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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#394 Wednesday, October 21, 2015

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Comment on FHWA Proposal to Eliminate 11 of 13 Controlling Design Criteria
----- France to Propose Bike Commuter Travel Reimbursement
----- Six European Cities Plan Car-Free Districts
----- U.S. Bicycle Routes Now over 11,000 Miles in 23 States
----- White House Champions of Change, Innovators in Transportation
----- What It Takes to Get a Road Diet Done

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- Oklahoma City: Ped-Friendly Infrastructure Key to Obesity Fight
----- Google Plan to Double Bike Commuters to Mountain View, CA HQ
----- Washington, DC: Transit Enhances ADA Accessibility
----- New Walk Friendly Communities + Call for Applications
----- Seattle, WA: SRTS Action Plan
----- Updated Wisconsin Bicycling Maps
----- Portland, OR Metro: SRTS and Climate Smart Communities
----- SRTS Helps Reach Portland, OR Regional Transportation Goals
----- Seattle, WA: Customized Community Crosswalk Criteria

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Webcams Used to Study Crowds at Crosswalks
----- Model of Health Effects of Urban Walking Features
----- Built Environment Features and Physical Activity
----- Benefits of Street-Scale Features for Walking & Biking
----- Development of a Pedestrian Demand Estimation Tool
----- Optimizing Walking Could Add Billions to City Economies
----- What Posted Photos Say About Walkability
----- Review of 10 Years of SRTS Program Impact

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Book: Gabe Klein’s Start-Up City
----- APBP: Essentials of Bike Parking
----- Online Streets as Places Resources
----- SRTS National Partnership Searchable Resource Database
----- Bike2Work Campaigns in 17 European Countries
----- British National Propensity to Cycle Tool
----- Quantifying Transit Impacts on GHG Emissions & Energy Use
----- MeasureUp Assesses Program Impact
----- Metrics for Healthy Communities: Impact on Health & Well-being
----- Mapping Child Opportunities for Health by Neighborhood
----- How Developers Can Build Healthier Places Toolkit
----- Searchable Sustainable Community Indicator Catalog
----- Responses to Five Common Ways Engineers Deflect Criticism

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

COMMENT ON FHWA PROPOSAL TO ELIMINATE 11 OF 13 CONTROLLING DESIGN CRITERIA
by Mark Plotz
-> Thirty years ago the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) designated 13 controlling criteria for roadway design for the purpose of ensuring the efficient and safe operation of the National Highway System (NHS). State DOTs were also encouraged to adopt these standards and many did so because, well, bureaucracies are conservative and risk-averse. As a result, the 13 Controlling Design Criteria (CDC) became the law of the land, and whenever a designer wished to deviate from them, he/she had to enter into the process of requesting a formal design exemption, the outcome of which was uncertain—other than knowing it would add delay and cost to a project. The effect is that we got one-size-fits-all designs regardless of context or community wishes.

The Federal Highway Administration is revisiting the 13 criteria and is requesting comment on a proposal to eliminate all but 2 (Design Speed and Structural Capacity) for NHS roadways under 50 mph. Under this proposal it will be

  • Easier for designers to choose narrower lanes to find space for bicycle facilities or to reduce crossing distances for pedestrians.
  • Possible for designers to use narrower right of ways to avoid the high costs of land acquisition.
  • The likely beginning of the end of our wider, straighter and faster design paradigm (Horizontal Alignment, Vertical Alignment, Grade, Superelevation and Lateral Offset) that has yielded deadlier roads and enabled sprawl.

Should the proposed rule change become policy, the percentage of roads affected will be small. That said, the ripple effect could be huge if/when state DOTs follow suit—and why shouldn’t they, as these proposed changes could yield significant cost savings and myriad other benefits.

Be sure to tell FHWA what you think by December 7, 2015. You should write in. This is big. http://1.usa.gov/1KnCm3V

Additional reading:

A final thought:
For the moment the 13 Controlling Design Criteria remain the de facto law of the land, but remember that under the status quo design exemptions are still a possibility. The Michigan DOT, which has embraced Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS), grants around 600 exemptions annually. The CSS process, which is endorsed by FHWA and AASHTO, is a collaborative, interdisciplinary and holistic approach to the development of transportation projects. For more detail, see http://bit.ly/1MIcBT1.

FRANCE TO PROPOSE BIKE COMMUTER TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT
-> Recently the French Minister for the Environment, confirmed that a voluntary reimbursement scheme for employees cycling to work will be introduced in France. The amount of the allowance exempted from social security contributions and income tax is fixed at 0.25 € (US$0.28) per kilometer cycled.

