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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#392 Wednesday, September 23, 2015

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Reflections on PARK(ing) Day
----- Promoting Active Living in Rural Communities
----- EPA: Smart Growth Self-Assessment for Rural Communities
----- European Parliament Approves EU Roadmap for Cycling
----- FHWA Review: Creating International Bike & Ped Networks
----- Grassroots Campaign Slows UK Traffic to 20 mph
----- Streetfilms: Central London, England Streets Transformed
----- London, England: Separate Cyclist & Motorist Turns
----- Archive: Launch of Call to Action on Walking & Walkable Communities
----- African-American Cycling Perceptions & Intervention Strategies
----- RTC: Take the National Trail User Survey
----- Take Context Sensitive Solutions Clearinghouse Survey
----- Take the Physical Activity & Public Health Survey
----- City Planners Must Practice Everyone-Based Design

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- San Francisco, CA: Data-Informed Measures Increase Safety
----- CA: Use VMT to Assess Traffic Impacts of Development
----- North Texas: Bike & Ped Connections to Rail Network
----- Portland OR: #1 Major U.S. City for Biking to Work
----- Colorado: Reaction to $100 Million Pledge for Bike & Ped
----- America Walks Creating Walkable Communities Workshops in MT & KY
----- New York City Now Has 1,000 Miles of Bike Lanes

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Top First/Last Mile Priorities: Sidewalks, Ped Crossing
----- Walkability’s Impact on Housing Values, Foreclosures & Crime
----- Youth Biking Fatalities Down 90% Since 1977
----- More Likely to Take Transit to Work: Living Near Stop or Working Near One?
----- DC Bikeshare Traffic Congestion Impacts
----- Tool: Number of Jobs Accessible by Walking in Biggest Metros
----- Mode Choice and Commuting Stress: Drivers Most Stressed

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- WHO: Reporting on Road Safety: A Guide for Journalists
----- Toolkit: Financing Walkable Urban Places
----- Online HotReport: Searchable Community Sustainability Indicators
----- Before/After Shots of Ped-Friendly Transformations
----- FHWA Transportation Planning Process Briefing Book
----- USDOT: Pedestrian Safety Enforcement Operations Guide
----- Videos: How People Incorporate Biking into Daily Life
----- FHWA Innovations: Road Diets & Crash Cutting Safety Improvements
----- Map of Federally Funded Local Community Projects
----- Smart Phone App: pathVu Sidewalk Gathers Conditions

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

REFLECTIONS ON PARK(ING) DAY
-> Celebrating its tenth year, PARK(ing) Day (http://bit.ly/1LNl6X2) is an annual event where artists, activists and citizens turn metered parking spots into temporary public spaces for people rather than cars. PARK(ing) Day got its start when a handful of people asked: Why are drivers the only ones allowed to rent that 8' x 20' parcel of public space? How could it be used differently? Project for Public Spaces Vice President and Director of the National Center for Bicycling and Walking, Mark Plotz reflects on the parklet he helped set up outside PPS's Washington, DC office.

With a delicious berry smoothie in hand, and a compelling demonstration just a few feet away of how a 160 square foot patch of asphalt could be used differently, it didn't take long for passersby to make the mental leap about which was the better use: storage for a single car or fun and social interaction for a dozen people? The biggest crowds and smiles came from those we invited to pedal our fender blender. Similarly, having some sidewalk chalk available awakened the inner artist in a few people. The hopscotch game was a big hit with the suits at quitting time on a Friday... http://bit.ly/1G1OeYB

[National PARK(ing) Day is always the third Friday in September—but who says your neighborhood has to wait that long?]

PROMOTING ACTIVE LIVING IN RURAL COMMUNITIES
-> "Promoting Active Living in Rural Communities" (http://bit.ly/1j8p3Pp) summarizes current research on elements of the rural built environment that may be related to obesity and physical activity. It also provides policy implications and a list of important rural-specific built environment measures that have been developed and tested for assessing active living supports, barriers and perceptions. Among other conclusions, the research brief shows that building infrastructure (e.g., wider paved shoulders along rural roads, and pedestrian crossings) and implementing Complete Streets policies that accommodate the needs of pedestrians and bicyclists can help reduce barriers to being physically active.

