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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#384 Wednesday, June 3, 2015

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Federal Safe Streets Act Introduced
----- US DOT Mayors Challenge Update
----- Active Transportation Equity Master Plan Scan
----- Four US Cities Creating Protected Intersections
----- Vancouver, BC: Nearly 50% Ped, Bike & Transit Mode Share
----- Vancouver, BC: To Convert Another Bridge Lane to Bike & Ped Traffic
----- Analysis of Fiscal Implications of Municipal Development Patterns
----- Understanding Smart Growth Economic Savings & Benefits
----- Study: Quebec Cycle Tourists Spend More, Stay Longer, Come More Often
----- Vote for Walking Visionary Awards Nominees

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- Nashville, TN & Chicago, IL: Green Alleys, Stormwater & Placemaking
----- Univ. of WA Installs Sides Guards on its Large Trucks
----- Court Finds WI DOT Used Inflated Forecasts to Justify Road Expansion
----- Albuquerque, NM: Pilots Lower Cost Bike-Share Model
----- San Francisco, CA: Bike to Worship Week
----- FL Legislature to Consider $50M/YR for Network of Bike & Ped Trails
----- Apply to be a Walk Friendly Community

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Wider Lanes Make Streets More Dangerous
----- U.S. Bicycling Participation Study
----- Economic Benefits of Nonmotorized Transportation
----- Impact of SRTS Programs on Walking and Biking
----- Ranking of Major US Metros by Walking Access to Jobs

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Cross-Modal Project Prioritization Peer Exchange Report
----- TRB Highway Capacity Manual 2010
----- Rural & Small Metro Regions: Performance-based Planning
----- Guidelines for Applying Right-Turn Slip Lanes
----- Bicycling Participation Benchmarking Study Report
----- Ped Safety Enforcement Operations Guide
----- Truck Side Guards Resource Page
----- U.S. Bicycle Route System Resource Page
----- New Installment: Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper Resource Guide
----- Free e-Book: The Public Life Reader
----- New Online Courses from Planetizen

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

FEDERAL SAFE STREETS ACT INTRODUCED
-> Representatives Doris Matsui (D-CA-5) and David Joyce (R-OH-14) introduced the Safe Streets Act of 2015 (HR 2071: http://1.usa.gov/1AKeLwM) on April 28. The bill would require states and Metropolitan Planning Organizations to adopt a Complete Streets policy for planning, designing, and building streets. They were joined by 17 additional original cosponsors from both sides of the aisle. To let your US Representative know your interests related to Complete Streets, go to http://bit.ly/1IgQxwx.

US DOT MAYORS CHALLENGE UPDATE
-> As of May 19, 2015, 218 cities have signed on to Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx’s Mayors’ Challenge (http://1.usa.gov/1Cx9G8C). (Check to see if yours is among them: http://1.usa.gov/1GjTMD8) The Challenge, part of the Secretary’s “Safer People, Safer Streets” initiative to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety, calls for mayors and top elected officials to take a public stance to reduce pedestrian and bicycle crashes. The effort calls for cities to take action in seven areas:

  • Take a Complete Streets approach.
  • Identify and address barriers to make streets safe and convenient for all road users, including people of all ages and abilities and those using assistive mobility devices.
  • Gather and track biking and walking data.
  • Use designs that are appropriate to the context of the street and its uses.
  • Take advantage of opportunities to create and complete pedestrian and bicycle networks through maintenance.
  • Improve walking and biking safety laws and regulations.
  • Educate and enforce proper road use behavior by all.

Cities may still join by emailing their team leader’s contact information to pedbikesafety@dot.gov.

ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION EQUITY MASTER PLAN SCAN
-> Active Transportation Equity: A Scan of Existing Master Plans (http://bit.ly/1K8SFFW) examines 38 current bicycle and pedestrian master plans to assess the definition and inclusion of equity as a stated goal or outcome. Equity within the bicycling and walking movement tends to focus on recognizing and reacting to the underrepresentation of youth, women, and people of color in advocacy efforts and local transportation decisions. As active transportation advocates, planners, and engineers move forward on planning efforts, this resource is intended to serve as a reference with examples of approaches they can learn from and build upon.

FOUR US CITIES CREATING PROTECTED INTERSECTIONS
-> Fifteen months after American bikeway designer Nick Falbo coined the phrase “protected intersection” to refer to a Dutch-style intersection between two streets with protected bike lanes, the concept hasn’t just ricocheted around the Internet — it’s been approved by four different cities: Austin, Salt Lake City, Davis and Boston. (See article for 2 brief video demonstrations) [http://bit.ly/1Qo50FT]

(See also http://bit.ly/1SVyWgQ for video and details of Salt Lake City plans.)

