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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#274 Wednesday, Mar. 16, 2011

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- New York, New York: Separated Bicycle Facilities, Home Runs and Balks
----- Letting Bicycling Save the Economy
----- FTA Warns Transit Agencies to Make Equity a Priority
----- You Can Call Him "Walker"...
----- Safer, More Livable Streets through Bike Lanes
----- The Cost of Incomplete Streets: $3M Jury Award in MD. Pedestrian Death
----- A Must Read: Rage Against Your Machine
----- NACTO Releases Bikeway Design Guide
----- Cyclists Descend on Capitol Hill, Ask Lawmakers to Preserve Bike $
----- U.S. Bicycle Route System Hits 30-State Milestone
----- Alliance for Biking & Walking Presents 2011 Advocacy Awards
----- NYC Cyclist's View of Amsterdam Bike Culture
----- Bike Trail vs Billion Dollar Melbourne Freeway Upgrade?

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- 6th Annual "Georgia Rides to The Capitol" Hits the Streets
----- Portland's Not Perfect, But Offers Bright Ideas
----- Burt Township Makes 32nd Michigan Complete Streets Policy

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Study: Older Drivers Overlook Peds 2x as Often as Younger Drivers
----- Mississippi Cost of Obesity Could Hit $4B
----- Report: Md. Schools Fail to Support Walking, Biking

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National & International Scene
- Regional and Local Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Stats R Us
- Webinars, Webcasts and Seminars
- Resources
- Calendar
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

NEW YORK, NEW YORK: SEPARATED BICYCLE FACILITIES, HOME RUNS AND BALKS
by Sharon Z. Roerty, AICP/PP

-> Last week, New York City's commissioner of transportation Janette Sadik-Khan received a hero's welcome at the National Bike Summit. It was richly deserved: in three year's time the City has created hundreds of miles of bike lanes; it has innovated new separated bicycle facilities and reclaimed the streets for people; and, best of all, the city's traffic deaths are at a 100 year low, yes a 100 year low. Injuries to all road users are down 40 to 60 percent on streets that have bike lanes and traffic calming. What could possibly be wrong with that?

A recent dust-up over separated bike lanes along Prospect Park West in Brooklyn has spawned a lawsuit (thanks to Neighbors for Better Bike Lanes; don't join, they are opposing the project), and has turned the spotlight back onto Commissioner Sadik-Kahn, instead of focusing on the health, safety, environmental, and economic benefits all New Yorkers reap from the new network. This is unfortunate because as Commissioner Sadik-Khan and the NYCDOT have pushed New York City forward, it has had the effect of pulling the rest of the country along with it. (You wouldn't think that pictures of the 9th Avenue's protected bike lanes would get people in Mobile, Alabama excited, but you'd be wrong.)

For the last 10 years, any time someone said to me that they wished their city could be more bicycling-friendly, but...our weather is too cold, we get too much snow, our streets are too narrow, etc., all I had to do was whip out the Chicago Bike Lane Guide book: 50 pages of pure gold! New York City is proving to be an effective foil to those who say: "we want those linear parks and urban connectors, but we don't have the space and we don't know that people will use them." Gotham is proving that if you build it, it will be used. And (perhaps) most importantly, the City has proved: that which benefits the pedestrian and the cyclist, also benefits the other road users by improving safety and mobility. If Senator Schumer or a writer from the New Yorker has a harder time parking, it appears to be a small price to pay for all of the above. The new and improved street is lovely and now accommodates more people in the same amount of space - public space.

This tempest underscores the old adage that we have to keep our friends close (very close) and our detractors even closer. People are not comfortable with change. A loss of one or two parking spaces in a neighborhood can attract more attention than a murder. Yet that same street with that same bike lane, multi-use path or walkway in another neighborhood could be the reason we move to that street or neighborhood. This fracas also demonstrates that public involvement is a necessary and continuous process. Whether you are a bike/ped advocate, transportation planner, city official or county commissioner -- you may be on third base but you have to check the runner on first; and be prepared for the occasional balk. Collect before and after use data; safety data; customer satisfaction data; be ready to show return on investment; and get the local businesses on your side. How many ice cream cones did you sell before the path went in? How many do you sell now? And importantly be open to public input; let the ideas be owned by others.

Local coverage of the Prospect Park West saga:
http://tinyurl.com/65sxhd7
http://tinyurl.com/69m342u
http://tinyurl.com/6j5gtbu
http://tinyurl.com/6793tdh

A nice write-up from Washington DC, which draws same parallels to local skirmishes over bicycle facilities.
http://tinyurl.com/63v5rfl

Update: As I was writing this today, I received an email from my friend Sarah Bowman from the The Walkable and Livable Communities Institute. Sarah wrote, "Preparedness and resiliency should touch a nerve. Take a look at the photos from Japan -- people biking or walking. Even if the roads were drivable, fuel is not available. Roads will become parking lots...just like Lake Shore Drive in Chicago this winter. We don't need anything near the magnitude that Japan has experienced to halt traffic/block roads."

"The talk should be about NYC as a keen example of a prepared city -- one that looks for opportunities to provide quality places that serve the greater good. This could be the seeds of expecting more from our streets, our buildings, our green spaces. They allow us healthy minds and bodies and when all hell breaks loose; we know where to go, how to get there and what to do."

LETTING BICYCLING SAVE THE ECONOMY
by Sharon Z. Roerty, AICP/PP

-> Since the last CenterLines, we have noticed a flurry of stories about bicycling. One of the more provocative ones arrives from Grist*, which posits that an individual who gives up his car can expect an annual financial windfall of $3k to $12k. Imagine that. Better yet, imagine being the mayor or governor who delivered such benefits to her constituents: straight to the White House for you; skip the book tour!

