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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#388 Wednesday, July 29, 2015

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Study confirms that 10-foot lanes make safer intersections
----- CDC Releases New Built Environment Assessment Tool
----- Review of State DOT Distribution of Planning Funds to MPOs
----- U.S. Access Board New Ch. 4 Online Guide to ADA & ABA Standards
----- USDOT: Share Unconventional Public Involvement Activities

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- St. Louis, MO: New Downtown Protected Bike Lanes
----- Report: New York City Citi Bike: The First Two Years
----- Kansas Statewide Walking School Bus 1st Year Results
----- Minneapolis, MN Eliminates Parking Requirement for Some Buildings
----- Chicago, IL: Proposed Denser Growth + Updated TOD Ordinance
----- Chicago, IL: Development Near Transit Benefits Calculator
----- BikeHouston Interviews Bike-Dependent for Master Plan Process
----- Portland, OR: Latino Families Call for Safe Streets & Healthy Kids
----- San Francisco, CA: $5 Million Pedestrian-Friendly Freeway Fix
----- CA: Community Bicycle & Pedestrian Safety Trainings
----- Mackinac Island, MI: America’s Original Bicycling Paradise

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Cities Safer by Design Report
----- Streetscape Features Related to Pedestrian Activity
----- TRB: Institutionalizing Safety in Transportation Planning Processes
----- Commuting to Work in the 30 Largest U.S. Cities
----- School-Transportation-Related Crashes

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Rudder App Finds Most Well-lit Walking Route
----- Walkonomics app Finds the Most Beautiful Walking Route
----- Short-Range Low-Cost Livability Projects
----- Costs for Pedestrian and Bicycle Infrastructure Improvements
----- 8 80 Cities: Healthiest Practice Open Streets Website
----- Making the Case for Statewide Complete Streets Implementation
----- Project for Public Spaces Image Collection
----- Interactive App Lets Constituents Balance Their City’s Budget

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

STUDY CONFIRMS 10-FOOT LANES MAKE SAFER INTERSECTIONS
-> Side impact- and turn-related crash rates are lowest at intersections where average lane widths are between 10 and 10.5 feet, according to a study (Narrower Lanes, Safer Streets: http://bit.ly/1Iq1G8H) presented at the Canadian Institute of Transportation’s annual meeting last month. This challenges the long-held, but often disputed, assumption that wider lanes are safer. Crash rates were highest where average lane widths at the approaches were narrower than 10 feet or wider than 10.5 feet. Intersection approaches with 10-foot lanes also carried the highest traffic volumes. Bicycle and pedestrian volumes generally increased as lanes became narrower.

Narrower lane widths (10 to 11 feet) are sanctioned in national policies outlined by AASHTO, particularly for urban areas, but the official standards in many states prohibit them. According to a 2010 study published in the ITE Journal, six states require a minimum of 12-foot lanes and another 24 states require 11-foot lanes. The author of this most recent study notes that lane width guidelines, in particular, were established well before we had reliable crash and safety data. http://bit.ly/1fG3XFX

CDC RELEASES NEW BUILT ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT TOOL
-> It is often difficult for local program staff and evaluators to know which features of the built environment are most important to measure to determine their impact on health behaviors and outcomes, and which tool(s) most accurately and feasibly assess those features. The Built Environment Assessment Tool (BE Tool: http://1.usa.gov/1JQoX4T), an adaptation of MAPS, assesses a core set of features including built environment infrastructure (e.g., road type, curb cuts/ramps, intersections/crosswalks, traffic control, transportation), walkability (e.g. sidewalk/path features, walking safety, aesthetics & amenities), bikeability (e.g., bicycle lane/path features), recreational sites and structures, and the food environment (e.g., access to grocery stores, convenience stores, farmers markets, etc.). The BE Tool also describes the training of data collectors, provides instructions for selecting and assessing street segments, and offers guidance on managing and analyzing data.

The built environment includes buildings, roads, sidewalks, utilities, homes, transit, fixtures, parks and all other man-made entities that form the physical characteristics of a community. These can impact human health by affecting rates of physical activity, air pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter that can exacerbate asthma and respiratory disease, and emissions of carbon dioxide that contributes to climate change.

