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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#361 Wednesday, July 16, 2014

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- How Low-Income Commuters View Cycling
----- FHWA FAQs Re Health in Transportation
----- Evolution to Protected Bike Lanes
----- Add to National Inventory of Protected Bike Lanes
----- Toronto (Canada): Additions to Active Transportation Benefits Video Series
----- Bike Parking Overtakes Auto Parking in Some Places
----- RTC Developing Trail Modeling Assessment Tools
----- 6-Min Video History of How the Dutch Became a Cycling Nation

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- CT Town-by-Town Bike & Walk-Friendly Scorecard
----- DC is the world's most walking city (among people with iPhones)
----- Oregon to Pilot Vehicle Miles Traveled Fee in Lieu of Gas Tax
----- Pittsburgh (PA) Begins 3 Protected Bike Lane Projects
----- Arlington (VA): Success of Demand-side Transportation Strategies
----- Boulder (CO) Eco Totem & Cyclists Green Wave
----- 170-Mile NJ Shore Bike Route Showcases Sandy Recovery

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Evaluation of Green Lanes/Protected Bike Lanes
----- Smart Growth Policies' Effect on Travel Demand
----- Recommended Bicycle Lane Widths for Various Roadway Characteristics
----- Ped & Bike Data Collection Methods in Oregon
----- Air Toxins from Motor Vehicles & Distance from Highways
----- Lack of exercise, Not Diet, Linked to Rise in Obesity

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Paying for Innovative OnStreet Bike Infrastructure
----- AARP Resources for Livable and Age-Friendly Communities
----- Collaborations between Safe Routes to School & School Busing
----- Recommendations for Modeling & Data Collection to Improve Active Transportation 
----- Uncontrolled Ped Crossings Assessment & Design Guide
----- 2 Rural Safe Routes to School Resources + Wellness Policy & General Plan Language
----- Guidelines for Road Diet Conversions

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National & International Scene
- Regional and Local Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Stats R Us
- Webinars, Webcasts and Seminars
- Resources
- Calendar
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

HOW LOW-INCOME COMMUTERS VIEW CYCLING

-> According to a July 15th CityLab article, "...American Community Survey data show that D.C. bicycle commuting increased an astounding 208 percent between 2000 and 2012. Yet biking to work is far less common in the lower-income areas east of the Anacostia River. Despite the recent additions of substantial cycling infrastructure, many mobility challenges remain.

"Our research examines mobility barriers, perceived or real, among low-income residents in Washington.  As cyclists ourselves, our initial study aimed to help the Washington Area Bicyclist Association plan its advocacy in D.C.'s Wards 7 and 8—areas that are more than 94 percent African-American, and with above-average poverty. With a $29 budget and a team of American University students, we surveyed more than 260 commuters in two surveys in 2012 and 2013. Below are three of our key findings.

  • "Poor respondents spend more time commuting...
  • "Most people, poor and non-poor alike, still want cars...
  • "Cycling just isn't popular among the urban poor (yet)..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1jwnLfR
Title & Author: "How Low-Income Commuters View Cycling" by Eve Bratman & Adam Jadhav

FHWA FAQS RE HEALTH IN TRANSPORTATION

-> According to a July 10th Human Environment Digest article, "The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Office of Planning, Environment, & Realty posted 'Frequently Asked Questions' about Health in Transportation (http://1.usa.gov/1gojXWl). The FAQ addresses a variety of health-related transportation topics, including what opportunities exist to address health through transportation and how health effects are addressed through Federal actions."

Source: http://1.usa.gov/1jOL05x
Title & Author: "FHWA Posts Health in Transportation FAQ" by Staff

EVOLUTION TO PROTECTED BIKE LANES

-> According to a July 9th On the Commons article, "'Over the past five years we're seeing an infrastructure revolution, a rethinking of our streets to accommodate more users—busways, public plazas, space for pedestrians and, of course, bike lanes,' says David Vega-Barachowitz of the National Association of City Transportation Officials. 'More protected bike lanes is one of the most important parts of this.'

"Protected bike lanes separate people on bikes from rushing traffic with concrete curbs, plastic bollards or other means— and sometimes offer additional safety measures such as special bike traffic lights and painted crossings at intersections.  Protected bike lanes help riders feel less exposed to danger, and are also appreciated by drivers and pedestrians, who know where to expect bicycles. Streets work better when everyone has a clearly defined space... Protected lanes have recently popped up in more than 30 communities across the U.S. from Munhall, Pennsylvania, to Temple City, California, with many additional projects set to open later this year..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1snfmyl
Title & Author: "How to Inspire Millions More People to Bike: Bike lanes of the future can be seen on the streets right now" by Jay Walljasper

[See also Protected Bike Lane Inventory item below and Evaluation in Research Section later in this issue.]

ADD TO NATIONAL INVENTORY OF PROTECTED BIKE LANES

-> According to a July 11th People for Bikes post, "One of the most-used resources on this website is the one we started building first: an inventory of every protected bike lane in the United States and Canada (http://bit.ly/1rftidv). We hope. This month, we're updating it, and we want to make sure it's as complete as possible. For that, we need your help. Check out the Google spreadsheet and see if it includes the protected lanes you know of. If it doesn't, or if the information is wrong, send a note to maryam@peopleforbikes.org with your corrections, additions or tips...