Oh, and those savings are just a start because the new, fitter you now needs fewer trips to the doctor and the drug store; you might even be tempted to give up the gym membership
*http://tinyurl.com/49oxehg

FTA WARNS TRANSIT AGENCIES TO MAKE EQUITY A PRIORITY

-> Last week Peter Rogoff, head of the Federal Transit Administration, issued a friendly and poignant reminder to local transit agencies that are considering fare hikes, service reductions, or both: remember Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and do not make decisions that disproportionately impact people of color. The FTA is offering free resources, trainings, and technical assistance to help transit agencies comply with Title VI.

FTA's Title VI training: http://tinyurl.com/5tvyrda
FTA's Letter to Transit Agencies: http://tinyurl.com/6jc97j4
Streetsblog coverage: http://tinyurl.com/4cxtsbo

YOU CAN CALL HIM "WALKER"...
by Mark Plotz

...but that's where his support ends for Wisconsin's pedestrians and their close cousins riding transit and bikes. The Governor's budget for 2011-2013 has received a lot of coverage over the proposed abrogation of collective bargaining rights for state workers, and the subsequent public outcry. Receiving much less attention is his elimination of $2.5 million in state bike/ped funding, and his proposal to move transit funding from its current position in the DOT's budget, into the General Fund. This means transit would compete with all other budget priorities-except roads. Perhaps most interesting of all is the question of whether, by eliminating transit workers' right to collective bargaining, the Governor has run afoul of Department of Labor rules, and has thereby jeopardized $100+ million in Federal transit aid. This story is far from over.

A couple of local responses:
-> "Milwaukee's Business By Bike convenes its first meeting" (featuring special guest John Burke of Trek Bicycles): http://tinyurl.com/4mwja8d
-> "John Wayne and my Grandpa would not like Walker's budget" by Dave Schlabowske, Milwaukee's Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator: http://tinyurl.com/4cqorwf

Governor Walker's budget eliminates state money for bike/ped improvements.
http://tinyurl.com/4npky74

Two opinion/editorials about the budget's impact on transit.
http://tinyurl.com/4eapfcs
http://tinyurl.com/49459lw

SAFER, MORE LIVABLE STREETS THROUGH BIKE LANES

-> In a Mar. 8th Placemaking Blog entry, Megan MacIver wrote, "In this new StreetFilm, [Project for Public Spaces] Senior Director of Transportation Initiatives, Gary Toth explains Floating Parking and Bike Buffer Zones. This new, contested street feature confers many benefits -- and not just for cyclists. In fact, floating parking and bike lanes can actually change the way a street is experienced. They slow traffic and make the sidewalk more livable. And floating parking does this in a way that doesn't involve a lot of tax payer dollars to build infrastructure. These are low-cost interventions that can turn a street into a community place."

"In floating parking, cars are not parked directly against the curb but against stripes which buffer the parked cars from the bike lane. This buffer zone protects cyclists from getting 'doored' -- from running into opening car doors -- and also protects motorists from stepping out of the car and into the way of an oncoming bike. This configuration is different from what we've come to expect from roads around the country. Many of today's most common road features seemed radical when they were first introduced. In this Streetfilm, Toth mentioned how people were shocked when the first-ever grade separated interchange was introduced in 1919. It was called 'extravagant' and no one could imagine a highway feature that blocked horses and buggies from entering highways! Today, grade-separated interchanges have become a fixture in the American landscape..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/4o995m3

THE COST OF INCOMPLETE STREETS: $3M JURY AWARD IN MD. PEDESTRIAN DEATH

-> Last week, a jury in Price George's County, Maryland, awarded $3.3 million to relatives of a woman killed by a motorist as she walked along a stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue that lacked pedestrian facilities. The jury found the state of Maryland liable in the wrongful death suit for not providing safe accommodations for pedestrians.

Read more: http://tinyurl.com/4834vrv

A MUST READ: RAGE AGAINST YOUR MACHINE

-> The March 2011 edition of Outside Magazine features an article on bicycle commuting, written by Tom Vanderbilt, author of Traffic: Why we Drive the Way We Do. Vanderbilt's book was well-received by the bicycling and pedestrian world, in part, because it was written by someone who walks, bikes, drives, and takes public transportation. (It also stands by itself as a good read.) For his newest adventure, Vanderbilt rides along with an ultra bicycle commuter, who covers 50 miles on his twice-weekly journey. Along the way, Vanderbilt offers some original insight into what happens when a bicyclist and motorist encounter one another on our public roads. It's a must read for advocates.

http://tinyurl.com/4d9khts

NACTO RELEASES BIKEWAY DESIGN GUIDE

-> According to a Mar. 9th National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) news release, "A coalition of transportation commissioners from major American cities launched a new design manual for bicycle-friendly streets today, announcing its release in Washington, D.C. at the League of American Bicyclists 2011 Bicycle Summit. The new 'Urban Bikeway Design Guide' is a publication of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), an association that shares transportation practice and experience among its members and represents cities in national transportation issues."

"NACTO undertook the project because many of its members found existing design manuals inadequate for their efforts to promote bicycle transportation.To create the Guide, officials from NACTO cities and a team of top planners and designers conducted an extensive survey of expert knowledge, existing guidelines from countries and cities around the world and innovative projects in the U.S."

"'Portland planners, engineers and designers have learned countless lessons creating the streets and bikeways that make our city stand out for cycling. We've also looked to other cities and abroad for encouragement and design lessons, and are thankful for the colleagues who've helped us along the way,' Portland Mayor Sam Adams said. 'The NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide has captured the national cycling expertise in a reference document that will enable cities to have safer and more attractive designs today.'..."

