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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#389 Wednesday, August 12, 2015

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- SRTS: 10 Years of Improving Community Walking & Biking Conditions
----- GHSA Report: Understanding & Addressing Pedestrian Safety
----- Better City-Making Means Breaking Down Silos—Here's How
----- Copenhagen Metro Area, Denmark Regional Cycling Report
----- Australian National Cycling Strategy: Implementation Report
----- Cambridge, UK: Britain’s Cycling Capital
----- Sydney, Australia Launches First E-paper Traffic Signs
----- Canada Crosses Protected Bike Lane Tipping Point
----- Blessing Bicycles for the Earth

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- Indianapolis, IN: $500 Million Creates More Walkable City
----- NV DOT Builds Sidewalks & Crosswalks at Elementary Schools
----- California Ped & Bike Safety Curriculum for Grades 4 & 5
----- MN Law: Local Governments to Align w/ MN DOT Design Standards
----- Transportation Alternatives Program Spending Report by State
----- LAB: 3 New or Updated Model Laws for Bicyclist Safety
----- What Works Cities Named for Support in Using Big Data
----- Twin Cities, MN: 2015 Switch My Trip Campaign

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- TA: 2015 Mid-Year Vision Zero Report Card for New York City
----- Report: MN Bike/Ped Counting Study
----- Two Street Features that Encourage Walking in Salt Lake City
----- NAR Survey Finds Younger Generations Prefer Multimodal Options
----- Co-benefits of Designing Communities for Active Living
----- Australian Cycling Casualties, Crash Types & Use Levels

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Improve School Arrival & Departure Procedures Toolkit
----- Ped/Bike Planning & Engineering University Course Materials
----- FHWA Online Tools: Community Visioning Metrics & Placefit
----- Advice & Tools for Building Better Project Communications
----- US DOT: Traffic Safety Facts 2013 Data
----- Report: Making Sense of the New Urban Science
----- Transit Information Access for Persons w/ Impairments
----- MN DOT: Permeable Pavements in Cold Climates Report
----- Online Course: Form Based Codes 101- Downtowns

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

SRTS: 10 YEARS OF IMPROVING COMMUNITY WALKING & BIKING CONDITIONS
-> When Deb Hubsmith founded the National Partnership in 2005 – the same year that the first federal Safe Routes to School legislation was passed, authorizing funding to 50 states and the District of Columbia – her vision for the Safe Routes to School movement was much broader than the $612 million in initial funding outlined in the legislation. From the very beginning, Hubsmith believed that Safe Routes to School had the potential to transform our cities and towns into healthy, active communities where all people can walk, bicycle, and be physically active. She was determined to grow and expand the program, increase funding, and leverage additional resources to improve conditions for walking and bicycling and advance policies that supported Safe Routes to School, such as Complete Streets, shared use, and school wellness policies...(Read more of early history and accomplishments.) http://bit.ly/1UCvUOg

GHSA REPORT: UNDERSTANDING & ADDRESSING PEDESTRIAN SAFETY
-> Governor’s Highway Safety Association’s "Everyone Walks: Understanding & Addressing Pedestrian Safety" report provides an overview of current pedestrian safety data and research and discusses how states are using this and other information to address the issue. This report does not address infrastructure improvements. Rather, it focuses on legislative, enforcement and educational initiatives at the national, state and local level that work in tandem with engineering solutions to foster safe mobility for those on foot. http://bit.ly/1L424Os

[See also Webinar section for an August 12 webinar on this report.]

BETTER CITY-MAKING MEANS BREAKING DOWN SILOS—HERE'S HOW
-> Breaking down the silos in city halls toward a more multidisciplinary, holistic perspective on city-making is absolutely necessary for better planned, designed, and built cities. http://bit.ly/1IDAh6r

COPENHAGEN METRO AREA, DENMARK REGIONAL CYCLING REPORT
-> The Centre for Regional Development in Denmark has released a report (Capital Region of Denmark Regional Cycling Report) that provides an overview of cycling trends in the Copenhagen metropolitan area. The report provides key figures and knowledge about regional cycling trends and improves their ability to monitor and influence developments in the area. http://bit.ly/1UCB8tF