EPA: SMART GROWTH SELF-ASSESSMENT FOR RURAL COMMUNITIES
-> The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released a report (Smart Growth Self-Assessment for Rural Communities: Madison County, New York: http://1.usa.gov/1OtRKTD) that discusses how a smart growth approach can strengthen rural communities' economies, protect their environment and residents' health, and encourage them to compete with urban areas for workers.

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT APPROVES EU ROADMAP FOR CYCLING
-> The European Parliament recently approved a report (DRAFT REPORT on the Implementation of the 2011 White Paper on Transport: Taking Stock and the Way Forward Towards Sustainable Mobility: http://bit.ly/1V93Ypd) that calls on the European Commission to include the EU Roadmap for Cycling in its next work agenda. The EU Roadmap for Cycling is envisaged as an EU-wide strategy to assimilate and align the current relevant initiatives of the fifteen Directorates-General of the Commission, in addition to allowing for the formation of further policy measures conducive to a modal shift towards cycling. http://bit.ly/1PrKepM

FHWA REVIEW: CREATING INTERNATIONAL BIKE & PED NETWORKS
-> The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the University of North Carolina (UNC) published a report (Delivering Safe, Comfortable, and Connected Pedestrian and Bicycle Networks: A Review of International Practices: http://1.usa.gov/1O9xdCL) examining noteworthy and innovative international designs and treatments that improve bicycle and pedestrian safety. The report covers practices in 11 countries and focuses on such topic areas as signalization, policy change, and network infrastructure.

GRASSROOTS CAMPAIGN SLOWS UK TRAFFIC TO 20 MPH
-> More than 15 of the 64 million people in the United Kingdom are now living in communities where the speed limit is 20 miles per hour. The 20's Plenty for Us (http://bit.ly/1Kuu3qp, also see related Streetfilms video: http://bit.ly/1WhVHw0) movement was launched in 2007, and now encompasses 263 local campaigns around the U.K. These grassroots groups have built support for the idea of slower traffic speeds, with the aim of making streets that are safer for people of all ages and more pleasant to live in. http://bit.ly/1MHlj3S

STREETFILMS: CENTRAL LONDON, ENGLAND STREETS TRANSFORMED
-> Streetfilms has released an interview and walking tour with Iain Simmons who is the Assistant Director of City Transportation for the City Of London. The tour included looking at some of the many streets that have been widened for pedestrians, some of the high-quality materials & traffic calming used to keep speeds at 20 mph, and a look at where one of London's Cycle SuperHighways will be installed. Mr. Simmons emphasized that when the public and news media predicts chaos when new bike lanes, sidewalk extensions and traffic calming are proposed, "....the reality is it never, ever, ever does." http://bit.ly/1NLEtUV

LONDON, ENGLAND: SEPARATE CYCLIST & MOTORIST TURNS
-> A new junction [intersection] designed to avoid cyclists being hit by left-turning traffic has been unveiled in London. This is the first junction of its kind in Britain. Cyclists and turning motor traffic will move in separate phases, with left-turning vehicles held back to allow cyclists to move without risk, and cyclists held when vehicles are turning left. There will also be a new ‘two-stage right turn' to let cyclists make right turns in safety. For straight-ahead traffic, early-release traffic lights will give cyclists a head start. These innovations aim to significantly cut the cyclist casualty rate. Around 85% of cyclist accidents happen at junctions, mostly involving turning traffic. The new junction, on the upgraded Cycle Superhighway 2 at Whitechapel Road and Cambridge Heath Road, will be the template for junctions to be introduced across London's main road network in future. http://bit.ly/1V9v22c

[Since vehicles travel on the left side of the road in Britain, switch left with right turns above for North American contexts.]

AFRICAN-AMERICAN CYCLING PERCEPTIONS & INTERVENTION STRATEGIES
-> "Changing Perceptions of Cycling in the African American Community to Encourage Participation in a Sport that Promotes Health in Adults" (http://bit.ly/1EUcTmJ) reports on two intervention strategies designed to influence perceptions of cycling among African- Americans. Past research shows that cycling disparities between African-Americans and other ethnic groups are linked to negative perceptions among inexperienced cyclists and non-cyclists. This study examines African-American cycling perceptions and fills a void in addressing the lack of bicycle ridership in the African-American community.