France plans to follow the example of Belgium, where commuting cyclists have been reimbursed 0.22 €/km (US$0.25/km) since the 1990s. The number of employees who benefited from the program increased by 40% between 2009 and 2013, while the total number of Belgians cycling to work also has increased steadily. http://bit.ly/1ZWhqN2

SIX EUROPEAN CITIES PLAN CAR-FREE DISTRICTS
-> Since the start of 2014 at least six European cities have announced ambitions to convert parts of their central districts into pedestrian havens with less automobile congestion and air pollution: Oslo, Milan, Dublin, Paris, Madrid, and Brussels. http://bit.ly/1MTahYC

U.S. BICYCLE ROUTES NOW OVER 11,000 MILES IN 23 STATES
-> Adventure Cycling Association and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials announced that AASHTO has approved another 2,141 miles of U.S. Bicycle Routes in five new states – Vermont, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas and Arizona – along with an alternate route for USBR 50 in Ohio. With those additions, the U.S. Bicycle Route System now encompasses 11,053 miles of routes in 23 states and the District of Columbia. http://bit.ly/1GpdRbv

WHITE HOUSE CHAMPIONS OF CHANGE, INNOVATORS IN TRANSPORTATION
-> Last week three of the eleven honored as White House Champions of Change, Innovators in Transportation (http://1.usa.gov/1QQihsk) work to make it easier and safer for people to walk and bike: Peter Lagerwey, Olatunji Reed, and Kyle Wagenschutz. Each have demonstrated exemplary leadership and creativity that has led to the kinds of innovative solutions required to usher in a 21st Century American transportation system that is safe, effective, and accessible. Bravo and Encore Peter, Olatunji and Kyle! http://1.usa.gov/1W3a6dA

WHAT IT TAKES TO GET A ROAD DIET DONE
-> In an article titled "What It Takes to Get a Road Diet Done," New Brunswick, NJ’s city planner explains why a seemingly simple street project can take so long to complete: Fighting preconceptions takes time; multiple jurisdictions mean multiple headaches; unexpected costs arise... http://bit.ly/1ZWWJAt


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

OKLAHOMA CITY: PED-FRIENDLY INFRASTRUCTURE KEY TO OBESITY FIGHT
-> The mayor of Oklahoma City declared war on obesity, launching health campaigns and implementing pedestrian-friendly new infrastructure. This veteran Republican politician took on the car culture that shaped his nation and asked citizens to back a tax rise to fund a redesign of the state capital around people. This unleashed an incredible range of initiatives, including the creation of parks, sidewalks, bike lanes, and landscaped walking trails across the city. The Mayor wanted to remake his huge metropolis by remolding it around people in place of cars. http://theatln.tc/1Gi2fXL

GOOGLE PLAN TO DOUBLE BIKE COMMUTERS TO MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA HQ
-> Google is hoping to help turn Silicon Valley into something more like the bicycle paradise of Copenhagen. At its Mountain View headquarters, the company wants to double the number of employees who ride bikes to work from 10% to 20%. "Rather than looking at what bike infrastructure is there, they looked at the user experience," says Colin Heyne, deputy director of the Silicon Valley Bike Coalition, which partnered with Google and Alta Planning to create Google's Bike Vision Plan (http://bit.ly/1GpaO38) for the area. "They looked at levels of stress faced by bicyclists, and how those could change based on the infrastructure that could be there in the future," http://bit.ly/1P1zVf2

WASHINGTON, DC: TRANSIT ENHANCES ADA ACCESSIBILITY
-> The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) provides three basic criteria when defining an "accessible" bus stop. It should 1) have a firm landing surface; 2) be at least five feet wide and eight feet long; and 3) connect to the curb. Because when bus stops are narrow or located in a patch of grass, getting to and waiting at the bus stop isn’t just unpleasant for people with disabilities — it’s a barrier to travel.