The Urban Bikeway Design Guide is an interactive document that can be found online at the link below. Development of the Guide was supported by the SRAM Corporation and the Bikes Belong Foundation.

Source: http://tinyurl.com/4jzz3gu

CYCLISTS DESCEND ON CAPITOL HILL, ASK LAWMAKERS TO PRESERVE BIKE $

-> In a Mar. 11th DC.Streets.Blog entry, Tanya Snyder wrote, "Every year, the cyclists that gather in Washington for the National Bike Summit meet with hundreds of Congressional offices to ask for expanded bike funding. This year, they're just asking lawmakers not to cut it."

"With an anti-spending mood prevailing inside the Beltway, bicycling advocates are trying to be realistic. 'We haven't forgotten that there's a bill out there that still needs support,' said League of American Bicyclists President Andy Clarke, referring to the larger transportation bill that will lay out the federal investment in bicycling. 'We want to work a slightly different strategy and find out who is willing to support something like that up on the Hill, without making it "The Big Ask" for everyone.'..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/4lcn5nk

U.S. BICYCLE ROUTE SYSTEM HITS 30-STATE MILESTONE

-> According to a Mar. 9th news release, "Adventure Cycling Association today announced a new "state-by-state progress" webpage for the U.S. Bicycle Route System (USBRS). The new online resource displays the National Corridor Plan map for the USBRS, which links to a progress report on every state's work to establish official U.S. Bicycle Routes (USBR)."

"As of February, 30 states are working to implement U.S. Bike Routes for cycling transportation, recreation, and tourism. The number of states working on routes has more than doubled in the past year, and this spring, it's expected that the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) will approve the first new U.S. Bicycle Routes in nearly three decades. Another 11 states have also expressed interest in working on the USBRS..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/48pdbb4

A related AASHTO Journal article is here: http://tinyurl.com/4hrxn5x

ALLIANCE FOR BIKING & WALKING PRESENTS 2011 ADVOCACY AWARDS

-> According to a Mar. 8th news release, "To shine the spotlight on the progress and victories of the bicycle and pedestrian advocacy movement, the Alliance for Biking & Walking is pleased to announce its 2011 Advocacy Award winners. Since 2009, the Alliance has solicited public nominations and recognized the individuals, organizations and business leaders who are propelling our People Powered Movement. 'Our 2011 award winners represent all corners of the continent and a variety of different campaigns and initiatives to increase biking and walking,' Jeff Miller, Alliance President/CEO, said. 'But they are all shining examples of the energy, enthusiasm and progress of the bicycle and pedestrian advocacy movement -- a movement that is transforming communities across North America.'.."

This year, the Alliance honors the following winners:
-- Advocacy Organization of the Year: Bike Pittsburgh
-- Advocate of the Year: Jackie Douglas, LivableStreets (Boston, MA)
-- Business Advocate of the Year: New Belgium Brewing Company
-- Winning Campaign of the Year: Michigan Complete Streets
-- Best Practices: Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition
-- Susie Stephens Joyful Enthusiasm Award: Stephanie Routh
-- Innovation Award: Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling

Details: http://tinyurl.com/5wznjay

NYC CYCLIST'S VIEW OF AMSTERDAM BIKE CULTURE

-> In a Mar. 2nd Canadian Press article, Warren Levinson wrote, "Nearly everyone in Amsterdam rides a bicycle. No one sweats. As a longtime cyclist in New York City, and a sweaty guy who can raise a few droplets going to the end of the walk to retrieve the newspaper in January, that's how it seemed to me when I was there. I was prepared for the ubiquity of cyclists. But the refinement was a surprise. Who knew that urban cycling -- which I find mostly exhilarating and joyous, but occasionally a grim struggle for a sliver of pavement -- could also be elegant? This is how I saw the Dutch cyclists. I ride to news assignments, sometimes in jacket and tie, feeling overdressed."

"I saw well-dressed men riding to work in Amsterdam, and they didn't seem remotely uncomfortable. And the women! Granted that riding a bike is like playing the cello -- one of those things that makes men look dorky and women look hot -- but women bikers in Amsterdam seem to cut no fashion corners. High heels and skirts are not uncommon, whether they are headed to the office or carting a crateful of kids to school on one of those cargo bikes with a big box up front. Part of staying fashionable is that no one wears a helmet. Not the riders; not the kids sitting up front or on the luggage rack. Either cycling is extraordinarily safe in Amsterdam or the lawyers aren't in charge yet..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/4d2gr86

BIKE TRAIL VS BILLION DOLLAR MELBOURNE FREEWAY UPGRADE?

-> According to a recent Bicycle Victoria blog entry, "Melbourne's massive congestion busting Monash Freeway upgrade appears to be an embarrassing flop, carrying limited additional traffic, and in danger of being outpaced by the bike path that runs alongside it. A count undertaken on a recent weekday registered 1772 vehicles in the new, extra city-bound lane of the freeway between 7am and 9am. On the adjacent Main Yarra Trail, a total of 1239 bikes were counted in the city bound bike lane over the exact same period."

"The count was made from MacRobertson Bridge in Burnley. The result is astonishing and calls into question the view that Melbourne's congestion problems can be solved by building more roads. But more crucially, it shows that investment in more and better bike routes can improve Melbourne's mobility at a tiny cost compared to the dollar devouring freeway and road projects. The Main Yarra Trail is one of Melbourne's busiest bike commuter routes, and is fed by the Gardiners Creek Trail which runs alongside the freeway through Melbourne's south eastern suburbs. The bike lane and the freeway share the same commuter catchment..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/62agq8w


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

6TH ANNUAL "GEORGIA RIDES TO THE CAPITOL" HITS THE STREETS

-> According to a Mar. 10th news release, "On March 22, 2011 the Metro Atlanta Mayors Association (MAMA) will co-sponsor the Sixth Annual 'Georgia Rides to the Capitol' event to raise support for the development of a regional-scale bicycle network of both on-road facilities and multi-use-trails, as well as cycling connections focused around major transit facilities, activity centers and schools."

