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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#286 Wednesday, August 31, 2011

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Placemaking: How to Engage your Transportation Agency (Part 3)
----- Walking is Healthy, so Why isn't it Safer?
----- Early Reg. Rates end 9/14/11 for APBP Pro Development Seminar
----- New FTA Policy Makes it Easier to Walk & Bike to Transit
----- NYC Student Activist Inspires Nat'l SRTS Conference Audience
----- APBP Endorses NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide
----- Too Much Trans Infrastructure, too Little Productivity
----- Cycling Industry Gives U.K. Economy 3 Billion Boost

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- Wyoming Scores Federal Grants for Pathways and Sidewalks
----- La Crosse First Wisconsin City to Adopt Complete Streets Ordinance
----- Let Cities Lower Speeds Without Red Tape
----- Hoboken (NJ) City Council Votes to Add 10 Miles of Bike Lanes
----- NPS Proposes Boston & Charlestown Paths to Historic Sites
----- Philly's First Green Bike Lane Appears on The Scene

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Cycling to Work Can Add 5 Years if You Pedal Hard & Avoid Crashes

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National & International Scene
- Regional and Local Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Stats R Us
- Webinars, Webcasts and Seminars
- Resources
- Calendar
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

PLACEMAKING: HOW TO ENGAGE YOUR TRANSPORTATION AGENCY (Part 3)
by Mark Plotz

-> When seeking better outcomes from your DOT, you may only get so far before bumping up against a common roadblock: liability. Chapter 8 of "How to Engage Your Transportation Agency" helps put liability into its proper context. Gary Toth, a former DOT insider, explains how destructive this word can be to a constructive dialogue:

"The fear of lawsuits is often a factor in the selection of rigid street designs and is one of the chief barriers citizens face when seeking flexibility. It is a powerful event when a professional sits across the table from a citizen and says 'we cannot do what you asked because we will be liable.' This usually shuts down the dialogue without ever delving into the details. The Executive Director of a Park Commission in New Jersey once complained to me, 'you engineers use liability in the same way villagers use a cross to hold back vampires: you hold up the design books and say 'be gone, go away!'" (p.61)

The implied threat of being sued for building anything other than the same old incomplete street, is a tool deployed far & wide by DOTs to shutdown discussion and give cover for eliminating crosswalks (might encourage pedestrians to cross a dangerous road); paved shoulders and sharrows/bike lanes (might encourage bicyclists to use the public roadways); and sidewalks (might encourage pedestrians to walk in the auto recovery zones). When confronted with the 'L' word, take a deep breath (and recognize that lawyers aren't born with kung-fu grips, so they're not so scary); stand your ground; then consider Gary's translation of what is really happening:

"I watched this happen many times during my career at NJDOT. What I began to learn, however, was that most of the transportation professionals who cited liability had never been sued or even consulted with an attorney."

Gary's advice: when working with a community to design a project that meets its needs, you don't unduly exposing yourself or your agency to being sued, as long as you follow accepted engineering practices and manuals, and the decision-making process is not arbitrary. Courts recognize that transportation professionals must design projects that balance the needs of all users: transit, drivers, bicyclists, and pedestrians. If the transportation professional in front of you remains unconvinced, turn to page 63 where Gary lists five simple questions that community members can ask to ensure the conversation continues once the 'L' word has been uttered.

Perspective helps too: states that have a history of hostility to bicyclists and pedestrians often already embrace tort reform, making huge lawsuits and settlements against a DOT unlikely and less lucrative.

Lastly, when faced with the liability argument, it is entirely appropriate to ask: "What's the cost of maintaining the status quo?" The purpose of starting the conversation about roadway design is to ensure the needs and safety of all anticipated users will not be overlooked and can be reasonably met. Removing a crosswalk or leaving a shoulder out of a design will not prevent pedestrians from crossing the road or a bicyclist from riding to work in a transit-deficient area. The story that follows explains the aftermath of what happens when transportation planners and engineers design roads for cars, then look the other way.

Source: "How to Engage Your Transportation Agency" can be downloaded from the PPS website: (http://bit.ly/mUAttj)

WALKING IS HEALTHY, SO WHY ISN'T IT SAFER?

-> According to an Aug. 19th Atlantic article, "Many communities aren't pedestrian-friendly -- so people have to choose between being unhealthy and being a bull's-eye. I suppose it should come as no surprise that sprawling, Sun Belt metro regions built completely around the automobile are the nation's most unsafe places to walk. In a new report analyzing traffic fatality data over the last 10 years, the nonprofit advocacy coalition Transportation for America has found that the top four 'most dangerous' metro regions for pedestrians in the country are all in the state of Florida. Rounding out the top 10 are regions in Texas, California, Tennessee, Nevada, and Arizona."

"Here are the 10 worst places to walk, according to the report:
Orlando-Kissimmee, FL; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL; Jacksonville, FL; Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL; Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA; Las Vegas-Paradise, NV; Memphis, TN-MS-AR; Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ; Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX; Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX."

"While pedestrian deaths are usually labeled as accidents by local authorities, Transportation for America believes many are, in fact, attributable to poor roadway design that fails to safely accommodate walkers. Because walking is proven to be good for our health, lowering obesity rates, many people in these unsafe areas are forced to choose between an unhealthy lifestyle or an unsafe one. Children, older adults, and racial and ethnic minorities are disproportionately represented in pedestrian fatalities..."