VANCOUVER, BC: NEARLY 50% PED, BIKE & TRANSIT MODE SHARE
-> Recent travel data show that the City of Vancouver's (BC) automobile mode share has declined to about half of all trips (most North American cities have about 80% automobile mode share), offset by growth in walking, cycling and public transit trips. Daily automobile trips declined from 980,000 in 2013 to just 918,000 in 2014, while walking, cycling, and public transit trips rose from 893,000 to 905,000. That puts the alternative modes in a statistical dead heat with automobile trips. The city has already surpassed its long-term target to reduce vehicle trips at least 20 percent by 2040.

The Vancouver region:

  • Has 3.9 traffic deaths per 100,000 residents, one of the lowest among North American cities, and despite rapid growth in bicycle travel, crashes involving bicycles have not increased, indicating a declining crash rate.
  • Households devote just 12.4 percent of their household budgets to transportation, the least of any North American city
  • Rates as one of the world’s most livable cities. [http://bit.ly/1BmpasZ]

(Come see for yourself at Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place in Vancouver, September 12-15, 2016.)

VANCOUVER, BC: TO CONVERT ANOTHER BRIDGE LANE TO BIKE & PED TRAFFIC
-> In 2009, Vancouver converted a southbound car lane on the west side of the Burrard Bridge to a protected bikeway. On the east side, the city converted the existing sidewalk into a bike path. The three-month experiment defied predictions of carmageddon and became a permanent fixture. According to the city, the bridge handled about 300,000 bike trips per month between September and November last year. Now, Vancouver is looking to remove another car lane to open up room for a walking path on the east side, and to redesign the intersection at the other foot of the bridge to reduce conflicts between drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians. The main part of the span would have four car lanes and dedicated paths for walking and biking in each direction, compared to six car lanes and narrow, mixed-use paths before the 2009 redesign. [http://bit.ly/1dKDl6q]

(Check out progress on Burrard Bridge while at Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place 2016 in Vancouver—take at least one of the 300,000+ bike trips on the bridge that month.)

ANALYSIS OF FISCAL IMPLICATIONS OF MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS
-> Over the past 40 years research has shown that low-density, unconnected, development is more costly to the public sector than compact, urban development. Every municipality considering new development should understand the financial implications of these options. How much will it cost to support that new development in coming years? Would the development bring more net revenue if designed differently? These are potentially multi-million dollar questions that no municipality can afford to ignore.

Smart Growth America, a national non-profit, and RCLCO, a national real estate advisory firm, have created a new model designed to help municipalities understand the financial performance of development patterns, and what strategies could generate better returns in the future. They consider a variety of public costs and revenues to help municipal leaders understand how a smart growth approach to development could help improve their bottom line. SGA has used its new model to analyze the fiscal implications of development patterns (The Fiscal Implications of Development Patterns: A Model for Municipal Analysis: http://bit.ly/1eOCrpF) in Macon, GA; Madison, WI and West Des Moines, IA. For instance, In Macon, smart growth would generate 4.7 times the fiscal impact as development on the edge of town. [http://bit.ly/1Ibt7pu]

UNDERSTANDING SMART GROWTH ECONOMIC SAVINGS & BENEFITS
-> How communities develop can have many direct and indirect impacts. Smart growth policies, which result in more compact, multimodal development, reduce per capita land consumption and the distances between common destinations, which reduces the costs of providing public infrastructure and services, improves accessibility and reduces per capita motor vehicle travel, which in turn provides economic, social and environmental benefits. A new report (Understanding Smart Growth Savings: Evaluating Economic Savings and Benefits of Compact Development, and How They Are Misrepresented By Critics: http://bit.ly/1FsMq9I) examines these impacts. It defines smart growth and its alternative, sprawl, summarizes current research concerning their costs and benefits, investigates consumer preferences, and evaluates smart growth criticisms.

STUDY: QUEBEC CYCLE TOURISTS SPEND MORE, STAY LONGER, COME MORE OFTEN
-> Cycle tourists spend more, take frequent trips and travel for longer periods of time than the typical leisure tourist. And because they schedule their trips as early as June and as late as September, cycle tourists are helping to extend Quebec’s tourist season. These are some of the highlights of a study released by UQAM’s Transat Chair in Tourism. (Study Highlights: http://bit.ly/1Jkrl8s)

This study shows that cycle tourists spend 6% more than other leisure travelers, all markets combined, or an average of $675 per cycling trip in Quebec. The presence of the Route Verte also seems to encourage tourists to cover more distance and/or stay for a longer period of time, thus emphasizing the importance of ongoing development, maintenance and promotion efforts. The connectivity afforded by the Route Verte between the various regions constitutes its key strength. [http://bit.ly/1JpODbw]

VOTE FOR WALKING VISIONARY AWARDS NOMINEES
-> Vote for your favorite Walking Visionary project(s) once a week per project and e-mail address. Voting ends June 16, 2015, at 12:00 CET. (http://bit.ly/1FgH6XM). In addition to Every Body Walk!, (http://bit.ly/1MkEtJk) and Perils for Pedestrians (http://bit.ly/1RJfz9h), check out:

  • The Standing up for Older Pedestrians campaign combines research, evidence-based resource development and sustained advocacy through the media and directly to all levels of government in Australia. (http://bit.ly/1AtXyHN)
  • Machinoeki, a hospitality station for people whose main mode of transport is walking: free use of toilets and resting places, local information and guidance. There are more than 1600 Machinoekis throughout Japan. (http://bit.ly/1GDPc17)
  • Accessible?, an app providing valid, in-depth information with pictures about a route’s, a trail’s, a place’s or a venue’s accessibility. (http://bit.ly/1ExCeMc)
  • GreaterPlaces, a crowdsourced, online community devoted to city and town design. Like Houzz for interiors. (http://bit.ly/1Ro1kGz)
  • Building Walkability With Data, a walkability project in Nairobi, Delhi and Bogota to empower women and girls as agents of change in making their communities safer. (http://bit.ly/1Ay5N5l)
  • Camina a strategy to claim the place of the pedestrian with Tactical Urbanism interventions in Mexico City. (http://bit.ly/1FZaQhB)


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

NASHVILLE, TN & CHICAGO, IL: GREEN ALLEYS, STORMWATER & PLACEMAKING
-> Nashville is hoping it can make its The Nations neighborhood more resilient to weather-related events by creating green alleys. The city has launched its first green alley project, whereby volunteers plant shallow rain gardens in residents’ backyards along about 20 blocks of alleyways. Generally, green alleys are designed to capture stormwater before it runs into nearby waterways and pollutes them. Under Nashville’s program, the goal is to have zero runoff from residential properties. Nashville also wants to make its green alleys more walkable and safe, to create “living” spaces: places that not only implement sustainable best practices, but also encourage community activities and active uses like walking and bicycling.

Chicago was one of the first to pioneer a green alley program in 2006. The Chicago Green Alley program’s goal was to resurface its alleys with porous material that could absorb water into the ground rather than having it spill into Lake Michigan. So far, the city has outfitted more than 100 alleys. [http://bit.ly/1GYzHRm]

UNIV. OF WA INSTALLS SIDES GUARDS ON ITS LARGE TRUCKS
-> In mid-May, the University of Washington installed side guards on each of the 31 box trucks in its campus fleet. Doing so should greatly reduce the number of bicyclists and pedestrians killed in side-impact crashes. The cost of each side guard varied by truck size—UW paid in the range of $1,500 per truck.

Side guards work by filling the space between front and rear wheels on heavy commercial trucks with high ground clearance such as delivery and garbage trucks and tractor-trailers. Without them, pedestrians and bicyclists can fall under the truck and into the path of the rear wheels, which is often fatal. This typically happens in left and right hook situations where a turning truck hits a bicyclist traveling straight or a pedestrian crossing the street. Side guards have been mandatory on most trucks in the United Kingdom and all trucks in the European Union since 1986 and 1989. [http://bit.ly/1M41sHE]

(See Resources section for Truck Side Guards Resource Page)

COURT FINDS WI DOT USED INFLATED FORECASTS TO JUSTIFY ROAD EXPANSION
-> On Friday, the U.S. Eastern District Court upheld claims in a lawsuit filed by 1000 Friends of Wisconsin and cut off federal funding for the beleaguered Highway 23 road expansion project between Fond du Lac and Plymouth. The Court agreed with the land use organization that the Wisconsin Department of Transportation used unsupported, inflated traffic forecasts to justify the project. The Court ruled that the project is ineligible for federal funding until documented accurate traffic forecasts can be made that justify expanding the highway. The state can now either go back to the drawing board and do verifiable forecasting or scrap the expansion plans. The ruling does not stop the state from building the project using only state funds. [http://bit.ly/1Q6pdoX]

ALBUQUERQUE, NM: PILOTS LOWER COST BIKE-SHARE MODEL
-> On Bike to Work Day, May 15th, Albuquerque, New Mexico, rolled out its new bike-share pilot program. Named BICI — a shortened version of bicicleta, the Spanish word for bicycle — the pilot launched in the downtown core with 65 bikes at 13 stations. BICI is using Zagster, a less expensive alternative to the kiosk-based systems that most cities have. The bike-share program comes as part of a broader revitalization effort for Albuquerque’s flagging downtown.