"Metro-area mayors and council members are encouraged to participate in the bike ride, which will have routes departing from Decatur and Roswell. There will also be a three-block ceremonial ride from Hurt Park in the city of Atlanta to the Capitol. Last year, more than 30 metro-area mayors and council members participated in the bike ride."

"'The ride to the Capitol is my favorite bicycle ride of the year,' said Roswell Mayor Jere Wood, who will lead the bicycle ride from Roswell. 'It's not only fun, it's a great way to demonstrate to the state that there is strong support for bicycling in Georgia.'..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/5s862k7

PORTLAND'S NOT PERFECT, BUT OFFERS BRIGHT IDEAS

-> According to a Next American City blog entry by Jay Wallhasper, "It's become a cliche that Portland is America's most livable city, a hotbed of innovation when it comes to green policies, public spaces, pedestrian amenities, transit, public spaces, and, of course, bicycles. In fact some people are growing weary (and the rest of us envious) of hearing about how great things are in Oregon's largest city. But cliches often turn out to be true. After spending several days exploring Portland as part of a Bikes Belong Foundation-sponsored transportation workshop for city officials from across the country, I must admit that Portland offers a wealth of inspiration and practical tips for how we can make our towns more bikeable, vital and fun."

"Yet, as the delegation of transportation leaders from Chicago, Houston, Seattle, Minneapolis and Salt Lake City discovered while biking across the city, Portland is no Ecotopia. Local bikers still contend with roaring traffic on crowded streets and motorists who park illegally in bike lanes or honk for no apparent reason. As Laura Spanjian, Sustainability Director in the Houston mayor's office, observed, 'I was surprised there's so much traffic. Actually that made me hopeful -- that we can do some of the same things in Houston even with all our traffic.' 'Portland is still an American city,' explains Roger Geller, the city's Bicycle Coordinator. 'But since the 1990s, we've tried to make biking safer and more comfortable, and good things have happened. What you see are the results of a 20-year effort to promote biking.'..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/5tme3s7

Via Planetizen : http://tinyurl.com/4okuduj

BURT TOWNSHIP MAKES 32ND MICHIGAN COMPLETE STREETS POLICY

-> According to a Mar. 12th Michigan Complete Streets Coalition article, "Michigan continues to lead the nation in adopting local complete streets ordinances and resolutions. On the heals of the League of Michigan Bicyclists receiving national recognition for the Michigan Complete Streets Coalition, we are pleased to report that the momentum is not slowing down."

"In March we have the pleasure to add the City of Ann Arbor and Burt Township to our growing list of communities who have adopted policies that support all modes of transportation in future road projects. Based on census data, Michigan's 32 policies equates to 24% (2,352,874) of our state's population living in a community with a complete streets resolution or ordinance..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/6jkcntv


THE RESEARCH BEAT

STUDY: OLDER DRIVERS OVERLOOK PEDS 2X AS OFTEN AS YOUNGER DRIVERS

-> According to a Mar. 7th L.A. Times article, "Older drivers may have a breadth of driving experience working for them behind the wheel. But a new study finds they tend to have a narrower field of vision than younger drivers and often miss developments on the curb or sidewalk that could demand their attention. The study, published online Monday by the journal Accident Analysis and Prevention, found that drivers over 65 were half as likely to notice pedestrians near or moving toward the street as were experienced drivers between the ages of 28 and 45. Placing the two groups of drivers in a simulator and in front of videos taken from a driver's eye view, researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev found that older drivers took longer to respond to road hazards as well."

"And compared to younger drivers simulating a drive through a variety of streetscapes, those over 65 tapped on their brakes in response to a 'roadside hazard' about half as often, suggesting either that they did not see it or that they did not consider it something they needed to attend to. The good news (unless you're driving behind one of these motor vehicle operators and you're late for an appointment) is that the older drivers drive more slowly -- about 20% more slowly -- perhaps to compensate for shortcomings in their peripheral vision and attention..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/6dnjgp6
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: No
Title: "Older drivers overlook streetside pedestrians almost twice as often as younger drivers"
Author: Melissa Healy

MISSISSIPPI COST OF OBESITY COULD HIT $4B

-> According to a Mar. 5th Clarion Ledger article, "Barring a crash diet by the nation's fattest state, health care costs for obese Mississippians will skyrocket to $3.9 billion by 2018 -- and taxpayers could foot up to half that bill. 'If we don't reverse this trend of obesity, the health care costs associated with obesity are going to overwhelm our health care system,' said Dr. John Hall, Arthur G. Guyton professor and chairman of physiology at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. 'That figure was estimated to be $925 million in 2008. We in Mississippi can't afford the $3.9 billion related to obesity, and I think that's an underestimate.'"

"This year, UMC is opening a Center for Obesity, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases that will partner with the state Department of Health, businesses and other institutions in hopes of reversing this projection: By 2018, more than half of all Mississippians will be obese. 'Last year, we found over 20 percent of preschoolers are obese,' Hall said. 'That's 4-year-old kids. It used to be rare to see any kind of obesity in that age.'..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/6ansugr
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: Yes
Title: "Cost of obesity could hit $4B"
Author: Jerry Mitchell

Via RWJF Childhood Obesity News Digest: http://tinyurl.com/6xfqrfj

REPORT: MD. SCHOOLS FAIL TO SUPPORT WALKING, BIKING

-> According to a Mar. 5th Washington Examiner article, "Maryland's schoolchildren aren't walking and biking to school each day because of local school policies including liability concerns, a lack of sidewalks and safe routes, according to a new survey. The Maryland Department of Transportation survey found that less than 20 percent of schools support students who walk or bike, while about the same amount of schools actively discourage them. Meanwhile the survey found that 70 percent of Prince George's County students are bused to school, along with 69 percent in Montgomery County."

