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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#380 Wednesday, April 8, 2015

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- $500M in New TIGER Funding
----- Paris Commits $164.5M to Cycling Over 5 Years
----- What’s Next for Transportation: Join Virtual Conversations
----- Philanthropic Approaches to Transportation Equity
----- 5 Things the Bike Movement Can Do To Advance Racial Equity
----- Engaging More Women in Bicycling
----- Walk Score Ranks The Most Walkable Cities of 2015
----- Transportation Engineers Question Use of Common Practices & Metrics
----- What Convinced a Transportation Engineer to Use Complete Streets

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- San Diego, CA: Biking up 346%, Big Jump after Buffered Bike Lanes Open
----- MN to Create Regional Transportation Coordination Councils
----- Local NJ Health in All Policies Approach
----- NYC-LA Transportation Leaders’ Discussion
----- Dallas-Fort Worth Region, TX: $38M for 33 Bike & Ped Projects
----- ADA Compliance: Los Angeles’ $1.4B 30-Yr Sidewalk Repair
----- Boston, MA: New Protected Intersection 1st Step in Vision Zero Initiative
----- Vision Zero: A Unifying Vision for Street Safety in Oregon
----- St. Paul, MN Passes Bike Infrastructure Plan, Dedicates $27M

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Collecting More Detailed Bike Crash Data
----- Crash Study Could Guide Design of Bicyclist Detection Systems
----- Safer Streets, Stronger Economies
----- Furth Lane & Bike Lane Width Annotated Bibliography
----- More Productive Uses for Parking Spaces
----- New Survey Highlights Key Obstacles to Riding
----- Some Physical Activity is Still Better Than None
----- Physical Activity, Air Pollution & Mortality in Urban Elderly

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Evaluating Complete Streets Projects: A Guide for Practitioners
----- Building Equity: Race, Ethnicity, Class & Protected Bike Lanes
----- Nine Advances Help Visually-Impaired Navigate Cities
----- Free Walking Groups Support Materials
----- San Francisco, CA: Living Alleys Toolkit
----- Guidebook on Ped Crossings of Public Transit Rail Services
----- Fiscal Impact of Development Patterns
----- Every Body Walk! Getting Started Practice Briefs
----- Personalized Smartphone Map Shows Users’ Favorite Places

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

$500M IN NEW TIGER FUNDING
-> U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx announced last week $500 million for transportation projects across the country under the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) competitive grant program. TIGER 2015 discretionary grants will fund capital investments in surface transportation infrastructure for capital projects that generate economic development and improve access to reliable, safe and affordable transportation for communities, both urban and rural. (Twenty percent of funds set aside for rural projects)

Pre-applications are due May 4, 2015 by 11:59 pm ET, final applications are due June 5, 2015 by 11:59 pm ET: http://1.usa.gov/1HOKNWV. [See Webinar section below for related application preparation webinars on April 14, 23, and 28.] [http://bit.ly/1JmDHtV]

PARIS COMMITS $164.5M TO CYCLING OVER 5 YEARS
-> Paris is destined to become the “world capital of cycling,” or at least, that's the grand ambition declared recently by Paris City Hall. To underscore that effort, the city has just announced a €150 million ($164.5 million) program over the next five years that aims to make Paris far easier, safer and more attractive for cyclists.

At the heart of the project are plans to double the city's bike lanes. Between now and 2020, Paris will add 80 kilometers (roughly 50 miles) of new, improved routes. The crown jewels of this new network will be a grid of five bike highways that will be bi-directional and almost entirely protected from automobile traffic by barriers...

Paris will also focus on overcoming obstacles that hamper cyclists from crossing the Boulevard Périphérique beltway. Separating the city core from its suburbs, routes across this barrier will be smoothed...

Junctions with traffic lights will be equipped with 7,000 new alternative corner crossings that allow cyclists to turn without waiting for lights to turn green. Where these are not in place, cyclists will benefit from priority at all lights...

People who ride bicycles in Paris should also stand to benefit from an ongoing plan to cut the citywide speed limit to 30 kilometers (18 miles) per hour, with only major roads rising to 50 kilometers (30 miles)...

Paris will fund 10,000 new parking spots for bicycles...

Parisians can now get reimbursed for 33 percent of the cost of an electric bike, with the upper cap set at €400 (US$435)... [http://bit.ly/1aJxFYN]

WHAT’S NEXT FOR TRANSPORTATION: JOIN VIRTUAL CONVERSATIONS
-> The What’s Next for Transportation event, sponsored by Kaiser Permanente, is structured around three live sessions combining phone and an online platform (phone-only participation is fine, but being online as well is strongly encouraged). The sessions take place on Monday 4/13, Wednesday 4/15, and Friday 4/17. Each one includes a “working session” from 11 am-12:30 pm Pacific/ 2-3:30pm Eastern, followed by an optional half hour of open networking. In each of three live virtual sessions you can choose to lead a conversation, or move among those being offered by others. Leveraging a new conversation platform you will be part of a highly engaging conversation, which is still as easy to connect to as a webinar or conference call. The live conversations are supplemented by online documents for networking, sharing stories, and reporting on the discussion, data surfaced, insight, and actions. [http://bit.ly/1c6GTP5]

PHILANTHROPIC APPROACHES TO TRANSPORTATION EQUITY
-> The juxtaposition of billions of dollars in transit investment at a time of increased economic and social isolation has caught the attention of a growing number of regional and national philanthropies. This paper (The Hardest Road: Philanthropic Approaches to the Evolving Field of Transportation Equity) examines the history and context of these issues and the philanthropic efforts under way in four regions where funders are aligning with advocates and government agencies to shape once-in-a-lifetime infrastructure investments so they benefit low-income people and communities of color. [http://bit.ly/19AX060]

5 THINGS THE BIKE MOVEMENT CAN DO TO ADVANCE RACIAL EQUITY
-> Simran Noor, the Center of Social Inclusion's Director of Policy and Strategy, spoke about the people and policies successfully addressing the root causes of inequity in the bike movement at the 2015 National Bike Summit. Noor noted "5 Things the Bike Movement Can Do To Advance Racial Equity." [http://bit.ly/1GJCT2e]

