meant to invoke physical activity as an essential component of good
health. But they could just as easily be a reference to the Herculean
task the government faces trying to combat inertia and obesity in the
United States..."
http://www.theolympian.com/home/news/20050420/living/129183.shtml

GREEN GUIDE: AMERICA'S TOP 10 GREEN CITIES

-> "We often think we have to escape the city to get to where it's
green and healthy to live, but many cities have advantages including
parks, excellent public transport, and walkable commutes to work,
unavailable in sprawling suburbs. And facilities such as bike trails
that keep people out of cars can also help reduce America's obesity
problem..."
http://www.thegreenguide.com/doc.mhtml?i=107&s=cities

U.C. SANTA BARBARA BIKE PATH PROJECT TO BEGIN IN JUNE

-> "[Each] student will pay $3 per quarter to finance the $600,000
project. Marsha Zilles, program manager of the Physical Facilities
Dept., said the 140-day construction period will begin in mid-June and
will continue through the end of October..."
http://www.ucsbdailynexus.com/news/2005/9490.html


R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S

-> "GEORGIA BIKE SENSE..."
Subtitled, "A Guide for Cyclists and Motorists;" intended to teach
cyclists and motorists how to safely and legally share the road; Mar.
2005; Georgia DOT. (9.3mb) The whole document or separate chapters may
be downloaded here:
http://www.dot.state.ga.us/dot/plan-prog/planning/projects/bicycle/georgia_bike_sense/index.shtml


C-A-L-E-N-D-A-R

Note Additional training opportunities are available on the National
Center for Bicycling & Walking web site. Readers are encouraged to add
their own items as long as they pertain to training in the bicycle,
pedestrian, or livable community fields. Go to:
http://www.bikewalk.org/technical_assistance/training_resources/training_calendar.htm

April 22-24, Thunderhead Training, Portland, OR. Info:
http://www.thunderheadalliance.org/trainings05.htm

April 24-28, 2005, 10th TRB Transportation Planning Applications
Conference, Portland, Oregon. Info:
http://www.trb-portland-05.com/conference_resources.html

April 25-26, 2005, Designing and Implementing Roundabouts, Madison, WI.
Info: Keith Knapp, Program Director, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
432 N. Lake Street, Madison, WI 53706; phone: (608) 263-6314; fax:
(608) 263-3160; e-mail: <knapp@epd.engr.wisc.edu>
http://epdweb.engr.wisc.edu/webG140

April 27-28, 2005, Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities, Madison, WI.
Info: Keith Knapp, Program Director, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
432 N. Lake Street, Madison, WI 53706; phone: (608) 263-6314; fax:
(608) 263-3160; e-mail: <knapp@epd.engr.wisc.edu>
http://epdweb.engr.wisc.edu/webG141

April 28 - May 1, 2005, 3rd Southeastern Foot Trails Conference,
Pickens, SC. Info Jeffrey Hunter, Southern Appalachians Initiative,
American Hiking Society, 175 Hamm Road - Suite C, Chattanooga, TN
37405; phone: (423) 266-2507; email: <jhunter@americanhiking.org>
http://www.americanhiking.org/alliance/sai.html

May 2-4, 2005, Bicycle Education Leaders Conference, New York, NY.
Info: League of American Bicyclists, 1612 K Street NW, Suite 800,
Washington, DC 20006-2850; phone: (202) 822-1333; fax: (202) 822-1334
email: <bikeleague@bikeleague.org>
http://www.bikeleague.org/events/index.html

May 9-13, 2005, Pedestrian Planning and Design Workshops, Raleigh NC.
Info: Institute for Transportation Research and Education.
http://www.itre.ncsu.edu/transit/Pedwkshp/location.html

May 22-25, 2005, Transportation Research Board National Roundabout
Conference, Vail CO. Info: Richard Pain, TRB Staff; phone: (202)
334-2964; email: <RPain@NAS.edu>
http://trb.org/Conferences/Roundabout/

May 24-27, 2005, Health Promotion and Education at the Crossroads,
Minneapolis, MN. Info: DHPE, 1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 601,
Washington, DC 20005; phone: (202) 659-2230; fax: (202) 659-2339;
email: <director@dhpe.org>
http://www.dhpe.org/nationalconference/

May 31-June 3, 2005, Velo City 2005, Dublin, Ireland. Info:
http://www.velo-city2005.com

June 1-2, 2005, 2nd Annual Conference on Obesity and the Environment,
Washington, DC. Info: email: <sanders5@niehs.nih.gov>
http://www.niehs.nih.gov/drcpt/events/oe2005/

June 3-5, 2005, Round*Up USA small wheel + folder bike fest,
Philadelphia, PA. Info:
http://www.trophybikes.com/events/roundup/index.html

June 5-8, 2005, Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers annual
conference, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Info:
http://www.cite7.org/saskatoon/

June 17-18, 2005 New York Statewide Trails and Greenways Conference,
New Paltz, NY. Info: Fran Gotcsik, Parks & Trails New York; phone:
(518) 434-1583; email: <fgotcsik@ptny.org>

July 18-21, 2005, Towards Carfree Cities V, Budapest, Hungary. Info:
Judit Madarassy, email: <madarassy@levego.hu> (put "TCFC V" in subject
line).
http://www.worldcarfree.net/

