------------------------------------------------------------

C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

------------------------------------------------------------

#387 Wednesday, July 15, 2015

------------------------------------------------------------

CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
------------------------------------------------------------
----- DOT Updates Highway Trust Fund Ticker: Deadline, Shortfall Loom
----- Why Millennials Are Driving Less
----- Designed to Move: A Physical Activity Action Agenda
----- New Mapping Tool Helps Judge Pedestrians, Public Space
----- Take Survey of Cities on Protected Bike Lane Designs
----- Milan, Italy to Create Car-free Downtown
----- How Transportation Can Create a Sense of Community
----- BIKE - The Amazing world of Cyclists in Utrecht, The Netherlands

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
------------------------------------------------------------
----- Minneapolis, MN 1st US City on the Copenhagenize Index
----- Portland, OR: Combine User Bike Trip Input & Real-time Bike Counts
----- VA Adopts Multimodal, Competitive Project Scoring Process
----- Cycletrack Progress in Boston, MA
----- Chicago, IL: $5/yr Bikeshare Low-income Membership
----- NYC: Citi Bike Workers 1st Bikeshare to Unionize
----- Honolulu, HI: Recycles Buses as Transitional Housing

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
------------------------------------------------------------
----- Dutch Cycling: Health and Related Economic Benefits
----- Walking & Cycling Can Save Europeans Over $88 Billion/Yr
----- Bike Sharing: Evidence on Impacts + Review of Implementation & Operation
----- Recreation Facilities Near Work Linked w/ Active Commuting
----- Reducing Congestion Via Faster, Greener & Cheaper Options
----- Three Childhood Obesity Research Tools

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
------------------------------------------------------------
----- At the Intersection of Active Transportation and Equity
----- How SRTS & Safety Initiatives Can Overcome Violence & Crime
----- Maps of Nearly Every Job in America
----- NIH Pedestrian Facility Design Course
----- Streets as Public Spaces and Drivers of Urban Prosperity
----- The Global Road Safety Review 2015
----- Performance-Based Practical Design to Improve Safety
----- APA: Safe Routes to Parks Factsheet

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
------------------------------------------------------------
- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

DOT UPDATES HIGHWAY TRUST FUND TICKER: DEADLINE, SHORTFALL LOOM
-> US DOT Secretary Anthony Foxx writes in a recent Fast Lane blog: In June, we published graphs showing past balances and projected balances for the two Highway Trust Fund accounts, the Highways Account and the Mass Transit Account. Those graphs showed the Highways Account balance quickly approaching zero with the Mass Transit Account balance not far behind. A month later, we've updated the data for both accounts to reflect June's activity. Both accounts are dwindling fast. With current surface transportation law set to expire by the end of this very month, the time for Congress to act is clearly now.

We released fact sheets for every state (http://1.usa.gov/1Jg4PsD) documenting the percentage of bridges that need major attention, the percent of roads in bad or mediocre condition, and the annual cost to drivers of those maintenance challenges. http://1.usa.gov/1fGyR1G

WHY MILLENNIALS ARE DRIVING LESS
-> The ongoing discussion about Millennial driving trends is not about whether they’re declining, but why. Two theories lead the charge. The first is that demographic or economic factors are primarily to blame. Since so many Millennials are out of work or delaying the start of family life, they have less daily need to drive. The second idea suggests that young people fundamentally have a different attitude toward cars than previous generations did at that age, instead preferring to live in the city longer and travel by multiple alternative modes.

A new analysis of Millennial driving habits (Are Millennials Really the "Go-Nowhere" Generation?: http://bit.ly/1SlyJQV) attributes 10 to 25 percent of the driving decline to changing demographics, 35 to 50 percent to attitudes, and another 40 percent to the general downward shift in U.S. driving habits. http://bit.ly/1K6fjgT

DESIGNED TO MOVE: A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ACTION AGENDA
-> Designed to Move is a call-to-action supported by a community of public, private, and civil sector organizations dedicated to ending the growing epidemic of physical inactivity. In 2010, Nike initiated a process with over 70 organizations to better understand the underlying issues related to physical inactivity and help consolidate the facts and findings on the topic. The goal was to establish a unified path forward for action.

The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the International Council of Sport Science and Physical Education (ICSSPE) joined Nike to validate, refine, and publish the findings. More than 70 expert organizations from the field of physical activity consulted in the development of Designed to Move. Many are current partners or organizations with whom the co-authors had relationships or experience. Others were proactively sought after for their deep expertise in the various issues. All partners are committed to putting the plan into action. Check out the Designed to Move: A Physical Activity Action Agenda: http://bit.ly/1Oau2c7.