REVIEW OF STATE DOT DISTRIBUTION OF PLANNING FUNDS TO MPOS
-> Metropolitan Planning Funds (PL funds) are provided from the Federal Highway Trust Fund and distributed by State Departments of Transportation (DOTs) to Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) to conduct the planning activities required by Title 23 of the U.S. Code 134. Each MPO is responsible for planning to meet the transportation needs within its metropolitan planning area. PL funds are distributed to States based on a ratio of urbanized-area population in individual States to the total nationwide urbanized-area population. State DOTs then distribute this funding to the MPOs in their State based on a formula, agreed to by the MPOs, and approved by their FHWA Division Office. This report describes a range of different approaches to distribution formulas, and provides observations drawn from the DOT and MPO contacts and the study team's analysis of the merits of the different approaches. FHWA is providing this information as a resource for DOTs and MPOs nationwide to use in self-assessment of current distribution approaches and to consider alternative approaches. http://1.usa.gov/1fGm4vv

U.S. ACCESS BOARD NEW CH. 4 ONLINE GUIDE TO ADA & ABA STANDARDS
-> The U.S. Access Board released its next installments to the online guide to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA: http://1.usa.gov/1lDQgZX) and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA: http://1.usa.gov/1r66nOr) standards: 1) technical bulletins covering requirements for accessible routes in Chapter 4 of the ADA and ABA Standards, including doors and gates, ramps and curb ramps, and elevators and platform lifts; and 2) referenced requirements for accessible means of egress. The documents explain and illustrate requirements in the standards, answer common questions, offer best practice recommendations, and provide animation demonstrations. Sign-up to receive email updates on new installments in the series: http://bit.ly/1jJ2FGa. http://1.usa.gov/1IFAGIR

USDOT: SHARE UNCONVENTIONAL PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT ACTIVITIES
-> Have you conducted outreach at the laundromat? Are you raffling off shopping sprees? USDOT wants to know! Share your story with us. We're seeking examples of your most unconventional, wackiest public involvement practices. We are compiling a compendium and want to include you in it. To contribute, email a ONE paragraph description of your activity: Why you did it, who was engaged, what was unique about it, and what the outcome was. Include your agency name and a point of contact. Images are great, but not required. Email us at the FHWA-FTA Transportation Planning Capacity Building Program: TPCB@dot.gov. http://1.usa.gov/1U618x3


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

ST. LOUIS, MO: NEW DOWNTOWN PROTECTED BIKE LANES
-> St. Louis has a brand new 1.2 mile protected bike lane downtown from Union Station to the Old Courthouse along the park side of Chestnut Street right through the heart of downtown. (double Seattle’s 0.6 miles on 2nd Ave.) As you bike, you are flanked by a wonderful blend of magnificent historic buildings and popular modern additions like the City Garden. Recently blogger Tom Fucoloro reported it wasn’t even totally finished yet (signage was largely still missing), yet there already children biking with their families. If you had said a few weeks ago that kids would be biking comfortably on a downtown St. Louis street, people would have thought you were crazy. That’s the power of protected bike lanes, and the change can happen overnight. http://bit.ly/1h4qrBo

[Check it out while participating in APBP’s Professional Development Seminar, September 28 – October 1, 2015 in St. Louis: http://bit.ly/VdB97X]

REPORT: NEW YORK CITY CITI BIKE: THE FIRST TWO YEARS
-> New York City launched Citi Bike, the largest bike share program in the United States, in May 2013. This study (Citi Bike: The First Two Years) examines the first two years of Citi Bike and its role in New York City mobility. Citi Bike’s station connection to public transportation hubs and station density are major factors in the system’s high ridership and use. Seventy-four percent of Citi Bike stations are within a five-minute walk of a subway station entrance, providing a "last mile" solution for transit commuters. The system’s greatest challenges are expanding and diversifying its customer base while also rebalancing the number of bicycles available at high-demand stations. Citi Bike has become an integral part of New York’s transportation culture, even though it serves a limited geographic area. This report addresses those challenges and recommends strategies for the future. http://bit.ly/1SMqHkf

KANSAS STATEWIDE WALKING SCHOOL BUS 1ST YEAR RESULTS
-> The first year of the statewide Kansas Walking School Bus Program had 715 children registered at 17 schools with 298 volunteers walking students to and from school Monday through Friday. As the WSB became a true and reliable mode of transportation for students, one school was able to eliminate all their in town busing while the WSB was operating. To date, 11 of the 17 participating schools have committed funding for the program once the grant period is over. http://bit.ly/1DaddNm