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL CYCLING STRATEGY: IMPLEMENTATION REPORT
-> The National Cycling Strategy: Implementation Report 2014 outlines progress made on the Australian National Cycling Strategy in 2014, a strategy that includes investments in cycling-related infrastructure and implementation of safety strategies. This report is available for no fee after logging onto the site. http://bit.ly/1Jbh9jI

CAMBRIDGE, UK: BRITAIN’S CYCLING CAPITAL
-> A new video from Streetfilms (Cambridge: Britain’s Cycling Capital 10:17 minutes) shows some of the things the city of Cambridge in the UK (population 124,000) has done over the last 15 years or so to make itself a place where people choose bikes over other modes. Official reports say 29 percent of Cambridge commuters cycle to work, and some advocates believe up to half of all trips in the city center are made on bikes. The proportion of women who cycle in Cambridge is pretty much equal to that of men.

First off, it has lots of car-free areas in the historic center, protected with a system of bollards that raise and lower to admit buses, emergency vehicles, and some commercial traffic. Second, the city uses an approach called "filtered permeability," which involves putting up gates to block out cars from certain streets while allowing bike and pedestrian access (these gates can be quickly opened to admit ambulances and fire trucks). Third, about half the streets in town have a 20-mile per hour speed limit—and it’s enforced with speed cameras. http://bit.ly/1KX2wOk

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA LAUNCHES FIRST E-PAPER TRAFFIC SIGNS
-> The Australian Road and Maritime Services has installed e-paper traffic signs on Sydney roads, representing the first time that electronic ink, a technology best known from e-book readers and smart watches, has been used in traffic signage. To reliably display road information, wireless signs have been built that communicate over the cellular network and don’t malfunction in the sun’s heat or during a power outage. (See photos and a short video new report) http://bit.ly/1WhPzFa

CANADA CROSSES PROTECTED BIKE LANE TIPPING POINT
-> Some time in the last year, the world's second-largest country crossed a tipping point in public consciousness. As part of PeopleforBikes’s work, they monitor every mention of protected bike lanes on Twitter. Though there's a steady drumbeat of discussion from across the U.S., Australia and the U.K., in the last six months they’ve watched in awe as a wave of protected bike lane chatter has been pouring out of every major English-speaking city in Canada: Victoria, Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Hamilton, Halifax, Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver. Vancouver has arguably made the most significant investment in a connected protected bike lane network of any city on the continent over the last four years. http://bit.ly/1JTGJZe

A record number of cyclists pedaled their way through Vancouver's separated bike lanes in June, helping the city reach its goal of having 50 per cent of all trips made by foot, bicycle or public transit. (http://bit.ly/1P69Mby). Check these lanes out for yourself when you come for Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place in Vancouver, September 12 - 15, 2016.

BLESSING BICYCLES FOR THE EARTH
-> At the sixth annual Blessing of the Bikes, groups of eight or so riders wheeled their bicycles down the red-carpeted center aisle of Toronto’s Trinity-St. Paul’s Church. The white-robed officiate sprinkled holy water on about 50 riders’ heads and on their bikes’ handlebars and wheels. Since the first mass blessing of bicycles in 1999 in New York City, bike blessings have spread across denominations, and to other cities including Los angles and Melbourne, Australia. As climate change and living with respect for creation have become perceived as more of moral and religious imperatives, bicycling brings climate change action to a personal level. http://bit.ly/1KXw6mI


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

INDIANAPOLIS, IN: $500 MILLION CREATES MORE WALKABLE CITY
-> After going more than 20 years without constructing sidewalks, Indianapolis saw an infusion of $500 million for infrastructure in 2010 after it sold its water and sewer utility to a public charitable trust. Fifty public meetings gathered ideas for how to spend the RebuildIndy money. Consistently, sidewalks were at or near top of list, along with trails and bikeways. The city put together a five-year plan for capital improvements, including $29 million dedicated to filling the sidewalk gap: constructing sidewalks where none existed and repairing ones that were in poor shape.