LAUNCH OF CALL TO ACTION ON WALKING & WALKABLE COMMUNITIES
-> If you missed the launch of "Step It Up!, the Surgeon General's Call to Action on Walking and Walkable Communities," watch the webcast archive. It offers strategies for increasing walking and walkable communities for people of all ages and abilities. Only half of American adults get enough physical activity to reduce the risk of chronic disease, the leading cause of death in the U.S. Walking is an easy way to start and maintain a physically active lifestyle. The Surgeon General aims to increase walking across the nation by calling for access to safe and convenient places to walk and wheelchair roll. http://bit.ly/1iLGtBs

RTC: TAKE THE NATIONAL TRAIL USER SURVEY
-> Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC) has begun the first-ever nationwide survey of trail use to help to create analytical models that can accurately—

  • Measure how effectively trail systems have connected—and could further connect—urban areas
  • Factor and forecast the demand for, and potential use of, new trail connections
  • Assess the impact of trail use on regional tourism and economic development, as well as dollars saved in relation to transportation and health care.

Take the survey online: http://bit.ly/1JoEZ57

TAKE CONTEXT SENSITIVE SOLUTIONS CLEARINGHOUSE SURVEY
-> The Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) Clearinghouse needs user feedback as it plans for a website revamp. Please complete a short survey (http://bit.ly/1MokDgV) by Friday, September 25. CSS is a multidisciplinary approach used by state DOTs for developing transportation projects. It works with stakeholders to identify common goals such as historic preservation, environmental justice, and economic development, in contexts ranging from rural to urban, with the goal of getting the project right the first time. http://bit.ly/1MIcBT1

TAKE THE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & PUBLIC HEALTH SURVEY
-> The University of South Carolina Prevention Research Center is conducting a survey (eMedia Use and Preferences for Physical Activity and Public Health) to better understand how physical activity researchers and practitioners receive, seek out, and share information about physical activity and public health. http://bit.ly/1JoYTwO

CITY PLANNERS MUST PRACTICE EVERYONE-BASED DESIGN
-> Day to day, moment by moment, each of us moves in and out of disability. When we can't see because we've lost our glasses; when our arms are incapacitated because they are full with groceries or a baby as we walk through the automatic doors at the supermarket; when we have a migraine headache and can't bear the noise of traffic. In those times, we've tilted into disability. This everyday disability should inform our choices in urban planning and universal design. To some extent, that is happening under the auspices of the "age-friendly city." http://bit.ly/1V8Rs91


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

SAN FRANCISCO, CA: DATA-INFORMED MEASURES INCREASE SAFETY
-> San Francisco's "Vision Zero" plan is to eliminate traffic deaths by 2024. A big part of the strategy involves data—improving the quality of information on pedestrian injuries and fatalities, analyzing those numbers, and "using data to inform better public policy." The "Education & Evaluation: Safe Streets SF" study (http://bit.ly/1V8VJcu) looked at the effect various tactics had on driver behavior at four of the most dangerous intersections in the city.

CA: USE VMT TO ASSESS TRAFFIC IMPACTS OF DEVELOPMENT
-> In an effort to shift from car-centric planning and incentivize eco-friendly transportation options, California is revising the way it measures traffic impacts of development projects under its Environmental Quality Act. The new guidelines replace the congestion-related Level of Service (LOS) metric with Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), which aims to encourage alternative modes of transportation. http://bit.ly/1iL54pZ

NORTH TEXAS: BIKE & PED CONNECTIONS TO RAIL NETWORK
-> North Texas' network of walking and bicycling infrastructure around rail stations was recently documented in a study that will help decisionmakers prioritize investments needed to improve access to transit services. (Active Transportation Routes to Rail: http://bit.ly/1gMRhNT) The study also considered how far pedestrians must walk between stations and their destinations, which may be impacted by gaps in the sidewalk network and other barriers such as waterways, major roadways and highways lacking pedestrian accommodations. http://bit.ly/1P0I0xs