MINNEAPOLIS, MN ELIMINATES PARKING REQUIREMENT FOR SOME BUILDINGS
-> For a long time in Minneapolis, almost everyone who wanted to build a new apartment complex was required to add one parking spot for every unit in the building — whether or not residents wanted one. There was an exception for a small area downtown, but not for outlying neighborhoods served by light rail and bus systems. And all these unneeded or unwanted parking spots would add to the cost of construction, drive up rent, encourage driving, and take up valuable land as they sat empty. This sort of minimum parking requirement is the law in almost every city across the country. Now, however, Minneapolis's City Council has voted to eliminate the parking requirement for many new buildings. Small or midsize buildings that are within walking distance (specifically, a quarter-mile) of a rail or bus line no longer have to build any off-street parking at all. Large buildings (those with 50 or more units) now only have to provide one space for every two units. http://bit.ly/1SMmtsV

CHICAGO, IL: PROPOSED DENSER GROWTH + UPDATED TOD ORDINANCE
-> Recently the Metropolitan Planning Council (MPC) unveiled Grow Chicago (http://bit.ly/1IqYEFH), a campaign to grow Chicago’s population by increasing the opportunity for denser housing and commercial development near public transportation. Mayor Rahm Emanuel has proposed an updated TOD ordinance (http://bit.ly/1D7kGgs). http://bit.ly/1KwmfqH

CHICAGO, IL: DEVELOPMENT NEAR TRANSIT BENEFITS CALCULATOR
-> See how development near transit can benefit residents and their communities through economic development and jobs, more revenue for schools and essential city services, and better transportation access. Select a parcel from the map or search for an address. http://bit.ly/1Se36Oy

BIKEHOUSTON INTERVIEWS BIKE-DEPENDENT FOR MASTER PLAN PROCESS
-> There are hundreds if not thousands of people who rely on bicycles to move around Houston who often get left out of the planning and design process. BikeHouston intern, Nabiha Hossain, wanted to change this dynamic and took on the project of interviewing bicycle-dependent residents to ensure their voice is heard in the current Bicycle Master planning process. She found that while people who rely on bikes and public transit to move around Houston may not have heard about the city’s Bicycle Master Plan process, they share the same concerns as recreational riders – the need to educate motorists about safety and for a more complete and safer network of bike paths and lanes. http://bit.ly/1MUeSHa

PORTLAND, OR: LATINO FAMILIES CALL FOR SAFE STREETS & HEALTHY KIDS
-> On July 26th, Andando en Bicicletas en Cully (ABC), the Community Cycling Center, Cully youth, and the For Every Kid Coalition said with one voice: "We want safe streets!" On the lawn in the new Khunamokwst Park at NE 52nd and Alberta, parent and youth advocates revealed their "Photovoice Project" calling for safe streets close to parks, schools, and other destinations in the Cully neighborhood, a racially diverse neighborhood with high rates of poverty located in central Northeast Portland. http://bit.ly/1glq7yb

SAN FRANCISCO, CA: $5 MILLION PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY FREEWAY FIX
-> Well into its second year of a Vision Zero campaign, San Francisco can put another mark in the win column for pedestrians. A newly re-aligned freeway ramp for Highway 80 in San Francisco was unveiled recently after ongoing backlash over the original design. The new configuration is less dangerous for walkers negotiating the area where freeway traffic dumps into a neighborhood. The new off-ramp features safer conditions for pedestrians while creating a significantly more valuable parcel of land that will allow for development of new retail space and housing, more than one-quarter of which will be affordable. http://bit.ly/1IJmD4R

CA: COMMUNITY BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN SAFETY TRAININGS
-> The purpose of the Community Bicycle Safety Training (CBST) is to make bicycling safer and more pleasant in California’s communities. Modeled off of SafeTREC’s Community Pedestrian Safety Training (CPST), CBST will empower communities to envision safer bicycling environments, and reduce bicycle-related traffic crashes in California. The training includes expert presentation on safe bicycling, an interactive training session, walking assessment of bicycling conditions, and small group discussion and priority setting.