The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, or Metro, which serves the Washington, DC region, took accessibility one step further. In April 2014, the Metro Board of Directors adopted a fourth criterion: "A curb cut at the corner nearest to the bus stop with a matching curb cut at (at least) one adjacent corner." That means the sidewalks and street crossings leading to the bus stop will also be accessible — because a pad of concrete in an otherwise grassy area isn’t accessible, and a crossing without curb ramps isn’t accessible either. http://bit.ly/1Lw2dvD

NEW WALK FRIENDLY COMMUNITIES + CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
-> The Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center announced two new Walk Friendly Communities—Springfield, MO and Columbia, SC, both at the Bronze Level—and one community, Decatur, GA re-designated at the Silver Level. (http://bit.ly/1OHH04G)

The "Walk Friendly" title means a city or town is being recognized for its success in working to improve a wide range of conditions related to walking, including safety, mobility, access, and comfort. The deadline for the next round of applications is November 1, 2015 (http://bit.ly/10SYBZU)

SEATTLE, WA: SRTS ACTION PLAN
-> Safe Streets, Healthy Schools and Communities (http://bit.ly/1GhIJuM) is a five-year action plan that guides investments for engineering improvements, education, encouragement, and enforcement around schools in Seattle. It is a first of its kind document for Seattle, developed by a coalition of public agencies, parents and safety advocates. The Mayor’s proposed 2016 budget allocates $5.8 million to support Safe Route to School projects at 9 schools. Every third, fourth and fifth grade Seattle public elementary school student will receive walking and biking safety education through their physical education classes. http://bit.ly/1OFIril

UPDATED WISCONSIN BICYCLING MAPS
-> The new 2015 updated Wisconsin Bicycling Maps, now waterproof and tear proof, feature State & County roads rated for rideability, Mountain Bike Trails, Bike Shops, State Bike Paths and Town Roads. http://bit.ly/1RnskVM

PORTLAND, OR METRO: SRTS AND CLIMATE SMART COMMUNITIES
-> Safe Routes to School is a proven tactic to reach tailpipe emission reduction goals established in Metro’s (Portland, OR) Climate Smart Strategy Report (http://bit.ly/1koCVFV), and can help achieve performance targets listed for many of its policy areas. http://bit.ly/1W4ARDJ

SRTS HELPS REACH PORTLAND, OR REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION GOALS
-> See details on how the For Every Kid Coalition (http://bit.ly/1QR63jd) in the Portland, OR metro area makes the case for dedicated Safe Routes to School funding in the Regional Transportation Plan: http://bit.ly/1MSSwIE

SEATTLE, WA: CUSTOMIZED COMMUNITY CROSSWALK CRITERIA
-> After a "guerilla" installation celebrating a neighborhood's culture, Seattle has developed a process/criteria for all neighborhoods to customize crosswalks within basic safety criteria (http://bit.ly/1KnAWGx) — a great example of a city being responsive to passionate citizens looking to add a unique flavor to their community. http://bit.ly/1M74lMA

[See also FHWA-issued Official Interpretations for artwork within a marked crosswalk which require muted artwork and no bright colors or patterns which could degrade the contrast between the transverse crosswalk lines and distract road users. 1) Colored Pavement Treatments in Crosswalks (2011) - http://1.usa.gov/1PyUVKs, and 2) Application of Colored Pavement (2013): http://1.usa.gov/1OHjRPE.]


THE RESEARCH BEAT

WEBCAMS USED TO STUDY CROWDS AT CROSSWALKS
-> In a study entitled "Using Webcams and Crowds to Study the Impact of Enhanced Crosswalks and Temperature on Active Transportation" (http://b.gatech.edu/1GoVuU3), 20,529 publicly available webcam images from two intersections in Washington, D.C., were used to examine the impact of an improved crosswalk on active transportation. This provided an objective, cost-effective alternative to traditional means of examining the effects of built environment change on active transportation and suggests further research should be done to validate this method in a variety of settings.

MODEL OF HEALTH EFFECTS OF URBAN WALKING FEATURES
-> "Predicting Urban Design Effects on Physical Activity and Public Health: A Case Study" (http://bit.ly/1MDp2du) develops a computer simulation model for forecasting the health effects of urban features that promote walking. This article demonstrates the model using a proposed small-area plan for a neighborhood of 10,400 residents in Raleigh, North Carolina. The simulation model predicts that the plan would increase average daily time spent walking for transportation by 17 minutes; decrease annual deaths from all causes by 5.5%, and reduce new cases of several diseases. The value of these health benefits is $21,000 per resident.

BUILT ENVIRONMENT FEATURES AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
-> "The Patterns of Walkability, Transit, and Recreation Environment for Physical Activity" (http://bit.ly/1MSZopt) study explored whether patterns of GIS-derived built environment features explained objective and self-reported physical activity, sedentary behavior, and BMI.