NEW MAPPING TOOL HELPS JUDGE PEDESTRIANS, PUBLIC SPACE
-> The Urban Network Analysis, a city-modeling software program from MIT’s City Form Lab, has not quite figured it all out. But it does reveal the deterministic powers of urban design. It’s been four years since they debuted the Urban Network Analysis plug-in for ArcGIS (http://bit.ly/1L2xt68), the powerful mapping software popular among planners and geographers. The free plug-in, which uses a set of algorithms to predict things like pedestrian routes, accessibility and market share, has over 100,000 users.

In April, City Form introduced UNA for Rhino 3D (http://bit.ly/1Sjtnps), a modeling software popular among architects, engineers and designers. Network theory, broadly speaking, uses simple schemes of edges and nodes to study complex systems. It’s used to solve problems involving logistics, social circles and ecosystems. Urban Network Analysis incorporates a third element, buildings, which can be weighted according to their employee head count, their value, their residential population or some other factor. Some of the app’s other tools compute how pedestrian movement responds to urban design, predicting popular routes and revealing important data. http://bit.ly/1CBrp1z

TAKE SURVEY OF CITIES ON PROTECTED BIKE LANE DESIGNS
-> If you work for a public agency to plan or build bike lanes, you should check out The Green Lane Project's new 15-minute Survey of Cities on Protected Bike Lane Designs: http://bit.ly/1TyViUS. The last time they did a survey like this, the findings became a key part of their case to the Federal Highway Administration that cities and states needed a clear "go" sign from the federal government that protected bike lanes are safe and desirable infrastructure. http://bit.ly/1dXt4Ts]

MILAN, ITALY TO CREATE CAR-FREE DOWNTOWN
-> Paris, Madrid, Brussels, Dublin—and now Milan. Italy’s second city is the latest of a string of European metropolises to start expelling cars from its downtown. There is no timeline for the project and the plan is to do it gradually, almost street by street. Meanwhile, over on the city center’s southern edge, the canal-side Navigli neighborhood is also getting its pedestrian area expanded, creating a car-free bar and café quarter to add to the just-pedestrianized Piazza Missori nearby. Put all this together and Milan will have what the deputy mayor calls "the creation of a vast area of pedestrian privilege", the city core passing a tipping point beyond which people, not cars, will forever dominate. http://bit.ly/1CAzWCj

HOW TRANSPORTATION CAN CREATE A SENSE OF COMMUNITY
-> For our streets to fulfill the critical "town square" function that is missing in most communities today, they need to be planned and designed appropriately using three essential guidelines: design for appropriate speeds; plan for community outcomes; and think of streets as public spaces. The Project for Public Spaces has identified ten qualities that, in conjunction with the principles described above, contribute to the success of great streets. Check out the descriptions of Attractions & Destinations; Identity & Image; Active Edge Uses; plus 7 other qualities. http://bit.ly/1K1woeQ

BIKE - THE AMAZING WORLD OF CYCLISTS IN UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS
-> Take a short break to check out a sweet documentary of bike culture in Utrecht, The Netherlands. (5:44) http://bit.ly/1MrR8K8


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

MINNEAPOLIS, MN 1ST US CITY ON THE COPENHAGENIZE INDEX
-> According to the Top 20 Copenhagenize Index of Bicycle-Friendly Cities: Minneapolis muscles its way into the Copenhagenize Index - the first American city to feature since the number of cities ranked increased in 2013. The city has the lowest baseline score of all the cities in the Top 20 but made up for that with bonus points in a number of categories. The city boasts 189 km of what they call "on-street bikeways" and 147 km of off-street. The latter is less interesting for urban cycling but Minneapolis is quickly becoming the go-to city in America for building infrastructure. An impressive - for America - modal share helped push them into the Index and we like the political will coming out of City Hall. A respectable bike share system is helping to cement the bicycle on the transport foundation of the city. Seeds have been planted and a garden is growing. America - often content with baby steps - is in desperate need of leadership cities and Minneapolis has emerged as a contender. http://bit.ly/1HIChXp. See the full list at http://bit.ly/1fGnKpe.

PORTLAND, OR: COMBINE USER BIKE TRIP INPUT & REAL-TIME BIKE COUNTS
-> One of Portland’s most interesting tech startups is about to move into its next phase: attempting to recruit thousands of local bike users to become rolling bikeway evaluators. Knock Software, the company that is simultaneously contracting with the City of Portland on an experimental piece of hardware that aims to radically lower the cost of counting bike traffic, is also setting out to convince 10,000 people to install its mobile app by the end of this summer. The offer: put the free app on your phone, give each bike trip a quick "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" as you complete it, and the city will be able to parse massive numbers of such trips into data that can rapidly improve Portland’s streets.