"As part of the Green Lane Project's newly revised style guide (http://bit.ly/1zHowb4), we've spelled out a protected bike lane's three characteristics:
1. Physical separation. ... some sort of physical, stationary, vertical element between moving motor vehicle traffic and the bike lane... Paint alone does not create a protected bike lane.
2. Exclusively for people on bikes. ... define and allocate space exclusively for people on bikes, not shared with pedestrians or motorized traffic except for brief mixing zones where necessary and at intersections....
3. On or adjacent to the roadway. ... part of the street grid... may be separated from the road by landscaping or other features, but it runs parallel and proximate to the roadway..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1r38yEa
Title & Author: "Tech Talk: Is Our Inventory of Protected Bike Lanes Missing Yours?" By Michael Andersen

TORONTO (CANADA): ADDITIONS TO ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION BENEFITS VIDEO SERIES

-> According to a July 15th email message from Nancy Smith Lea of the Toronto Centre for Active Transportation, "Today, TCAT releases the eighth video in the It`s Your Move series featuring Vito Tolone, Senior Transportation Planner at the City of Burlington. (http://bit.ly/1lPwGcb. See all 8 videos posted to date: http://bit.ly/1qenYaF)

"This video highlights how Burlington's recent Transportation Master Plan (TMP) update explicitly recognizes that the automobile is not the only way that people travel. The update, called Go Your Way, sets out a 20-year vision for transportation to ensure that the transportation infrastructure, services and operational policies are aligned to accommodate Burlington's expected growth. To achieve this, the plan is focused on creating a balanced and accessible transportation system for all modes of travel including transit, cyclists, pedestrians and automobiles..."

BIKE PARKING OVERTAKES AUTO PARKING IN SOME PLACES

-> According to a July 9th Mobility Lab article, "... Interestingly, Arlington gives as much attention to bike parking as it does auto parking. As bike ridership numbers rise in D.C. (and nationally), so does the demand for bike parking. The county currently requires developers of site-plan buildings to construct one bike parking space per 2.5 residential units. John Durham, transportation demand management planner for Arlington County Commuter Services (ACCS), believes that number may be too low because 50 percent of all households in the county own at least one bicycle.

"Not only are quality bicycle-parking facilities an effective way to encourage and influence bicycle-ridership numbers, but they also are a more efficient use of land and maximize resources. One automobile parking space can accommodate 10 bikes, according to Durham.

"Mounting research suggests that bike facilities pay off economically to business owners. In D.C., businesses located near Capital Bikeshare stations appear to benefit economically. Similarly, protected bike lanes in New York City have been shown to increase retail sales by 49 percent. Just as Arlington County is focused on moving people instead of cars, some businesses are recognizing that cars don't buy things, people do. Particularly in areas of density with scarce parking generally, it can make sense to provide bike parking as a complement to (or replacement for) car parking. The goal is to maximize foot traffic..."

Source: http://bit.ly/W9kXuR
Title & Author: "Bike Parking Overtakes Auto Parking in Some Places" by Paul Goddin

RTC DEVELOPING TRAIL MODELING ASSESSMENT TOOLS

-> According to a July Fostering Livable Communities Newsletter article, "In 2014, the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy is launching a $1.2 million, three-year initiative to create the next generation of trail planning data collection instruments, methodologies, and analysis tools for trail planners and trail builders in the United States (U.S.). Through the Trail Modeling Assessment Platform (T-MAP), the organization is working with 12 communities across the country to develop and test a suite of analytical models that quantify trail system connectivity, trail demand, and healthcare savings from increased physical activity.

"Over the last 20 years, Federal, State, and local governments have invested billions of dollars to create trails in communities across America, but the full societal benefit has not been assessed and published, due, in part, to limited data availability. The vision for T-MAP is to transform trail development and empower trail planners with robust, evidence-based, and easy-to-use tools that will enable them to manage, prioritize, and advocate for trails.

"The T-MAP models include the following:
1. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) method for measuring trail system connectivity...
2. Demand factoring and forecasting models...
3. Tools that translate trail use into financial savings related to health and transportation impacts..."

Source: http://1.usa.gov/1tQ2p1z
Title & Author: "Rails-to-Trails Conservancy Takes National Trail Development to the Next Level with T-MAP" by Dr. Tracy Hadden Loh

6-MIN VIDEO HISTORY OF HOW THE DUTCH BECAME A CYCLING NATION

-> According to a July 11th City Clock article, "The short video below provides a summary of how the Dutch created a cycling nation. The Dutch cycling nation before WW2 was different. The Netherlands has the most cyclists per-capita in the world.  If you have had a chance to visit, it's hard to miss the vast cycling network no matter where you are in the country.  Many think that cycle paths were always there. That isn't entirely true.  Before World War 2, the network was far less advanced.  Where cycling lanes did exist, they were much more narrow. There were intersections that didn't accommodate cyclists. The network was also not fully connected...."

Source: http://bit.ly/U9vy7u
Title & Author: "Documentary (6 min) – History of how the Dutch made a cycling nation" by @urban_future


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

CT TOWN-BY-TOWN BIKE & WALK-FRIENDLY SCORECARD

-> According to July 16th Bike Walk Connecticut article, "As part of a new 'complete streets' initiative, Bike Walk Connecticut released a first-of-its-kind ranking of the state's cities and towns on how bike- and walk-friendly they are.  Simsbury (1), New Haven (2), New Britain (3), Glastonbury (4), and Middletown (5) claim top honors as the five most bike- and walk-friendly communities. (See full results: http://bit.ly/U9dXwv)

"The scorecard and rankings are based on an online, statewide public opinion survey that ran this spring and was open to anyone who lives or works in Connecticut.  The rankings are also based on municipal leadership and engagement efforts—whether cities or towns have bicycle and pedestrian master plans; citizen task forces or advisory groups; complete streets policies; and whether they have conducted any public outreach efforts related to cycling, walking or complete streets.

"The surveys and scorecard are expected to be conducted annually as part of Bike Walk Connecticut's new five-year initiative to make it safer and easier to walk and bike by implementing "complete streets" in cities and towns across Connecticut.  Complete streets make it easier and safer for people to get around on foot or by bike, so they can be more physically active."