ENGAGING MORE WOMEN IN BICYCLING
-> The League of American Bicyclists felt that a dimension of the national conversation about bicycling was missing: Why reach out to women? Its recently released report, “Engaging More Women in Bicycling: Key Steps and Best Practices to Improve and Advance Women’s Specific Bicycle Advocacy” (http://bit.ly/1DSFmYk), is designed for advocates interested in creating a successful women’s outreach and encouragement initiative in their community. In addition to some practical advice on how to design programs that are inclusive, culturally relevant and financially sustainable, they define some of the philosophical underpinnings of women-specific bike advocacy to help you make your case.[http://bit.ly/1Cqnenc]

WALK SCORE RANKS THE MOST WALKABLE CITIES OF 2015
-> New York, the nation’s most walkable city, has increased its lead over No. 2 San Francisco in the latest ranking by Walk Score. Walk Score ranked the most walkable U.S. cities with populations of more than 300,000. (Top 5 Cites: New York, San Francisco, Boston, Philadelphia, and Miami. “New York is clearly leading the way in walkability by reclaiming space from cars for people,” said Matt Lerner, Walk Score co-founder... [http://redf.in/1FzEINH]

TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERS QUESTION USE OF COMMON PRACTICES & METRICS
-> This month, for at least the second time in a year, the Institute of Transportation Engineers has challenged its members to rethink common practices and metrics that are often thought of as objective and unbiased, but that convey values that aren’t necessarily in line with the greater public interest. In particular, these values emphasize the movement of vehicles above all other interests.

In an op-ed for this month’s ITE Journal (http://bit.ly/1yUOu8l), Jason DeGray, a licensed engineer and a member of the group’s advocacy committee... argues that conventional approaches to engineering, developed over years of outward suburban growth, are particularly biased toward motorized road users--most noticeably in urban areas.

A feature article in the ITE Journal’s August 2014 issue, titled “Decisions, Values, and Data: Understanding Bias in Transportation Performance Measures” (http://bit.ly/1CeAI1D), gives an example of one such metric--level of service--explains precisely how it reflects values and biases inherent to transportation design... [http://bit.ly/1c5G4WK]

WHAT CONVINCED A TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER TO USE COMPLETE STREETS
-> On a recent panel to discuss the report “Safer Streets, Stronger Economies” (http://bit.ly/1FU86iS) there were many questions about working with transportation engineers. National Complete Streets Coalition staff later interviewed panelist, Dean Ledbetter, a Senior Engineer at the North Carolina DOT to ask what convinced him to use a Complete Streets approach and to get advice on how to work with transportation engineers. [http://bit.ly/1Ff3CoC]


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

SAN DIEGO, CA: BIKING UP 346%, BIG JUMP AFTER BUFFERED BIKE LANES
-> In late 2012, SANDAG, the San Diego region’s planning agency, installed bike counters around the entire county. According to the count data obtained from SDSU’s Active Transportation Research, the bike traffic in Uptown has gone up — by an average of 346% since 2012. And it looks like the biggest jump in bike ridership happened after the buffered bike lanes were striped on Fourth and Fifth Avenues in 2014... [http://bit.ly/1air3zT]

MN TO CREATE REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION COUNCILS
-> The Minnesota Departments of Transportation and Human Services, in collaboration with other state agencies, are proposing to work with the Metropolitan Council, local governments, and other organizations to create regional transportation coordination councils. Coordination between transportation providers and service agencies is a strategy that can help fill transportation gaps by providing more rides using the same or fewer resources, making transportation easier to use, and giving customers more options for where and when to travel.

The state agencies would provide support for creating a statewide framework of 8-10 Regional Transportation Coordination Councils throughout Minnesota in order to break down transportation barriers and offer a seamless system of transportation services. The Regional Transportation Coordination Councils would be responsible for coordinating transportation services through a network of existing public, private, and nonprofit transportation providers. The Regional Transportation Coordination Councils will be developed after consultation with stakeholders through a webinar and four regional stakeholder meetings located across the state. [http://bit.ly/1ako363]

[A free statewide webinar will explain the need and concepts for regional transportation coordination on April 16, 2015, from 1:30 – 3:00 pm CT: http://svy.mk/1akov40.]

LOCAL NJ HEALTH IN ALL POLICIES APPROACH
-> Local planning and policy decisions are integral to achieving community health goals and affecting change in our communities and improving health outcomes over the long term. This white paper (Integrating Health into Community Design and Decision-making: Opportunities for New Jersey Municipalities):

  1. Outlines the importance of considering health outcomes in all policy and community planning decisions;
  2. Explores the emerging practice of Health Impact Assessment as a tool for considering health impacts in planning and policy decisions;
  3. Highlights some of the great working being done by New Jersey municipalities to use Health Impact Assessment and Health in All Policies approaches to inform decision-making;
  4. Suggests steps local officials can take to advance a Health in All Policies approach to local decision-making; and
  5. Showcases some of the resources and near term learning opportunities available to local officials throughout New Jersey to create healthy communities. [http://bit.ly/1JnqOj0]

NYC-LA TRANSPORTATION LEADERS’ DISCUSSION
-> "Cars don't shop" and "If you want a better city, build bike lanes. It's an economic development strategy." Those were two of the takeaways from a March 25 event at the Hammer Museum featuring former New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan and Los Angeles Department of Transportation's (LADOT's) new General Manager Seleta Reynolds. In a lively conversation, the two transportation leaders spent the night riffing on how the streets and public spaces revolution happened in New York and elsewhere and what might be in store for Los Angeles on Reynolds' watch... [http://huff.to/1H3zuf8]

[See video of the event at: http://bit.ly/1HPdUcB (1:28)]