Source: http://bit.ly/mWJSPa
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: No
Title: "Walking Is Healthy, So Why Isn't It Safer?"
Author: Kaid Benfield

EARLY REG. RATES END 9/14/11 FOR APBP PRO DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

-> An Aug. 30th Association of Pedestrian & Bicycle Professionals news release suggests, "Plan to attend the best sustainable transportation conference in 2011! Join a wide cohort of bicycle and pedestrian staff, consultants, engineers, planners, landscape architects, policymakers, advocates, and many others at APBP's Professional Development Seminar in Charlotte, N.C., October 24-27. Complete Streets is the focus this year and Charlotte is a living laboratory where participants can explore textbook policy and exemplary implementation. September 14 is the deadline for early registration."

"Five all-day, stand-alone workshops on Monday, October 24, offer deep learning opportunities on Smart Trips; Healthy Living In Place; and Toward Zero Deaths (classroom) and mobile sessions to Greenville and Spartanburg, S.C. and Davidson, N.C. Conference tracks will focus on Complete Streets Design and Implementation; Livability and Economic Development; and New Guidelines, Research and Standards. PDS participants may choose from 26 in-depth, 3-hour classroom and mobile sessions beginning Tuesday, October 25."

"Attendees will learn from a dream team of bike/ped experts, including Andy Clarke, League of American Bicyclists; Barbara McCann, National Complete Streets Coalition; Dan Burden, Walkable and Livable Communities Institute; exceptional professionals from Charlotte's Department of Transportation; and many other recognized masters. Conference agenda and session details: http://bit.ly/oHYa1I"

"Advocates should attend the PDS to gain technical know-how that complements existing skills. Conference sessions consider all aspects of complete streets from policy development through design and implementation, offer information on the most up-to-date design guidelines and research, and look at the contributions of specific bicycling and walking programs to communities' livability and economic development."

"A student poster contest offers five winners the chance to attend the conference through a student scholarship award and travel stipend. The deadline to submit an abstract is September 12 details here: <http://bit.ly/rb68p0>."

Quick! Register here: http://bit.ly/pyJQMV

NEW FTA POLICY MAKES IT EASIER TO WALK & BIKE TO TRANSIT

-> In an Aug. 19th LAB Blog entry, Daren Flusche wrote, "The majority of the Federal Transit Administration's grant programs allow money to be spent on the design, construction, and maintenance of walking and biking projects that "enhance or are related to public transportation facilities." But how do they determine if such a relationship exists? Until now the FTA had used 1,500 feet from the transit stop or station as the rule of thumb."

"Today, the FTA announced that 'all pedestrian improvements located within one-half mile and all bicycle improvements located within three miles of a public transportation stop or station shall have a de facto physical and functional relationship to public transportation.' Apparently in response to public comments, the agency also stipulated that projects located beyond those distances can be eligible if walkers and cyclists could reasonable be expected to make longer trips..."

Source: http://bit.ly/piQDxM

For the August 19th Federal Register entry (76 FR 52046 Final Policy Statement on the Eligibility of Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements Under Federal Transit Law), click on http://1.usa.gov/rfIM1c (211KB pdf)

NYC STUDENT ACTIVIST INSPIRES NAT'L SRTS CONFERENCE AUDIENCE

-> In an Aug. 19th DC.Streets Blog entry, Carolyn Szczepanski of the Alliance for Biking & Walking wrote, "Only two speakers at this week's Safe Routes to School National Conference in Minneapolis earned a standing ovation. For former Minnesota Congressman Jim Oberstar the crowd stood out of honor and gratitude. For Kimberly White, the audience shot out of their seats with sheer awe and inspiration."

"A resident of Flatbush, Brooklyn, and a sophomore at Baruch College, White's a recognizable face to some in New York City. She appeared on a Times Square billboard with a solar bicycle and organized the recent Youth Bike Summit, attended by several hundreds students from 14 states."

"Addressing her first national audience during the closing plenary of the Safe Routes conference, White described her evolution from passively accepting injustices in her low-income neighborhood to discovering bicycling as a vehicle for environmental activism and personal transformation. Given the crowd of educators and officials, White didn't shy away from one key point: Adults too often discount the intellect and ideas of youth..."

Source: http://bit.ly/nOmArc

Via the MN Active Living Network News: http://bit.ly/pf2XEX

APBP ENDORSES NACTO URBAN BIKEWAY DESIGN GUIDE

-> According to an Aug. 30th news release, "The Board of Directors of the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP) endorses the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) Urban Bikeway Design Guide for use in projects that accommodate all bicyclists on streets in North America. APBP applauds NACTO for taking the initiative to push the envelope to improve urban bicycle facilities."

"As people of all ages call for more comfortable and safer places to bicycle for transportation, cities are seeking new ways to respond. The NACTO guide is a useful tool in a city's toolbox for urban bikeway design. In deciding when, where, and how to apply the NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide, APBP urges cities to consider seeking official experimentation status for treatments that are not currently authorized by design manuals and standards so that this research can benefit other cities seeking similar solutions."

For more info, go to: http://bit.ly/qaVtiZ

TOO MUCH TRANS INFRASTRUCTURE, TOO LITTLE PRODUCTIVITY

-> In an Aug. 8th Strong Towns blog entry, Charles Marohn wrote, "The American Society of Civil Engineers has just released a report that should be titled, 'Pretending it is 1952.' Like a broken record, ASCE is again painting a bleak picture of the future if American politicians -- as if they need to be plied -- won't open up the checkbook for our noble engineers. And in a way that the Soviet Central Committee would have expected from Pravda, the media and blogger world is sounding the alarm. This feels more like a cult than a serious discussion on America's future."