Knock founder William Henderson said in an interview that the combination of instant real-time bike counts (gathered by Knock’s small, low-cost sensors) and real-time user evaluations (gathered voluntarily from people who install Knock’s upcoming app, which is called Ride) would completely change the city’s ability to prove that its biking improvements are making a difference. http://bit.ly/1Ob4RpO

VA ADOPTS MULTIMODAL, COMPETITIVE PROJECT SCORING PROCESS
-> Last year Virginia enacted legislation to select state-supported transportation projects through a multimodal, competitive process. State-of-good-repair projects, such as bridge and pavement rehabilitation, as well as highway safety projects, were exempt. But a wide range of other projects, including road, transit and bicycle-pedestrian infrastructure; operations improvements; and transportation demand management, will be scored together. The law prescribed five areas to be considered in the scoring, along with project cost: congestion mitigation, economic development, accessibility, safety, environmental quality and land use. http://bit.ly/1dXgXWE

CYCLETRACK PROGRESS IN BOSTON, MA
-> Boston Cyclists Union reports in December, the City of Boston committed to installing a cycletrack on Commonwealth Ave, and the Bike Union has been working with them ever since on details of the design. In February, the Department of Conservation and Recreation unveiled a bold new concept for the Arborway that includes cycletracks from Kelley to Murray circle and back, and turns all three existing traffic rotaries into calmer, safer roundabouts. This will connect the Arnold Arboretum and Jamaica Pond for families and everybody who wants to ride a bike-regardless of their skill level. In May, the town of Brookline proposed a cycletrack between the Muddy River Path and Brookline Village, after an extended advocacy effort from the Bike Union, several local residents and Brookline Bicycle Committee members.

This year's new project is Bikeways for Everybody, an effort that will highlight five crosstown routes that are the most desired by bicyclists, and thus the most likely to encourage more biking if they are comfortable for people of all ages. The first route is a 15-mile cycletrack from Mattapan Square to Assembly Row. http://bit.ly/1K5AZfY

CHICAGO, IL: $5/YR BIKESHARE LOW-INCOME MEMBERSHIP
-> Chicago is hoping to bring its Divvy bikeshare to a wider audience with "Divvy for Everyone" (http://bit.ly/1fDdzSB), a discounted annual membership of just $5 for qualified applicants — that's $70 off the normal price. (Citi Bike also offers a discounted annual membership, but it's still $60.) Applicants' households must bring in less than 300 percent of the federal poverty level, which would start at $35,310 for an individual with no children. The first 250 applicants are also going to get a free helmet. http://bit.ly/1O1qc4z

NYC: CITI BIKE WORKERS 1ST BIKESHARE TO UNIONIZE
-> Citi Bike workers have a new labor contract, just months after joining the Transport Workers Union, becoming the nation’s first employees of a bike-share program to reach such an agreement. About 200 people are covered under the new deal, the New York Times reported, and the contract calls for pay raises of at least $1.50 per hour immediately, with additional increases over the next four-and-a-half years. By the end of the contract, in 2020, the Wall Street Journal added, workers’ wages will have risen by more than 20 percent, on average. http://bit.ly/1SjvWrn

HONOLULU, HI: RECYCLES BUSES AS TRANSITIONAL HOUSING
-> The City of Honolulu will transform old, out of commission city buses into transitional housing for homeless people in the city. The city will partner with architecture firm Group 70 International, to renovate the buses into living and recreational areas while other buses will be outfitted solely with bathrooms and showers. http://bit.ly/1CvHUqL


THE RESEARCH BEAT

DUTCH CYCLING: HEALTH AND RELATED ECONOMIC BENEFITS
-> The famous Dutch obsession with bicycles is clearly paying off – a recent study (Dutch Cycling: Quantifying the Health and Related Economic Benefits: http://bit.ly/1HYUXXm) has found that, due to cycling, about 11,000 deaths are prevented each year in the Netherlands and Dutch people have half a year longer life expectancy than the average European. Most importantly, the study clearly shows that Dutch investments in bicycle-promoting policies, such as improved bicycle infrastructure and facilities, are likely to yield a high cost-benefit ratio in the long term.

Health benefits translate into economic benefits of over 5% of Dutch GDP. To calculate the economic health benefits of cycling, HEAT (Health Economic Assessment Tool: http://bit.ly/1HDgBfi) uses a standard value of a statistical life (VSL) to monetize the number of deaths per year prevented by cycling. With a Dutch VSL of €2.8 million (US$3 million) per prevented death, investment in cycling is an extremely wise economic investment. The €0.5 billion ($.55 billion) per year spent by the Dutch government on road and parking infrastructure for cycling is estimated to yield total economic health benefits of €31 billion (US$34.13 billion) per year. http://bit.ly/1K20u1E

WALKING & CYCLING CAN SAVE EUROPEANS OVER $88 BILLION/YR
-> Active transport makes sense – in today’s congested, polluted, and over-priced cities, walking and cycling offer a simple, cheap, and time-effective means of transport. And yet, a recent study by the Centre for Economics and Business Research has found that 1 in 4 adults across Europe is insufficiently physically active, as are 4 out of 5 adolescents. This cannot go on – physical inactivity is costing the European economy over €80 billion (US$88 billion) per year – in other words, €5 billion (US$5.5 billion) more than the world spends on cancer drugs in a year. Not only that, the report reveals that physical inactivity could become a bigger risk to public health than smoking.