The Community Pedestrian Safety Training (CPST) program is a joint project of UC Berkeley SafeTREC and California Walks. The training is designed to provide participants with pedestrian safety best practices to address and improve pedestrian safety conditions. Participants are then guided on a walkability assessment before setting pedestrian safety action plans for their community. http://bit.ly/1SM2bja

MACKINAC ISLAND, MI: AMERICA’S ORIGINAL BICYCLING PARADISE
-> Many reports tout several communities in the United States as the most bikeable or bike-friendly. What they often overlook is the one and only community in the country that since 1898 has prohibited all motor vehicles (except emergency vehicles, construction equipment, and snowmobiles in winter) and where everyone gets around by bicycle, on foot, or by horse. The City of Mackinac Island is home to 492 year-round residents and as many as 15,000 thousand tourists per day during the peak travel and tourism season, Mackinac Island is a non-motorized transportation advocate’s ultimate paradise. http://bit.ly/1OAJttS


THE RESEARCH BEAT

CITIES SAFER BY DESIGN REPORT
-> A new report (Cities Safer by Design: http://bit.ly/1JupNIJ) examines cities around the world to discover why some have safer streets than others. The report documents design elements that make streets safer for all users. Traffic safety has become a public health concern in many countries, and the fatalities can have a significant economic development impact. In less developed countries, the majority of deaths are among pedestrians and bicyclists hit by motor vehicles. The authors provide real-world examples and evidence-based techniques to improve safety through neighborhood and street design that emphasizes pedestrians, bicycling, and mass transport, and reduces speeds and unnecessary use of vehicles. http://bit.ly/1U5RxX8

STREETSCAPE FEATURES RELATED TO PEDESTRIAN ACTIVITY
-> Researchers measured 20 streetscape features and numerous other variables for 588 blocks in New York City, to identify variables that explain pedestrian traffic volumes. (Streetscape Features Related to Pedestrian Activity: http://bit.ly/1LQUSq9 free download through 8/31/15) Three streetscape features had significant positive correlations with pedestrian counts: the number of pieces of street furniture, the proportion of windows on the street, and the proportion of active street frontage. http://bit.ly/1IIoSpg

INSTITUTIONALIZING SAFETY IN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING PROCESSES
-> TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) "Report 811: Institutionalizing Safety in Transportation Planning Processes: Techniques, Tactics, and Strategies" provides field-tested guidance on institutionalizing the integration of safety into transportation planning and programming processes. The guidebook also provides ways to measure the effectiveness and success of integration efforts. Seven principles lead to a coordinated and comprehensive approach to safety, including "Incorporate transportation safety issues, such as pedestrian and bicycle safety, safe mobility for older citizens, and transit safety, in planning programs and documents"... http://bit.ly/1I8TieD

COMMUTING TO WORK IN THE 30 LARGEST U.S. CITIES
-> The aim of the "Commuting to Work in the 30 Largest U.S. Cities" study was to provide a broad overview of commuting by workers 16 years of age and older in the 30 largest U.S. cities, by highlighting the following aspects of commuting: who, how, how time consuming, and when. The study used the 2013 data from the American Community Survey—an ongoing annual survey by the U.S. Census Bureau. Among the aspects examined: 1) No vehicle available: 1.8% in Fort Worth and San Jose, 46.0% in New York; 2) Using public transportation to work: 0.7% in Oklahoma City, 56.7% in New York; 3) Walking to work: 1.2% in Fort Worth, 14.5% in Boston; and 4) Bicycling to work: 0.1% in El Paso, 5.9% in Portland. http://bit.ly/1eyIfCR

SCHOOL-TRANSPORTATION-RELATED CRASHES
-> A school-transportation-related crash is a crash that involves, either directly or indirectly, a school bus, or a non-school bus functioning as a school bus, transporting children to or from school or school-related activities. In this fact sheet "school-age" children are defined as children 18 or younger. From 2004 to 2013, there were 116 school-age pedestrians (18 or younger) who died in school transportation-related crashes. Sixty-two percent were struck by school buses, 5 percent by vehicles functioning as school buses, and 33 percent by other vehicles (passenger cars, light trucks and vans, large trucks, and motorcycles, etc.) involved in the crashes. http://1.usa.gov/1SfyLyV


QUOTES R US

"As the provision of roadside bike paths is increasingly being accepted as a civic obligation rather than a perk, cities and regions [across Northern Europe] are moving on to create a second wave of bike infrastructure that is heavier, more highly protected, and considerably more expensive."
—Feargus O’Sullivan in a CityLab article on a 14-path network of wide, segregated "Bike Autobahns" being planned in Munich, Germanyhttp://bit.ly/1fGpMFl