Source: http://bit.ly/1nvk5X5
Title & Author: "The Results are In! How Bike- and Walk-Friendly Is Your Town?: Bike Walk Connecticut Releases First Ever Town-by-Town Scorecard" by Staff

DC IS THE WORLD'S MOST WALKING CITY (AMONG PEOPLE WITH IPHONES

-> According to a July 7th ElevationDC article, "More people in D.C. spend more time walking than in any other city worldwide, a new analysis says. One large caveat: the data was culled from an app called Human (http://bit.ly/1mg89YI, free), which people download to their iPhones and which automatically calculates how much time users spend walking, cycling, running or driving. So it's more accurate to say that D.C. residents with iPhones who have downloaded Human like to walk more than residents of other cities who also have the same app.

"Still, it's striking to see. According to the app's data, D.C. residents spend just under 50 percent of their time walking places, coming in ahead of Berlin, Tokyo, and New York. But as far as cycling goes, we have a long way to go: app users in Amsterdam spent a third of their time on a bike, whereas Washingtonians spend just under 10 percent.

"Read the full rankings (most active, cycling, walking, running, and cars cities): http://bit.ly/1l27cn8."

Source: http://bit.ly/U95Lw9
Title & Author: "DC is the world's most walking city (among people with iPhones)" by Staff

[Ready to make your community more walkable? Come to Pro Walk Pro Bike Pro Place's Walking Institute in Pittsburgh September 8-11. This six-session track will provide information and skills designed to organize, orient and promote walking and local walking advocacy efforts. See details at http://bit.ly/1snAUe7.]

OREGON TO PILOT VEHICLE MILES TRAVELED FEE IN LIEU OF GAS TAX

-> According to a July 12th Washington Post article, "...The Highway Trust Fund, which provides most states with about half of their transportation money, will begin to dry up in the coming months, the Transportation Department recently warned. But even if Congress extends funding, the solution will likely only be temporary... A few alternative ideas have been kicking around for years, but only a handful have been tested in the real world. One of those is a Vehicle Miles Traveled fee, a way to more closely tie road funding to those who use it most and which Oregon has for years been exploring. We caught up with Oregon state Senator Bruce Starr (R)... What follows is an abridged transcript of our conversation about the state's VMT test...

"'In 2001, we passed a bill that basically says the legislature needs to find an alternative to the gas tax... The road-user charge ultimately was the place we settled. We did a couple of pilot programs that we learned a lot from and so just this year we passed a bill that created the next pilot, where we're going to have up to 5,000 vehicles where people will actually pay their road-user charge — pay for their road use via a per-mile charge — as opposed to the fuel tax. I think that the most important piece of this is that we're not building a huge government bureaucracy to accomplish this, we're leaning on the private sector to do it. What we learned in some of our earlier pilots was people were very concerned about Big Brother, about government knowing where they're driving, when they're driving...'"

Source: http://wapo.st/1qf5SFq
Title & Author: "Oregon may have a better way to fund highway projects" by Niraj Chokshi

PITTSBURGH (PA) BEGINS 3 PROTECTED BIKE LANE PROJECTS

-> According to a July 3rd Office of Mayor William Peduto release, "Mayor William Peduto today announced the first phases of the city's new protected bike lane program, to be built in Schenley Park, Greenfield and Downtown. More lanes will follow around the city in partnership with People for Bikes and the Green Lane Project... Penn Avenue traffic Downtown will be changed to inbound-only to accommodate the protected lanes, which will be on the southern (or left) side of the street. Later phases of the Downtown protected lanes are planned to connect to the city's existing trail systems and the Strip District...

"Construction on the Greenfield and Schenley Park lanes will begin first later this month and construction Downtown will follow. Officials from the city's Public Works and Planning departments have met regularly with neighborhood stakeholders in all three parts of the city..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1qf3ajg
Title & Author: "Mayor William Peduto Announces Construction Of Three Protected Bike Lanes: Work on Downtown, Schenley Park and Greenfield lanes to begin this summer" by Staff

ARLINGTON (VA): SUCCESS OF DEMAND-SIDE TRANSPORTATION STRATEGIES

-> According to a July 7th Mobility Lab article, "Two recent headlines really sum it up nicely for Arlington County, Virginia. 'As Arlington Booms, Traffic Drops' was written by Canaan Merchant in Greater Greater Washington and 'The Suburb of the Future is Here – How one city avoided the worst of suburbanization and revealed the path toward sustainable urban development' was by Henry Grabar in Salon.

"They highlight Arlington's ability to remake itself – in little more than a generation – from an aging suburban bedroom community into a thriving urban place that has grown by tens of thousands of residents and workers. All the while, auto-traffic and congestion have been kept at bay because people have adopted transit, walking, and biking as a way of life...The lesser-known part of this good story is the TDM (transportation demand management) strategies that my bureau, Arlington County Commuter Services, has provided over the last 20 years. These have helped ensure that people use the place the way the planners intended..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1mTtbAO
Title & Author: "Demand-side Transportation Strategies Are Secret to Arlington's Success" by Chris Hamilton

[See Streetsblog's Talking Headways Podcast: Good Riddance, "Level of Service" that discusses Arlington's decisions as population grew to change transportation patterns and cause car traffic drop: http://bit.ly/14FXEsW]

BOULDER (CO) ECO TOTEM & CYCLISTS GREEN WAVE

-> According to the July Community Cycles Monthly Update, "An Eco-Totem that counts bicyclists is coming to 13th Street (http://bit.ly/W93GBR). Already installed on 13th is a 'green wave,' which makes traffic signals more friendly to bikes (http://bit.ly/1kuxrCX) traveling on 13th street. 'Every time I rode from the Teahouse up 13th Street, I always hit a light on that tiny uphill at Walnut,' said Community Cycles Development Director Jennifer Shriver. 'Now when I come to Walnut, the light is green and I can keep my momentum!'..."