"In the Long Depression of the 1870's, the railroads found they had over-invested in transportation capacity. Speculating on future growth and the returns on land development, they collectively built more rail lines than could be put to productive use. The result was a huge financial correction in which the private-sector railroads consolidated their routes, down-sized their unproductive infrastructure and put their reserve capacity into endeavors that had a higher rate of return. This was a painful, but necessary, correction. The parallels to 2011 are obvious..."

Source: http://bit.ly/nXlgMP

Via Citywire.net (Neal Peirce): http://bit.ly/rei1Na

CYCLING INDUSTRY GIVES U.K. ECONOMY 3 BILLION BOOST

-> According to an Aug. 22nd BBC News story, "Cycling generates nearly 3bn a year for the UK economy, a report by the London School of Economics has found. The figure takes into account factors such as bicycle manufacturing, retail and cycle-related employment. The report says 51m was raised for UK manufacturers from the 3.7 million cycles sold in 2010 -- a rise of 28% on the number of cycles sold in 2009."

"More than a million people also started cycling last year, bringing the total number of cyclists to 13 million. Last year more than 1.5bn was spent on bikes and another 850m on accessories, with the LSE estimating that the cycling industry is now worth some 2.9bn a year. There are now 23,000 people working in cycling, contributing more than 600m to the economy in wages and taxes..."

Source: http://bbc.in/oPOKQq
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: No
Title: "Cycling industry gives economy 3bn boost"
Author: Staff

Via ECF Newsletter: http://bit.ly/p1fKau


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

WYOMING SCORES FEDERAL GRANTS FOR PATHWAYS AND SIDEWALKS

-> According to an Aug. 18th Friends of Pathways blog entry, "The USDOT announced competitive grants awarded from several federal transportation programs. Jackson Hole did really well, winning three major grants for community priorities."

"The Town of Jackson was awarded $1,253,575 from the Scenic Byway Program for sidewalks and pathways along West Broadway, which is along the Wyoming Centennial Scenic Byway. The new grant will allow the construction of safe, wide sidewalks along the south side of West Broadway from the Y to the 5-Way, and leverages the WY-22/West Broadway SPET funds that will pay for the final design. The Scenic Byway grant was very competitive, and Jackson won one of the highest awards in this program. Friends of Pathways helped assist the Town with the successful application."

"In addition to the WY-22 good news, Grand Teton National Park received the news it has been awarded a new $2,930,000 grant for pathways phase III. This will connect the Moose area with a new Pathway up to Antelope Flats Junction north of Moose. This opens up the quiet east side of the park for visitors to safely enjoy the views, wildlife viewing, and the historic sites, when starting from Dornan's or Moose. The new pathway will extend directly from the pathway now being constructed south of Moose."

"Friends of Pathways helped bring the grant possibility to the attention of park officials, and congratulates the park staff on the successful application. The funds are from a program called a Public Land Highway Discretionary Program..."

Source: http://bit.ly/olPbWI

LA CROSSE FIRST WISCONSIN CITY TO ADOPT COMPLETE STREETS ORDINANCE

-> According to an Aug. 12th Tribune article, "La Crosse has become the first Wisconsin city to adopt a 'complete streets' ordinance for pedestrian and bicycle use. The move, unanimously approved Thursday by the Common Council, means the city will consider ways to better accommodate walking or biking, as well as stormwater control."

"The city already has begun marking bike lanes on some routes. But most of the changes under the new Green Complete Streets ordinance will be phased in as major street repairs are done, said Dale Hexom, city public works director. 'It's not something, obviously, that's going to happen overnight,' Hexom said..."

Source: http://bit.ly/omjJK4
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: No
Title: "City to have 'complete streets'"
Author: Staff

Via the National Complete Streets Coalition E-Newsletter: http://bit.ly/oxIItW

LET CITIES LOWER SPEEDS WITHOUT RED TAPE

-> In an Aug. 1st Seattle Times column, Alan Durning wrote, "On Thursday afternoon, I got a pit in my stomach when I found strings of yellow police tape blocking the bike commute on Seattle's Dexter Avenue. I learned over the hours that followed, with all of Seattle, that an SUV had struck and fatally injured Michael Wang, a PATH photographer of my age, in his forties. Wang had been riding in the Dexter bike lane at Thomas Street when the SUV sped across traffic, slammed into him and fled. Such calamities are far too common. In 2009, traffic collisions killed 1,095 people -- including 106 pedestrians and cyclists - in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Car crashes are the No. 1 cause of death among American children and young adults, and the group of pedestrians most in jeopardy is seniors."

"In almost all of these deaths, speed is a critical variable. Some 91 percent of 2009 Northwest traffic deaths occurred on streets with speed limits of 30 mph, like Dexter, or higher. Yet for all that cities try to improve street safety, with cross walks, signals and traffic circles, state law binds them in red tape if they want to do the simplest thing: lower speed limits. Olympia dictates speed limits for each category of city roadway. Localities cannot lower speeds without first extensive and expensive speed and engineering studies. That's right: Costly studies are required just to make commonsense safety improvements. The rest of the Northwest trusts its localities more than we do. In June, Oregon passed a law giving cities discretion to reduce speed to 20 mph on residential roadways..."