Before 2010, there was less than a mile of bike lanes in Indianapolis. Now, there are over 90 miles. They have built 70 miles of trails, along with about 900,000 linear feet of sidewalk, nearly 10,000 ADA-compliant access ramps and two roundabouts. The RebuildIndy effort also repaired 119,511 linear feet of alleyways and 89 bridges, resurfaced 1,821 lane miles of roads, planted 14,441 trees, and made energy-saving retrofits on nearly 700 traffic signals. http://bit.ly/1ISdFvY

NV DOT BUILDS SIDEWALKS & CROSSWALKS AT ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
-> The Nevada Department of Transportation included its own back-to-school program in the summer construction season, building sidewalks and pedestrian crosswalks at five elementary schools in Washoe County. The agency said that project built about 2,800 feet of new sidewalk and upgraded pedestrian crosswalk ramps and signage in front of the schools. Previously, many of the roadways did not have sidewalks near school entrances. A contractor completed the nearly $500,000 job in six weeks, with the cost covered by the state's federal highway funding apportionment as a "safe routes to school" project. http://bit.ly/1DwDpCt

CALIFORNIA PED & BIKE SAFETY CURRICULUM FOR GRADES 4 & 5
-> The California Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Curriculum for Grades 4 and 5 (http://bit.ly/1JTb8Hf) and its on-line training (http://bit.ly/1WgviQj) are available free of charge. The curriculum provides nine lessons for 4th and 5th grade teachers to educate students on how to be safe pedestrians and bicyclists and understand the positive impact that walking and bicycling has on their health and environment.

[See also Webinar section for a September 15 webinar on this curriculum.]

MN LAW: LOCAL GOVERNMENTS TO ALIGN W/ MN DOT DESIGN STANDARDS
-> Lawmakers in Minnesota enacted legislation this spring that should give cities and counties more flexibility in how they design roads—a big win for safer walking, bicycling, and driving. The new law sets in motion a year-long process that will align the design standards used by local units of government with the design standards used by MnDOT. The MnDOT standards give designers more flexibility to fit the needs of all transportation modes—especially biking, walking, and transit—into street projects despite limited right-of-way (i.e. limited space to work with). Applying one set of flexible design standards to all of the roadways in Minnesota will make our roadways safer and friendlier for all users. http://bit.ly/1IFuc9v

TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES PROGRAM SPENDING REPORT BY STATE
-> The Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s "FY 1992-2014 Transportation Alternatives Spending Report" documents the initial responses of states to the transition from Transportation Enhancements (TE) to the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) in fiscal year 2014 through an analysis of actual financial and programming data collected from two sources: a survey of state DOTs and the Federal Highway Administration’s fiscal tracking system. How does your state compare with other states when it comes to spending federal Transportation Enhancement and Transportation Alternatives funds? This report provides a view into this federal transportation funding source and provides transparency and valuable comparisons to assist those interested in transportation policy. http://bit.ly/1TqVJi1

LAB: 3 NEW OR UPDATED MODEL LAWS FOR BICYCLIST SAFETY
-> The League of American Bicyclists released three new or updated model laws that states and communities can use to craft legislation that supports the safety of bicyclists.

  • An improved and updated Vulnerable Road User law –provides punishment for motor vehicle drivers who seriously injure people using roadways who are not protected by a motor vehicle. http://bit.ly/1J39dPo
  • A new model Safe Passing law –provides language directing motor vehicles to move over a lane where possible or pass bicyclists at no closer than 3 feet. It also enables motor vehicles to cross double-yellow lines to safely pass bicyclists. http://bit.ly/1f6OEpg
  • A new model Where to Ride law –provides language empowering a bicyclist to make safe choices regarding lane position and increases public understanding about where bicyclists should ride on the road. http://bit.ly/1JbSTOk

WHAT WORKS CITIES NAMED FOR SUPPORT IN USING BIG DATA
-> Bloomberg Philanthropies announced today the first eight cities chosen for What Works Cities, the organization’s new $42 million initiative to help mayors and planners make the most of big data: Chattanooga, TN; Jackson, MS; Kansas City, MO; Louisville, KY; Mesa, AZ; New Orleans, LA; Seattle, WA; and Tulsa, OK. The goal is eventually to help 100 mid-sized U.S. cities (populations between 100,000 and one million) by boosting open government in municipalities around the country, writing best practices guidelines and streamlining the use of data as it applies to effective policymaking. . http://bit.ly/1NaUG3N