The study (The Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe: http://bit.ly/1M6DTl6), commissioned by the International Sport and Culture Association (ISCA) shows that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are diseases linked to a lack of physical exercise, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. http://bit.ly/1IVTsKn

BIKE SHARING: EVIDENCE ON IMPACTS + REVIEW OF IMPLEMENTATION & OPERATION
-> A recently published report, "Bike Sharing: A Review of Evidence on Impacts and Processes of Implementation and Operation" (http://bit.ly/1gAnpEK), reports on the analysis of existing studies and surveys for evidence that supported claims that bike-share shifts people’s mode-share choices, creates new cyclists and diversifies cycling, has economic and health impacts, reduces congestion and single-occupancy vehicle use, and reduces carbon emissions. It also considers the processes by which cities set up and operate bike-share systems. http://bit.ly/1CF07HF

RECREATION FACILITIES NEAR WORK LINKED W/ ACTIVE COMMUTING
-> The recent study "Choice of commuting mode among employees: Do home neighborhood environment, worksite neighborhood environment, and worksite policy and supports matter?" (http://bit.ly/1Ld5YFG) bolsters the findings of previous studies, linking residential proximity to transit stops and employer-provided free or reduced-price transit passes to commuters’ likelihood of choosing transit, and linking shorter commuting distances and the availability of bike parking at workplaces to commuters’ decisions to bike or walk to work.

One new takeaway from the study is the link between active commuting and the availability of free or low-cost recreation facilities in the worksite neighborhood. Facilities like parks, walking trails, bike paths, and recreational centers near worksites could provide an added incentive for commuters to choose active transportation modes by giving them recreational opportunities before or after work. The results of the study can also be used to support arguments that relatively low-cost investments in transportation demand management—such as subsidized transit passes or bicycle parking at worksites—can pay big dividends in both lowering the need for parking and relieving peak-hour congestion. http://bit.ly/1HEK8FB

REDUCING CONGESTION VIA FASTER, GREENER & CHEAPER OPTIONS
-> A recent study found that the expansion of alternative modes of transportation could lead to reduced congestion and other benefits, and identified the types of transportation suited to a city or suburb. (Smart Mobility: Reducing Congestion and Fostering Faster, Greener, and Cheaper Transportation Options: http://bit.ly/1MqkZmk) Instead of examining the most common alternative to driving — public transit — the study looked at ridesharing services (carpooling), bike commuting, carsharing, and on-demand ride services. The study uses geospatial analytics, such as coupling location data with existing government data, to examine the potential congestion reduction benefits in major metropolitan areas across the U.S. Congestion reduction could result from the expansion of alternative modes of commuting. http://bit.ly/1HZrcWx

THREE CHILDHOOD OBESITY RESEARCH TOOLS
-> The National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) has launched its third tool, the Registry of Studies. The free, searchable database compiles information on community-based studies that are assessing known factors impacting rates of childhood obesity. It provides information on the study design, measures, content areas, and populations examined. http://bit.ly/1TyOR3V

Also see other NCCOR tools: 1) Catalogue of Surveillance Systems: access to over 100 publicly available datasets relevant to childhood obesity research (http://bit.ly/1HZyfhR) and 2) Measures Registry: a searchable database of diet and physical activity measures relevant to childhood obesity research (http://bit.ly/1eY3Bdj).


QUOTES R US

"The response to yesterday's announcement [of his leaving his post at the League of American Bicyclists] has been humbling. Thank you. The bicycling movement is in an amazing place right now -- poised for the kind of success and progress us old-timers can scarcely believe. I am proud of the work the League has contributed to get us to this point and excited to see a new generation of leaders pick up the reins. There is nothing more inspiring to me than seeing our work at the national level being turned into real change, on the ground, in communities across the country, by amazing and passionate people like you. I look forward to continuing our work together, even as our individual roles and responsibilities change."
~ Andy Clarke, outgoing President of the League of American Bicyclists, http://bit.ly/1IOAdOw

"In most developed economies, physical inactivity is so deeply entrenched that it has become the norm. Emerging economies are following fast. The problem is much bigger and its consequences are far more radical than people may realize. Perhaps most alarming is the fact that the problem, its costs and its consequences are passed forward across generations, creating a cycle of poor physical and emotional health, and tragically wasted human potential."
~ From Designed to Move: A Physical Activity Action Agenda http://bit.ly/1Oau2c7