Source: http://bit.ly/pqdo39
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: No
Title: "In wake of cyclist's death, let cities lower speeds without red tape"
Author: Alan Durning

Via Daily Sightline: http://bit.ly/qNCPnk

HOBOKEN (NJ) CITY COUNCIL VOTES TO ADD 10 MILES OF BIKE LANES

-> In an Aug. 25th Mobilizing the Region blog entry, Janna Chernetz wrote "The ordinance amendment provides for on-street bike lanes on segments of Hudson Street, Garden Street, Park Avenue, Willow Avenue, Clinton Street, Adams Street, Jefferson Street, Monroe Street, Jackson Street, Harrison Street, Newark Street, 2nd Street and 11th Street. According to spokesman Juan Melli, separate from this ordinance, Hoboken will also paint an additional 9.7 miles of shared-road markings on narrower streets that cannot accommodate a striped bike lane. In addition, Hoboken intends to create a two-way protected 0.43-mile bike lane along Observer Highway as part of a complete street redesign scheduled for next year. 'We are taking a big leap towards making Hoboken truly bike friendly,' said Mayor Dawn Zimmer. 'By slowing down traffic, bike lanes make streets safer for everyone including drivers and pedestrians, and this lays an even stronger foundation for our ongoing pedestrian safety efforts.'..."

Source: http://bit.ly/ozi5te

NPS PROPOSES BOSTON & CHARLESTOWN PATHS TO HISTORIC SITES

-> According to an Aug. 12th Charlestown Patch article, "The National Parks Service is seeking an endorsement from the City Council for the plan. If a Parks Service proposal is approved, it might be easier for visitors to get from the North End to the Navy Yard along Boston's Freedom Trail -- by foot or by bike."

"Essentially, the National Parks has pitched the idea of a pedestrian and bicycle path from MBTA stations to National Parks sites in downtown Boston and Charlestown, according to records from the City Council's Aug. 3 meeting. With the City Council's approval, the Transportation Department could begin planning these pathways."

"The department would use some $450,000 from the Parks Service to evaluate how the city could make sidewalks, roads and bridges more suitable to walking and bicycling, said Sean Hennessey, a spokesman for the National Park Service in Boston..."

Source: http://bit.ly/qu1XFm
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: No
Title: "Parks Officials Propose More Paths from T Stops to Historic Sites"
Author: Amanda Kersey

Via StreetHeadlines: http://bit.ly/ncBMlJ

PHILLY'S FIRST GREEN BIKE LANE APPEARS ON THE SCENE

-> According to an Aug. 22nd Bicycle Coalition blog entry, "Philadelphia, the city with the largest percentage of bike commuters among large American cities, is joining its peer cities by installing its first green bike lane! We spotted green paint going down on the Ben Franklin Parkway's new outer roadway bike lanes late this afternoon. These new lanes are part of the Parkway re-construction that the Department of Parks and Recreation formally announced in 2010. The construction project is improving the 2000-2200 blocks of the Parkway for pedestrians and cyclists, as reported back in July. The Bicycle Coalition worked with DPR and the Streets Department to improve the transition zone to help cyclists move across 20th Street safely over to the outer roadway, which will be made as part of this construction project..."

Source: http://bit.ly/oQvhgD


THE RESEARCH BEAT

CYCLING TO WORK CAN ADD 5 YRS IF YOU PEDAL HARD & AVOID CRASHES

-> According to an Aug. 30th Daily Mail article, "Taking intense exercise helps you live longer than if you choose long periods of gentler activity, research shows. A study found fast cyclists lived up to five years longer than those who cycled at a slower pace -- and the speed was more important than the duration. The 20-year study, involving 5,000 healthy people who cycled every day, found men who cycled quickly survived 5.3 years longer than those cycling the most slowly."

"Men pedaling at an average pace lived 2.9 years longer. Among women, fast cyclists lived 3.9 years and average speed cyclists 2.2 years longer than those in the slow lane. Fast cyclists who spent no more than an hour a day on a bike had the best chance of avoiding premature death from any cause, the Copenhagen City Heart Study found. Dr Peter Schnohr, who led the research at Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, said: 'This study suggests that a greater part of the daily physical activity in leisure time should be vigorous, based on the individual's own perception of intensity...'"

Source: http://bit.ly/nFhVAt
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: No
Title: "Cycling to work can add five years to your life... but only if you pedal hard (and avoid crashing)"
Author: Jessica Satherley and Jenny Hope


QUOTES R US

"For a child, having increasing opportunities to navigate the world around them, explore, invent, fall down, scrape knees, make decisions, screw up, get into - and solve -- conflicts and, ultimately, achieve a sense of personal identity and self-sufficiency is a good thing. The right thing. But you can't do it easily just anywhere. Place matters. It matters in the design of the streets and the things they connect to. It matters in the variety of uses, opportunities and activities. It even matters in the diversity of housing types. After all, smaller homes or accessory units end up housing people who appreciate, and want to be able to afford, the prospect of being a stay-at-home parent..."

-- Scott Doyon, PlacesShakers and NewsMakers http://bit.ly/rqEjzj
Via "The Popsicle and Halloween Tests: What Makes a Place Livable?" by Kaid Benfield (NRDC) in the Atlantic: http://bit.ly/o3Dah6


STATS R US

DRIVING HABITS CHANGING AMONG YOUNGER AMERICANS

-> Referring to the 2001 and 2008 National Household Transportation Survey, Clark Williams-Derry of the Sightline Institute wrote, "Among older folks, driving didn't change that much between the two studies. But among younger Americans, driving habits changed radically: folks between the ages of 20 and 40 drove far less in 2008 than their counterparts did in 2001. This is perhaps the most compelling piece of evidence I've seen suggesting that there's been a profound generational shift in America's driving habits...'"

http://bit.ly/nWLUfl

THE GAP IN TRANSIT ACCESS FOR MANY ZERO-VEHICLE HOUSEHOLDS

-> According to an article in the Aug. 18th Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program Update, "Over 90 percent of zero-vehicle households in large metropolitan areas live in neighborhoods with access to transit service of some kind. This greatly exceeds the 68 percent coverage rate for households with a vehicle, suggesting transit service aligns with households who rely on it most. However, some 700,000 zero-vehicle households in the 100 largest metro areas lack access to transit...."