TWIN CITIES, MN: 2015 SWITCH MY TRIP CAMPAIGN
-> Between now and the end of October, the Twin Cities’ Switch My Trip campaign urges people replace a drive-by-yourself trip and instead take the bus or train, bicycle, carpool, walk, telework or vanpool, and be entered into a variety of prizes. Check out the Pledge To Switch One Trip In 2015 form and brief survey: http://bit.ly/1gz9GOh. http://bit.ly/R2xgXv


THE RESEARCH BEAT

TA: 2015 MID-YEAR VISION ZERO REPORT CARD FOR NEW YORK CITY
-> Transportation Alternatives has released its "Class of Vision Zero: 2015 Mid-Year Report Card," the first of what will be bi-annual performance reviews of New York City’s effort to end traffic fatalities and serious injuries by 2024. The letter grades, accolades and noted failures are based in part on policy analysis drawn directly from the City’s Vision Zero Action Plan, but more heavily on real-life results. Enforcement data cover the first five months of 2015. http://bit.ly/1PkAVbj

REPORT: MN BIKE/PED COUNTING STUDY
-> The University of Minnesota has released a report that discusses efforts to foster non-motorized traffic monitoring. (The Minnesota Bicycle and Pedestrian Counting Initiative: Implementation Study: http://bit.ly/1IKezLS) The objectives were to install and validate permanent automated sensors, use portable sensors for short duration counts, develop models for extrapolating counts, and integrate continuous counts into MnDOT traffic monitoring databases. http://bit.ly/1UCAr3s

TWO STREET FEATURES THAT ENCOURAGE WALKING IN SALT LAKE CITY
-> A new study identifies two important street features that encourage pedestrian activity on Salt Lake City streets. (Do Better Urban Design Qualities Lead to More Walking in Salt Lake City, Utah?: http://bit.ly/1P65SiO) Using similar methodology as in a New York City study (Streetscape Features Related to Pedestrian Activity: http://bit.ly/1LQUSq9 free download through 8/31/15), researchers spent 30 minutes counting walkers on 179 blocks in downtown Salt Lake City.

Out of five broad categories of design features, they found that two had statistically significant relationships to the number of people on foot: 1) Transparency: "the degree to which people can see or perceive what lies beyond the edge of a street and what human activity is contained there,." 2) Imageability: what makes a place distinctive and memorable—a visual identity that could be made of parks or plazas, unique views or vistas, old or unusual architecture, and al fresco dining. http://bit.ly/1DMdKoX

NAR SURVEY: YOUNGER GENERATIONS PREFER MULTIMODAL OPTIONS
-> The National Association of Realtors released the results of the 2015 Community Preference Survey (http://bit.ly/1DLXX9D). The bulk of the questions focus on biking, walking, and transit use, as well as a respondent's willingness to trade off housing size to live in a more walkable community. Sidewalks and places to walk increased in importance from 72 to 85 percent, while access to transit increased from 46 to 64 percent. The results reinforce other reports that younger generations are driving less and prefer communities with multimodal transportation options—see infographic at http://bit.ly/1IJQgxB. http://bit.ly/1EktXwC

CO-BENEFITS OF DESIGNING COMMUNITIES FOR ACTIVE LIVING
-> To reverse the global epidemic of physical inactivity that is responsible for more than 5 million deaths per year, many groups recommend creating "activity-friendly environments." Such environments may have other benefits, beyond facilitating physical activity, but these potential co-benefits have not been well described. The purpose of the "Co-benefits of Designing Communities for Active Living: An Exploration of Literature" paper is to explore a wide range of literature and conduct an initial summary of evidence on co-benefits of activity-friendly environments. Six potential outcomes/co-benefits were searched: physical health, mental health, social benefits, safety/injury prevention, environmental sustainability, and economics.