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

COOL VIDEO GAME ABOUT FIXING INFRASTRUCTURE
Grab your flashlight and start fixing a dangerous, crumbling mining city in INFRA. It was actually America’s dangerously outdated roads and levees that inspired Loiste Interactive’s Oskari Samiola to create "INFRA." "The idea to make an infrastructure-themed game came after I watched the ‘Crumbling America’ documentary about the U.S.A.’s at-the-collapsing-point infrastructure," says Samiola, who’s 22 and lives in Finland. "And generally after hearing news about spoiled tap water and seeing roads in poor condition." http://bit.ly/1HZK35y

JAPAN’S MT. FUJI NOW HAS FREE WIFI. CHECK OUT SOME OTHER REMOTE WEB HOTSPOTS.
http://wapo.st/1CB3i2Y


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

WEBINAR "Equity and Transportation"
Date: July 15, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Mary Ebeling (SSTI) & Erika Rincon-Whitcomb (PolicyLink)
Host: State Smart Transportation Initiative
Details: http://bit.ly/1O43SqN, free

WEBINAR "Transit-Oriented Development and Equity in Latino Neighborhoods: A Comparative Case Study of Macarthur Park (Los Angeles) and Fruitvale (Oakland)"
Date: July 16, 2015, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET (1PDH, 1 CM pending)
Presenters: Geraldo Sanoval (U of OR)
Host: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/1QpaNev, free

WEBINAR "An Inside Look at Transportation Reauthorization in Congress"
Date: July 16, 2015, 4:00 - 5:00 pm ET
Presenters: Joe McAndrew (T4America), Christopher Coes (LOCUS) & Stefanie Seskin (National Complete Streets Coalition)
Host: Smart Growth America
Details: http://bit.ly/1O4oKyl, free

WEBINAR "Active Transportation and Equity: Key Challenges and Opportunities from the Field"
Date: July 21, 2015,1:00 - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Sara Zimmerman (Safe Routes to School National Partnership), Pedro Arista (Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum), Tamika Butler, (Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition) & Alyia Smith-Parker (National League of Cities)
Host: Safe Routes to School National Partnership
Details: http://bit.ly/1eZSeBP, free

WEBINAR "Model Inventory of Roadway Elements Reassessment Vetting Session"
Date: July 22, 2015, 2:00 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Federal Highway Administration
Details: http://bit.ly/1LfikwZ, free

WEBINAR "Examining Biking and Walking through a Racial Justice Lens"
Date: July 23, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET (Revised date)
Presenters: TBA
Host: Alliance for Biking and Walking
Details: http://bit.ly/1M48RJD, free

WEBINAR "Building Your Fundraising Leadership Towards Walkable Communities" ("Walking College" webinar)
Date: July 27, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Brighid O’Keane (Alliance for Biking & Walking), David Weinberger (ioby)
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/1dYvNMy, free

WEBINAR "Four Types of Cyclists: A National Look"
Date: August 11, 2015, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET (1PDH, 1 CM pending)
Presenters: Jennifer Dill (Portland State Univ.)
Host: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/1QpaNev, free

WEBINAR "Best Practices and Strategies for Assessing Economic Implications of Disinvestment or Right-Sizing Scenarios"
Date: August 12, 2015, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET (1.5 PDH, 1.5 CM pending)
Presenters: Greg Bischak (Community Dev. Financial Institutions Fund), Chandler Duncan (Economic Dev. Research Group) & James Tymon (AASHTO
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1UXXczN, free for TRB Sponsor or TRB Sustaining Affiliate employees, $89 for others

WEBINAR "Out of the Box Ways to Boost Public Engagement"
Date: August 13, 2015, 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Meagan Picard (Orton Family Foundation), Meaghan Carlson (Heart & Soul Project: Gardiner, ME) & Robby Henes (Heart & Soul Project: Cortez, CO)
Host: Orton Family Foundation
Details: http://bit.ly/1f06jj8, free

WEBINAR "Heart & Soul Training: Explore Your Community"
Date: September 10, 2015, 3:00 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Alece Montez Griego & Meagan Picard (Orton Family Fdn)
Host: Orton Family Foundation
Details: http://bit.ly/1HtNxYK, free

WEBINAR "Creating a Vision Zero Movement for Everyone"
Date: September 16, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Alliance for Biking and Walking
Details: http://bit.ly/1GsFQDH, free for Alliance members, $15 for others

WEBINAR "Transportation Cost Index: A Comprehensive Multi-modal Performance Measure for Transportation and Land Use Systems"
Date: October 1, 2015, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Liming Wang (Portland State University)
Host: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/1dYA9Dq, free