Source: http://bit.ly/qlQ9ae


AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

PEDAL-POWERED SCHOOL BUS CUTS KIDS' CALORIES

-> According to a June 29th WIRED article, "In Berlin, Germany, you can regularly see toddlers being loaded into trolleys, four or more to a cart, and dragged by long-suffering teachers from school to -- well, to where I don't know, as I would always try to avoid the brats. But these kiddie convoys would go a lot easier if the Germans would import this pedal-powered school bus from their neighbors up in the Netherlands."

"Made by De Cafe Racer, this child-powered school bus is just the thing to save teachers' backs, help the the environment and wear out hyperactive rugrats. It even comes in school-bus yellow, although if they even have school buses in the Netherlands I doubt they are yellow..."

Source: http://bit.ly/qQC06o
Archive search: use "Search" window
Archive cost: No
Title: "Pedal-Powered School Bus Cuts Kids' Calories"
Author: Charlie Sorrel


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS

"Funding, Organizing and Maintaining Bicycle Fleets"

Date: September 14, 2011, 1:00 p.m to 2:00 p.m. EDT

Presenters: Jessica Binder, Bicycle Federation of Wisconsin; Shane MacRhodes, Eugene 4J School District; Mallory Burda, Specialized Bicycle Dealer Grant Program.

Host: SRTSNP & the SRAM Cycling Fund

Cost: None

Details & registration: http://bit.ly/qCR9Rf

Contact: Dave Cowan SRTSNP <dave@saferoutespartnership.org>

"Making the Case for Trails in Tight Economic Times"

Date: September 22, 2011, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. PDT

Presenters: Robert M. Searns, American Trails; Jim Wood, Florida State Parks & Amy Camp, The Progress Fund

Host: AmericanTrails.org

Cost: $25 American Trails members, $45 non-members

Details & registration: http://bit.ly/oKR54R

Contact: American Trails <trailhead@americantrails.org> or or phone: (530) 547-2060


RESOURCES

-> "A GUIDE TO FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER TRAIL BRIDGES"
Report by Groenier, Eriksson, Kosmalkski, USDA Forest Service Technology and Development Pgm, Missoula MT; 7E72H69-FHWA. July 2006, revised May 2011 (General info & link to 39.3MB pdf)
http://bit.ly/oMJQCx

-> "NEIGHBOURHOOD PLANNING TOOLKITS AND GUIDANCE"
A wealth of resources on neighborhood planning collected by the UK Design Council CABE from the LinkedIn Neighbourhood planning group. August 26, 2011 (list and links to resources)
http://bit.ly/nsE1Wp
Via the Design Council CABE Newsletter: http://bit.ly/nt0Hs1

-> "PEDESTRIAN FORUM"
Newsletter from the Office of Safety, FHWA, Vol 55. Summer 2011 (General info & link to 768KB pdf)
http://bit.ly/oE505A

-> "PEDESTRIAN COUNTERMEASURE POLICY BEST PRACTICE"
Report by FHWA Safety Program; FHWA-SA-11-017. 2011 (Summary & link to 529KB pdf)
http://bit.ly/ory9zj

-> "STATE BEST PRACTICE POLICY FOR SHOULDERS AND WALKWAYS"
Report by FHWA Safety Program; FHWA-SA-11-018. 2011 (Summary & link to 389KB pdf)
http://bit.ly/qWvBCy

-> "STATE BEST PRACTICE POLICY FOR MEDIANS"
Report by FHWA Safety Program; FHWA-SA-11-019. 2011 (Summary & link to 399KB pdf)
http://bit.ly/rcyuEt

-> "ASSESSING WHETHER QUIET ELECTRIC AND HYBRID VEHICLES..."
"...Pose a Safety Risk to the Vision Impaired;" report by Morgan, Morris, Keigan & Muirhead (Transport Research Laboratory); for the UK Dept. of Transport; PPR525. 2010 (General info & link to 2.5MB pdf; free registration to TRB website)
http://bit.ly/pDAwQ9

-> "GUIDE TO SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION PERFORMANCE MEASURES"
Report by by ICF International; for the US EPA; EPA 231-K-10-004. August 2011 (general info & link to 2.7MB pdf)
http://bit.ly/q7OEL2

-> "THE WALKING SCHOOL BUS AND CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY..."
"...A Pilot Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial;" article by Mendoza, Watson, Baranowski, Nicklas, Uscanga & Hanfling; Pediatrics, (doi: 10.1542/peds.2010-3486). August 22, 2011 (abstract and link to article ($))
http://bit.ly/q1uUmt

-> "EFFECT OF 20 MPH TRAFFIC SPEED ZONES ON ROAD INJURIES IN..."
"...London, 1986-2006: Controlled Interrupted Time Series Analysis;" article by Grundy, Steinbach, Edwards, Green, Armstrong, & Wilkinson (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine); BMJ 2009; 339:b4469. September 14, 2009 (194KB pdf)
http://bit.ly/qpR64f

Via 8-80 Cities Newsletter: http://bit.ly/ocdxwN

-> "THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTERISTICS AND..."
"...Body Size and Physical Activity in the California Teachers Study Cohort;" article by Keegan, Hurley, Goldberg, Nelson, Reynolds, Horn-Ross & Gomez (Cancer Prevention Inst of CA), Bernstein (City of Hope); American Journal of Public Health, 10.2105/AJPH.2011.300150. August 18, 2011 (Abstract & link to article ($))
http://bit.ly/pHTo4V