Source: http://bit.ly/WgwTv2
Title & Author: "New Eco-Totem and Green Wave on 13th Street" by Staff

170-MILE NJ SHORE BIKE ROUTE SHOWCASES SANDY RECOVERY

-> According to a July 11th AASHTO Journal article, "The New Jersey Department of Transportation recently announced a new bike tour route that helps to promote recreation and showcase the towns and businesses that have continued to recover from Superstorm Sandy, which devastated the area in October 2012.

"The new tour route, Explore the Jersey Shore by Bicycle (http://bit.ly/1r3BtIa), extends almost 170 miles along the state's shoreline (and some inland areas) from Cape May to Sandy Hook, split into four segments: Cape May to Somers Point (42 miles long), Somers Point to Tuckerton (45 miles), Tuckerton to Brick (45 miles), and Brick to Sandy Hook (36 miles)...

"According to NJDOT, the state's many bike tour routes, trails, and pathways bring hundreds of bicyclists to the area each year—and economic benefits with them. The newest tour guide joins another 20 or so regional guides that feature rides for cyclists, who can use their smart phones to access touring guide cue sheets and track their route progress in real time. Traditional maps are also available to print from NJDOT's website..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1r3Bmw6
Title & Author: "New Jersey DOT Promotes Bicycling on Restored Jersey Shore with New Tour Route" by Staff


THE RESEARCH BEAT

EVALUATION OF GREEN LANES/PROTECTED BIKE LANES

-> According to a July 7th State Smart Transportation Initiative article, "This report (Lessons from the Green Lanes: Evaluating Protected Bike Lanes in the U.S.: http://bit.ly/1snPJxr) presents findings from research evaluating U.S. protected bicycle lanes (cycle tracks) in terms of their use, perception, benefits, and impacts. The data was analyzed to assess actual behavior of bicyclists and motor vehicle drivers to determine how well each user type understood the design of the facility and to identify potential conflicts between bicyclists, motor vehicles and pedestrians.

"The study found that protected bike lanes encouraged substantial numbers of new bikers to take to the road, largely because they feel safer about doing so. More than half of automobile drivers felt the protected lanes made cyclists more predictable and safer. Residents saw the physically-separated bike lanes as improvements for their neighborhoods as a whole, even if they made it harder to park. And almost 60 percent of residents said the separated bike lanes made their streets work better for everyone."

Source: http://bit.ly/1wuxzYv
Title & Author: "Lessons from the Green Lanes: Evaluating Protected Bike Lanes in the U.S. (National Institute for Transportation and Communities, 2014)" by Staff

SMART GROWTH POLICIES' EFFECT ON TRAVEL DEMAND

-> According to a July 10th Transportation Research Board posting, "TRB's second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2) has released a project brief that provides transportation planning agencies with improved tools and methods to accurately and comprehensively integrate transportation investment decision making with land development and growth management. (Evaluating the Effect of Smart Growth Policies on Travel Demand: http://bit.ly/1mTyOPy)

"The project produced a decision support software tool and online resources to improve communication, interactions, and partnerships between decision makers and planners in both the transportation and land use arenas."

Source: http://bit.ly/1nH9VHn
Title & Author: "Evaluating the Effect of Smart Growth Policies on Travel Demand" by Staff

RECOMMENDED BICYCLE LANE WIDTHS FOR VARIOUS ROADWAY CHARACTERISTICS

-> According to a July 10th Transportation Research Board posting, "TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 766: Recommended Bicycle Lane Widths for Various Roadway Characteristics (http://bit.ly/1mTxQmc) presents an analysis of the research and design guidance for bicycle lane widths on existing travel lane widths and parking lane widths. The conclusions are most applicable to urban and suburban roadways with level grade and a posted speed limit of 30 mph and should be used cautiously for the design of roadways with motor vehicle speeds outside of the range of 25 to 35 mph, and in particular for higher-speed roadways."

Source: http://bit.ly/1mgclYt
Title & Author: "Recommended Bicycle Lane Widths for Various Roadway Characteristics" by Staff

PED & BIKE DATA COLLECTION METHODS IN OREGON

-> According to the abstract of the Design and Implementation of Pedestrian and Bicycle-Specific Data Collection Methods in Oregon published in June, "Although there is a growing need to access accurate and reliable pedestrian and bicycle data, there is no statewide system to collect data or plan future data collection efforts in the state of Oregon. To address these issues this research conducted a comprehensive review of pedestrian and bicycle data collection methods and counting technologies. Oregon data sources were also compiled and AADT estimation techniques were reviewed and applied to Oregon data. A pilot study was conducted to test bicycle and pedestrian counting methods at signalized intersections with 2070 controllers. The report also provides a summary of recommendations regarding factoring methods and the implementation of a statewide non-motorized data collection system."

Source: http://1.usa.gov/1zHKJ8O
Title & Author: "Design and Implementation of Pedestrian and Bicycle-Specific Data Collection Methods in Oregon" by Miguel Figliozzi, Chris Monsere, Krista Nordback, et al.

AIR TOXINS FROM MOTOR VEHICLES & DISTANCE FROM HIGHWAYS

-> According to a June Air Quality and Transportation Conformity Highlights article, "The FHWA and EPA National Near-Road Study Detroit, MI (http://1.usa.gov/1yq3Fr2), provides a summary of a monitoring study conducted in Detroit in 2010 - 2011. The objective of this study was to determine Mobile Source Air Toxic (MSAT) concentrations and variations in concentrations as a function of distance from the highway and to establish relationships between MSAT concentrations as related to highway traffic, meteorological conditions; and other pollutants primarily emitted from motor vehicles." 