DALLAS-FORT WORTH REGION, TX: $38M FOR 33 BIKE & PED PROJECTS
-> Interest in enhancing active transportation in North Texas has seen growth over the past few years. Last fall, the Regional Transportation Council (RTC) advanced that growth by awarding $38.2 million to projects that could broaden bicycle and pedestrian facilities and increase connectivity in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. (See project list: http://bit.ly/1IIaOqU) The RTC allocated the funding to 33 projects as part of its Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) project selection. With local entities contributing more than $40 million toward the projects, over $78 million will be invested in active transportation enhancements as a result of the funding awards, improving bicycle and pedestrian facilities in Collin, Dallas, Denton, Hunt, Parker, Tarrant and Wise counties... [http://bit.ly/1E2HvQM]

ADA COMPLIANCE: LOS ANGELES’ $1.4B 30-YR SIDEWALK REPAIR
-> In a landmark settlement to fix its badly broken sidewalks announced last week, Los Angeles is moving toward a future in which its infrastructure for non-drivers will get some long-needed attention. The settlement comes in response to a class-action lawsuit filed under the Americans with Disabilities Act, which alleged the city did not maintain its sidewalks “in a condition that is useable by class members who rely on wheelchairs, scooters, and other assistive devices to get around.” The agreement (still pending a judge’s approval) means L.A. could commit a stunning $1.4 billion over the next 30 years to repairing and upgrading sidewalks, installing curb cuts, and ensuring access to crosswalks.

At one time, property owners were responsible for maintaining sidewalks adjacent to their homes and businesses, as is the case in many other cities. But back in the 1970s, L.A. took control of sidewalk maintenance in order to qualify for a federal grant program aimed at assisting cities with street repairs... [http://bit.ly/1E0hL7G]

BOSTON, MA: NEW PROTECTED INTERSECTION 1ST STEP IN VISION ZERO
-> The morning after his staff received a standing ovation for their safety-centric redesign of Commonwealth Ave in Allston, Mayor Marty Walsh held a press conference to tie the project into a much broader initiative: Vision Zero. Vision Zero in Boston will begin with extending the crash data work done with bikes to pedestrians, and identifying hot spots. The task force will seek to create rapid response improvements and create "residential slow zones."

The Commonwealth Avenue project itself is a major step forward for Vision Zero. In particular the protected intersection design in the Comm Ave plan is rather new in the U.S., having only been installed in a suburban area in Austin, Texas so far. NACTO has been holding special design charrettes with Boston and other cities who are working to implement it. The design helps reduce the common "right hook" crash type by creating more visibility between cars and bikes, and will likely change the way cycletracks are built in cities around the country... [http://bit.ly/1aJrgwD]

VISION ZERO: A UNIFYING VISION FOR STREET SAFETY IN OREGON
-> Oregon Walks and the Bicycle Transportation Alliance have released Vision Zero: A Unifying Vision for Street Safety in Oregon. (http://bit.ly/1FeztWs) This report has three main objectives: (1) to demonstrate the critical need to improve street safety, referencing the cost of inaction in human terms, (2) to present data and evidence that support the life-saving benefits of road-safety measures taken by other cities in the U.S. and internationally, and (3) to offer constructive recommendations on how the Portland Metropolitan area can build consensus for the large-scale change the region needs to eliminate fatalities and incapacitating injuries on our streets. [March 31 email message from BTA Executive Director Rob Sadowsky]

ST. PAUL, MN PASSES BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN, DEDICATES $27M
-> The City Council adopted the Saint Paul (MN) Bicycle Plan (http://bit.ly/1FA0W2j) that more than doubles bike pathways and connections throughout Saint Paul over the next several decades. In the City’s 2015 budget, Mayor Chris Coleman dedicated more than $27 million of the 8-80 Vitality Fund to road reconstruction, including the creation of bike pathways – the largest investment in bike infrastructure in Saint Paul’s history... [http://bit.ly/1IqH8SF]


THE RESEARCH BEAT

COLLECTING MORE DETAILED BIKE CRASH DATA
-> When it comes to reporting crashes between bikes and motor vehicles, police departments around the country are still using incident forms designed for an earlier era. A new study suggests these outdated reporting methods, which often don’t account for essential differences between the two modes of transport, represent a crucial lost opportunity. (Database Improvements for Motor Vehicle/Bicycle Crash Analysis: http://bmj.co/1CSXsqw) If officers recorded more detailed information about such collisions, says the study’s lead author, Dr. Anne Lusk of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, that data could be used to design streets and intersections that would be significantly safer for everyone.

The authors developed a set of variables that could be recorded in the event of a crash: four “bicycle environments” (no bike lane, sharrows, painted bike lane, and cycle track); 18 motor vehicle potential impact points (including opening doors); four bicycle potential impact points; and 10 bicycle-crash-scene patterns... [http://bit.ly/1DIfejT]

CRASH STUDY COULD GUIDE DESIGN OF BICYCLIST DETECTION SYSTEMS
-> A growing number of vehicles are equipped with front crash prevention technology that can recognize the back of another vehicle and prevent a rear-end crash. If more of these systems could also recognize the backs of bicycles and bicyclists, they could prevent or mitigate a large portion of the crashes that kill people traveling on two wheels.

More than 3,300 bicyclists were killed in crashes in a five-year period from 2008 to 2012. Seventy-four percent of those deaths occurred when the bicyclist was struck by the front of a passenger vehicle, IIHS researchers found in a new study of bicyclist crash types relevant to the design of crash prevention systems. Of those crashes, the most common scenario, accounting for 23 percent, involved a vehicle traveling in the same direction as a bicycle and hitting it from behind... The study was based on information on crashes from two federal databases, the Fatality Analysis Reporting System, a census of all fatal crashes, and the National Automotive Sampling System General Estimates System, which is a nationally representative sample of police-reported crashes. [http://bit.ly/1CehEAF]

SAFER STREETS, STRONGER ECONOMIES
-> What do communities get for their investments in Complete Streets? In this study of 37 projects (Safer Streets, Stronger Economies: http://bit.ly/1NeaOjS), Smart Growth America found that Complete Streets projects tended to improve safety for everyone, increased biking and walking, and showed a mix of increases and decreases in automobile traffic, depending in part on the project goal. Compared to conventional transportation projects, these projects were remarkably affordable, and were an inexpensive way to achieve transportation goals. In terms of economic returns, the limited data available suggests Complete Streets projects were related to broader economic gains like increased employment and higher property values. [http://bit.ly/1FU86iS]

[Read a recap of a panel discussion of this research and watch its recorded webinar: http://bit.ly/1a4iXu4]

FURTH LANE & BIKE LANE WIDTH ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
-> Peter Furth, Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor at Northwestern University, has posted an annotated bibliography on the effects on lane width and bike lane width on road safety and operations on his web site: Lane Widths and Other Cross-Section Elements on Urban Roads: An Annotated Bibliography (http://bit.ly/1HPDMVK). See also his extensive publications list at http://bit.ly/1ycA0pF.