PORTLAND OR: #1 MAJOR U.S. CITY FOR BIKING TO WORK
-> In 2014, Portland led the nation for the rate of people biking to work in major cities, according to recently released American Community Survey data. Slightly more than 7 percent of the city's commuters chose to pedal—that's about 23,350 people, a leap of 27 percent over 2013's estimate of roughly 18,300 commuters. (Several smaller cities have higher bike to work rates, including Davis, CA, and Boulder, CO.) http://bit.ly/1KMrelS

[Portland will launch its bikeshare program in spring 2016. Watch video of the Bike Share presentation at Portland City Council on September 16, 2015 and view the Bike Share Slideshow. http://bit.ly/1MpCiEN]

COLORADO: REACTION TO $100 MILLION PLEDGE FOR BIKE & PED
-> Two camps emerged after Governor John Hickenlooper announced that the state will invest more than $100 million in making Colorado better for biking and walking (http://bit.ly/1LN1Dpn): those who saw the bid as a way to expand travel choices while reducing traffic injuries and deaths, and those who viewed it as a threat to the idea that all transportation dollars should be spent on car infrastructure. Hickenlooper's pledge includes a commitment from CO DOT to devote at least 2.5 percent of its $738 million budget to bike and pedestrian projects. http://bit.ly/1Kz5JS3

AMERICA WALKS CREATING WALKABLE COMMUNITIES WORKSHOPS
-> As part of its workshop series, America Walks has been bringing together decisionmakers who have an impact on creating walkable communities. Montana Departments of Transportation, Public Health and Human Services, and Commerce directors participated in a workshop in Helena, MT. Their staffs and Bike Walk Montana's Executive Director presented a proposed "Collaborative Framework for Walkable Montana Communities." http://bit.ly/1MpsWZM

America Walks also hosted a similar workshop in Frankfurt, Kentucky. Managers and staff from the Kentucky Department of Public Health and Kentucky Transportation Cabinet jointly developed an innovative "Pedestrian Planning for Communities" training program which guides local officials and community residents through the process of gathering public input about pedestrian safety and access needs in their community, and developing a formal Pedestrian Plan that is adopted by the City Council or County Board. http://bit.ly/1KNKS19

NEW YORK CITY NOW HAS 1,000 MILES OF BIKE LANES
-> After an aggressive expansion in recent years, New York City reached a thousand miles of bikes lanes yesterday, and more bike lane are planned throughout the city. Almost 40% of the miles are shielded from traffic, such as through greenways or off-street bike lanes. http://bit.ly/1NKUnih


THE RESEARCH BEAT

TOP FIRST/LAST MILE PRIORITIES: SIDEWALKS, PED CROSSINGS
-> Mile High Connects, a coalition of transit advocates in the Denver metropolitan area, held focus groups with 22 organizations and surveyed 48 individuals from those groups to understand the top needs and priorities in providing first- and last-mile connections. Sidewalks were rated as the most important improvement, followed by pedestrian crossings, wayfinding, lighting, and other safety measures. "Much of the focus is on new technologies—things like car share and bike share... for a majority of folks the thing that is most impactful is just sidewalks. And that in many cases there aren't really steady and reliable funding streams to be able to address that very basic need in many communities throughout the region." (First and Last Mile: Funding Needs & Priorities for Connecting People to Transit: http://bit.ly/1V9wbH4)

WALKABILITY'S IMPACT ON HOUSING VALUES, FORECLOSURES & CRIME
-> In the "Does Walkability Matter? An Examination of Walkability's Impact on Housing Values, Foreclosures and Crime" study (http://bit.ly/1Oufqau), researchers examined 170 neighborhoods in a medium-sized city to see whether walkability influences neighborhood sustainability. Their analysis shows a positive impact not only on neighborhood housing valuation but also on neighborhood crime and foreclosure. These results provide policy opportunities for planners and citizen groups to pursue strategies to encourage the development of more walkable and sustainable neighborhoods.