Source: http://1.usa.gov/1t2baSf
Title & Author: "FHWA Posted New Report" by Staff

LACK OF EXERCISE, NOT DIET, LINKED TO RISE IN OBESITY

-> According to a July 7th Stanford Medicine News article, "An examination of national health survey results suggests that inactivity, rather than higher calorie intake, could be driving the surge in obesity. Inactivity rather than overeating could be driving the surge in Americans' obesity, according to a study by a team of Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. (Obesity, Abdominal Obesity, Physical Activity, and Caloric Intake in U.S. Adults: 1988-2010: http://bit.ly/1mTR4rW) Examining national health survey results from 1988 through 2010, the researchers found huge increases in both obesity and inactivity, but not in the overall number of calories consumed.

"'What struck us the most was just how dramatic the change in leisure-time physical activity was,' said Uri Ladabaum, MD, associate professor of gastroenterology and lead author of the study. 'Although we cannot draw conclusions about cause and effect from our study, our findings support the notion that exercise and physical activity are important determinants of the trends in obesity.'..."

Source: http://stanford.io/1l2DOxa
Title & Author: "Lack of exercise, not diet, linked to rise in obesity, Stanford research shows" by Becky Bach


QUOTES R US

"We're in the top 30 best cities in the country for cycling but that's not good enough. We have the ability to be a top 10 city in this country and even do better, and that is going to be the commitment our administration is going to make. We will make sure cycling is not only safe, but a viable part of our economic development strategy and a critical part of our transportation needs."

-- City of Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto
http://bit.ly/1qf3ajg

"What the Mayor is promising today (construction of Pittsburgh's first 3 protected bike lane projects), and what Public Works and Planning will deliver over the next two months, is a new balance between cyclists and motorists on the roadway, one we're confident will mean a safer street for both."

-- City of Pittsburgh Assistant Public Works Director Patrick Hassett
http://bit.ly/1qf3ajg

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

GLOBAL WARMING INTERACTIVE: HOW HOT WILL YOUR CITY GET?

If Americans think record-breaking summer heat in recent years has been brutal, just wait several decades. That's the message of a new project from Climate Central, a nonprofit climate news and research organization based in New Jersey... The scientists' findings are summed up in the report, "1,001 Blistering Future Summers" (http://bit.ly/1wudyRT), which includes an interactive tool that allows users to look up projected June-August temperatures in their communities by century's end. 

http://bit.ly/U9vZi7


WEBINARS, CONFERENCE CALLS AND SEMINARS

WEBINAR "Buses, Boots, and Bicycles: Getting Safe Routes to School and Student Transportation Departments to Work Together"

Date: July 17, 2014, 2:00 p.m. to 3:0 0 p.m. ET 
Presenters: Michael Martin (National Association for Pupil Transportation), Bob Young (Boulder Valley School District) & Sara Zimmerman (Safe Routes to School National Partnership)
Host: Safe Routes to School National Partnership
Cost: Free
Details & Registration: http://bit.ly/VaSl3X

WEBINAR "Building Urban Trails in Difficult Places"

Date: July 17, 2014, 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET (Extra charge for .10 CEU)
Presenters: Chuck Flink, FASLA (Greenways Incorporated), Bill Neumann, ASLA, (DHM Design) & Bob Searns
Host: American Trails
Cost: $35 American Trails members / $55 nonmembers
Details & Registration: http://bit.ly/1kMRLOQ

WEBINAR "Improving Pedestrian Crossing Safety at Uncontrolled Locations"

Date: July 17, 2014, 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET
Presenters: Nazir Lalani
Host: American Society of Civil Engineers
Cost: Member $299, Non-Member $349 (Site Fee)
Details & Registration: http://bit.ly/Sh6VW6

WEBINAR "Where Health Meets Sustainability: The Intersection of the STAR Community Rating System and Public Health"

Date: July 18, 2014, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET 
Presenters: John Balbus (National Institutes of Health), Vickie Boothe (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention), Eric Faisst, (Madison County, NY), Evonda Thomas-Smith & Catherine Hurley (City of Evanston, IL)
Host: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Cost: Free
Details & Registration: http://bit.ly/1jJ5oiI

WEBINAR "Livability and Level of Service: Making the Connection"

Date: July 22, 2014, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: National Highway Institute
Cost: Free
Details & Registration: http://1.usa.gov/1ncsAcR

WEBINAR "Crosstown Bikeways for Everybody: Lessons from San Francisco"

Date: July 23, 2014, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET 
Presenters: TBA
Host: Alliance for Biking & Walking
Cost: Free
Details & Registration: http://bit.ly/1kvtSwb

WEBINAR "Performance Measurement for Asset Management - MAP-21 and Beyond"

Date: July 30, 2014, 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET 
Presenters: Mark Nelson (MN DOT), David Nicol (Del DOT), Liane Welch (Tillamook County Public Works)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Cost: Free for TRB Sponsors & sustaining Affilates, $89 /site for others
Details & Registration: http://bit.ly/1kcCQ0O

WEBINAR "Accessible Routes-Advanced Session"

Date: August 7, 2014, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET
Presenters: US Access Board staff Jim Pecht & David Yanchulis
Host: Accessibility Online
Cost: Free
Details & Registration: http://bit.ly/1bGyEYp

WEBINAR "Transform Bicycling and Walking Outside the Urban Context"