-> "TRAFFIC GRIDLOCK: THE REAL DEAL OR A PILE OF NONSENSE?"
Report by Dr. Barry Wellar, University of Ottawa; SlideShare. July 28, 2011 (Online presentation)
http://slidesha.re/nCLZxy

-> "ACTIVE TRAVEL IN GERMANY AND THE U.S., CONTRIBUTIONS OF DAILY..."
"...Walking and Cycling to Physical Activity"; article by Buehler (Virginia Tech), Pucher (Rutgers University), Merom & Bauman (University of Sydney); Am J Prev Med 2011;41(3):241-250. 2011 (Abstract & link to full article ($))
http://bit.ly/nCF6Ub

-> "SIDEWALKS PROMOTE WALKING"
Fact sheet from RITA/USDOT. 2011 (Summary & link to 87KB pdf)
http://1.usa.gov/nd5yAt

-> "PROJECT DEVELOPMENT PROCESS MANUAL"
Revised manual by the Texas Department of Transportation. June 2009 (1.3MB pdf)
http://bit.ly/oLKnm2
Via July 19, 2011 issue of Public Roads: http://1.usa.gov/r7xjjB

-> "VOLUME 2198; 2010; TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH RECORD: JOURNAL..."
"...of The Transportation Research Board;" includes 10 pedestrian/bicycle articles; ISSN; 0361-1981. February 04, 2011 (list of articles & links to free pdfs):
-- "Incorporating Bicycle and Pedestrian Topics in University Transportation Courses"
-- "Empirical Bayesian Evaluation of Safety Effects of High-Visibility School (Yellow) Crosswalks in San Francisco, California"
-- "Safety Effectiveness of Leading Pedestrian Intervals Evaluated by a Before-After Study with Comparison Groups"
-- "Driver and Pedestrian Behavior at Uncontrolled Crosswalks in Tahoe Basin Recreation Area of California"
-- "Relationships and Characteristics of Pedestrian Traffic Flow in Confined Passageways"
-- "Association Between Roadway Intersection Characteristics and Pedestrian Crash Risk in Alameda County, California"
-- "Automated Analysis of Pedestrian-Vehicle Conflicts Context for Before-and-After Studies"
-- "Pedestrian Safety Prediction Methodology for Urban Signalized Intersections"
-- "Development and Implementation of a Vehicle-Pedestrian Conflict Analysis Method Adaptation of a Vehicle-Vehicle Technique"
-- "Real-Time System for Tracking and Classification of Pedestrians and Bicycles"
Source: http://bit.ly/qQr6vJ

Via CMAP Weekly Update: http://bit.ly/nUN9rj


CALENDAR

Additional training opportunities are available on the National Center for Bicycling & Walking web site. Add your own items to the on-line calendar...it's quick and easy. Please be sure your calendar items pertain to training and workshops in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields. Go to:
http://www.bikewalk.org/calendar.php

HEY, YOU! SEND US YOUR CALENDAR ITEMS -- PRONTO!

-> August 30-September 1, 2011, TRB's Emerging Issues in Safe and Sustainable Mobility for Older People conference, Washington DC. Info: (Early Bird registration expires July 15).
http://tinyurl.com/6a4t3tg

-> September 7, 2011, Place Matters National Conference, Washington DC. Info: CommonHealth Action, Barbara Kershaw email: <bkershaw@commonhealthaction.org>
http://tinyurl.com/3tba9t6

-> September 7-8, 2011, Conference on Performance Measures for Transportation and Livability, Austin TX. Info: Tara Ramani, Conference Coordinator <t-ramani@ttimail.tamu.edu>; Katie Turnbull, Conference Planning Committee Chair <k-turnbull@tamu.edu>
http://tinyurl.com/4pgecsl

-> September 17-18, 2011, Wheels in Motion, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Info: <TomT@bicyclensw.org.au>
http://tinyurl.com/4hvsphq

-> September 18-21, 2011, the Asia-Pacific Cycle Congress, Brisbane, Australia. Info: State of Queensland (Department of Transport and Main Road; email: <info@cyclecongress.com>
http://tinyurl.com/4sacgf3

-> September 22-23, 2011, 4th International Urban Design Conference, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. Info: Sarah Hoekwater, Conference Secretariat, PO Box 29, Nerang QLD, 4211, Australia; phone: +61 7 5502 2068, fax: +61 7 5527 3298, email: <conference@urbandesignaustralia.com.au>
http://tinyurl.com/7z6ukf

-> September 23-24, 2011, Finger Lakes Trails & Greenways Conference: Connecting Communities, Promoting Health, And Strengthening Local Economies, Ithaca, NY. Info: Parks & Trails New York, phone: (518) 434-1583; fax: (518) 427-0067; email: <ptny@ptny.org>
http://bit.ly/nAXLv5

-> October 2-5, 2011, 5th Mid America Trails and Greenways Conference, Fort Wayne, IN. Info: Amy Hartzog, City of Fort Wayne, phone: (260) 427-6228; email: <amy.hartzog@cityoffortwayne.org>
http://tinyurl.com/4cofdy7

-> October 12, 2011, Moving Together: Advancing Healthy Transportation with GreenDOT Boston, MA. Info: The Baystate Roads Program, phone: (413) 545-5403, fax: (413) 545-6471, email: <info@baystateroads.org>
http://bit.ly/o4Thtj