Specific environmental features with the strongest evidence of multiple co-benefits were park proximity, mixed land use, trees/greenery, accessibility and street connectivity, building design, and workplace physical activity policies/programs. The exploration revealed substantial evidence that designing community environments that make physical activity attractive and convenient is likely to produce additional important benefits. http://bit.ly/1EmPncy

AUSTRALIAN CYCLING CASUALTIES, CRASH TYPES & USE LEVELS
-> The Australian Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development has released an information sheet (Australian Cycling Safety: Casualties, Crash Types and Participation Levels) that analyzes cycling casualties by demographics, types of crashes that resulted in cyclist injuries, and trends in cycling participation. http://bit.ly/1PiZyoN


QUOTES R US

"The Safe Routes to School Program is giving us the opportunity to change the habits of an entire generation to ensure that healthy children grow to be healthy adults."
—the Late Congressman Jim Oberstar, Safe Routes to School champion, commenting on the creation of the federal Safe Routes to School program in 2010. August 10 marked its 10th anniversary.

"Over the past decade, more than 17,400 schools --serving kindergarten through eighth grades in all fifty states and the District of Columbia-- have been a part of Safe Routes, with schools serving low-income populations making up 68 percent of Safe Routes schools. The program has reached more than 6.8 million students nationwide, demonstrating the transportation and health benefits of safely biking and walking to school."
-US DOT Secty. Anthony Foxx
http://1.usa.gov/1L0PBuN

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

REVERSE GRAFFITI: CREATIVE CLEANING CREATES GINORMOUS MURAL
See how workers using water and high-pressure washers to remove decades of grime on a dam in Poland created an eco-mural 300 feet wide X 177 feet tall honoring local flora and fauna. http://bit.ly/1MmxyCz


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

WEBINAR "Everyone Walks. Understanding & Addressing Pedestrian Safety"
Date: August 12, 2015, 2:00-3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Pam Fischer (Author: Everyone Walks. Understanding & Addressing Pedestrian Safety report)
Host: Governors Highway Safety Association
Details: http://bit.ly/1TodyDu, free

WEBINAR "Integrating Ped/Bike Concepts into University Courses: New Materials and Noteworthy Practices"
Date: August 19, 2015, 1:00-2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Mike Flynn (Sam Schwartz Engineering), Carl Sundstrom (UNC Highway Safety Research Center), Kari E. Watkins (Georgia Tech) & Jeff LaMondia (Auburn University)
Host: Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1IFp3yi, free

WEBINAR "Planning for Complete Streets: City Examples"
Date: August 20, 2015, 12:00-1:30 pm ET (1.5 PDH/Pending 1.5 CM)
Presenters: Amy Lewin (City of Fort Collins, CO), Emma Belmont (Transfort/City of Fort Collins, CO) & Tom Hester (Parsons Brinckerhoff)
Host: Institute of Transportation Engineers & the Complete Streets Council
Details: http://bit.ly/1Pk6DW8, $125

WEBINAR "Pedestrians Count! – How to Measure Foot Traffic"
Date: August 27, 2015, 1:00-2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Krista Nordback (Portland State University), Shawn Turner (Texas Transportation Institute), Scott Brady (Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission), Theo Petritsch (Sprinkle Consulting) & David Jones (Federal Highway Administration)
Host: Initiative for Bicycle & Pedestrian Innovation
Details: http://bit.ly/1MjH0Fc, free

WEBINAR "What’s Happening at the Walking College?" (Walking College Series)
Date: September 1, 2015, 1:00-2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Joyce Husseini (Stoughton Public Schools, MA), Lisa Diaz (Denver, CO), Jim Palmquist (AARP-PA) & Lindsey Wooten (Wayne Main Street, MI)
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/1NpD8kF, free

WEBINAR "The 6 E's of Walk to School Day Encouragement"
Date: September 2, 2015, 1:00-2:00 pm ET
Presenters: David Hornak (Holt Public Schools, Waffiyyah Murray (Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia), Shane MacRhodes (Eugene Safe Routes to School) & Rosie Mesterhazy (Safe Routes to School National Partnership)
Host: Safe Routes to School National Partnership
Details: http://bit.ly/1J2NJ5m, free

WEBINAR "US Access Board Open Q & A"
Date: September 3, 2015, 2:30-4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Rex Pace & Earlene Sesker (US Access Board)
Host: US Access Board
Details: http://bit.ly/13YfYxd, free

WEBINAR "U.S. Federal Policy Briefing"
Date: September 15, 2015, 1:00-2:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/1h1SZvN, free