MORE PRODUCTIVE USES FOR PARKING SPACES
-> Conventional wisdom says that businesses need parking spots. If would-be customers can’t pull up out front, how will they come inside? This is a powerful idea, and it invariably animates the opposition any time cities threaten to redesign roadways, replacing parking spots with bus lanes, cycle tracks, bike racks or wider sidewalks. Remove parking, the argument goes, and business will wither.

The reality, though, is more complicated. Consider one illustration: For the last few years, Philadelphia has converted a handful of parking spots in front of neighborhood businesses into temporary "parklets" no bigger than the space that might fit one or two cars. Records from adjacent businesses show sales went up about 20 percent immediately after the parks were installed, relative to right beforehand. (The Case for Parklets: Measuring the Impact on Sidewalk Vitality and Neighborhood Businesses: http://bit.ly/1HPTzEb) [http://wapo.st/1DIYskH]

NEW SURVEY HIGHLIGHTS KEY OBSTACLES TO RIDING
-> A new survey commissioned by People for Bikes finds that, along with concerns about infrastructure and cars, equity-related issues loom large among the obstacles to higher bike ridership. (U.S. Bicycling Participation Benchmarking Report: http://bit.ly/1II74pB) Among the more than 16,000 people surveyed, 48 percent lived in a household without an operational bicycle. Additionally, about a third of respondents, both riders and non-riders alike, were concerned about personal safety issues, such as being mugged, when riding a bike in their area. Non-white respondents and those with annual incomes below $40,000 were particularly concerned about their personal safety while biking. These results highlight the need for planners and policymakers to broaden their efforts beyond infrastructure and traffic safety improvements to address inequity in access to active transportation. [http://bit.ly/1E2yhUE]

SOME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IS STILL BETTER THAN NONE
-> During many years of follow-up, people who did less than the minimum recommended amount of physical activity still had a considerable decrease in risk of death compared to people who did no activity at all, in a new analysis of six studies. Based on self-reports of physical activity, people who did less than the recommended minimum of activity were still 20 percent less likely to die during the studies than people who were not active at all. [http://reut.rs/1CaJAFt]

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AIR POLLUTION & MORTALITY IN URBAN ELDERLY
-> A recently published study examining whether benefits of physical activity on mortality are moderated by long-term exposure to high air pollution levels in an urban setting found in general, exposure to high levels of traffic-related air pollution did not modify associations indicating beneficial effects of physical activity on mortality. (A Study of the Combined Effects of Physical Activity and Air Pollution on Mortality in Elderly Urban Residents: The Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Cohort) [http://1.usa.gov/1CwmB6T]


QUOTES R US
“I think the challenge is getting people to think about health in a broader context, and one of the foundations of health impact assessment is thinking about the range of social and environmental determinants of health.”
-Jon A. Carnegie, Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers Executive Director in referring to a white paper entitled Integrating Health into Community Design and Decision-making: Opportunities for New Jersey Municipalities (See Regional section) [http://bit.ly/1IJ6SWT]

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

THIS SEATTLE STREET ART ONLY APPEARS WHEN IT'S RAINING
If you go for a walk while it’s raining in Seattle, you might stumble onto a "Rainworks" creation around the city—street art made from a sort of invisible ink that only appears when it's wet. [http://bit.ly/19Q66fT]

PLAY PAC-MAN ON THE STREETS OF YOUR OWN CITY
For a limited time, you can finally experience Pac-Man on your favorite (or least favorite) place to navigate IRL. One of the best navigational easter eggs ever, Google Maps is currently letting users experience the world through the eyes of a Pac-Man. Washington, D.C.'s Logan Circle now has all the Pac-Dots your Pac-Gut can handle...William Penn designed Rittenhouse Square with Philadelphia's pedestrians in mind, but he also created one hell of a Pac-Man maze. Unfortunately, not all of the world's roads are available. Users should expect to be told that "it looks like Pac-Man can't play here" along various subdivisions and highways... [http://bit.ly/1aIKH95]


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

WEBINAR "Scalable, Data Driven Analysis, Session 2 of 3" (See also May 14)
Date: April 9, 2015, 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET
Presenters: John Davis & Zev Winkelman (RAND Corp.)
Host: FHWA
Details: http://bit.ly/1FDuUoq, free

SEMINAR & WEBINAR "Creating Space for Bikeways - Road Diets and Parking Removal”
Date: April 10, 2015, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET
Presenter: John Brazil (City of San Jose, CA)
Host: Safe Transportation Research and Education Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1ybMKgf, free

WEBINAR "The Fine Art of Messaging"
Date: April 13 2015, 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET 
Presenters: Jennifer Messenger Heilbronner & Karen Saverino (Metropolitan Group)
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/1Inl74b, free

WEBINAR "How to Compete for TIGER Discretionary Grants"
Date: April 14, 2015, 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: U.S. Department of Transportation
Details: http://bit.ly/1aIylNY, free

WEBINAR "Creative Ways to Consider Funding Future Transportation"
Date: April 15, 2015, 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET (1.5 PDHs & AICP CMs available)
Presenters: Carole Turley (Univ. of CA at LA), David Ungemah & Chris Swenson (Parsons Brinckerhoff)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1BLGjuP, free for TRB employees, sponsors, and sustaining affiliates, $89 for others