-> October 14, 2011, Delaware Bike Summit, Lewes, DE Info: Randi Novakoff, Outreach Manager, Wilmington Area Planning Council phone: (302) 737-6205 ext. 111; email: <rnovakoff@wilmapco.org>
http://tinyurl.com/3w3wk25

-> October 14-16, 2011, Winning Campaigns Training, Los Angeles, CA. Info: Alliance for Biking & Walking, Carolyn Szczepanski, Communications Coordinator, email: <carolyn@peoplepoweredmovement.org>
http://tinyurl.com/4xbdz4g

-> October 22-24, 2011, EcoMobility Changwon 2011/World Congress on Mobility for the Future of Sustainable Cities, Changwon, Republic of Korea. Info:
http://bit.ly/oEti5J

-> October 24, 2011, Workshop: Smart Trips: How to Encourage Travel Options, Charlotte, N.C. Info: Debra Goeks, the Assn of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, phone: (262) 228-7025; email: <info@apbp.org>
http://bit.ly/oT0Wxr

-> October 24, 2011, Workshop: Designing for All Ages: Healthy Living in Place, Charlotte, N.C. Info: Debra Goeks, the Assn of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, phone: (262) 228-7025; email: <info@apbp.org>
http://bit.ly/oLsPAR

-> October 24, 2011, Workshop: Toward Zero Deaths: What Does TZD Mean for Bike/Ped Professionals? Charlotte, N.C. Info: Debra Goeks, the Assn of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, phone: (262) 228-7025; email: <info@apbp.org>
http://bit.ly/nkHs1e

-> October 24, 2011, Mobile Tour of Greenville and Spartanburg SC: Greenville's Evolution from Mill Town to Vibrant Village, Charlotte, N.C. Info: Debra Goeks, the Assn of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, phone: (262) 228-7025; email: <info@apbp.org>
http://bit.ly/pGaxwn

-> October 24, 2011, Mobile Tour of Davidson NC: Small Town, Big Reputation: What Does Livability Look Like in Davidson? Info: Debra Goeks, the Assn of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, phone: (262) 228-7025; email: <info@apbp.org>
http://bit.ly/r7rMwl

-> October 25-27, 2011, Using Census Data for Transportation Applications Conference, Irvine, California. Info: Transportation Research Board, Thomas M. Palmerlee, <TPalmerlee@nas.edu>
http://tinyurl.com/676ngsa

-> October 27-28, 2011, How to Turn a Place Around, New York, NY. Info: Casey Wang, Project for Public Spaces, email: <cwang@pps.org>
http://bit.ly/nfkAdi

-> October 29 - November 2, 2011, APHA Annual Meeting - Health Communities Promote Healthy Minds & Bodies, Washington, DC. Info: Eloisa Raynault, Transportation, Health & Equity Pgm Mgr, APHA, 800 I St NW, Washington, DC 20001, phone: (202) 777-2487; email: <eloisa.raynault@apha.org>
http://bit.ly/ogkWJt

-> November 3-4, 2011, Placemaking: Making it Happen, New York, NY. Info: Casey Wang, Project for Public Spaces, email: <cwang@pps.org>
http://bit.ly/oe9kJU

-> November 4-6, 2011, Winning Campaigns Training, Columbia, SC, Info: Alliance for Biking & Walking, Carolyn Szczepanski, Communications Coordinator, email: <carolyn@peoplepoweredmovement.org>
http://tinyurl.com/3hmtuuv

-> November 10-11, 2011, Streets as Places, New York, NY. Info: Casey Wang, Project for Public Spaces, email: <cwang@pps.org>
http://bit.ly/psLr4N

-> January 22-26, 2012, TRB 91st Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C. Info:
http://tinyurl.com/4vk6jw8

-> April 16-19, 2012, NARRP Annual Conference, Baton Rouge, LA. Info: Jennifer Heisey: phone: (318) 793-9427, email: <heis0068@umn.edu> or Rick Just: phone: (208) 514-2480, email: <rick.just@idpr.idaho.gov>
http://bit.ly/pVVUOV

-> June 24-27, 2012, 4th Urban Street Symposium, Chicago, IL. Info:
http://bit.ly/mQHvBT
Via TRB E-Newsletter: http://bit.ly/n63f0Z

-> September 10-13, 2012, Pro Walk/Pro Bike® 2012 Long Beach, California, produced by the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, and Project for Public Spaces: email Mark Plotz, mark@bikewalk.org


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS

Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks!

-> JOB -- ENGINEERING PROJECT MANAGER -- BOULDER (CO)

Posting Start Date: 08/19/11 12:00 AM Mountain Time
Posting End Date: 09/09/11 11:59 PM Mountain Time

Pay Grade: MGMT-G
Hiring Range: $69,250 to $83,120 (DOQ)
Salary: $69,250.00 - $110,800.00 Annually

Position End Date: N/A
Work Schedule: M-F, 8 to 5; Salaried position - above 40 hours per week is not compensated and may be required.
Job Type: Full-Time
Location: Park Central Building, 1739 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado
Department: Public Works

Under general supervision, to coordinate all phases of assigned Transportation Capital Improvement Projects (CIP), and capital maintenance projects and to perform related duties as required.

Details: http://1.usa.gov/nfnC1t

-> JOB -- BIKE, PEDESTRIAN COORDINATOR -- CITY OF MINNEAPOLIS

The City of Minneapolis is hiring a Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator to lead the Bicycle and Pedestrian Programs. This position is housed within the Public Works Department and will assist in all aspects of transportation planning related to regional and citywide transportation projects, including city analyses, review, and approvals with regards to bicycle and pedestrian programs and systems.