Each Zagster bike is equipped with an electronic lockbox similar to those used by real estate agents on homes they’re showing. When you want to ride a bike you either use a smartphone app or text a number provided to get the lockbox key code. The lockbox has a key inside that you use to unlock a regular U-lock at the rack. When you’re done riding, you check it back in with the app or by texting the word “end” to the same number. Annual memberships are $25, monthly memberships are $15, and day passes are $3. [http://bit.ly/1SVyqiP]

SAN FRANCISCO, CA: BIKE TO WORSHIP WEEK
-> Bike to Worship Week, May 24-31, was an interfaith community event led by SF Bicycle Coalition member-volunteers of all different faiths in partnership with the San Francisco Interfaith Council and California Interfaith Power and Light. Various congregations planned to raise visibility of biking to worship (and elsewhere!) while making their communities safer and more pleasant places to live. [http://bit.ly/1HK9yBZ]

FL LEGISLATURE TO CONSIDER $50M/YR FOR NETWORK OF BIKE & PED TRAILS
-> When the Florida Legislature resumes business this week, the Senate will take up a bill to create a statewide network of bicycle and pedestrian paths known as SunTrail. The measure (SB 7054) would designate $50 million a year toward the network of bike and pedestrian trails. Half the money would come from a $225 fee that’s already imposed when drivers register new motor vehicles. The other half would come from Amendment 1, the money that voters approved overwhelmingly in November for conserving land and water. [http://bit.ly/1AK3D2S]

APPLY TO BE A WALK FRIENDLY COMMUNITY
-> The Walk Friendly Communities program, which recognizes communities that are committed to improving conditions for walking, is accepting applications through June 15th. [Apply at: http://bit.ly/10oYyVz]


THE RESEARCH BEAT

WIDER LANES MAKE STREETS MORE DANGEROUS
-> A new study (Narrower Lanes, Safer Streets: http://bit.ly/1AJVv2q) reinforces the argument that cities need to reconsider lane widths and redesign streets accordingly. In a paper to be presented at the Canadian Institute of Traffic Engineers annual conference, author Dewan Masud Karim presents hard evidence that wider lanes increase risk on city streets. Looking at the crash databases, Karim found that collision rates escalate as lane widths exceed about 10.5 feet. Roads with the widest lanes — 12 feet or wider — were associated with greater crash rates and higher impact speeds. Karim also found that crash rates rise as lanes become narrower than about 10 feet, though this does not take impact speeds and crash severity into account. He concluded that there is a sweet spot for lane widths on city streets, between about 10 and 10.5 feet. [http://bit.ly/1eOgWVR]

U.S. BICYCLING PARTICIPATION STUDY
-> People for Bikes commissioned the U.S. Bicycling Participation Study (http://bit.ly/1II74pB), an unprecedented comprehensive survey of bicycling participation. They measured all kinds of riding by all kinds of people, including women. It turns out that much of what we thought we knew was wrong. Here are three important and interesting findings from the study.

  • We found that 104 million people—a third of the population—rode a bicycle last year and of those, 45 million (43%) were women compared to 59 million men (57%).
  • 95% of the 45 million women who rode in 2014, did so for recreation. Nearly two-thirds of women who bike, ride only for recreation. And among women who do ride for transportation, the most popular types of transportation trips, coming in at 68%, were related to social or leisure activities.
  • Women with children ride at a higher rate than those without (32% vs. 19%), as do men (47% with children vs. 31% without)...
[http://bit.ly/1EVcQQH]

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF NONMOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION
-> White Paper: Evaluating the Economic Benefits of Nonmotorized Transportation (http://bit.ly/1EUQkYr) examines potential methods for evaluating the economic benefits from nonmotorized transportation investments: commute cost savings for bicyclists and pedestrians, direct benefits to bicycle and tourism-related businesses, indirect economic benefits due to changing consumer behavior, and individual and societal cost savings associated with health and environmental benefits. This report reviews potential methods for analyzing these different economic benefits at the project, neighborhood, and larger community scale.

IMPACT OF SRTS PROGRAMS ON WALKING AND BIKING
-> The “Impact of Safe Routes to School Programs on Walking and Biking” (http://bit.ly/1Mk419h) research review highlights findings from studies conducted in several states and cities that have examined walking or biking rates, safety, and economic issues associated with Safe Routes to School. There is consistent evidence that implementation of SRTS programs is associated with more children walking and biking safely to and from school in a cost-effective manner. Moreover, each additional year of SRTS participation leads to more students walking and biking. While evaluations of SRTS are limited and based on selected states and cities, the evidence from multiple large studies supports continued SRTS programs.

RANKING OF MAJOR US METROS BY WALKING ACCESS TO JOBS
-> A new study (Access Across America: Walking 2014: http://bit.ly/1cwC94Q) ranks the 50 largest metro areas in America according to the accessibility of jobs by walking. Using “detailed pedestrian networks,” the researchers measured the number of jobs reachable in a 10-minute walk for the typical worker in each metro. Then they measured how many jobs were reachable within 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes. In top-rated New York City, for instance, about 5,000 jobs are within a 10-minute walk of the average residence. In lowest-rated Birmingham, it’s only 180 jobs. The top 5 cities: New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington. See the report for where the other 45 major metros fall. [http://bit.ly/1Qo4esw]