WEBINAR "Legal Rights and Issues for Pedestrians and Cyclists"
Date: April 15, 2015, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET (Continuing education credits available)
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP)
Details: http://bit.ly/1DZJCSD, $50 APBP members/$85 non-APBP members, or multi-webinar discounts (Site Fee)

SEMINAR or WEBINAR "Protecting Pedestrians and Bicyclists, One Safer Truck at a Time"
Date: April 23, 2015, 12:00 pm to 12:30 pm ET
Presenter: Alex Epstein (Volpe)
Host: Volpe, The National Transportation Systems Center
Details: http://1.usa.gov/1IqCwvE, free

WEBINAR "Preparing a Benefit Cost Analysis (BCA)"
Date: April 23, 2015, 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: U.S. Department of Transportation
Details: http://bit.ly/1yc4JDc, free

WEBINAR "Lighter, Quicker Cheaper - And Healthier"
Date: April 23, 2015, 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET
Presenters: Kate Rube (Project for Public Spaces)
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/1G9tD7B, free

WEBINAR "How to Compete for TIGER Discretionary Grants"
Date: April 28, 2015, 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: U.S. Department of Transportation
Details: http://bit.ly/1ClPAKP, free

WEBINAR "Designing Wayfinding Systems that Extend Your Civic Brand"
Date: April 30, 2015, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET
Presenter: Grant Hayzlett (National Sign Plazas)
Host: U.S. Department of Transportation
Details: http://bit.ly/1H3ekhl, free

WEBINAR "The Power of How: Using Tested Metaphors to Build Public Understanding about Environmental Health"
Date: May 5, 2015, 1:30 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: American Public Health Association
Details: http://bit.ly/1aLVoax, free

WEBINAR "Tools for Analysis of Capacity and Efficient Flow for Roundabout Design: Part I"
Date: May 6, 2015, 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET
Presenters: Howard McCulloch (NE Roundabouts) & Karen Giese (PTV Group)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1c72HKr, free for TRB employees, sponsors, and sustaining affiliates, $99 for others

WEBINAR "Using CDC's Community Guide to Advance Planning for Public Health"
Date: May 6, 2015, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Built Environment and Public Health Clearinghouse, American Public Health Association & American Planning Association
Details: http://bit.ly/19bZB6I

WEBINAR "U.S. Federal Transportation Policy Briefing”
Date: May 12, 2015, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Caron Whitaker (League of American Bicyclists)
Host: League of American Bicyclists, Alliance for Biking & Walking & Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/1O73MQ5

WEBINAR "Scalable, Data Driven Analysis, Session 3 of 3" (See also April 9)
Date: May 14, 2015, 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET
Presenters: John Davis & Zev Winkelman (RAND Corp.)
Host: FHWA
Details: http://bit.ly/1FDuUoq, free

WEBINAR "Law Enforcement Strategies to Improve Pedestrian and Cyclist Safety"
Date: May 20, 2015, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET (Continuing education credits available) 
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP)
Details: http://bit.ly/1Fr96bV, $50 APBP members/$85 non-APBP members, or multi-webinar discounts (Site Fee)

WEBINAR "Building Bridges Toward Healthy Transportation"
Date: June 3, 2015, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Built Environment and Public Health Clearinghouse, American Public Health Association & American Planning Association
Details: http://bit.ly/19bZB6I

WEBINAR "First Mile / Last Mile Connections to Transit"
Date: June 17, 2015, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET (Continuing education credits available) 
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP)
Details: http://bit.ly/1IIG3Ce, $50 APBP members/$85 non-APBP members, or multi-webinar discounts (Site Fee)


RESOURCES

EVALUATING COMPLETE STREETS PROJECTS: A GUIDE FOR PRACTITIONERS
-> New strategies for transportation require new measurements of success. Over the last decade, the National Complete Streets Coalition has promoted the use of performance measures that reflect multimodal needs and that are relevant to all individuals using the system. Evaluating Complete Streets Projects: A Guide for Practitioners (http://bit.ly/1y3r8SM) is an introduction to this approach...

This guide is meant for agencies interested in, but just beginning, their project evaluation efforts. It provides general steps to take in evaluating projects; suggested measures and metrics for common Complete Streets goals (including access, economy, environment, equity, place, public health, and safety); tips for sharing successes; and further resources for communities ready to dive deeper into the why and how of performance measurement for Complete Streets... [http://bit.ly/1HPs3Xf]

[View a recorded webinar introducing this resource: http://bit.ly/1GnFFLZ]

BUILDING EQUITY: RACE, ETHNICITY, CLASS & PROTECTED BIKE LANES
-> In partnership with PeopleForBikes, last month the Alliance for Biking and Walking released "Building Equity: Race, Ethnicity, Class and Protected Bike Lanes" (http://bit.ly/1Ei4jg7), a 36-page "idea book for fairer cities." The report has three main ingredients: (1) Profiles of 10 very different people of color from around the country who are, for diverse reasons, advocating for protected bike lanes in their communities. (2) Data-rich explorations of the role protected bike lanes have played in advancing equity in Colombia, Denmark and China. (3) A collection of statistics, new and old, about the intersections of race, ethnicity, income and bike infrastructure, including some from a major new statistically valid survey of U.S. biking habits. [http://bit.ly/1JnhUCi]

NINE ADVANCES HELP VISUALLY-IMPAIRED NAVIGATE CITIES
-> There are over 285 million blind and visually-impaired people in the world. As such, there’s a ton of room to develop technology that will make their lives a little more convenient, especially when it comes to navigating urban areas confidently and conveniently. Below are a few examples of a wave of advances making cities easier to navigate for visually impaired travelers that want to do so independently... [http://bit.ly/1BKwv4I]

FREE WALKING GROUPS SUPPORT MATERIALS
-> The University of South Carolina Prevention Research Center conducted Sumter County on the Move!, a community-based walking study. They recruited and formed 4 to 8 member groups from existing social networks, and provided training to team leaders including motivation strategies, tips for overcoming common barriers, health and safety information, and community walking resources. Walking manuals, materials, and local maps as models are available for free download after completing a form: http://bit.ly/1DIINBP. [March 27 email from USC PRC, PUB HEALTH]