The position will remain open for applicants through Wednesday, August 31st. Read the full job description (http://bit.ly/nvrHEN)and apply online (http://bit.ly/qpyLII)

-> JOB -- DEV & COMMUNICATIONS MGR -- LOCAL MOTION, BURLINGTON VT

Local Motion is hiring a Development & Communications Manager, who will work closely with the Executive Director to plan, manage, and execute a wide range of fundraising activities. He/She will be responsible for our e-Newsletter, Member Bulletins, mailings, Facebook, Blog, and Twitter posts. We're looking for someone with at least 3 years of fundraising experience, passion for bike/ped issues and great writing skills.

Local Motion is a Greater Burlington, VT, non-profit promoting people-powered transportation and recreation for healthy and sustainable Vermont communities. Founded in 1999, our membership organization is going through an exciting growth phase as we expand our popular initiatives such as the Safe Streets Collaborative, Bicycle Recycle Vermont, trail development, bike ferry service, our Trailside Center, online Trail Finder, and many outreach events. Building an active culture of bicycling and walking in Northwestern Vermont is the unifying passion of our 9 year-round and many seasonal employees, our 15-member Board and our 1,100+ area members. We are the largest bike/ped advocacy and education organization in the country for a region of this size, have a great deal of visibility, and are highly regarded in the community.

Details: http://bit.ly/oKHJDQ

-> INTERNSHIPS -- BOSTON CYCLISTS UNION -- BOSTON, MA

We are looking for reliable individuals to help us grow our membership and programs. Come build your skills with us and enjoy the Fall on two wheels!

Internships available:

Member Services Intern - This intern will help manage and recruit new members of the union, work with volunteers to plan and organize fundraising house parties all over Boston, and table at bike events and farmer's markets. The ideal candidate will have event planning, sales, or other related experience and have strong communication skills and be comfortable talking with new people.

Communications Intern - This intern will assist in growing BCU's online presence via website, Facebook, Twitter, and Google calendar. May also be asked to edit and/or write articles for The Union Rider, the Union's monthly e-newsletter. Familiarity with social media is a plus. Writing, editing, photography or video experience is preferred.

Graphic/Web design and Outreach Intern - The Graphic/Web design Intern will help maintain and improve bostoncyclistsunion.org, create flyers for upcoming events, help distribute and coordinate Outreach efforts, event promotions, and new publications. Strong InDesign skills and a good eye required. Web design and GIS skills helpful but not necessary.

Details: http://bit.ly/pDeOlP

-> JOB -- EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR -- BIKE FLORIDA

The Executive Director is responsible for developing, promoting and managing a wide range of bicycle safety programs and bicycle rides designed to fulfill BIKE FLORIDA's mission to promote biking and trail use in order to create a more active, safer, cleaner and healthier Florida. The Executive Director is responsible for all full and part-time staff, personnel issues, recruitment and supervision of volunteers and student interns.

Specific duties include oversight of all programs, projects, mini-grants and events of BIKE FLORIDA. This includes, but is not limited to, a marketing and promotion plan of the annual week-long spring bicycle ride event, the Share the Road license plate, St. John's River-to-Sea Loop (SJR2C) tours, the Spinning the Florida Trails DVD series, Safety Tips and Group Riding Techniques, and the safety education program coordinated with the Florida Traffic and Bicycle Safety Education Program (FTBSEP).

For further information regarding this position email <BikeFloridaBoard@aol.com> or call Leigh at (386) 736-1202 (home) or (386) 747-2590 (mobile).

Details: http://tinyurl.com/68yldxg

-> JOBS & INTERNSHIPS -- MISC. POSITIONS -- SAN FRANCISCO BICYCLE COAL.

Jobs:
* Communications Director

Internships:
* Social Media Internship
* Grassroots Organizing
* Communications Internship
* Graphic Design Internship
* Bicycle Advocacy Intern

Source: http://tinyurl.com/machp3

-> JOB -- MULTIPLE POSITIONS -- ACTIVE TRANS ALLIANCE, CHICAGO

If you have a passion for bicycling and a strong desire to effect change for bicyclists in and around Chicago, then the Active Transportation Alliance might be the perfect place for you.

Current vacancies:
--- Communications Internship
--- Photography Internship
--- Graphic Design Internship
--- Marketing Communication Internship
--- Event Marketing Internship
--- Better Blocks Youth Summer Internship
--- High School Transportation Program Instructor
--- Planning/GIS Intership

Details: http://tinyurl.com/3azq84d


HOUSEKEEPING

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http://www.bikewalk.org/newsletterarchives.php

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND CALENDAR ITEMS: We want to hear what you're up to! Contact <john@bikewalk.org> today!

List your local, statewide, and regional training events on NCBW's National Training Calendar:
http://www.bikewalk.org/calendar.php

COPYING: We encourage you to copy our content as long as you identify the source in this way: "from CenterLines, the e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking."

Contributors: John Williams, Mark Plotz, Jimmy Johnston, Linda Tracy, Russell Houston, Harrison Marshall, Christopher Douwes, Charles Bingham, Ken Wuschke, Bob Laurie, John Cinatl, Tim Young, Judi Wallace, Jay Mendoza, Deb Hubsmith, John Pucher, Carolyn Szczepanski, William Hanson, Charlene Wallace, Debra Goeks, and Clifton Chenier.

Editor: John Williams
Send news items to: <john@bikewalk.org>
Executive Editor and Program Director: Mark Plotz, MPA


CONTACT US

©2011 - NCBW | The National Center for Bicycling & Walking is a program of Project for Public Spaces, Inc. http://www.bikewalk.org/contact.php