"'With obesity on the rise across our country, we need to create more opportunities for children to get exercise by safely walking or biking to school,' Maryland Transportation Secretary Beverley Swaim-Staley said in a written statement. Beyond the lack of exercise, walking and biking are also much cheaper than busing. A separate study from 2007 showed that statewide costs for school bus transportation had more than doubled since 1992, reaching $438 million by 2006. In Montgomery County, alone, the new report said, busing takes up $90 million of the annual budget..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/6emghv2
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: No
Title: "Report: Md. schools fail to support walking, biking"
Author: Kytja Weir


QUOTES R US

-> "'Intelligent cities' and 'smart cities' are all the rage right now, especially in corporate image advertising related to emerging technology. But is there a downside? I think there may be, insofar as those phrases are used to describe tech-based panaceas for urban problems whose roots lie not in a lack of sophisticated information flow but in a half-century or more of dumb growth patterns, central-city disinvestment and poor neighborhood design..."
-- Kaid Benfield, NRDC

http://tinyurl.com/6jcw9m8

-> "A fiscally conservative person might...reasonably argue that while bikes are nice, we have to fix our crumbling roads and bridges for all modes before we can afford nice extras like bike lanes, trails and sidewalks. But remember building roads is really expensive (around $50 million per mile for freeways), and Walker's budget includes funds to expand our freeways, rather than just rebuild them. Take a drive down I94 south towards Chicago and you can see all the bridges are about twice as wide and the freeway is 50% wider. Why would a fiscally responsible person expand the extremely expensive interstate, increasing annual maintenance and operational costs by 50% when the demand does not warrant expansion? For years the traffic volumes on our freeways have stayed about the same or even gone down..."
-- Dave Schlabowske, Over the Bars in Milwaukee blog

http://tinyurl.com/4cqorwf

-> "'Motor vehicle crashes are still the leading cause of death for from ages 3 through 34. They are taking our youngest people away. There are 93 deaths every day, one death every 16 minutes."
-- Dr. Federico Vaca, professor of emergency medicine, Yale School of Medicine

http://tinyurl.com/6eapseb

-> "Communities are not going to be able to control driver behavior adequately through ticketing, red-light cameras, distracted-driver campaigns, and other measures of those sorts. Street design has to be an important element in the government response..."
-- Philip Langdon, New Urban Network

http://tinyurl.com/6eapseb

AND NOW, FOR SEVERAL THINGS COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

WORLD PREMIERE OF BIKE SAUNA AT PRAGUE CRITICAL MASS RIDE

According to the March 14th ECF Newsletter, "On Thursday, February 17, as part of the regular Prague Critical Mass ride, the world premiere of Bike SAUNA was celebrated at Prague's Plage (beach) on the River Vltava. The men-powered Bike Sauna, which can host up to 6 people, is a gift from the Prague cycling community to all those who do not stop riding in winter. Bike Sauna was created by Prague architects from H3T (http://tinyurl.com/6z4m6vl) and can be rented from DIY bike workshop (http://tinyurl.com/5wy6bz3). About 30 people tested the fully operational sauna last night on the banks of the River Vltava."

Source (with photo & link to video!): http://tinyurl.com/63v3jth

IDITAROD INVITATIONAL: BASINGER WINS, KOBIN SETS NEW WOMEN'S RECORDS
[Note: This is a BIKE event!]

"On a hard, fast trail, cyclist Peter Basinger pedaled and pushed from Knik across the Alaska Range to McGrath to notch his fifth win in the Iditarod Trail Invitational, but he missed setting a new course record by about an hour as Interior temperatures plunging to 30 degrees below zero slowed everyone and everything."

"Except maybe Californian Louise Kobin. She did what Basinger couldn't quite do and grabbed two records, becoming the first woman to break four days in the Invitational and setting a new women's record of 3 days, 22 hours and 20 minutes for the 350-mile race from Knik to McGrath..."

Source: http://tinyurl.com/6anot79


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS

WEBINAR: "CFS's Employee Transportation Program"

Date: March 21, 2011, 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM Eastern Time

Presenters: Karin Savoie of Fondaction CSN and Bernadette Brun of Voyagez Fute

Host: Tools of Change and Transport Canada

Cost: $50/site for APBP members, $75/site for non-members

Registration and details: http://tinyurl.com/4lmg58w

Contact: Cate Berthelet <registrar@toolsofchange.com>

WEBINAR: "How to Build a Walking School Bus Program from Grass Roots Up: Best Practices in Design, Implementation and Dissemination"

Date: March 22, 2011, 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. EDT

Presenters: Ian Thomas, PedNet Coalition of Columbia (MO)

Host: America Walks and the National Center for Safe Routes to School

Cost: None

Registration and details: http://tinyurl.com/6anfgsa

Contact: Nicole Mogul <nmogul@americawalks.org>

WEBINAR: "Congestion Management Process: A Guidebook"

Date: March 23, 2011, 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. EDT

Presenters: Egan Smith, FHWA; Michael Grant and Matthew Day, ICF International; Chris O'Neill, Capital District Transportation Committee (Albany, NY); Michelle Meaux, Capital Area MPO (Austin, TX)

Host: FHWA & FTA

Cost: None mentioned

Registration and details: http://tinyurl.com/4vygegq

WEBINAR: "Preventing Roadway Fatalities and Injuries"

Date: Tuesday, April 5, 2-3 pm EDT (11-12 pm PDT, 1-2 pm CDT).