YOUTH BIKING FATALITIES DOWN 90% SINCE 1977
-> Last month, a fresh analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Bicyclist Deaths Associated with Motor Vehicle Traffic — United States, 1975–2012: http://1.usa.gov/1iw2S4V) shared some potentially terrific news: youth biking fatalities have plummeted 90 percent since 1977. The best numbers available suggest that today's American kids bike as much — if not more — than kids did in the mid-1970s. Youth biking fatality figures are not actually the result of rapidly falling bike use among kids. They're the result of colossal improvements in youth bike safety over the last 40 years, possibly due to a huge increase in off-street facilities. http://bit.ly/1NLui2E

MORE LIKELY TO TAKE TRANSIT TO WORK: LIVING NEAR STOP OR WORKING NEAR ONE?
-> Which is more likely to get commuters out of their cars: living near a stop, or working near one? University of Denver researchers analyzed the 2009-2010 commute patterns of 3,400 employed locals who either lived, worked, or lived and worked near three of the region's light rail lines. (The impact of transit station areas on the travel behaviors of workers in Denver, Colorado: http://bit.ly/1KA4wtI) "Near" means being within a mile, half-mile, or 15-minute walk of a station. Far more commuters made the trip to work without a car when their office was near transit than when their home was near. http://bit.ly/1OQIfgw

DC BIKESHARE TRAFFIC CONGESTION IMPACTS
-> A recent study (Bicycle Infrastructure and Traffic Congestion: Evidence from DC's Capital Bikeshare: http://bit.ly/1L4Tnqm) examined whether or not Washington, DC's Capital Bikeshare program reduces traffic congestion in the urban environment. The researchers found evidence that the presence of a Capital Bikeshare dock reduces traffic congestion by an average of two to three percent. There is also evidence that there is a spillover effect that causes higher traffic congestion in areas neighboring bike stations. This study only examined within-city commuting decisions.

TOOL: NUMBER OF JOBS ACCESSIBLE BY WALKING IN BIGGEST METROS
-> The Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota published "Access Across America: Walking 2014" (http://bit.ly/1KNtaL2), an online tool that visualizes the number of jobs accessible by walking across the country's 50 most populous metropolitan areas. The report presents detailed accessibility values for each metropolitan area, and block-level maps that illustrate spatial patterns of accessibility within each area.

MODE CHOICE AND COMMUTING STRESS: DRIVERS MOST STRESSED
-> A recent study analyzed commuter survey results of people who walked, rode transit, or drove to work or school in Montreal. (Am Stressed, Must Travel: The Relationship between Mode Choice and Commuting Stress: http://bit.ly/1iLIXjc) The survey measured the various objective (e.g. travel time budgets) and subjective (e.g. trip pleasantness) stressors felt by some 3,800 students, faculty, and staff of McGill University during their commute on a typical winter day. Drivers had the highest average stress, largely owing to "unexpected delays." http://bit.ly/1LMnHAK


QUOTES R US

"The hottest issue right now is what we're calling protected bike lanes... There's a lot of demand for some guidance and consistency for what those look like... I think by the time we put together that new [AASHTO] bike guide it's going to have new guidance on protected bike lanes."

—Tony Laird, WY DOT State Highway Development Engineer & Vice-chair, AASHTO Technical Design Committee on Non-Motorized Transportation, on what he saw as the major issues in the lead-up to AASHTO's next bike guide.

"I think all of us in transportation recognize that it's not just about the cars any more. I think that where we're heading is that we just have to talk about design for all of our customers." [There is also] "genuine interest from our department" in learning more about street designs currently available only in non-AASHTO documents.

—Joyce Taylor, ME DOT Chief Engineer & the Vice-chair, AASHTO' General Subcommittee on Design
http://bit.ly/1OtLuve

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

COMING NEXT SUMMER: CANOE & BIKESHARING ON MISSISSIPPI RIVER
Research is underway to create of a first-of-its-kind National Park Service canoe- and bike-sharing service along the Mississippi River slated to launch by summer 2016. Two dozen state, local and national parks stakeholders tested the 12-mile bike and 9-mile river route. Many said they found the canoe portion safe and navigable, but that more brainstorming is needed for the bike portion. The group biked along the twisting, sometimes shoulderless suburban streets that make up parts of the Mississippi River Trail. http://strib.mn/1Ld88WG