July 26-27, 2005, Mid America Trails and Greenways Conference, St. Paul
MN. Info: Rory Robinson, Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance,
IN Projects Manager, 2179 Everett Rd., Peninsula, OH 44264; phone:
(330) 657-2951; fax: (330) 657-2955; email: <Rory_Robinson@nps.gov>
http://www.railtrails.org/

July 27-30, 2005, TrailLink 2005, Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN. Info: Katie
Magers, RTC media coordinator; phone: (202-974-5115); e-mail:
<katie@railtrails.org>
http://www.railtrails.org

August 26-28, 2005, Thunderhead Training, Decatur (Atlanta), GA. Info:
http://www.thunderheadalliance.org/trainings05.htm

September 13-21, 2005, 2005 Physical Activity and Public Health
Courses, Hilton Head, SC. Info: Janna Borden, University of South
Carolina Dept of Exercise Science, 730 Devine St., Columbia, SC 29208;
phone: (803) 576-6050; fax: (803)777-2504; email: <jsborden@gwm.sc.edu>.
http://prevention.sph.sc.edu/seapines/index.htm

September 14-16, 2005 Walk/Bike California 2005 Conference, Ventura,
CA. Info: Gail Payne, California Bicycle Coalition; phone: (510)
306-0066; email: <gpayne@alamedanet.net>.
http://www.walkbikecalifornia.net

September 22-23, 2005, Walk 21 (VI), Zurich, Switzerland. Info: Walk21,
Diddington House, Main Road, Bredon, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, GL20
7LX, United Kingdom; phone: 00 44 (0) 1684 773 94; email:
<info@walk21.co>
http://www.walk21.com/

September 22-24, 2005, International SIIV Congress on People, Land,
Environment and Transport Infrastructures, Bari, Italy. Info: contact
Joedy Cambridge by email: <JCambridge@nas.edu> with subject line of
"International SIIV Congress on People, Land, Environment and Transport
Infrastructures."
http://trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=4567

October 13-15, 2005, Walking for Health: Measurement and Research
Issues and Challenges, Urbana-Champaign, IL. Info:
http://www.acsm.org/meetings/walkingconference2005.htm

October 27-29, 2005, Cooper Institute Conference on Childhood Obesity,
Dallas, TX. Info: Melba Morrow, Cooper Institute, 12330 Preston Rd.,
Dallas, TX 75230; phone: (972) 341-3247; email:
<mmorrow@cooperinst.org>.
http://www.cooperinst.org/conf2005intro.asp

March 28-30, 2006, Transportation and Economic Development 2006, Little
Rock, AR. Info: Mark Norman at <MNorman@nas.edu>
http://trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=4837


J-O-B-S--G-R-A-N-T-S--A-N-D--R-F-P-S

-> JOB -- PART TIME Dev/Conf Coordinator -- BIKEWALK VA.
BikeWalk Virginia, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, is seeking a
qualified individual (1) to manage our new development program and (2)
to coordinate the annual Virginia conference on biking and walking.
This position will start at part time, but we anticipate evolving to
full-time. The development program will involve seeking funding to
promote safe biking and walking throughout the state. Grants will also
be sought through our Virginia Trails division to promote greenways,
blueways, and trails for all users. Development responsibilities would
include grant writing, general and corporate membership development,
and building an endowment. Our annual two-day conference is held each
spring at different locations around the state. Conference
responsibilities include working with the Executive Director and our
state agency partners to plan and coordinate all aspects of the
conference. The coordinator would oversee the budget, marketing,
program planning, meeting site logistics, and sponsorships.

Qualifications The successful applicant shall have a bachelor's degree
and experience in non-profit publicity and marketing, grant writing,
planning and executing conferences and workshops, excellent
communication and public speaking skills, an ability to execute complex
logistics, the ability to travel frequently in Virginia, and experience
with Word, Excel, Access, desktop publishing, and web management. Home
Office Location: Williamsburg, Virginia. The Development/Conference
Coordinator can work from his/ her home or another office location in
Virginia. Salary: Starting annual part-time salary of $11,000 - $14,000
approximately 20 hours per week. Please mail a cover letter, resume,
and two references by May 6 to: BikeWalk Virginia,
Development/Conference Coordinator, PO Box 203, Williamsburg, VA
23187-0203
http://www.bikewalkvirginia.org



H-O-U-S-E-K-E-E-P-I-N-G

TO SUBSCRIBE TO CENTERLINES: send a blank email to
<cl_subscribe@bikewalk.org>

TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM CENTERLINES: Send a blank
email to <cl_unsubscribe@bikewalk.org>

MISS AN ISSUE? Find it here.

GOT SOMETHING TO SAY? Tell it to the NCBW OnLine Forum.

SEND US YOUR NEWS We want to hear what you're up to!
Contact <john@montana.com> today!

COPYING We encourage you to copy our content as long as you
identify the source in this way: "from CenterLines, the e-newsletter
of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking."


Contributors: John Williams, Bill Wilkinson, Corey Twyman, Gary
MacFadden, Mark Plotz, Sharon Roerty, Bob Chauncey, Ross
Trethewey, Harrison Marshall, Todd Antoine, David Loutzenheiser.

Editor: John Williams
Send news items to: <john@montana.com>
Director: Bill Wilkinson


National Center for Bicycling & Walking, 8120 Woodmont Ave, Suite 520,
Bethesda, MD 20814. Phone: (301) 656-4220; fax: (301) 656-4225; email:
<info@bikewalk.org>
Web: http://www.bikewalk.org