Date: August 20, 2014, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET (.1 CEU, 1 AICP CM)
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP)
Cost: $50 APBP members/$85 non-APBP members, or multi-webinar discounts (Site Fee)
Details & Registration: http://bit.ly/1lDSimN

WEBINAR "Optimize Signals for Pedestrians and Bicyclists"

Date: September 17, 2014, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET (.1 CEU, 1 AICP CM)
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP)
Cost: $50 APBP members/$85 non-APBP members, or multi-webinar discounts (Site Fee)
Details & Registration: http://bit.ly/VeyH77


RESOURCES

PAYING FOR INNOVATIVE ONSTREET BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE

-> According to a July 7th Advocacy Advance post, "Advocacy Advance recently released its latest report, 'How Communities are Paying for Innovative OnStreet Bicycle Infrastructure.' (http://bit.ly/1rpH6jh) The report provides examples of how communities across the country are paying for separated bicycle infrastructure. Just like how communities are paying for other important civic infrastructure, communities are using a combination of federal, state, local/regional, and private sources of funds...

"In conjunction with the report's release, Advocacy Advance held a webinar with the report's author, Darren Flusche, Policy Director at the League of American Bicyclists? Randy Neufeld, Director at SRAM Cycling Fund? and Kyle Wagenschutz, Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator at the City of Memphis, TN. Watch the webinar recording (http://bit.ly/1rfCIFQ - just over 1 hour) and download the combined slides from all panelists (http://bit.ly/1rfCNJB - PDF)..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1mg3mXl
Title & Author: "Getting it done: How communities are paying for innovative infrastructure" by Staff

AARP RESOURCES FOR LIVABLE AND AGE-FRIENDLY COMMUNITIES

-> According to a July Fostering Livable Communities Newsletter article, "Central to the creation of livable communities is the possibility for everyone, regardless of age or ability, to travel safely. Yet, many of our nation's roads do little to meet the needs of the growing population of older Americans."

-Excerpted from the Complete Streets in the Southeast Tool Kit (http://1.usa.gov/1nvgDf2) released in 2014 by Smart Growth for America, the National Complete Streets Coalition, and AARP...

"According to AARP, two complementary approaches can overcome these transportation challenges. First, communities can ensure that residents of all ages and abilities have access to a range of transportation options (including public and specialized transit services) and that streets are safe for walking and bicycling as well as for driving. Second, policy makers can coordinate housing, transportation, and land-use policies to promote the development of walkable, transit-oriented communities that allow older adults to live near essential services."

Source: http://1.usa.gov/1tQ2p1z
Title & Author: "AARP Provides Resources for Livable and Age-Friendly Communities" by Amy Levner

COLLABORATIONS BETWEEN SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL & SCHOOL BUSING

-> According to a July Safe Routes to School National Partnership eNews article, "Student transportation departments usually focus on busing children to school, but there is great potential for collaboration with Safe Routes to School advocates. Buses, Boots, and Bicycles: Exploring Collaboration Between Safe Routes to School and School Busing Professionals to Get Children to School Safely and Healthily, a new report released by the National Partnership (http://bit.ly/1yqJae2), presents a comprehensive look at student transportation in the United States and proposes ways that Safe Routes to School professionals and transportation directors could collaborate more effectively to ensure that all children safely access their local schools. (50% of vehicle trips to school are at a distance easily covered on foot or by bike.)"

Source: http://bit.ly/1mKXfiP
Title & Author: "Buses, Boots, and Bicycles: Exploring Collaboration Between Safe Routes to School and School Busing Professionals" by Staff

[See related July 17 webinar in Webinar section above.]

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MODELING & DATA COLLECTION TO IMPROVE ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION 

-> According to a July Safe Routes to School National Partnership eNews article, "To better understand the current state of active transportation data collection and modeling in California, the National Partnership regional network project staff conducted a series of structured interviews with modeling professionals across California in the fall of 2013. The National Partnership has compiled the results from these interviews into a report titled Improving Modeling and Data Collection to Improve Active Transportation (http://bit.ly/WhdeuZ) to provide policy makers a series of recommendations they can implement to improve data collection and modeling for active transportation. While this report specifically focused on efforts in California, many of the recommendations will apply to states across the nation."

Source: http://bit.ly/1mKXfiP
Title & Author: "New Report Aims to Catalyze Improvements to Modeling and Data Collection" by Staff

UNCONTROLLED PED CROSSINGS ASSESSMENT & DESIGN GUIDE

-> According to a July CTS Catalyst article, "...To help Minnesota transportation agencies evaluate pedestrian crossings and determine where improvements are warranted, the Minnesota Local Road Research Board funded the development of a new guidebook for practitioners. (Pedestrian Crossings: Uncontrolled Locations: http://bit.ly/1rpFztj) The guidebook focuses specifically on uncontrolled pedestrian crossings, which aren't controlled by a stop sign, yield sign, or traffic signal.

"The new guidebook recommends when to install marked crosswalks and other enhancements based on a number of factors, including the average daily vehicle count, number of pedestrians, number of lanes, and average vehicle speed. It helps agencies rate a crossing for pedestrian service, and includes a flow chart and several worksheets to assist in data collection and decision making... The guidebook is designed around an 11-step evaluation process that engineers can use to evaluate an uncontrolled pedestrian crossing location in a systematic way. Based on the results of the evaluation, users can identify what level of treatment is appropriate for their location, ranging from in-street crossing signs to overhead flashing beacons to traffic calming devices such as curb bump-outs. For each potential treatment option, the guidebook includes information on advantages, disadvantages, recommended locations, and cost..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1wtjb2L
Title & Author: "New guidebook aims to make pedestrian crossings safer" by Staff

2 RURAL SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL RESOURCES + WELLNESS POLICY & GENERAL PLAN LANGUAGE

-> According to a July 15th email message, "Even though the Safe Routes to School movement has gained momentum nationwide, many communities still face challenges implementing these programs. Four new publications from ChangeLab Solutions are now available to help districts, parents, and active transportation advocates develop policies for walking or bicycling to school.