QUOTES R US

“By providing sidewalks, cycle-paths and safe crossings, reducing and enforcing speed limits and installing speed management (like the humble but effective speed hump) local infrastructure can be improved to create a ‘forgiving’ environment in which children can be better protected when they travel.”
--From “Safe to Learn: Safe Journeys to School are a Child’s Right,” in calling for a new impetus to reduce child injury on roads and in public spaces to make the school journey safe for all the world’s children http://bit.ly/1IfimFy

“You can, for a very, very low cost, make the difference between potential accident and potential tragedy. Why wouldn’t you?”
--University of WA Director of Transportation Josh Kavanagh on installing $1,500 side guards on large campus trucks: http://bit.ly/1M41sHE

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

ANCIENT GROMA TOOL HELPED ROMANS BUILD MOSTLY STRAIGHT ROADS
The roads of ancient Rome were an engineering marvel. Some still exist today, 2,000 years (or so) after they were first built. Roman roads were also remarkably straight. They used a “groma,” surveying tool that was simple to make and easy to carry. (Description: http://bit.ly/1K9kEFx. Images: http://bit.ly/1IclqiK) Romans also placed seashells on the top surface to reflect the moon at night. http://bit.ly/1EVvjwy


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

WEBINAR "Partners for Places Grant Webinar” (See Jobs section for RFP)
Date: June 8, 2015, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Funders' Network for Smart
Details: http://bit.ly/1IcwLiN, free

WEBINAR "Using the Right Tools for Systemic Safety Analysis”
Date: June 8, 2015, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Scott Davis (Thurston County, WA), Scott Jones (UT DOT) & Doug Bish (OR DOT)
Host: Federal Highway Administration
Details: http://1.usa.gov/1ePd1YQ, free

CONFERENCE CALL "Citizen Planning Academies”
Date: June 11, 2015, 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Wayne Senville (PlannersWeb.com), Leanna Lawson (Rockingham County Citizens' Academy) & Kathleen Osher (Transit Alliance)
Host: Community Matters
Details: http://bit.ly/1SVP01W, free

WEBINAR "Why Walking?" (1st Walking College Webinar)
Date: June 18, 2015, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Jonathon Stalls (Walk2Connect) & Jim Stone (Circulate San Diego)
Host: America Walks, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Public Health Association, New Jersey Department of Health, & Every Body Walk! Collaborative
Details: http://bit.ly/1SVrdiT

WEBINAR “Pedestrian Safety Enforcement Operations" (see Resources section)
Date: June 18, 2015, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Wil Price (National Highway Traffic Safety Admin.), Ranjit Walia (Civic Eye Collaborative LLC), George Branyan (Washington DC DOT) & Sergeant Richard Ruth (Orlando Police Dept.)
Host: Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1eONf7j, free

WEBINAR "Taking Steps to Prevent Pedestrian Injuries: New Tools & Resources"
Date: June 18, 2015, 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Scott Bricker (America Walks), Stefanie Seskin (National Complete Streets Coalition), James Gallagher (Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center) & Katie Arseniadis (Safe States Alliance)
Host: Safe States Alliance
Details: http://bit.ly/1EV3Yuq, free

WEBINAR "Understanding the Socio-Psychological Factors Affecting Active Travel to School"
Date: June 23, 2015, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: June 23, 2015, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Host: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/1Ftmmv9, free

WEBINAR "Designing Places for People" (2nd Walking College Webinar)
Date: June 23, 2015, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Dan Burden & Samantha Thomas (Blue Zones)
Host: America Walks, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Public Health Association, New Jersey Department of Health, & Every Body Walk! Collaborative
Details: http://bit.ly/1FsRHOB, free

WEBINAR "Institutionalizing the Change" (3rd Walking College Webinar)
Date: July 15, 2015, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Mark Fenton
Host: America Walks, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Public Health Association, New Jersey Department of Health, & Every Body Walk! Collaborative
Details: http://bit.ly/1FtISF9, free

WEBINAR "Transit-Oriented Development and Equity in Latino Neighborhoods: A Comparative Case Study of Macarthur Park (Los Angeles) and Fruitvale (Oakland)”
Date: July 16, 2015, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Gerardo Sandoval (Univ. of OR)
Host: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/1QpaNev, free


RESOURCES

CROSS-MODAL PROJECT PRIORITIZATION PEER EXCHANGE REPORT
-> The US DOT released a report (Cross-Modal Project Prioritization: A Transportation Planning Capacity Building Program Peer Exchange: http://1.usa.gov/1ddkL5S) that highlights recommendations and practices for implementing the Strategic Transportation Investment Law in North Carolina—legislation that requires capital expenditures across all modes of transportation to compete for funding. [http://bit.ly/1Qo7kNm]

TRB HIGHWAY CAPACITY MANUAL 2010
-> The fifth edition of the “Highway Capacity Manual (HCM2010),” which updates HCM2000, will significantly enhance how engineers and planners assess the traffic and environmental effects of highway projects. It:

  • Provides an integrated multimodal approach to the analysis and evaluation of urban streets from the points of view of automobile drivers, transit passengers, bicyclists, and pedestrians;
  • Addresses the proper application of micro-simulation analysis and the evaluation of those results;
  • Examines active traffic management in relation to both demand and capacity; and
  • Explores specific tools and generalized service volume tables, to assist planners in quickly sizing future facilities. ($220.00, $165.00 for TRB Affiliates) [http://bit.ly/1GY7Ssu]

RURAL & SMALL METRO REGIONS: PERFORMANCE-BASED PLANNING
-> “Moving toward Performance-based Transportation Planning in Rural and Small Metropolitan Regions” (http://bit.ly/1Jkjckw) research found that many organizations are adopting measures and considering performance measurement carefully. The efforts of state DOTs and state legislatures to increase performance culture play a significant role in determining the extent to which regional agencies are moving toward performance measurement. In many cases, a strategic planning framework is already well entrenched in RTPOs’ planning processes and could be adapted to include systematic performance measurement. [http://bit.ly/1Jkj9Fp]

GUIDELINES FOR APPLYING RIGHT-TURN SLIP LANES
-> The Center for Transportation Research at the University of Texas at Austin has released A” Report on the Development of Guidelines for Applying Right-Turn Slip Lanes” (http://bit.ly/1M3NMwl) that summarizes research on the application of right-turn slip lanes— lanes that promote slower turn speeds and enhance visibility of the pedestrian crossing location.

BICYCLING PARTICIPATION BENCHMARKING STUDY REPORT
-> People for Bikes’ “U.S. Bicycling Participation Benchmarking Study Report” (http://bit.ly/1IbDiub) provides a standard methodological approach for quantifying and tracking bicycle use over time and projected returns on investments to increase bicycle use.

PED SAFETY ENFORCEMENT OPERATIONS GUIDE
-> The “Pedestrian Safety Enforcement Operations: A How-To Guide“ (http://1.usa.gov/1GYHe2B) provides tips and guidance on how States and communities can effectively deploy pedestrian safety enforcement operations to reduce pedestrian injuries and fatalities. It includes a summary of promising practices, guidance on planning and implementing an operation, a discussion of several considerations and variations, recommendations regarding the evaluation of pedestrian safety programs, and a series of case studies. The guide also contains an Appendix with sample forms and other useful information.

(See Webinar section for June 18 webinar on this guide.)

TRUCK SIDE GUARDS RESOURCE PAGE
-> Truck side guards are vehicle-based safety devices designed to keep pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorcyclists from being run over by a large truck’s rear wheels in a side-impact collision. The Volpe National Transportation Systems Center is:

  • Conducting research and partnering with cities to help deploy side guards and other technologies
  • Building a national network of early adopters in the area of truck side guards and other truck safety technologies related to pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorcyclists, and
  • Maintaining a Truck Guards Resource Page for municipalities and private sector businesses. [http://1.usa.gov/1FrIJky]

(See Regional and Local Actions section for Univ. of WA Installs Sides Guards on its Large Trucks item.)

U.S. BICYCLE ROUTE SYSTEM RESOURCE PAGE
-> The U.S. Bicycle Route System is a huge, complex project that offers an incredible and inspiring vision for a national bicycle route network. Adventure Cycling Association has introduced its new and improved online resources to help find USBRS information in one easy, convenient place. [http://bit.ly/1M4mkyI]

(See a release at http://bit.ly/1cxjkhW for details about the latest expansions of this nearly 9,000-mile network. Brava!)

NEW INSTALLMENT: LIGHTER, QUICKER, CHEAPER RESOURCE GUIDE
-> Check out the newest installment of Project for Public Spaces ongoing Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper (LQC) Resource Guide: a convenient typology of the four major components of any LQC project, along with case studies for each. (Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper is a Placemaking strategy that empowers communities to create great places in their neighborhoods, cities, or regions. Short-term LQC improvements – whether it’s new amenities, programming, art, or design changes – are part of a larger and more permanent vision for a particular site.) The LQC Resource Guide is an interactive and evolving set of new ideas and tools for turning public spaces within your community into quality shared places. [http://bit.ly/1Jjxsdq]

FREE E-BOOK: THE PUBLIC LIFE READER
-> Next City’s 50-page downloadable ebook, “The Public Life Reader” (free after registration: http://bit.ly/1EUTLy1) explores the public spaces that define our cities. With a mix of original reporting and reflection by urban design practitioners, The Public Life Reader illuminates critical questions about how to create public spaces that bring people together across racial, cultural and class lines.