Presenters: Georges Benjamin, American Public Health Association; Andrew L. Dannenberg, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Jean Armbruster, the PLACE Program/Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

Host: Eloisa Raynault, APHA

Cost: None

Contact: Eloisa Raynault <eloisa.raynault@apha.org>

Registration and details: http://tinyurl.com/6agl6fm

WEBINAR: "Integrating Bicycles with Streetcars"

Date: April 20, 2011, 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. EST

Presenters: Jessica Roberts and Steve Durrant; Alta Planning + Design, and Mark Dorn, URS

Host: APBP

Cost: $50/site for APBP members, $75/site for non-members

Contact: Debra Goeks <info@apbp.org>

Registration and details: http://tinyurl.com/47zomoh

WEBINAR: "England's Sustainable Travel Towns"

Date: May 10, 2011, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. EDT

Presenters: Joe Finlay, England's Department for Transport, and Emilie van de Graaff, Worcester Sustainable Travel Town project

Host: Tools of Change

Cost: $50/site

Registration and details: http://tinyurl.com/6avuyy

Contact: Cate Berthelet <registrar@toolsofchange.com>


RESOURCES

-> "WALKING STRATEGIES OF VISUALLY IMPAIRED PEOPLE ON..."
"...trapezoidal- and sinusoidal-section tactile groundsurface indicators;" article by Ranavoloa, Conteab, Iavicolia, Serraoc, Silvettia, Sandrinib, Pierellic, & Draicchioa; Ergonomics, Vol. 54, Issue 3, pages 246-256. March 2011 (abstract + link to download $)
http://tinyurl.com/4mphma8

-> "PEDESTRIAN DESIGN GUIDELINES 'DON'T DRIVE...WALK!"
Report by Romi Roy, Sr. Consultant, UTTIPEC; for Delhi Development Authority, New Delhi. November 2009 (31MB pdf)
http://tinyurl.com/5u24mxd

-> "EVALUATION OF INNOVATIVE BICYCLE FACILITIES: SW BROADWAY"
"...Cycle Track & SW Stark/Oak Street Buffered Bike Lanes, Final Report;" by Monsere (Civil & Environmental Engineering), McNeil & Dill (Ctr for Transportation Studies), Portland State University; for City of Portland Bureau of Transportation. January 14, 2011 (general info and link to 3.0MB pdf)
http://tinyurl.com/6acwtqp

-> "THE FIRST CASUALTY OF A NON-EXISTENT WAR..."
"...Evaluating Claims of Unjustified Restrictions on Automobile Use, and a Critique of 'Washington's War On Cars And The Suburbs'" report by Todd Litman, Victoria Transport Policy Institute. March 14, 2011 (323KB pdf)
http://tinyurl.com/49luv2b

-> "FIX IT FIRST, EXPAND IT SECOND, REWARD IT THIRD..."
"...A New Strategy for America's Highways;" report by Matthew E. Kahn and David M. Levinson; for the Hamilton Project; Discussion Paper 2011-03. February 2011 (general info and link to 3.1MB pdf)
http://tinyurl.com/6885f3v

-> "LIFESTYLE BEHAVIORS ASSOCIATED WITH SECONDARY..."
"...Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease Among California Adults;" article by Bellow, Epstein, Parikh-Patel, PhD, MPH; Prev Chronic Dis 2011;8(2). Mar. 10, 2011
http://tinyurl.com/4mus3qr

-> "BICYCLE FACILITIES AND THE MANUAL ON UNIFORM TRAFFIC..."
"...Control Devices;" FHWA. . March 2011 (online list of bicycle facilities and status in the FHWA Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices)
http://tinyurl.com/4dzlefn

-> "MAKING THE CASE FOR BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN YOUTH EDUCATION..."
"...Bicycle and Pedestrian Curricula Guide;" by David Cowan & Robert Ping, Safe Routes to School National Partnership. February 2011 (6.9MB pdf)
http://tinyurl.com/6f78x9v

-> "PEDESTRIAN CROSSING SAFETY AT OR NEAR PASSENGER STATIONS"
Draft report by the Federal Railroad Administration. December 2010 (1.6MB pdf)
http://tinyurl.com/4hh8m7y
Via Soles and Spokes http://tinyurl.com/4trlmqb

-> "THE POTENTIAL OF SAFE, SECURE AND ACCESSIBLE..."
"...Playgrounds to Increase Children's Physical Activity;" by Russell Lopez, Northeastern Univ; for Active Living Research. Feb. 2011 (532KB pdf)
http://tinyurl.com/68n7dd6


CALENDAR

Additional training opportunities are available on the National Center for Bicycling & Walking web site. Add your own items to the on-line calendar...it's quick and easy. Please be sure your calendar items pertain to training and workshops in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields. Go to:
http://www.bikewalk.org/calendar.php

HEY, YOU! SEND US YOUR CALENDAR ITEMS -- PRONTO!