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

HOLOGRAMS OF PEOPLE WHO NEED DISABLED PARKING SPACES STOP OTHERS FROM PARKING ILLEGALLY
According to the Russian organization Dislife, over 30% of drivers in the country regularly take disabled spots illegally. Sensors mounted near disabled parking places in certain locations around Moscow can detect the presence of a state-issued disabled parking permit as an individual is sliding their car in. If no permit is detected, a hidden projector beams a movie of an actual disabled person onto a fine layer of water mist, making them seem to pop out of nowhere. After springing to life, the hologram effectively shames the person for attempting to illegally park in a designated disabled space—see the video. http://bit.ly/1LWvXmC


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

WEBINAR "How Rapid Transformation Delivers Bike-Friendly Urban Streets"
Date: July 29, 2015, 3:00 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals & the Green Lane Project.
Details: http://bit.ly/1Iq2URh, free

WEBINAR "Safe and Accessible Pedestrian Routes for Older Adults"
Date: July 30, 2015, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Isabel Rovira (Miami Urban Health Solutions/Urban Health Partnerships Program) & Ben Woody (Currituck County, NC)
Host: National Center on Senior Transportation
Details: http://bit.ly/1I90tn7, free

WEBINAR "Part I: Americans' Views of Transportation and Livable Communities"
Date: August 5, 2015, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET (1 CM credit) (Part 2 on August 11, 2015)
Presenters: Jennifer Dill (Portland State University) & Hugh Morris (National Association of Realtors)
Host: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/1D7SKZZ, free

WEBINAR "Walkability: The Health and Wellness Equation W =WCA2"
Date: August 6, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Dan Burden & Samantha Thomas (Blue Zones)
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/1H0MMVz, free

WEBINAR "Four Types of Cyclists: A National Look"
Date: August 11, 2015, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET (1PDH, 1 CM pending)
Presenters: Jennifer Dill (Portland State Univ.)
Host: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/1QpaNev, free

WEBINAR "Engage with Local Government: Critical Stakeholders in Your Walkable Community Movement"
Date: August 14, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET (1 CM credit)
Presenters: Elaine Clegg (Boise City Council), Roger Millar (Smart Growth America) & Gary Toth (Project for Public Spaces)
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/1IpST6K, free

WEBINAR "Tactical Urbanism"
Date: October 21, 2015, 3:00 - 4:00 pm ET (1 CM credit)
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/1ecB8jw, $50 APBP members, $85 non-members


RESOURCES

RUDDER APP FINDS MOST WELL-LIT WALKING ROUTE HOME
-> Rudder, a navigation app, takes into account streetlight data for your city to provide you with the most well-lit path home. Once you are on route, the app will give you an easy-to-follow turn-by-turn progress bar at the bottom of your screen, giving you tangible context for how much longer you will be walking until your next turn. Some of the app’s most notable features include a light meter - a unique feature that lets you quickly gauge how well-lit your current surroundings are - as well as a progress meter for the entire trip, and for each individual step of your travel to show you just how much further until you arrive at your destination. Future features will include sharing your travel progress with friends and family to give them a heads up when you get home safely. Data for 12 cities to date. http://bit.ly/1JQSgUT

WALKONOMICS APP FINDS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL WALKING ROUTE
-> Use the Walkonomics app to find the most beautiful walking route to your destination through tree-lined streets and parks. Walkonomics has mapped the walkability of over 700,000 streets and footpaths, you can add your own ratings. http://bit.ly/1glEliF

SHORT-RANGE LOW-COST LIVABILITY PROJECTS
-> Check out 13 "short-range," relatively low-cost improvements that can typically be implemented in less than a year — sometimes as quickly as a few weeks — and cost anywhere from a few hundred to several thousand dollars. These improvements include bicycle lanes, chicanes, crossing islands, curb extensions, way finding, among others. For these and other tools see The Imagining Livability Design Collection (http://bit.ly/1LR35L0), a 38-page "visual portfolio of tools and transformations" created by AARP Livable Communities and the Walkable and Livable Communities Institute. http://bit.ly/1Irk3hW

COSTS FOR PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS
-> "Costs for Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Infrastructure: A Resource for Researchers, Engineers, Planners, and the General Public" (http://bit.ly/1h4fika) (and its associated database) provides meaningful estimates of infrastructure costs by collecting up-to-date cost information for pedestrian and bicycle treatments from states and cities across the country. . http://bit.ly/1Daal2Y