WEBINAR "New California Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Curriculum for Grades 4 and 5"
Date: September 15, 2015, 1:00-3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: California Safe Routes to School Technical Assistance Resource Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1WguQ4t, free


RESOURCES

IMPROVE SCHOOL ARRIVAL & DEPARTURE PROCEDURES TOOLKIT
-> From cars, buses, to kids on foot and bikes, there is quite a bit of chaos before and after school. The recently released Feet First "Improve Your School Arrival and Departure Procedures Toolkit for School Safety Committees" provides tips to make the often most unsafe area (outside the school entrance) a safer place for everyone. http://bit.ly/1PkxbGR

PED/BIKE PLANNING & ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY COURSE MATERIALS
-> The Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation Short Series from the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center offers three modules to augment introductory undergraduate courses in basic civil engineering or transportation planning. The modules are: Planning for Pedestrians and Bicycles; Pedestrian and Bicycle Facility Design; and Pedestrian and Bicycle Data and Performance. Free download includes the 3 modules each with slides for a 50-minute lecture, speaker notes, and references; suggested additional readings; and four student assignments. http://bit.ly/1NpBdMY

[See Webinar section for August 19 webinar on these materials.]

FHWA ONLINE TOOLS: COMMUNITY VISIONING METRICS & PLACEFIT
-> What level of housing density is appropriate for a community? Is public health a concern? What about access to transportation? These questions are examples of a transportation planner's metrics for building a community's vision. Two planning web-based tools, Community Visioning Metrics (CVM: http://1.usa.gov/1MjtVf0) and Placefit Community Characteristics Database (http://1.usa.gov/1hx7l7j), help transportation planners, local officials and the public identify their community's vision. The CVM offers searchable fields to help find performance measures that match a community's context and goals. Placefit is a web-based database that provides access to a variety of existing websites based on livability characteristics. Planners can use Placefit to find livable communities according to thirteen primary categories, such as density and demographics, geography and climate, and education.

ADVICE & TOOLS FOR BUILDING BETTER PROJECT COMMUNICATIONS
-> In today’s media rich environment, people are inundated on a regular basis with high quality content from organizations big and small. How can small cities and towns craft "must read" content that resonates with their target audiences? Creating a first-rate community outreach strategy doesn’t have to be prohibitively expensive, and can make a big difference in catalyzing support for your design project. Here are some key considerations to keep in mind along with a suite of great free tools that anyone can use to build better community outreach materials... http://bit.ly/1Jc8Mo3

US DOT: TRAFFIC SAFETY FACTS 2013 DATA
-> The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released a fact sheet summarizing the number of people killed and injured in police-reported motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2013 and reports analysis on other years’ data. For instance, the estimated economic cost of pedestrian crashes in 2010 (most current available data) is $11.5 billion, and for bicyclist crashes is $4.4 billion. When the value of lost quality of life is added to the 8 categories that comprise the tangible economic costs, the comprehensive costs of these crashes is $65 billion and $21.7 billion. http://1.usa.gov/1TlN8SQ

REPORT: MAKING SENSE OF THE NEW URBAN SCIENCE
-> The "Making Sense of the New Urban Science" report is an initial attempt to understand the collective scope and impact of the new science of cities movement. What does this new science seek to achieve? Who are its practitioners? What questions are they pursuing? What methods do they use? What are they learning? How might their discoveries shape our shared urban destiny? http://bit.ly/1MmtYbB

TRANSIT INFORMATION ACCESS FOR PERSONS W/ IMPAIRMENTS
-> TRB's "Transit IDEA Report 71: Transit Information Access for Persons with Visual or Cognitive Impairments" explores ways to use technology to address their needs. This project envisioned a new location-based information access system that provides personalized transit information to each user to increase ridership to large segments of the community who are currently unable or unwilling to travel independently. http://bit.ly/1IWKvMd

MN DOT: PERMEABLE PAVEMENTS IN COLD CLIMATES REPORT
-> The Minnesota Department of Transportation has released a report (Permeable Pavements in Cold Climates: State of the Art and Cold Climate Case Studies) that reviews full-depth permeable pavements, including porous asphalt, pervious concrete, and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. http://bit.ly/1JSQY02