-> March 13-20, 2011, Sustainable Trails Conference, Asheville, NC. Info: Pam Gluck, Professional Trailbuilders Association, phone: (530) 547-2412p; email: <pam_gluck@americantrails.org>
http://tinyurl.com/47mryz9

-> March 24, 2011, Florida Bike Summit, Tallahassee FL. Info: Laura Hallam, Executive Director, phone: (352) 468-3430; fax: (352) 468-3430; email: <laura@floridabicycle.org>, Florida Bicycle Association, P.O. Box 718, Waldo, FL 32694.
http://tinyurl.com/yh3fg7d

-> March 25-27, 2011, Bike!Bike!Southeast! Charleston, SC. Info:
http://tinyurl.com/4apu3hr

-> March 30, 2011, Going Up a Gear: Urban Cycling Beyond London, Sheffield, UK. Info:
http://tinyurl.com/68cqwb9

-> April 5, 2011, Anoka County TMO Transportation Summit, Andover, MN. Info: Anoka County TMO, 1440 Bunker Lake Boulevard, Andover, MN 55304; phone: (763) 862-4260; fax: (763) 862-4201; email: <tmo@co.anoka.mn.us>
http://tinyurl.com/6arumqj

-> April 6, 2011 (San Mateo) & April 8 (San Jose), Silicon Valley Bike Advocacy Summit 2011, California. Info:
http://tinyurl.com/49me3bp

-> April 15-17, 2011, Filmed by Bike, Portland, OR. Info: Filmed by Bike
http://tinyurl.com/28m93tx

-> April 28-29, 2011, Complete Streets Forum, Toronto, ON (Canada). Info: Carrie Armstrong, Toronto Clean Air Partnership, 75 Elizabeth St, Toronto, ON, M5G 1P4; phone: (416) 392-0260; email: <carmstrong@cleanairpartnership.org>
http://tinyurl.com/5sfgy47

-> April 28-29, 2011, Streets as Places Training Seminar, New York, NY. Info: Dana Kitzes, Project for Public Spaces; email: <dkitzes@pps.org>
http://tinyurl.com/4hzamxh

-> May 5-6, 2011, How to Turn a Place Around Training Seminar, New York, NY. Info: Dana Kitzes, Project for Public Spaces; email: <dkitzes@pps.org>
http://tinyurl.com/246oq3w

-> May 10-11, 2011, 2011 Transportation Planning, Land Use, and Air Quality Conference, San Antonio, Texas. Info: Transportation Research Board; contact: Christine Gerencher, email: <CGerencher@nas.edu>
http://tinyurl.com/2bl3n3r

-> May 15-19, 2011, National Scenic and Historic Trails Conference, Abingdon, VA. Info: The Partnership for the National Trails System
http://tinyurl.com/2bl3n3r

-> May 18-20, 2011, 3rd International Conference on Roundabouts, Carmel, IN. Info
http://tinyurl.com/2b82jsr

-> May 22-25, 2011, National Main Streets Conference, Des Moines, IA. Info: National Trust for Historic Preservation Main Street Center.
http://tinyurl.com/25ljpg4

-> May 23-26, 2011, 31st Annual National Recreation Resource Planning Conference, Breckenridge, CO. Info: National Association of Recreation Resource Planners, P.O. Box 221, Marienville, PA 16239; phone: 814-927-8212; fax: 814-927-6659l email: <info@narrp.org>
http://tinyurl.com/636szrw

-> May 25-28, 2011, 22nd International Cycling History Conference (ICHC), Paris, France. Info: French National Institute for Transport and Safety Research, Francis Papon, phone: 0145925705 ICPEF,INRETS/DEST/EEM, email: <papon@inrets.fr>, communication projects should be sent before February 1st, 2011.
http://tinyurl.com/2ug6xrq

-> June 1-4, 2011, CNU 19, Growing Local, the 19th annual event from the Congress for the New Urbanism, Madison, WI. Info:
http://tinyurl.com/4569zes

-> June 9-10, 2011, Placemaking: Making It Happen, New York, NY. Info: Project for Public Spaces, Dana Kitzes, email: <dkitzes@pps.org>
http://tinyurl.com/6zjddmp

-> June 20-22, 2011, Transit Initiatives and Communities Conference, St. Louis, MO. Info: <info@cfte.org>
http://tinyurl.com/2ewnxvr

-> June 24-27, 2012, 4th Urban Street Symposium, Chicago, IL. Info: TRB flyer
<http://tinyurl.com/4p2yoc8 (138KB pdf)

-> July 18-20, 2011, 19th International Symposium on Transportation and Traffic Theory, Berkeley, CA. Info:
http://tinyurl.com/6atbrz7

-> July 28-30, 2011, World Symposium on Transport and Land Use Research, Whistler (BC) Canada. Info: Center for Transportation Studies, Univ. of Minnesota.
http://tinyurl.com/2azxuv8
Note: Call for Papers deadline: December 31, 2010

-> August 16-18, 2011, 3rd Safe Routes to School National Conference, Minneapolis, MN. Info:
http://tinyurl.com/ajk7jy

-> August 21-25, 2011, International Conference on Ecology and Transportation, Seattle, WA. Info:
http://tinyurl.com/27lm4sl

-> September 7-8, 2011, Conference on Performance Measures for Transportation and Livability, Austin TX. Info: Tara Ramani, Conference Coordinator <t-ramani@ttimail.tamu.edu>; Katie Turnbull, Conference Planning Committee Chair <k-turnbull@tamu.edu>
http://tinyurl.com/4pgecsl

-> September 17-18, 2011, Wheels in Motion, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Info: <TomT@bicyclensw.org.au>
http://tinyurl.com/4hvsphq

-> September 18-21, 2011, the Asia-Pacific Cycle Congress, Brisbane, Australia. Info: State of Queensland (Department of Transport and Main Road; email: <info@cyclecongress.com>
http://tinyurl.com/4sacgf3

-> October 2-5, 2011, 5th Mid America Trails and Greenways Conference, Fort Wayne, IN. Info: Amy Hartzog, City of Fort Wayne, phone: (260) 427-6228; email: <amy.hartzog@cityoffortwayne.org>
http://tinyurl.com/4cofdy7

-> October 25-27, 2011, Using Census Data for Transportation Applications Conference, Irvine, California. Info: Transportation Research Board, Thomas M. Palmerlee, <TPalmerlee@nas.edu>
http://tinyurl.com/676ngsa

-> January 22-26, 2012, TRB 91st Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C. Info:
http://tinyurl.com/4vk6jw8


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS

Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks!