8 80 CITIES: HEALTHIEST PRACTICE OPEN STREETS WEBSITE
-> 8 80 Cities recently launched its Healthiest Practice Open Streets website (http://bit.ly/1KygWnK). ‘Open Streets’ are community-based programs that temporarily open selected streets to people, by closing them to cars. By doing this the streets become places where people of all ages, abilities, and backgrounds can come out and improve their health. The Healthiest Practice Open Streets program is a tried and tested best practice model. This new website features: 1) A toolkit to help plan a new Healthiest Practice Open Streets program or improve an existing program, 2) A video describing the Healthiest Practice Open Streets concept to share with others, among other resources.

MAKING THE CASE FOR STATEWIDE COMPLETE STREETS IMPLEMENTATION
-> Surveying the mounds of evidence connecting Complete Streets with improved physical activity and health, law student Samantha Chapman makes a strong case for state-level implementation in Indiana. Her article, published in the Indiana Health Law Review (Vol. 12, No. 1), should be reference for folks working in other states, too. (Combating Obesity One Step at a Time: Why Indiana Should Implement Statewide Complete Streets Legislation http://bit.ly/1IJ3akX)

PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES IMAGE COLLECTION
-> Project for Public Spaces has selected its best of nearly 1,000 of their images for purchase on a limited license basis. You can search and browse the collection. For instance, subcategories within the "Transportation - Streets" section include Bicycle Related, Streets - Pedestrian, Transit Amenities, Streets - Suburban & Rural, Streets - Urban, among others http://bit.ly/1HXKpts

INTERACTIVE APP LETS CONSTITUENTS BALANCE THEIR CITY’S BUDGET
-> A new web app called Balancing Act enables people to see the breakdown of their city’s budget via adjustable, comprehensive pie charts, and lets them interact with it and hypothesize a budget according to their priorities. The resource has already been utilized by Pedro Segarra, Mayor of Hartford, Connecticut. http://bit.ly/1f120n3


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - California Bicycle Summit, October 25-28, 2015, San Diego, CA.
Deadline: July 31, 2015, http://bit.ly/1KuBptC

-> CALL FOR PAPERS – TRB 95th Annual Meeting, January 10–14, 2016, Washington, D.C., & for publication in the Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Deadline: August 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1ddiTu5

-> Call FOR ABSTRACTS - 8th International Urban Design Conference, November 16-18, 2015, Brisbane, Australia.
Deadline: August 7, 2015, http://bit.ly/17ef3to

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - Active Living Research 2016, January 31 - February 3, 2016, Clearwater Beach, FL.
Deadline: August 28, 2015, 24:00 GMT, http://bit.ly/1FSW3BQ

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – 2016 International Conference & Workshop on Winter Maintenance and Surface Transportation Weather, on-line presentations available in February 2016, conference in April 2016, Denver, CO. (No specific dates provided)
Deadline: September 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GjdBnz

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - Velo-city Global 2016, February 27 - March 1, 2016, Taipei, Taiwan.
Deadline: September 18, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GhHeWl

-> CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS - Winter Cycling Congress 2016, February 2-4, 2016, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN
Deadline: September 30, 2015, http://bit.ly/1HtDZl2

-> CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - Every Body Walk! Collaborative Video Competition
Deadline: October 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1K6hrp3

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS — 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, November 16 - 19, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand.
Deadline: Call opens September 1, 2015, closes February 29, 2016 (Details and criteria available now), http://bit.ly/1KXYS8h

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> September 28-30, 2015, Move Together: Shared Mobility Summit & North American Bikeshare Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.
http://bit.ly/1VMAgE8
-> April 5-7, 2016, Fifth Safe Routes to School National Conference, Columbus, OH.
http://bit.ly/YE6ocN


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> JOB – NATIONAL COMPLETE STREETS COALITION DIRECTOR, WASHINGTON, DC
The National Complete Streets Coalition, a program of Smart Growth America, seeks a passionate, professional leader to serve as its Director. The successful candidate will build upon a decade of success by taking the Complete Streets movement to the next level. The Director reports to Smart Growth America’s President and CEO and works in support of a strategic plan developed collaboratively with the Coalition’s Steering Committee, a diverse group of national public interest organizations and transportation consulting firms. Responsibilities include: 1) Articulating the Complete Streets vision to varied audiences, including policy-makers, transportation professionals, public health professionals, and advocates; 2) Developing and delivering a program of policy, research, and technical assistance to advance the Complete Streets movement; 3) Managing Coalition staff and consultants; 4)Shepherding federal policy activities related to Complete Streets, including legislative and administrative strategies—among others.
Deadline: Applications accepted until position filled, http://bit.ly/1H0cxoZ