SAN FRANCISCO, CA: LIVING ALLEYS TOOLKIT
-> A living alley is a street that is activated, pedestrianized, and greened to support environmentally sustainable functions, with an emphasis on community and social activation. This toolkit is a resource for community members and designers to develop and implement living alleys. The Living Alleys toolkit includes 20 design tools as well as example prototypes, to give community members a range of options and inspiration for creating living alleys in the Market Octavia Plan Area, though much of this information is applicable to alleys throughout San Francisco. In addition to the design tools, constraints and opportunities are discussed so project designers and residents can understand the full breadth of the project. [http://bit.ly/1Cm07Wn]

GUIDEBOOK ON PED CROSSINGS OF PUBLIC TRANSIT RAIL SERVICES
-> TRB Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 175: Guidebook on Pedestrian Crossings of Public Transit Rail Services (http://bit.ly/1yUeeSo) presents a wide array of engineering treatments designed to help improve pedestrian safety for three types of public transit rail services: light rail, commuter rail, and streetcar.

The Guidebook addresses key pedestrian safety issues associated with public transit rail services; presents pedestrian crossing issues associated with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Americans with Disabilities Act; summarizes readily available decision flowcharts used to make decisions regarding pedestrian treatments at rail crossings; presents information for 34 pedestrian treatments used at rail crossings, grouped into eight appropriate categories; and includes four case studies that examine specific decisions with respect to pedestrian rail crossings. The Guidebook is supplemented by a final research report, TCRP Web-Only Document 63: Treatments Used at Pedestrian Crossings of Public Transit Rail Services (http://bit.ly/1Gnf81B). [http://bit.ly/1FAbmyJ]

FISCAL IMPACT OF DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS
-> To what degree does the choice of development pattern impact costs for a local government? How do these decisions affect a municipality’s budget and tax revenues, and the cost of infrastructure and services it must provide? The Fiscal Impact of Development Patterns (http://bit.ly/1CdRQof), a new model from Smart Growth America and real estate advisors RCLCO, is designed to help municipalities answer these questions... [http://bit.ly/1E3tToq]

[Watch a video presentation of this new model by Chris Zimmerman, Smart Growth America Vice President for Economic Development, and Patrick Lynch, Smart Growth America Research Director (http://bit.ly/1ajTugJ)]

EVERY BODY WALK! GETTING STARTED PRACTICE BRIEFS
-> The Every Body Walk! Collaborative and expert Mark Fenton are pleased to be able to offer this series of Getting Started Practice Briefs designed to provide local organizations and advocates with resources, knowledge and insider tips on how to make their communities more walkable. [http://bit.ly/1GnefpD]

PERSONALIZED SMARTPHONE MAP SHOWS USERS’ FAVORITE PLACES
-> Citymaps 2.0 smartphone app is a visually rich map, which enables users to annotate and bookmark their digital world. It lets them create shareable ‘collections’ and will even learn the tastes of users over time, resulting in a personalized map which emphasizes specific venue types and brands. [http://bit.ly/1EGbTfQ]


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> Call for Abstracts - ASCE International Conference on Transportation & Development (ICTD 2016), June 26-29, 2015, Houston, TX.
Deadline: April 12, 2015, http://bit.ly/1uD3jzy

-> Call for Papers – Future of Places, June 29 – July 1, 2015, Stockholm, Sweden.
Deadline: April 15, 2015, http://bit.ly/1xZGI1S

-> Call for Student Research – APBP Ken Cross Student Research Poster Scholarship for presentation at the Professional Development Seminar (PDS) in St. Louis Sept. 28-Oct. 1, 2015. Grand prize – paid registration and a travel stipend to Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place 2016 in Vancouver, BC.
Deadline: May 31, 2015, http://bit.ly/1HAu4Gg

-> Call for Proposals - Aging in America Conference, March 20-24, 2016, Washington, DC.
Deadline: June 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1E3dKzg

-> Call for Nominations - Tools of Change Peer-Reviewed Landmark Case Studies Tools of Change is now soliciting nominations for its 2015 Landmark behavior change case studies in effective, innovative or impactful approaches for changing transportation behaviors.
Deadline: June 12, 2015, http://bit.ly/1EV3HM5

-> Call for Abstracts - 8th International Urban Design Conference, November 16-18, 2015, Brisbane, Australia.
Deadline: August 7, 2015, http://bit.ly/17ef3to