CIA AGENTS' SECRET BIKE-CANOE COMMUTES TO HQ
The CIA canoe pool was active for over 20 years, crossing a ferry to the Sycamore Island Canoe Club's grounds with their bikes, unchaining their canoes from a tree and paddling across the Potomac River year round from Maryland to Virginia. Read the declassified, redacted report: http://bit.ly/1Kmxvof


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

Webinar "Long Distance Trails – Think Regionally, Implement Locally"
Date: October 1, 2015, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Dawn Fredrickson (MO State Parks), Diane Kripas (PA Dept. of Conservation & Natural Resources) & Elissa Garofalo (Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor)
Host: Society of Outdoor Recreation Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/1KO8C54, free for SORP members, $45 for others

Webinar "Youth Serving Accessibility - A Wonderful and Powerful and Combination"
Date: October 8, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Fred Banks (MD Conservation Jobs Corps/CJC)
Host: American Trails
Details: http://bit.ly/1FtG54r, $35 members, $55 non-members

Webinar "Heart & Soul for Planners: Discover a New Way to Better Planning"
Date: October 8, 2015, 3:00 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Orton Family Foundation
Details: http://bit.ly/1Sl2Urs, free

Webinar "Tactical Urbanism"
Date: October 21, 2015, 3:00 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/1ecB8jw, $50 site fee for APBP members, $85 for non-members

WEBINAR "Signal Timing Manual, Second Edition"
Date: November 4, 2015, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET (1.5 PDH)
Presenters: Tom Urbanik (Kittelson & Associates) & Peter Koonce (City of Portland)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1KDudPr, free for TRB affiliates & sponsors, $89 site fee for others

[See Resources section for link to the Signal Timing Manual.]


RESOURCES

WHO: REPORTING ON ROAD SAFETY: A GUIDE FOR JOURNALISTS
-> "Reporting on Road Safety: A Guide for Journalists" (http://bit.ly/1G1rEPY) reflects the experiences and lessons learned from workshops with 1300 journalists and editors in nine countries, in particular those from low- and middle-income countries. The guide and its accompanying pamphlet entitled "16 Story Ideas" (http://bit.ly/1KN6v1s), includes links to stories, suggestions for new angles, descriptions of projects, and tips from editors, journalists and public health experts to enhance reporting on road safety.

TOOLKIT: FINANCING WALKABLE URBAN PLACES
-> As demand for walkable urban places rises across the country, real estate developers, investors, and elected officials are looking for innovative approaches to finance these highly complex developments. The 2015 LOCUS Federal Financing Toolkit: A Reference Guide (free to LOCUS affiliates, $60 fro others: http://bit.ly/1FejHwb), features federal resources and financing opportunities to move real estate projects from concept to realization. The toolkit provides access to a multitude of resources including: a comprehensive analysis and overview of over 40 current programs available ranging from community development and brownfields to affordable housing and transportation; and federal funding opportunities tailored to brownfields, community development, pollution and the environment, housing, transit and transportation, and food access. http://bit.ly/1V9wPEv

HOTREPORT: SEARCHABLE COMMUNITY SUSTAINABILITY INDICATORS
-> The Sustainable Communities HotReport is designed to give community leaders and residents a quick and easy way to determine how well their communities are performing on a variety of sustainability indicators in transportation, housing, economic development, income and equity. Select a community to view charts, tables, and maps showing performance trends over time or select other communities that you consider "peer" or comparison communities. http://1.usa.gov/1iLuUdu

BEFORE/AFTER SHOTS OF PED-FRIENDLY TRANSFORMATIONS
-> A remarkable new photo archive of urban transformations (Before/After Gallery: http://bit.ly/1If5ARn) shows that making city streets more user-friendly doesn't have to be that complicated. The archive put together by Brazilian urban design collective Urb-i houses a collection of over 350 before-and-after shots showing city blocks across the world that have been transformed by pro-pedestrian makeovers. http://bit.ly/1KumfFh

FHWA TRANSPORTATION PLANNING PROCESS BRIEFING BOOK
-> The updated "FHWA Transportation Planning Process Briefing Book: Key Issues for Transportation Decisionmakers, Officials, and Staff" (http://1.usa.gov/1QxA0ob) provides an overview of transportation planning and covers the basics and key concepts of metropolitan and Statewide transportation planning, along with references for additional information.