WEBINAR "Heart & Soul for Planners: Discover a New Way to Better Planning"
Date: October 8, 2015, 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Eric Blair (Orton Family Foundation), Rick Muriby (Golden, CO) & Jane Lafleur (Friends of Midcoast Maine)
Host: Orton Family Foundation
Details: http://bit.ly/1Sl2Urs, free


RESOURCES

AT THE INTERSECTION OF ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION AND EQUITY
-> A new report from the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, "At the Intersection of Active Transportation and Equity: Joining Forces to Make Communities Healthier and Fairer," explores the complexities of equitable active transportation and the issues that arise at the junction of efforts to advance walking and bicycling and work to increase health, fairness, and opportunity for low-income communities and communities of color. The report sets out why equity and active transportation matter, addresses tensions that may arise when the active transportation and equity movements intersect, describes opportunities for increasing equity in the field of active transportation, and explores some of the programs and initiatives that are doing this crucial work. http://bit.ly/1I0rEFQ

[See Webinar section for related webinar on July 21.]

HOW SRTS & SAFETY INITIATIVES CAN OVERCOME VIOLENCE & CRIME
-> Another new report from the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, "Taking Back the Streets and Sidewalks: How Safe Routes to School and Community Safety Initiatives Can Overcome Violence and Crime," provides a primer for Safe Routes to School professionals looking to address community safety threats that may discourage or endanger students walking or bicycling to school. In addition, the report is intended to be a reference for those working on violence prevention who are seeking new allies, resources, and approaches in the Safe Routes to School movement. The report examines ways in which Safe Routes to School and community safety efforts overlap and complement each other. The report primarily focuses on approaches to support personal safety for children and teens during the trip to and from school, but broader community strategies are also discussed in the course of providing background and exploring more comprehensive solutions to violence in communities. The report’s overall goal is to increase the safety and health of children and youth, and ensure that communities become more equitable places. http://bit.ly/1Ms2aiF

MAPS OF NEARLY EVERY JOB IN AMERICA
-> Among all the things that distinguish American cities from one another — their architecture, their demographics, their history and their terrain — their economies vary widely, too. These differences form economic identities that shape each city. And they're starkly — and beautifully — visible in a new visualization, made by Harvard Ph.D. student Robert Manduca, that maps nearly every job in America, one dot per job. (Where Are The Jobs? Employment in America, 2010: http://bit.ly/1L68AGO)

Zoom in and the map shows not just how the nature of jobs differs by city, but precisely where they're located within each region (a vital question for anyone trying to plan transportation, or develop new housing, or aid the poor). Around D.C., the jobs that have grown up along the Orange Line subway corridor in Arlington are clear, as are clusters in Crystal City, and around schools like Georgetown University. http://wapo.st/1DeQcUb

NIH PEDESTRIAN FACILITY DESIGN COURSE
-> You can host the National Highway Institute 1.5-day Pedestrian Facility Design course in your community. The course focuses on case examples involving corridor and intersection design issues. Participants are engaged through lecture, discussion, video demonstrations of problem areas in corridors and intersections, small group problem identification, and the development of design alternatives. This training was developed to provide information and application opportunities to those involved in the design of pedestrian facilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires newly constructed and altered sidewalks to be accessible and usable by people with disabilities, and accessibility improvements need to be implemented for existing facilities. Schedule a course in 2015 and save $275/participant over the 2016 fee. http://1.usa.gov/1f04Bhe

STREETS AS PUBLIC SPACES AND DRIVERS OF URBAN PROSPERITY
-> A key finding of the "Streets as Public Spaces and Drivers of Urban Prosperity" report is "prosperous cities are those that recognize the relevance of public spaces (with proper layouts) and those which have allocated sufficient land to street development, including sufficient crossings along an appropriate lengthy network. Those cities that have failed to integrate the multi-functionality of streets tend to have lesser infrastructure development, lower productivity and a poorer quality of life." http://bit.ly/1uXDBmx

THE GLOBAL ROAD SAFETY REVIEW 2015
-> World Highways has released the latest edition of its magazine that discusses major issues and key technology trends involving safety in road transportation. http://bit.ly/1gzFeUA

PERFORMANCE-BASED PRACTICAL DESIGN TO IMPROVE SAFETY
-> The Context Sensitive Solutions webinar, "Using Performance-Based Practical Design to Improve Safety" recording and slides are now posted on the FHWA website (http://bit.ly/1M8zkXl). Check out other past webinar recordings, case studies and resources too.