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

-> April 12-16, 2015, National Outdoor Recreation Conference, Annapolis, MD
http://bit.ly/1DoV7nd
-> April 13-14, 2015, Moving Active Transportation to Higher Ground: Opportunities for Accelerating the Assessment of Health Impacts, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1yhT7fi
-> April 15-17, 2015, Tennessee Greenways and Trails Forum, Burns, TN.
Robert.richards@tn.gov
-> April 16-17, 2015, Streets as Places, New York, NY.
http://bit.ly/1zJoH5q
-> April 18-21, 2015, American Planning Association National Conference, Seattle, WA.
http://bit.ly/1Fm9Rar
-> April 21-23, 2015, 2015 International Highway Technology Summit, Shanghai, China.
http://bit.ly/1zCOniZ
-> April 22, 2015, 2nd Annual OBF Ohio Bicycling Summit, Columbus, OH.
http://bit.ly/1Dx0SP2
-> April 22-24, 2015, California Trails and Greenways Conference, Yosemite, CA.
http://bit.ly/K7ovr9
-> April 23-24, 2015, Tennessee Bike Summit, Knoxville, TN.
http://bit.ly/1vL2Nh5
-> April 24, 2015, Connecticut Bike Walk Summit, Wethersfield, CT.
http://bit.ly/1E39IXI
-> April 29 - May 2: CNU, Dallas/Fort Worth, TX.
http://bit.ly/1wjMC7z
-> May 1 2015: : Massachusetts Transportation Summit, Worcester, MA.
http://bit.ly/1H3sIGi
-> May 1 2015: 2015 Physical Activity Forum, Edmonton, Canada.
http://bit.ly/1Fxt1GL
-> May 4, 2015, 2015 Physical Activity Forum, Calgary, Canada.
http://bit.ly/1Fxt1GL
-> May 4-5, 2015, 2015 PedalMN Bicycle Conference: "Building the Bike Friendly State," Minneapolis, MN.
http://bit.ly/1wSOGn8
-> May 5-6, 2015, Nevada Bicycle and Pedestrian Summit, Henderson, NV.
http://bit.ly/1FeDWIK
-> May 6, 2015, National Bike to School Day
http://bit.ly/15PtJyo
-> May 6-8, 2015, Placemaking: Making it Happen, New York, NY.
http://bit.ly/1CFKcaT
-> May 7, 2015, 2015 Walkable Bikeable Delaware Summit, Dover, DE.
http://bit.ly/1IIw93F
-> May 7-8, 2015, Transportation for Sustainability–An International Conference, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1veVFaf
-> May 14, 2015, The 8th Annual UCLA Downtown L.A. Forum on Transportation, Land Use and the Environment: Complete Streets, Completing Priorities, Los Angeles, CA.
http://bit.ly/17xLoji
-> May 17-20, 2015, American Trails International Trails Symposium, Portland, OR.
http://bit.ly/1lD37qJ
-> May 17-21, 2015, 15th TRB National Transportation Planning Applications Conference, Atlantic City, NJ.
http://bit.ly/1wB4tft
-> May 20-21, 2015, CTS Annual Research Conference, Saint Paul RiverCentre, MN.
http://bit.ly/1o0DfWn
-> May 27-31: American Society of Highway Engineers National Conference, Baltimore, MD.
http://bit.ly/1s1HRTH
-> May 29, 2015, Miami Valley Cycling Summit, Piqua, OH.
http://bit.ly/1CU0j01
-> May 31- June 2, 2015, 2015 TRB’s 5th International Conference on Transportation Systems Performance Measurement and Data, Denver, CO.
http://bit.ly/XZfUgT
-> May 31-June 2, 2015, Pragmatic Evaluation in Physical Activity & Public Health Training Course, Edinburgh, Scotland.
http://bit.ly/1CTZDw4
-> May 31 – June 5, 2015, Community Transportation EXPO 2015,Tampa, FL.
http://bit.ly/10lnp3L
-> June 1-3, 2015, Institute of Transportation Engineers Annual Meeting & Expo, Pittsburgh, PA.
http://bit.ly/1CULzTh
-> June 2-5, 2015, Velo City, Nantes, France.
http://bit.ly/1tZsgju
-> June 3-6, 2015, 14th International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) Meeting, Edinburgh, Scotland.
http://bit.ly/198iVl0
-> June 7-10: National Assn of Regional Councils Annual Conference & Exhibition, Raleigh, NC.
http://bit.ly/1xA8csN
-> June 13-20, 2015, Atlanta Cycling Festival, Atlanta, GA.
http://bit.ly/1D7f2Wp
-> June 16-18, 2015, National Health Impact Assessment Meeting, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1kd8hbx
-> June 18-19, 2015, Integrating Bike-Ped Topics into University Transportation Courses, Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation, Portland, OR.
http://bit.ly/18aIjWx
-> June 22-24, 2015, 5th International Symposium on Highway Geometric Design, Vancouver, BC.
http://bit.ly/1niIq5O
-> June 24, 2015, 2015 LOCUS Michigan Leadership Summit: Closing the Next [Smart Growth] Deal, Detroit, MI.
http://bit.ly/1K0NPqR
-> June 26-29, 2015, ASCE International Conference on Transportation & Development (ICTD 2016), Houston, TX.
http://bit.ly/1KLcBvx
-> June 29 – July 1, 2015, The Third Future of Places, Stockholm, Sweden.
http://bit.ly/1DZsIUa
-> July 6-7, 2015, 8th Making Cities Liveable Conference, Melbourne, Australia.
http://bit.ly/1ywDemV
-> July 6-8, 2015, 1st International Conference on Transport & Health, London, England. http://bit.ly/1rSFXRI
-> July 8, 2015 – Safe Cities Conference, Melbourne, Australia. http://bit.ly/1CTo0Kr
-> July 10-13: National Assn of Counties Annual Conference, Charlotte, NC.
http://bit.ly/1rSFXRI
-> July 15-19: National Society of Professional Engineers Annual Meeting, Bellevue, WA.
http://bit.ly/14ibh53
-> July 18 - August 7, 2015, Planning the Cycling City Course, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
http://bit.ly/1xcBQAA
-> July 26-30, 2015, Comprehensive Bikeway Design 1.0, Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation, Portland, OR.
http://bit.ly/1GDSWzR
-> August 2-5, 2015, Institute of Transportation Engineers 2015 International Annual Meeting and Exhibit, Hollywood, FL.
http://bit.ly/1CgQBnG
-> August 9-14, 2015, 2015 TRAFINZ Annual Conference, Dunedin, New Zealand.
http://bit.ly/1uI3hVe
-> August 10 - Sept. 2: American Public Works Assn Congress & Exposition, Phoenix, AZ.
http://bit.ly/1AB0BuW
-> August 17-21, 2015, Comprehensive Bikeway Design 2.0, Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation, Portland, OR.
http://bit.ly/18zI3jJ
-> August 30-September 2, 2015, American Public Works Association International Public Works Congress & Exposition, Phoenix, AZ.
http://bit.ly/1z7rx1n
-> September 16-18, 2015, International Conference on Transportation System Resilience to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1tIcgSl
-> September 19, 2015, KC Women’s Bike Summit, Kansas City, MO.
http://bit.ly/1E4scqe
-> September 20-24, 2015, International Conference on Ecology & Transportation, Raleigh, NC.
http://bit.ly/1rSWR6B
-> September 25-27, 2015, 2015 National Open Streets Summit, Atlanta, GA.
http://bit.ly/1aKChxB
-> September 28 –October 1, 2015, APBP Professional Development Seminar, St. Louis, MO.
http://bit.ly/VdB97X
-> October 1-31, 2015, Second EcoMobility World Festival, Johannesburg, South Africa.
http://bit.ly/1uURQ91
-> October 4-7: APTA Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
http://bit.ly/1BE9t0N
-> October 6-7, 2015, 8th Annual Growing Sustainable Communities Conference, Dubuque, IA.
http://bit.ly/1DfsQyk
-> October 11-14: ASCE Convention, New York, NY.
http://bit.ly/1AqpYy5
-> October 20-23, AMPO Annual Conference, Las Vegas, NV.
http://bit.ly/14ihEFk
-> October 20-23, 2015, Walk 21, Vienna, Austria.
http://bit.ly/1zPlfom
-> October 25-28: Rail~Volution, Dallas, TX.
http://bit.ly/S0xyxe
-> October 28-30: National Walking Summit, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1HGvJv0
-> October 28-31, 2015, Designing Cities 2015, Austin, TX.
http://bit.ly/16RUTJI
-> October 31 - Nov. 4, 2015, American Public Health Association Annual Meeting & Expo, Chicago, IL.
http://bit.ly/1Aaaq2h
-> November 6-9, 2015, 2015 American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting and Expo, Chicago, IL.
http://bit.ly/1wVHt4E
-> November 11-13, 2015, Disrupting Mobility: A Global Summit Investigating Sustainable Futures, Cambridge, MA.
http://bit.ly/1AeA1V7
-> November 13-14, 2015, 2015 Oklahoma Bike Summit, Stillwater, OK.
http://bit.ly/140AQHk
-> November 16-18, 2015, 8th International Urban Design Conference, Brisbane, Australia.
http://bit.ly/1wbKTQG
-> November 18-22, 2015, Gerontological Society of America Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL.
http://bit.ly/1vnWPVr
-> January 10-14, 2016, Transportation Research Board (TRB) 95th Annual Meeting, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1DiAYRh
-> January 31 - February 3, 2016, Active Living Research 2016, Clearwater Beach, FL.
http://bit.ly/1C9RQb1
-> March 20-24, 2016, Aging in America Conference, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1CTsOgT
-> April 5-7, 2016, Safe Routes to School National Conference, Columbus, OH.
http://bit.ly/YE6ocN
-> June 28-July 1, 2016, World Congress on Active Ageing 2016, Melbourne, Australia.
http://bit.ly/16QW2Ri