-> GRANT -- NAT'L TRAILS TRAINING -- USDOT

New deadline: March 21, 2011

New info: http://tinyurl.com/4ooekou

Original Info:
Funding Opportunity Number: DTFH61-11-RA-00007
Posted Date: Feb 07, 2011
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 07, 2011
Expected Number of Awards: 10
Estimated Total Program Funding: $496,000
Award Ceiling: $496,000
Award Floor: $124,000
CFDA Number(s): 20.219 -- Recreational Trails Program
Eligible Applicants: Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education

Link to Original Details: http://tinyurl.com/4sq25vc

-> JOB -- STAFF ENGINEER -- TYLIN INTERNATIONAL, CHICAGO (IL)

Description: Here is your opportunity to have an active role in establishing new, on-street bikeways in the City of Chicago. T.Y. Lin International is looking for a staff engineer that will primarily work within the Bicycle Program at the Chicago Department of Transportation. The Staff Engineer will be directly involved in the planning, design, construction and maintenance of on-street bicycle facilities throughout Chicago.

-- Responsible for managing a federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) grant program to establish 50-miles of bicycle lanes in the City.
-- Develop bicycle pavement marking and signage plans in Computer-Aided Design (CAD).
-- Prepare project documents including plans, specifications and estimates.
-- Perform intersection capacity analyses using Synchro traffic modeling software.
-- Collect data and perform observations at project sites.
-- Coordinate with city staff and outside agencies.
-- Provide guidance on bicycle facility designs for construction projects.
-- Suggest city policy changes related to bicycle issues.
-- May supervise seasonal and part-time staff.
-- Other duties as assigned.

Requirements: Bachelor's Degree in civil engineering or related field. Must have a strong interest in bicycling and non-motorized transportation. Experience with CAD software. Ability to learn traffic modeling software. Geographic information system (GIS) software experience a plus. Must have at least 2 years of experience.

Details: http://tinyurl.com/4d5eahd

-> JOBS -- PROGRAM MGR -- MASS BICYCLE COALITION

MassBike, the Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition, is seeking a full-time Program Manager. This brand-new role has broad responsibility including managing our education program, coordinating outreach activities, and participating in advocacy projects. The Program Manager will report to the Executive Director, and will work closely with both the Executive Director and the Development Manager. This position is based in our office in Boston.

Responsibilities:
- Manage existing Safe Routes to School bike safety training program, including recruiting, training, coordinating, and supervising instructors; coordinating with statewide SRTS program office; preparing invoices and payment requests.
- Manage existing workplace commuter workshop program, including recruiting, training, coordinating, and supervising instructors; scheduling workshops; teaching workshops as needed; preparing invoices and payment requests.
- Manage other education activities, including program evaluation and development.
- Regularly contribute blog posts about MassBike's advocacy work and programs, and coordinate email newsletter production.
- Represent MassBike at public events and actively seek out opportunities to communicate MassBike's message to the public.
- Develop innovative ways deliver our message and generate more interest in and excitement about MassBike.
- Work with Development Manager to increase our volunteer capacity for events.
- Provide advocacy support to Executive Director, including assisting with or taking primary responsibility for specific advocacy projects.

Details: http://tinyurl.com/2ad3m2r

-> JOB -- DEV. OFFICER -- CASCADE BICYCLE CLUB (WA)

Cascade's Development Officer is the frontline fundraiser for individual and foundation giving who works to increase contributed income through membership and donations. S/he is an advocate for the organization who enjoys spending a substantial portion of her/his time building relationships with donors or prospective donors through meetings, phone conversations and events.

Send cover letter and resume to <developmentofficer@cascadebicycleclub.org> with "Development Officer" in the subject field.

Deadline: Position open until filled.

Details: http://tinyurl.com/3ybvdjl

-> JOB -- MULTIPLE POSITIONS -- ACTIVE TRANS ALLIANCE, CHICAGO

If you have a passion for bicycling and a strong desire to effect change for bicyclists in and around Chicago, then the Active Transportation Alliance might be the perfect place for you.

Current vacancies:
--- IT Internship
--- Transit Organizer
--- Bicycle Ambassador

Details: http://tinyurl.com/3azq84d


HOUSEKEEPING

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MISS AN ISSUE? Find it here:
http://www.bikewalk.org/newsletterarchives.php

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND CALENDAR ITEMS: We want to hear what you're up to! Contact <john@bikewalk.org> today!

List your local, statewide, and regional training events on NCBW's National Training Calendar:
http://www.bikewalk.org/calendar.php

COPYING: We encourage you to copy our content as long as you identify the source in this way: "from CenterLines, the e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking."

Contributors: John Williams, Sharon Roerty, Mark Plotz, Jimmy Johnston, Linda Tracy, Russell Houston, Harrison Marshall, Christopher Douwes, Charles Bingham, Ken Wuschke, Bob Laurie, John Cinatl, Carrie Armstrong, Dan Gelinne, Bill Schultheiss, Winona Bateman, Gabe Rousseau, John Potis, Michelle Gulley, Dave Schlabowske, Jay Kassirer, Deb Goeks, Roger DiBrito, and Annette Taborn.

Editor: John Williams
Send news items to: <john@bikewalk.org>
Director: Sharon Z. Roerty, ACIP/PP


CONTACT US

©2011 - NCBW | The National Center for Bicycling & Walking is a program of the Bicycle Federation of America; http://www.bikewalk.org/contact.php