"On the Move (http://bit.ly/1mg54rG) and Get Out & Get Moving (http://bit.ly/1oXRGgo) are geared toward rural areas that face unique challenges around implementing Safe Routes to School programs. On the Move breaks down approaches and tools of particular interest to rural school districts, including highlights of the online Safe Routes to School Policy Workbook (http://bit.ly/1l24kGZ) tool. Get Out & Get Moving explores the legal implications of remote drop-off programs, and includes a cost-benefit worksheet for assessing risk...

"Incorporating Safe Routes to School into Local School Wellness Policies (http://bit.ly/1tPMZKT) and Model General Plan Language Supporting Safe Routes to Schools (http://bit.ly/1wtpbs8) provide model language that communities can adapt to their specific needs..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1l25cLD
Title & Author: "Healthy Resources for Walking & Biking to School" by Staff

GUIDELINES FOR ROAD DIET CONVERSIONS

-> According to a July 9th CMAP article, "The Kentucky Transportation Center at the University of Kentucky released Guidelines for Road Diet Conversions (http://bit.ly/1oY1F5o). The guidelines consider operational and safety aspects of the conversions to assist in the preliminary determination of whether a road diet conversion is appropriate for a given roadway segment. The guidelines provide suggested cross section designs, transition to and from the road diet section, and a flow chart for determining the appropriate actions.

"Road diets typically involve restriping of a four-lane, undivided roadway as a three-lane road with two through lanes and a two-way left-turn lane.  The resulting 'extra' roadway width can be converted to create bicycle lanes, supply on-street parking, widen sidewalks, or provide opportunities for landscaped median islands.  Road diets seek to develop multimodal corridors within the original right-of-way and are an innovative solution to address mobility and safety concerns in an environment with budgetary constraints."

Source: http://1.usa.gov/W9CFyl
Title & Author: "Guidelines for road diet conversions" by Staff


CALENDAR

Additional training opportunities are available on the National Center for Bicycling & Walking web site. Add your own items to the on-line calendar...it's quick and easy. Please be sure your calendar items pertain to training and workshops in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields. Go to:
http://www.bikewalk.org/calendar.php

HEY, YOU! SEND US YOUR CALENDAR ITEMS -- PRONTO!

-> CALL FOR PAPERS – World Town Planning Day, November 5 -7, 2014, Online
Deadline: July 31, 2014
http://bit.ly/1qGv8Ao

-> CALL FOR PAPERS – Transportation Research Board 94th Annual Meeting, January 11-15, 2015, Washington, DC.
Deadline: August 1, 2014 (Verify deadline for individual topics)
http://bit.ly/SsqyKs

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – Active Living Research, February 22 - 25, 2015, San Diego, CA.
Deadline: August 18, 2014 by 4 :00 pm PT
http://bit.ly/1mJ91Fm

CONFERENCES

-> July 20-23, 2014, 2014 Alternative Intersection & Interchange Symposium, Salt Lake City, UT.
http://bit.ly/1890ECt

-> July 21-23, 2014, 14th National Conference on Transportation Planning for Small and Medium-Sized Communities: Tools of the Trade, Burlington, VT.
http://bit.ly/11YmmnR

-> July 25-27, 2014, Winning Campaign Training, Indianapolis, IN.
http://bit.ly/1gDfSjf

-> July 27-31, 2014, Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 1.0, Portland State University, OR.
http://bit.ly/1l358xf

-> August 10, 2014, National Complete Streets Coalition Design Implementation for Professionals Workshop, Seattle, WA.
http://bit.ly/ZN5GPt

-> August 10-13, 2014, ITE Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA.
http://bit.ly/ZN5GPt

-> August 17-20, 2014, American Public Works Association Public Works Congress & Exposition, Toronto, Ontario. 
http://bit.ly/1rKMgcJ

-> August 19-20, 2014, California Adaptation Forum, Sacramento, CA.
http://bit.ly/1goBvED

-> August 25-29, 2014, Comprehensive Bicycle Design and Engineering 2.0, Portland State University, OR.
http://bit.ly/1duyODO

-> September 1-3, 2014, Future of Places International, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
http://bit.ly/1lr07yX

-> September 5-8, 2014, Alliance for Biking and Walking Leadership Retreat, Bolivar, PA.
http://bit.ly/1hwDGUQ

-> September 7-10, 2014, Governors Highway Safety Association, Grand Rapids, MI.
http://bit.ly/1gJDlir

-> September 8, 2014, Complete Streets Design Implementation for Professionals, Pittsburgh, PA.
http://bit.ly/1bcYxs9

-> September 8-11, 2014, Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place 2014, Pittsburgh, PA.
http://bit.ly/1bcYxs9

-> September 15, 2014, Oregon Transportation Summit, Portland, OR.
http://bit.ly/1jxhMaR

-> September 15-17, 2014, Transportation and Federal Land Partnership Enhancing Access, Mobility, Sustainability, and Connections to the American Great Outdoors, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/18l5es5

-> September 16-19, 2014, IENE 2014 International Conference on Ecology and Transportation, Malmo, Sweden.
http://bit.ly/1bLdPLB

-> September 21-24, 2014, Rail~Volution, Minneapolis, MN.
http://bit.ly/1dvfJA1

-> October 7-8, 2014, 7th Annual Growing Sustainable Communities Conference, Dubuque, IA.
http://bit.ly/1bU4HCh