-> JOB - PROJECT MANAGER, WALKBOSTON
WalkBoston is seeking a mid-level professional with a passion for sustainable transportation. If you are committed to making walking a major form of transportation and working in close coordination with bicycling, transit, health, planning and environmental advocates, they encourage you to apply for their Project Manager position. You would be working with a core team of advocates with years of experience in developing walkable communities. They are looking for an individual who wants to make sustainable transportation a career focus and help WalkBoston continue their work across Massachusetts serving urban, suburban and rural communities.
Deadline: August 5, 2015, http://bit.ly/1I0qNlw

-> JOB - POLICY & PROGRAM MANAGER, LOS ANGELES WALKS
Los Angeles Walks seeks an enthusiastic, experienced Policy & Program Manager to help take a small, dynamic organization to the next level. This is a great opportunity to have a real impact on the city you live in and to help guide a small and growing organization. Our work promotes safe, active transportation, justice for underserved communities, and better health for all.
Deadline: August 6, 2015, 5:00 pm PT, http://bit.ly/1DavKJs

-> JOB - TRAFFIC ENGINEER (BIKE/PEDESTRIAN COORDINATOR), ST. LOUIS, MO
This is a professional traffic engineering position in which the incumbent will coordinate bicycle and pedestrian projects. The incumbent will interpret and review technical specifications; plan and project for conformity with bike and pedestrian design standards; assist and serve as primary point of contact for Bike and Pedestrian related grants, awards and Bike Share Program; implement street bike and pedestrian traffic facilities such as bike lanes, shared lane markings, signage, bike racks, bike corrals, better crosswalks and pedestrian signals, and ADA guidance; among other duties.
Deadline: August 7, 2015, http://bit.ly/1H0E0qr

-> JOB - EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, BOSTON CYCLISTS UNION
The Bike Union is looking for an Executive Director to serve as a committed, passionate leader who can help take our young and dynamic organization to the next level. The ideal person is a tenacious advocate, an effective leader, a clear communicator, a proven fundraiser, and a creative problem solver with a passion for our mission.
Deadline: Open until filled, http://bit.ly/1DOc1KL

-> JOB - EDUCATION PROGRAMS COORDINATOR, SILICON VALLEY BICYCLE COALITION
Under the supervision of the Deputy Director, the Education Programs Coordinator supports the Safe Routes to School Program and other educational efforts by providing program coordination, education, and support to school districts, school sites, and community partners. This position will be running or supporting programs that engage youth grades K-12 as well as programs that provide bicycling safety and skills education to the general public, and shall assume accountability for the results in achieving the outlined goals and objectives of those programs.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/1Dav4nn

-> JOB - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM DIRECTOR, IOWA BICYCLE COALITION
The Iowa Bicycle Coalition is hiring a Safe Routes To School program director to run an encouragement and education program directed at elementary and middle schools across the state. In-state travel required. Full-time position with health/dental insurance.
Deadline: Open until filled, http://bit.ly/1LWZkFs

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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Contributors: @ APA_Planning; 8 80 Cities Special Newsletter; AASHTO Journal; Alliance for Biking and Walking; America Walks; Todd Antoine; APBP Members Listerve; Biking & Walking Roundup; Marielle Brown; Rick Brown; Complete Streets News; Christopher B Douwes; Reid Ewing; LeeAnne Fergason; Sarah Goodyear; Amir Hajrasouliha; Human Environment Digest; Chris Kochtitzky; Wendy Landman; LinkedIn National Complete Streets Coalition Group; Chris McCahill; (Chicago) Metropolitan Planning Council; Roger Millar; Marielle Mondon: Montana Associated Technology Roundtables; National Institute for Transportation and Communities; Next City; Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center; PedNet Consulting: Planetizen; Safe Routes to School National Partnership; SafeTREC; Michael Sivak; Smart Growth Information Clearing House; Dave Snyder; Springwise; State Smart Transportation Initiative; Joseph Stromberg; TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter; The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute; Vox Energy & Environment.


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