ONLINE COURSE: FORM BASED CODES 101- DOWNTOWNS
-> A new Plannetizen course reviews the important role of downtowns, both philosophically and urbanistically. They will present a series of case studies that illustrate the common features of form-based codes for downtowns across a range of scales and contexts, as well as highlight some unique features related to their specific characteristics and complexity. http://bit.ly/1IYom4t


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR INNOVATIVE IDEAS AS PECHA KUCHA PRESENTATIONS - 2015 National Open Streets Summit, September 25-27, 2015, Atlanta, GA.
Deadline: August 15, 2015, http://bit.ly/1IJZ4ne

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - Active Living Research 2016, January 31 - February 3, 2016, Clearwater Beach, FL.
Deadline: August 28, 2015, 24:00 GMT, http://bit.ly/1FSW3BQ

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – 2016 International Conference & Workshop on Winter Maintenance and Surface Transportation Weather, on-line presentations available in February 2016, conference in April 2016, Denver, CO. (No specific dates provided)
Deadline: September 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GjdBnz

-> Call for Presentations - NATMEC: Improving Traffic Data Collection, Analysis, and Use 2016, May 1-4, 2016, Miami, FL.
Deadline: September 17, 2015, http://bit.ly/1Mig9JF

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - Velo-city Global 2016, February 27 - March 1, 2016, Taipei, Taiwan.
Deadline: September 18, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GhHeWl

-> CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS - Winter Cycling Congress 2016, February 2-4, 2016, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN
Deadline: September 30, 2015, http://bit.ly/1HtDZl2

-> CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - Every Body Walk! Collaborative Video Competition
Deadline: October 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1K6hrp3

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS — 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, November 16 - 19, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand.
Deadline: Call opens September 1, 2015, closes February 29, 2016 (Details and criteria available now), http://bit.ly/1KXYS8h

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> August 26, 2015, Silicon Valley Bike Summit 2015, Palo Alto, CA.
http://bit.ly/1IFnu3r
-> September 19, 2015, KC Women’s Bike Summit, Kansas City, MO.
http://bit.ly/1N2Fj0h
-> October 1, 2015, 8th annual Complete Streets Forum, Toronto, Ontario.
http://bit.ly/1DIXHIO
-> October 7, 2015, National Walk to School Day
http://bit.ly/15PtJyo
-> October 25-28, 2015, California Bicycle Summit, San Diego, CA.
http://bit.ly/1fGCiVT
-> October 28, 2015, 4th Annual Illinois Bicycle Summit, Champaign, IL.
http://bit.ly/1iLadwh
-> November 11-15, 2015, WHEELS: Advancing Florida's Mobility Future, Miami, FL.
http://bit.ly/1galOp1
-> January 14-16, 2016, Vision Zero for Cities Symposium, New York, NY.
http://bit.ly/1h1QedR
-> February 2-4, 2016, Winter Cycling Congress, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN.
http://bit.ly/1NweVJ4
-> May 1-4, 2016, NATMEC: Improving Traffic Data Collection, Analysis, and Use 2016, Miami, FL.
http://bit.ly/1IDfhwB
-> May 4, 2016, National Bike to School Day
http://bit.ly/X7UOex
-> September 28-30, 2015, Move Together: Shared Mobility Summit & North American Bikeshare Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.
http://bit.ly/1VMAgE8
-> April 5-7, 2016, Fifth Safe Routes to School National Conference, Columbus, OH.
http://bit.ly/YE6ocN


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS - ONLINE MASTER OF SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
The Master of Sustainable Transportation program (MST) explores sustainable transportation planning, policy and analysis and examines the growing concern for transportation's environmental, social, energy and economic impact on our society. The program is divided into three areas of concentration: Planning and Livable Communities; Environmental Issues and Impacts; and Policy Development, Health and Economics. Designed for working professionals, the program is offered in a convenient, part-time, online format. The curriculum is comprised of 42 credits offered through nine courses over three years.
Deadline: September 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1h22n2C

-> JOB - MULTI MODAL MANAGER, CITY OF DURANGO, CO
To manage, supervise, and coordinate multi modal transportation programs, planning, marketing and implementation with a special focus on public transit, pedestrian and bicycle modes of travel. Assist with implementation of assigned duties with other City departments, State and Federal Agencies. Projects may have components, including but not limited to facilities, outreach/education, grant activities, and both long and short term planning. Provide highly responsible and complex administrative support to the Department Director.
Deadline: August 17, 2015 by 4:30 pm MT, http://bit.ly/1PkgVG1