APA: SAFE ROUTES TO PARKS FACTSHEET
-> According to the American Planning Association’s Safe Routes to Parks: Access to green space ties directly to a person’s health and well-being—a connection now widely supported by evidence and accepted by policy makers. Today, ensuring access to green space for all people is a value that should be shared by every resident, community group, and government official. Planners can facilitate increased access to parks and green space through their jobs and community responsibilities. This fact sheet and accompanying web supplements address the unique role of city and regional planners in fostering an environment that establishes Safe Routes to Parks. Aimed at planning and parks directors and commissioners, this handout defines the concept of Safe Routes to Parks, outlines the plans, policies, and strategies that planners can pursue, and identifies examples of communities that are establishing Safe Routes to Parks. http://bit.ly/1UZx2g7


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> Call for Presentations, 2015 NC Bike Summit, October 15 to 17, 2015, Charlotte, NC.
Deadline: July 17, 2015, via email:ncbikesummit2015@gmail.com

-> CALL FOR COMPETITION ENTRIES - Communicating Transportation Needs and Issues to Targeted Populations, TRB Committee ADA 60
Deadline: July 28, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GjJ3Za

-> CALL FOR PAPERS – TRB 95th Annual Meeting, January 10–14, 2016, Washington, D.C., & for publication in the Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Deadline: August 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1ddiTu5

-> Call FOR ABSTRACTS - 8th International Urban Design Conference, November 16-18, 2015, Brisbane, Australia.
Deadline: August 7, 2015, http://bit.ly/17ef3to

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - Active Living Research 2016, January 31 - February 3, 2016, Clearwater Beach, FL.
Deadline: August 28, 2015, 24:00 GMT, http://bit.ly/1FSW3BQ

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – 2016 International Conference & Workshop on Winter Maintenance and Surface Transportation Weather, on-line presentations available in February 2016, conference in April 2016, Denver, CO. (No specific dates provided)
Deadline: September 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GjdBnz

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - Velo-city Global 2016, February 27 - March 1, 2016, Taipei, Taiwan.
Deadline: September 18, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GhHeWl

-> CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS - Winter Cycling Congress 2016, February 2-4, 2016, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN
Deadline: September 30, 2015, http://bit.ly/1HtDZl2

-> CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - Every Body Walk! Collaborative Video Competition
Deadline: October 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1K6hrp3

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS — 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, November 16 - 19, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand.
Deadline: Call opens September 1, 2015, closes February 29, 2016 (Details and criteria available now), http://bit.ly/1KXYS8h

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> September 15, 2015, Transportation and Communities Summit, Portland, OR.
http://bit.ly/1DeUQS3
-> September 30 - October 2, 2015, Placemaking: Making it Happen, New York, NY.
http://bit.ly/1DbXRCF
-> October 25-28, 2015, California Bicycle Summit, San Diego, CA.
http://bit.ly/1fGCiVT
-> February 2016 for online presentations & April 2016 for conference, 2016 International Conference & Workshop on Winter Maintenance and Surface Transportation Weather, conference in Denver, CO. (No specific dates provided)
http://bit.ly/1M81q59
-> February 2-4, 2016, Winter Cycling Congress, Minneapolis & St. Paul, MN.
http://bit.ly/1NweVJ4
-> February 27 – March 1, 2016, Velo-city Global 2016, Taipei, Taiwan.
http://bit.ly/1RuuhnY


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> RFA - 2016 GREAT AMERICAN MAIN STREET AWARD, THE NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION
The competition is open to all Nationally Accredited Main Street Programs.
Deadline: July 31, 2015 by midnight CT, http://bit.ly/1gxkgFH

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS - COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE IN CONSERVATION AND OUTDOOR RECREATION
Have an idea for a trail, river, or park in your community? The National Park Service can help. The National Park Service Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance program supports community-led natural resource conservation and outdoor recreation projects across the nation. Project applicants may be state and local agencies, tribes, nonprofit organizations, or citizen groups. National Parks and other Federal agencies may apply in partnership with other local organizations.
Deadline: August 1, 2015, http://1.usa.gov/1MrXPfj

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - PARTNERS FOR PLACES MATCHING GRANTS
Partners for Places, a successful matching grant program, creates opportunities for cities and counties in the United States and Canada to improve communities by building partnerships between local government sustainability offices and place-based foundations.
Deadline: August 10, 2015, http://bit.ly/1xrcZgW

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER II, NC DOT
This position works with local governments to create comprehensive bicycle and pedestrian plans. Responsibilities include the development of application materials for the planning grant program, review of grant applications, communication with local government grant awardees, creation of planning best practices, review of draft plan materials, and provision of technical assistance with regard to bicycle and pedestrian transportation planning.
Deadline: July 17, 2015, by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1GhD9S1

-> JOB - PROGRAM COORDINATOR, WALK BIKE NASHVILLE, TN
Reporting to and working with the Executive Director, the Program Coordinator develops and maintains effective and efficient programs, including, researching trends, best practices, and recommended strategies to provide input to program design, implementation, and evaluation; planning and developing events and/or program/service to meet established goals, objectives and timelines; among others.
Deadline: July 22, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET), http://bit.ly/1MrUih5