NEW ONLINE COURSES FROM PLANETIZEN
-> Check out the new free online courses at Planetizen. Each is about an hour. (http://bit.ly/1JoX0Eh) Here are a couple of highlights:

  • CartoDB for Planners covers the web interface of CartoDB, an innovative online mapping platform. Learn how to setup a basic map, add data from ArcGIS and other sources, and publish your map on the web. (http://bit.ly/1Fs1UdW)
  • Photoshop CC for Planners 4: Creating Visual Simulations uses the skills and techniques covered in the previous three Photoshop CC courses (http://bit.ly/1GYrEEm, http://bit.ly/1EUwsVk & http://bit.ly/1BKa00U) to create an advanced visual simulation of a re-imagined public space. (http://bit.ly/1JoVL8d)


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR NOMINATIONS - Tools of Change Peer-Reviewed Landmark Case Studies Tools of Change is now soliciting nominations for its 2015 Landmark behavior change case studies in effective, innovative or impactful approaches for changing transportation behaviors.
Deadline: June 12, 2015, http://bit.ly/1EV3HM5

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - APBP 2015 Ken Cross Student Research Competition. 2015 APBP Professional Development Seminar, September 28 – October 1, 2015, St. Louis, MO.
Deadline: June 15, 2015, http://bit.ly/1188ckD

-> CALL FOR SESSION PROPOSALS - New Partners for Smart Growth, February 11-13, 2016, Portland, OR.
Deadline: June 30, 2015, http://bit.ly/1INzjp1

-> CALL FOR COMPETITION ENTRIES - Communicating Transportation Needs and Issues to Targeted Populations, TRB Committee ADA 60
Deadline: July 28, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GjJ3Za

-> CALL FOR PAPERS – TRB 95th Annual Meeting, January 10–14, 2016, Washington, D.C., & for publication in the Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Deadline: August 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1ddiTu5

-> Call FOR ABSTRACTS - 8th International Urban Design Conference, November 16-18, 2015, Brisbane, Australia.
Deadline: August 7, 2015, http://bit.ly/17ef3to

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - Active Living Research 2016, January 31 - February 3, 2016, Clearwater Beach, FL.
Deadline: August 28, 2015, 24:00 GMT, http://bit.ly/1FSW3BQ

-> CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS - Winter Cycling Congress 2016, February 2-4, 2016, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN
Deadline: September 30, 2015, http://bit.ly/1HtDZl2

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> July 20-21, 2015, Cities for Tomorrow Conference, New York, NY.
http://bit.ly/1ddwZLU


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL FOR NOMINATIONS - ACTIVE/SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM FOR LANDMARK BEHAVIOR CHANGE CASE STUDIES DESIGNATION, TOOLS OF CHANGE
Designation as a Landmark case study recognizes behavior change/social marketing approaches and programs considered to be among the most successful in the world. The designated programs gain exposure, credibility and free, on-line program case study materials, which can make it easier for them to maintain or increase program funding. Each designated approach/program is featured in a case study webinar. A video and transcript of the webinar, and a written case study based on the webinar, are publicly available after the webinar.
Deadline: June 12, 2015, http://bit.ly/1Qp3Qdw

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS – FREE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
Free technical assistance is now available for communities in CO, WY, ID & MT through New Mobility West – a partnership that includes the Sonoran Institute and Project for Public Spaces. Communities selected will receive assistance from July to November, 2015 for 3 key challenges: 1) State highways in communities, 2) local capital improvement planning and investment, and 3) resign commercial corridors.
Deadline: June 15, 2015, http://bit.ly/1MjwRqh and http://bit.ly/1FsWlwT

-> CALL FOR APPLICANTS- SUSIE STEPHENS (http://bit.ly/1dLCuCk) SCHOLARSHIP TO ATTEND APBP PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR SEPTEMBER 28 - OCTOBER 1, 2015, ST. LOUIS, MO (Must demonstrate financial need & be or become an APBP member)
Deadline: June 15, 2015, http://bit.ly/11TDXiS

-> RFP - PARTNERS FOR PLACES
Partners for Places is a successful matching grant program that improves U.S. and Canadian communities by building partnerships between local government sustainability leaders and place-based foundations. National funders invest in local projects developed through these partnerships to promote a healthy environment, a strong economy, and well being for all residents. Through these investments, Partners for Places fosters long-term relationships that make our urban areas more prosperous, livable, and vibrant. Grants will be between $25,000 and $75,000 for a one-year project with a 1:1 match required by one or more local, place-based foundations. The Selection Committee will consider proposals for two-year project support, with an award range of $50,000-$150,000.
Deadline: July 27, 2015, http://bit.ly/1dediDy