-> JOB - LIVABLE STREETS DIRECTOR, SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL TRANSPORTATION AGENCY, CA
The mission of Livable Streets is to create safe and inviting streets and sidewalks for all who walk and use a bicycle, focusing on Vision Zero projects with the goal of eliminating traffic deaths in San Francisco by 2024. This work unit is responsible for delivering bicycle, pedestrian, and traffic calming projects on time and within budget in conjunction with other City departments, including Recreation and Park, City Planning, and Public Works. The Livable Streets Director leads the Sustainable Streets Division’s Livable Streets Subdivision and oversees more than 55 full-time and 200 part-time seasonal staff in its Bicycle, Pedestrian, Traffic Calming and School Crossing Guard programs. This position ensures the delivery of SFMTA’s Bicycle, Pedestrian, School Safety, and Traffic Calming Capital Improvement Programs within the broad policy framework of Vision Zero.
Deadline: August 20, 2015 by 5:00 pm PT, http://bit.ly/1gyU7Gc

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER III, FAIRFAX COUNTY, VA
Coordinates the development, design and review of transportation projects, plans and feasibility studies with a focus on bicycle and pedestrian related projects. Reviews transportation facility design plans and resolves project issues for roadway, intersection, and multi-modal projects, such as transit, parking, bicycle or pedestrian facilities. Develops scopes for new projects, reviews traffic data, and provides transportation analyses. Prepares technical reports, correspondence and other written documents. Coordinates project development with residents, agencies and elected officials. Position may be underfilled as a Transportation Planner II.
Deadline: August 28, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1IX1huF

-> JOB - OUTREACH AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, BAY AREA BIKE SHARE, SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Bay Area Bike Share is seeking a new Outreach and Communications Manager to oversee the community affairs and communications around expansion in partnership with our client, the MTC, local city governments and consultants. Bike share in the Bay Area is poised to grow from a 700-bike system to a 7,000-bike system by the end of 2017.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/1KgnC7x

-> TWO JOBS - FUNDERS’ NETWORK FOR SMART GROWTH AND LIVABLE COMMUNITIES, CORAL GABLES, FL.
Funders’ Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities (TFN) will be the leading resource in philanthropy for interdisciplinary and transformative thinking and action that gives all people the opportunity to live in more environmentally sustainable, socially equitable, and economically prosperous regions and communities.

PROGRAM ASSOCIATE - OPERATIONS
The Program Associate – Operations is responsible for providing executive assistance and operations support for TFN. This position provides support primarily to the CEO and secondary support to other staff and contractors in the organization.
Deadline: Open until filled, http://bit.ly/1ToPqAF

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER
The Communications Manager is responsible for performing a variety of communications services for the organization and providing leadership in designing and executing a strategic communications agenda to advance the vision and mission of TFN.
Deadline: Open until filled, http://bit.ly/1f78tfW

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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Editor Emeritus & Founding Editor: John Williams
Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston

Contributors: AASHTO Daily Transportation Update; AASHTO Journal; American Bicyclist Update; APBP Members Listerve; BikeWalkKC News; Laura Bliss; James Brasuell; California Safe Routes to School Technical Assistance Resource Center; Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design; CityLab; Anna Clark; Dayna Cole; Footprints Monthly Newsletter; Funders' Network News and Notes; HEP Research Quarterly Newsletter; Herb Hiller; ; H+T—Friends Digest; LinkedIn Planetizen Group; Tracy Hadden Loh; Ken McLeod; Ariana McBride; Chris McCahill; Montana Associated Technology Roundtables; Hugh Morris; Harriet Mullaney; National Catholic Reporter; Next City; Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center; Planetizen; SafeTREC Newsletter; Smart Growth Network Newsletter; Nancy Smith Lea; Springwise; Ben Starrett; Jenn Stanley; St. Paul Smart Trips; Streetsblog; Streetside; Carolyn Szczepanski; Brent Toderian; Transit for Livable Communities News; TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter; TREC.


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