-> JOBS - ORANGE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION PLANNING DIVISION, ORLANDO, FL
Orange County Transportation Planning Division has immediate openings for two positions (Planner III and Planner II) to lead and support projects for multimodal corridor planning, pedestrian and bicyclist safety, corridor improvement, trail development, safety studies, and related initiatives. The Division has an interdisciplinary team that works with engineers and planners in a fast-paced studio environment. Our staff are actively engaged with state, regional, and local partners to address Orlando’s pedestrian safety issues and promote multimodal transportation.
Deadline Planner III: July 23, 2015, http://bit.ly/1M3HSOk (Reposted)
Deadline Planner II: July 26, 2015, http://bit.ly/1M3HSOk

-> JOB - BICYCLE PROGRAM SPECIALIST, DISTRICT DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION, WASHINGTON, DC
Reviews technical, regulatory and legal materials concerning bicycling in the District in order to develop diversified programs, making appropriate consultations to ensure feasibility. Develops a multi-use trail program adhering to local guidelines, the needs of various stakeholder and user groups, and in coordination with other District agencies Coordinates with Maryland, Virginia and Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments officials to identify and determine anticipated development of multi-use trails within their jurisdictions.
Deadline: July 30, 2015, http://1.usa.gov/1f0eF9X, Send an email and resume directly to jim.sebastian at dc.gov

-> JOB - EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, WASHINGTON, DC
The Executive Director is FHWA’s top ranking career executive providing leadership and direction over the administration and operation of the full range of FHWA responsibilities. The incumbent of this position provides Agency leadership and direction in developing and advancing DOT and FHWA performance-based programs and innovations to improve infrastructure, reduce fatalities on the Nation’s highways, and enhance transportation mobility while being good stewards of the environment.
Deadline: August 6, 2015, http://1.usa.gov/1IYiicz

-> JOB - DIRECTOR, SALT LAKE CITY LOCATION, BICYCLE COLLECTIVE
The role of the Salt Lake Bicycle Collective’s director is to design, develop and implement strategic plans for the Salt Lake location in a cost-effective and time-efficient manner. The director is also responsible for maintaining the high-functioning day-to-day operation of the location, including managing staff and coordinating with the wider Salt Lake community. The director is accountable to the Bicycle Collective’s executive director and reports to the ED on a regular basis.
Deadline: None provided (Job posted June 29, 2015), http://bit.ly/1OaN56g

-> JOB - COMMUNITY EDUCATION MANAGER, BIG EASY, NEW ORLEANS, LA
The Community Education Manager ensures biking in Greater New Orleans is safe, fun, and easy by actively educating people and managing education programs that improve the bicycling experience. Programs aim to create behavioral changes that lead to safer roadways and expanded healthy transportation options by helping people of all ages feel confident on and around bikes. Primary focus areas include programs with schools to promote biking and walking to school; community education programming, including bike rides, workshops, and trainings; and leadership development initiatives.
Applications accepted until position filled (Job posted July 1, 2015), http://bit.ly/1fGkf2i

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


HOUSEKEEPING

TO SUBSCRIBE OR UNSUBSCRIBE TO CENTERLINES:
http://www.bikewalk.org/newslettersubscribe.php

MISS AN ISSUE? Find it here:
http://www.bikewalk.org/newsletterarchives.php

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND CALENDAR ITEMS: We want to hear what you're up to! Contact <news@bikewalk.org> today!

COPYING: We encourage you to share our content as long as you identify the source in this way: "from CenterLines, the e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking."

Editor Emeritus & Founding Editor: John Williams
Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston

Contributors: AASHTO Journal; Alliance for Biking and Walking; Michael Andersen; APBP Members Listerve; Emily Badger; Bikeportland.org; CityLab; Josh Cohen; Christopher Douwes; Mary Ebeling; ECF General Newsletter; Anthony Foxx; Bill Holloway; Human Environment Digest; Eric Jaffe; David Kemp; Ethan Kent; Chris Kochtitzky; LinkedIn ITE Pedestrian & Bicycle Council Private Group; National Institute for Transportation and Communities; Next City; Nonprofit Quarterly; Orton Family Foundation; Orton Family Foundation; Feargus O’Sullivan; Physical Activity and Public Health On-Line Network; Project for Public Spaces; Martha Roskowski; Kate Rube; Gabe Rousseau; Safe Routes to School National Partnership; Smart Growth America; Smart Growth Online; Streetside; Eric Sundquist; SSTI e-newsletter; Alissa Barber Torres; TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter; Stephan Vance; Chris Ziegler.


CONTACT US

©2015 - NCBW | The National Center for Bicycling & Walking is a program of Project for Public Spaces, Inc. http://www.bikewalk.org/contact.php