-> JOB - BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN SUPERVISOR, MN DOT
This position is responsible for supervising staff in the development and delivery of coordinated and integrated plans, implementation of policies and work tasks in conjunction with the Districts, regional planning partners, local units of government and the Statewide Non-Motorized Transportation Advisory Committee. The position will serve as the assistant to the section manager and act accordingly in the absence of the manager. This includes bicycle and pedestrian technical support, planning, training, outreach, safety, evaluation and education. Primary responsibilities are for development and maintenance of the Bicycle System Plan, Pedestrian System Plan, Non-Motorized Counting Program, the Safe Routes to School Program, Bicycle Design Manual, Statewide Bicycle Map, State Bikeways, Share the Road Program and administration of the Statewide Non-Motorized Transportation Committee.
Deadline: June 5, 2015, http://bit.ly/1M4FMLF

-> JOB - BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN PROGRAM MANAGER, CITY OF RALEIGH, NC
The Bicycle and Pedestrian Program Manager is primarily responsible for the planning and implementation of the City’s bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. The position is also responsible for education and outreach to the public regarding cycling and walking transportation, and also for the City’s Safe Routes to Schools initiatives.
Deadline: June 10, 2015, 11:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1M4qs1z

-> JOB - BICYCLE PROGRAM MANAGER, SUSTAIN CHARLOTTE, NC
Sustain Charlotte is looking for an energetic Bicycle Program Manager with a passion and talent for fostering collaboration to accomplish shared goals. Reporting to the Executive Director, the Bicycle Program Manager will develop and manage a two-year initiative to build relationships and foster collaboration among the various organizations who offer cycling events and programs in the Charlotte area, assist with publicizing these activities, and establish Sustain Charlotte as the hub organization for information related to cycling. The Bicycle Program Manager will also assist in securing funding via grants and membership to support these activities beyond the initial two-year period.
Deadline: June 15, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GYoPmx

-> JOB - URBAN PLANNER III - COMPLETE STREETS COORDINATOR, CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, VA
The position conducts research and data collection and analysis, including field investigations, surveys, impact studies, demographic information, and other relevant documents to prepare technical reports for review by Boards, Commissions, City Council and the public. It also conducts field visits to site Capital Bikeshare locations, Car Share locations, parking meter locations, bicycle rack locations and to inspect project installation, among other responsibilities
Deadline: June 16, 2015, 11:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1IbQyPu

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER I OR II - BICYCLE/PEDESTRIAN PLANNING, NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS, ARLINGTON, TX
The Transportation Department of the North Central Texas Council of Governments is seeking an entry- or mid-level Transportation Planner to support the Sustainable Development program, specifically in the area of Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordination. This position will conduct activities related to multi-modal corridor studies, bicycle/pedestrian planning and studies, demographic analysis, bicycle and pedestrian counts, safety education, data collection, healthy communities, mapping, grant administration, Context Sensitive Design/Complete Streets, and urban design/landscaping.
Deadline: None provided, Transportation Planner I position: http://bit.ly/1Mk8Gbo; Transportation Planner II position: http://bit.ly/1Mk9bCa

-> JOB - MOBILITY DIRECTOR, CAMPUS PLANNING, UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI, CORAL GABLES, FL
The employee will manage and direct all transportation/traffic and parking management planning activities for all three campuses as required for regulatory approvals with the long-term focus being the reduction of the single occupant vehicle. This employee will oversee consultant selection, supervision and manage work associated/required for regulatory reports and approvals as needed and will develop policies, plans, and projects relating to access to the university via roads, cars, mass transit pedestrian systems, biking.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/1Mk7S6o

-> FELLOWSHIP - LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE FELLOW, SMART GROWTH AMERICA, WASHINGTON, DC
Smart Growth America is currently in search of a Fellow to support our Leadership Institute and technical assistance work. The Fellow will be an integral part of the technical assistance team and will play a vital role in managing the day-to-day operations of our workshop program for local communities around the country. Core responsibilities include: providing logistical and research support for workshops and policy summits, coordinating with workshop instructors and communities receiving workshops, authoring blogs, and promoting our technical assistance through social networking.
Deadline: None provided (posted May 19), http://bit.ly/1KCCbnH

See also:
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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Editor Emeritus & Founding Editor: John Williams
Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston

Contributors: 1000 Friends of Wisconsin; Active Living Research News; America Walks; Michael Andersen; APBP Members Listerve; Biking & Walking Roundup; Charles Bingham; James Brasuell; John Cock; Ariella Cohen; Josh Cohen; Elizabeth Daigneau; Governing; Jay Kassirer; LinkedIn Planetizen; Todd Litman; Next City; The Palm Beach Post; The PBIC Messenger; Project for Public Spaces Placemaking Newsletter; Jean-François Pronovost; Cara Seiderman; Angie Schmitt; Smart Growth America May News; Jim Smith; Jenn Stanley; Streetsblog; Streetside; Strong Towns; Technology Exchange Express; TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter; Vélo Québec; Volpe News; VTPI News; John Wetmore; What’s New in TPCB Friday Update.


CONTACT US

©2015 - NCBW | The National Center for Bicycling & Walking is a program of Project for Public Spaces, Inc. http://www.bikewalk.org/contact.php