USDOT: PEDESTRIAN SAFETY ENFORCEMENT OPERATIONS GUIDE
-> The U.S. Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have published the guide "Pedestrian Safety Enforcement Operations: A How-to Guide" (http://1.usa.gov/1GYHe2B) to provide tips and guidance on how states and communities can effectively deploy pedestrian safety enforcement operations to reduce injuries and fatalities. It includes a summary of promising practices, guidance on planning and implementing an operation, a discussion of several key considerations and variations, recommendations regarding the evaluation of pedestrian safety programs, and a series of case studies.

VIDEOS: HOW PEOPLE INCORPORATE BIKING INTO DAILY LIFE
-> Check out six short films showing how people in Arlington, VA incorporate biking into their daily lives. http://bit.ly/1NSlfOW

ROAD DIETS & CRASH CUTTING SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS
-> The Federal Highway Administration has released the latest issue of its bi-monthly Innovator newsletter which includes these articles and presentations:

  • Boost Safety by Going on a Road Diet: See article and link to Road Diets presentation video (1:41:04)
  • Cut Crashes by Targeting Safety Improvements: See article and link to Data-Driven Safety Analysis presentation video (1:44:44)

http://1.usa.gov/1V9u3iA

MAP OF FEDERALLY FUNDED LOCAL COMMUNITY PROJECTS
-> Check out a map that displays work being done by more than 15 Federal agencies in local communities across the country.http://1.usa.gov/1L4TYZi

SMART PHONE APP: PATHVU SIDEWALK GATHERS CONDITIONS
-> A recently developed a crowdsourcing smart phone application called pathVu and its database gathers sidewalk data, reports sidewalk features such as trip hazards, alerts pedestrians as they approach them, and provides navigation and walkable routes. http://bit.ly/1JoU5ax


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS - Winter Cycling Congress 2016, February 2-4, 2016, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN
Deadline: September 30, 2015, http://bit.ly/1HtDZl2

-> CALL FOR UNSOLVED PLANNING MYSTERIES - An interactive workshop planned for the 2016 TRB Annual Meeting seeks problems that vex transportation planners, modelers, and analysts to feature in a workshop titled, "Analyze This! What Planners Want to Know," January 10, 2016, Washington, DC.
Deadline: October 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1ivA6Bm

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - National Bike Summit 2016, March 7-9, 2016, Washington, DC.
Deadline: October 1, 2015, http://svy.mk/1Lw6wFX

-> CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - Every Body Walk! Collaborative Video Competition
Deadline: October 1, 2015, http://bit.ly/1K6hrp3

-> COMPETITION AND CALL FOR THE SIX MINUTE PITCH - Transportation Startup Challenge presentations to be made during 2016 TRB Annual Meeting, January 10-14, 2016, Washington, D.C.
Deadline: October 16, 2015, http://bit.ly/1Fefl84

-> CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS - 2016 National Road Research Alliance Conference, February 18, 2016, St. Paul, MN.
Deadline: October 31, 2015, http://bit.ly/1Mpsmey

-> Call FOR PROPOSALS - 5th SRTS National Conference, April 5-7, 2016, Columbus, OH.
Deadline: October 31, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1MavpKn

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS — 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, November 16 - 19, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand.
Deadline: Call opens September 1, 2015, closes February 29, 2016 (Details and criteria available now), http://bit.ly/1KXYS8h

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> October 14-15, 2015, Sustainable Trails for All Workshop, Greenfield, NH.
http://bit.ly/Y0dpYK
-> October 26-29, 2015, VERGE, San Jose, CA.
http://bit.ly/1IXRt3o
-> October 28-31, 2015, NACTO Designing Cities 2015, Austin, TX.
http://bit.ly/1ETYXZU
-> November 10, 2015, The Next 50 Years in Highway Safety: Connecting People and Technologies, Chapel Hill, NC.
http://bit.ly/1YBIxfD
-> February 18, 2016, 2016 National Road Research Alliance Conference, St. Paul, MN.
http://bit.ly/1Mpsmey
-> May 1-4, 2016, NATMEC: Improving Traffic Data Collection, Analysis, and Use 2016, Miami, FL
http://bit.ly/1IDfhwB
-> November 16-19, 2016, 6th biennial congress of the International Society for Physical Activity and Health (ISPAH), Bangkok, Thailand.
http://bit.ly/1JTPQYv