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS – BUILDING CAPACITY OF PROFESSIONAL PLANNERS TO ADDRESS PUBLIC HEALTH GOALS, CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL
CDC's Healthy Community Design Initiative works to improve public health by: Linking public health surveillance with community design decisions; Improving community design decisions through tools such as Health Impact Assessment; Educating decision makers on the health impact of community design; and building partnerships with community design decision makers and their influencers. To increase the capacity of professional planners and planning departments to address today's public health issues this cooperative agreement will develop strategies and initiatives designed to provide evidence based guidance that planning professionals can use to create health promoting communities.
Deadline: May 15, 2015, 11:59 pm ET, http://1.usa.gov/1GnvV4z

-> JOB – SENIOR CALIFORNIA POLICY MANAGER, SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL NATIONAL PARTNERSHIP
The Senior California Policy Manager serves as the lead staff for the National Partnership’s state policy work in California. As such, the Senior California Policy Manager maintains the California network and leads work with state agencies and the state legislature on strategies to increase funding and improve policies that result in more infrastructure and programs to support safe walking and bicycling for children and families, especially in lower-income communities, throughout California. The Senior California Policy Manager will also provide Safe Routes to School program and policy technical assistance as needed, and collaborate closely with other California-based staff.
Deadline: April 10, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1IIq1bJ

-> JOB - BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN PLANNER, TRAILNET, ST. LOUIS, MO
Trailnet is looking for an urban planner with expertise in placemaking and active transportation and the ability to manage events. We want a dynamic, highly skilled professional who desires to apply his or her urban planning expertise toward making St. Louis a better place for people to walk and bike. But more importantly, we seek a person who shares our passion to get people moving and to help our region build for better walking and biking.
Deadline: Open until filled, posted April 6, 2015, http://bit.ly/1DIxERu

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER, ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION & PUBLIC FACILITIES, ANCHORAGE, AK
The Central Region Planning Section of the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (DOT&PF) seeks a highly motivated and skilled individual for the position of Anchorage Metropolitan Area Transportation Solutions (AMATS) Planner. This position is DOT&PF’s primary staff member for the AMATS Technical Advisory and Policy Committees, and provides guidance and support for ADOT&PF representatives on the committees. Much of the work of this position focuses on road, highway, pedestrian, bicyclist, and transit improvements to the surface transportation network, smaller community airports, and intermodal connections.
Deadline: May 4, 2015 by 5:00 PM Alaska Time, http://bit.ly/1a4UEfJ

See also:
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


HOUSEKEEPING

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Editor Emeritus & Founding Editor: John Williams
Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston
Send news items to: <news@bikewalk.org>

Contributors: AASHTO Daily Transportation Update; America Walks Monthly Newsletter; American Bicyclist Update; APBP Member Listserve; Andrew J. Besold; Charles Bingham; Marielle Brown; Christin Camacho; CityLab; Environmental Health Perspectives; Fort Worth BCycle Newsletter; Funders'w Network News and Notes; Kate Kraft; Minnesota Active Living Network News; Mobility Matters; Next City; Public Health Newswire; Eloisa T. Raynault; Rob Sadowsky; Safe Routes to School National Partnership eNews; Smart Growth Online; State Smart Transportation Initiative; Status Report; Streetsblog; Streetside; TRB E-Newsletter; Urbancity Matters; Urbanful; U.S. Department of Transportation; Walk Boston E-Newsletter; The Washington Post.


CONTACT US

©2015 - NCBW | The National Center for Bicycling & Walking is a program of Project for Public Spaces, Inc. http://www.bikewalk.org/contact.php