-> October 8, 2014, Walk to School Day
http://bit.ly/15PtJyo

-> October 14-17, 2014, National Recreation and Park Association and Exposition, Charlotte, NC.
http://bit.ly/1cDd73b

-> October 16-17, 2014, Sustainable Trails for All Conference, Greenfield, NH.
http://bit.ly/Y0dpYK

-> October 16-18, 2014, 2014 Washington State Trails Conference, Bellingham, WA.
http://bit.ly/1cOmMCf

-> October 17-19, 2014, Winning Campaigns Training, Santa Barbara, CA.
http://bit.ly/1gDfSjf

-> October 21-23, 2014, Walk 21, Sydney, Australia.
http://bit.ly/1anKBfO

-> October 21-24, 2014, Association of Metropolitan Planning Organizations Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA.
http://bit.ly/1lhQtSb

-> October 22-25, 2014, NACTO Designing Cities 2014, San Francisco, CA.
http://bit.ly/1l3t57z

-> November 6-8, 2014, ASCE International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2014, Long Beach, CA.
http://bit.ly/1gEhrAV

-> November 15-19, 2014, American Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Exposition, New Orleans, LA.
http://bit.ly/1bVOE6N

-> November 18-20, 2014, Smart City Expo World Congress, Barcelona, Spain.
http://bit.ly/1mucsVC

-> November 27-28, 2014, Ageing and Safe Mobility, Bergisch-Gladbach, Germany.
http://bit.ly/1iLF7Ax

-> January 11-5, 2015, Transportation Research Board 94th Annual Meeting, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/RTQEWw

-> January 29-31, 2015, New Partners for Smart Growth, Baltimore, MD.
http://bit.ly/1mjA2VC

-> February 10-12, 2015, Winter Cycling Congress, Leeuwarden, Netherlands.
http://bit.ly/1pIZA0E

-> February 22-25, 2015, Active Living Research, San Diego. CA.
http://bit.ly/1mJ91Fm

-> May 17-20, 2015, American Trails International Trails Symposium, Portland, OR.
http://bit.ly/1lD37qJ

-> June 16-18, 2015, National Health Impact Assessment Meeting, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1kd8hbx

-> June 22-24, 2015, 5th International Symposium on Highway Geometric Design, Vancouver, BC.
http://bit.ly/1niIq5O


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS

Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks!

See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> JOB- EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FITNESS COUNCIL OF JACKSON, MI

The Fitness Council of Jackson, MI is seeking applications for Executive Director. This non-profit organization promotes health through physical activity. Candidates should have a bachelor's degree in related field (Nonprofit Administration, Urban Planning, Public Health, etc.), excellent written and oral communications skills, leadership and fundraising experience in a nonprofit setting, and familiarity with concepts of active living community environments.

Deadline: Position is open until filled.
http://bit.ly/1kFxrQd

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION ENG LIC SPL 13 - DESIGN/SAFETY PROGRAMS, STATE OF MICHIGAN, LANSING, MI

This position functions as the Department-wide Non-Motorized Specialist. This position acts as a statewide resource for resolving non-motorized engineering issues on the trunkline system as well as the locally owned system, developing guidance on non-motorized countermeasures through research and national practice, and developing training for Region and TSC personnel.  This position also manages the Safety Programs Unit Road Safety Audit (RSA) Program including consultant contracts, MDOT RSA teams, feedback and training.

Deadline: July 28, 2014
http://bit.ly/1jx523P

-> JOB- ENERGY CORPS/AMERICORPS, BIKENET, BILLINGS, MT

BikeNet seeks an Energy Corps member to assist with implementing programs and events that lead to more sustainable transportation, promotion of healthy choices, and protection of resources in the Billings community. The member will be involved in several projects including piloting programs related to increased walk/bike/bus rates in the community, developing educational programs to encourage residents to walk/bike for transportation, conduct a walk/bike traffic safety skill training, and analyze the economic and social benefits of a bicycle friendly community. 

Deadline: August 14, 2014 or until a suitable candidate can be identified

http://bit.ly/1jwhBfQ

-> MULTIPLE JOBS – ALTA PLANNING + DESIGN, VARIOUS CITIES

Alta Planning + Design, Inc. is an international consulting firm with a mission to create active communities where bicycling and walking are safe, healthy, fun, and normal daily activities. They specialize in bicycle, pedestrian, trail, park, greenway, and roadway planning, design, and implementation in addition to outreach and education programs.

Deadline: None provided.
http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9


HOUSEKEEPING

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http://www.bikewalk.org/newsletterarchives.php

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND CALENDAR ITEMS: We want to hear what you're up to! Contact <news@bikewalk.org> today!

List your local, statewide, and regional training events on NCBW's National Training Calendar:
http://www.bikewalk.org/calendar.php

COPYING: We encourage you to copy our content as long as you identify the source in this way: "from CenterLines, the e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking."

Editor Emeritus & Founding Editor: John Williams, john@montana.com
Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston
Send news items to: <news@bikewalk.org>

Contributors: AASHTO Daily Transportation Update; Association of Pedestrian & Bicycle Professionals Member-Listserve; CMAP Weekly Update; Christopher B Douwes; Kristi Drake; Mary Lauran Hall; Human Environment Digest; Inside Climate News; ITE Pedestrian and Bicycle Council LinkedIn Group; Maryam Karimi; Sonia Kirby; Zoe Kircos; Christy Kwan; Mobility Lab Express; Barbara McCann; Montana Associated Technology Roundtables; Planetizen LinkedIn Group; Jessica Roberts; David Sassoon; Justin Swan; Transportation Research Board E Newsletter


CONTACT US

©2014 - NCBW | The National Center for Bicycling & Walking is a program of Project for Public Spaces, Inc. http://www.bikewalk.org/contact.php