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL TO ACTION: EVERY BODY WALK! COLLABORATIVE MICRO GRANTS
America Walks and the Every Body Walk! Collaborative announced a new micro grant program to assist local walking advocates in building on the momentum of the Surgeon General's Call to Action. This one time award will fund 10-15 community groups up to $2,500 for activities designed to increase local walking programming and stimulate community demand for infrastructure improvements that provide accessible, safe walkable places for the entire community.
Deadline: October 15, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1QxLdVu

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - HEALTH IMPACT PROJECT
The Health Impact Project, a collaboration of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and The Pew Charitable Trusts, has issued a Call for Proposals (CFP) to target factors outside of the health care sector as a means for improving health equity in seven Southern and Appalachian states: AL, AR, KY, LA, MS, TN, and WV. The Health Impact Project will award seven "foundational" grants of up to $45,000 to provide the resources, time, and skills for grantees to engage key stakeholders and identify the most pressing health or health equity issues facing their communities—as well as the nonhealth care drivers behind those issues (i.e., health determinants). At the end of the grant period, grantees will have a clear, community-driven plan of action for achieving their outcome-based goals.
Deadline: November 13, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1PrQHRu

-> JOB – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, TRANSIT FOR LIVABLE COMMUNITIES, ST. PAUL, MN
Transit for Livable Communities, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization leading the movement for transportation reform in Minnesota, is currently accepting applications for their next Executive Director. This full-time position will lead TLC in efforts to transform Minnesota's transportation system through policy change, institutional and organizational change, and changing the built environment.
Deadline: October 9, 2015, http://bit.ly/1Kzx9r7

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER III, FAIRFAX COUNTY, VA
Among other duties, the Transportation Planner III is responsible for all aspects of project management and coordination for complex multi-modal transportation projects. Coordinates the development, design, and review of transportation projects, plans, and feasibility studies; this includes intersection, roadway, and multi-modal projects, such as pedestrian, bicycle, transit, and parking facilities. Reviews transportation facility design plans and resolves project issues.
Deadline: October 9, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1L4VJpc

-> JOB - SENIOR ASSOCIATE, HEALTH IMPACT PROJECT, WASHINGTON, DC
The Health Impact Project seeks a senior associate to assist with efforts that promote and support the use of HIAs as a tool for evidence-based policy making to improve health and health equity. The senior associate will also help evaluate the effectiveness of HIA as a tool for healthy public policy and for improving determinants of health.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/1MIn5Se

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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Editor Emeritus & Founding Editor: John Williams
Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston

Contributors: AASHTO Daily Transportation Update; Active Living Research; Brenda Adams-Weyant; America Walks Newsletter; Jim Baross Jr; CityLab; City of Fort Worth, TX; Anna Clark; CMAP Weekly Update; The Direct Transfer Daily; Christopher B Douwes; ECF General Newsletter; Elana Eden; Glenn Engstrom; Sarah Goodyear; Charles L. Green; @GreenLaneProj; Healthy Community Design News; Human Environment Digest; Eric Jaffe; Chris Kochtitzky; LOCUS; Tracy Hadden Loh; Chris McCahill; John Metcalfe; @modacitylife; Sarah Newsum; Next City; Orton Family Foundation; Feargus O'Sullivan; Khuram Parvez; PeopleForBikes; Planetizen; Rails-to-Trails Conservancy eNews; RoadSafe News; David Sachs; Chad Spoon; Smart Growth America; Smart Growth Network Newsletter; SSTI e-newsletter; State Smart Transportation Initiative; Streetsblog Denver; Sustainable City Network; Transportation Research E-Newsletter; UNC Highway Safety Research Center; @UNRSB; What's New in TPCB: Friday Update.


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