BENEFITS OF STREET-SCALE FEATURES FOR WALKING & BIKING
-> "The Benefits of Street-Scale Features for Walking and Biking" report (http://bit.ly/1jAxQdv), highlights a literature review that focuses on the benefits that may arise from investment in different types of street-scale features. The review considers not only potential impacts related to physical activity but also a variety of co-benefits including social cohesion, crime prevention and public safety, multimodal traffic safety, mental health, and economic effects. The review links these co-benefits to various types of street-scale features that encourage walking and biking, such as sidewalks, bicycle lanes, traffic calming, crossing aids, aesthetics and placemaking, public space, street trees, green infrastructure, and street furniture.

DEVELOPMENT OF A PEDESTRIAN DEMAND ESTIMATION TOOL
-> The "Development of a Pedestrian Demand Estimation Tool" (http://bit.ly/1W3Q8j5) study is one of the first to analyze the destination choice behaviors of pedestrians. Using about 4,500 walk trips from a 2011 household travel survey in the Portland, OR, region, authors estimated multinomial logit pedestrian destination choice models for six trip purposes. Results shed light on determinants of pedestrian destination choice behavior, and sensitivities in the models highlight potential policy-levers to increase walking activity. In addition, the destination choice models can be used in regional travel demand models or as pedestrian planning tools to evaluate land use and transportation policy and investment scenarios.

OPTIMIZING WALKING COULD ADD BILLIONS TO CITY ECONOMIES
-> An Australian project called "Walking to Global Competitiveness" deployed methods normally used to assess the efficiency of road and rail networks to evaluate pedestrian flows in Melbourne's central business district (CBD) and in inner Sydney. The findings reveal just how important walking is to Australia's biggest CBDs. The researchers discovered that more people cross Melbourne's Collins Street each day than drive over the Westgate Bridge, one of the city's key traffic arteries. It was also found that on a typical weekday 630,000 trips are made to Sydney's CBD but within the CBD there are 1.17 million daily walking trips.

SGS Economics and Planning concluded Melbourne's economy could be boosted by $1.3 billion a year if the flow of pedestrians around the CBD was optimized; a similar improvement in Sydney's CBD could yield a $2 billion lift to the city's economy. http://bit.ly/1ZWwvxT

WHAT POSTED PHOTOS SAY ABOUT WALKABILITY
-> Each day we post over millions of photos of everyday streets and urban places to the Internet – each holds valuable data about the qualities of each street. A recent collaboration between Walkonomics and researchers from Yahoo Labs have been able to begin to understand what millions of urban street photos can tell us about walkability. They analyzed over 7 million geo-tagged Flickr photos, 8,000 FourSquare locations and compared them to more than 3,000 street segments in Central London that had been rated for walkability by Walkonomics. Perhaps the most useful result highlighted the potential of geo-tagged photos to predict and map walkable streets. They found a strong correlation between street photographs that featured cars and streets that were not walking-friendly. http://bit.ly/1RQYzgV

REVIEW OF 10 YEARS OF SRTS PROGRAM IMPACT
-> A new report, "Creating Healthier Generations: A Look at 10 Years of the Federal Safe Routes to School Program" (http://bit.ly/1ZWJujd), released by the National Center for Safe Routes to School examines the accomplishments of the Federal Safe Routes to School Program over the past decade. It highlights the program’s rich data and features stories of SRTS funded projects that show the accomplishments and change the program has had on communities nationwide. http://bit.ly/1W4YxYN


QUOTES R US

"We were really interested in it [using a live on-street demo to test the effects of protected bike lanes’ changes to city streets] because it's a way for Baltimore City to try out a new innovative treatment, get some quick feedback from the community. Cycle tracks and that kind of stuff — it's all new, and the designs are changing quickly."
—Kate Sylvester, MD DOT Project Manager on making a $10,850 grant to fund a pop-up protected bike lane in Baltimore. http://bit.ly/1ORDjrr

"People have enough trouble driving in two dimensions; I don’t think it’s a good idea to give them the Z axis."
—Bob Gale, writer and producer of "Back to the Future, Part II," on the subject of flying cars. http://nyti.ms/1hTfi6l

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

HAPPY BACK TO THE FUTURE DAY!
October 21, 2015 is the date to which Marty McFly traveled into the "future" in Back to the Future Part II. Check out what the movie got right and got wrong: http://bbc.in/1OR68nV. The White House is marking "Back to the Future Day" with a series of conversations with innovators across the country answering the question, "What does 2045 look like?". Follow along and add your own predictions: http://1.usa.gov/1NTfpNz

INTERNET SHIFTS MEANING OF WORDS
Check out 24 words that mean totally different things now than they did pre-Internet: http://wapo.st/1Lp2e13


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

Online Conversation "Building Resilient States: A Framework for Agencies"
Date: October 22, 2015, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Smart Growth America
Details: http://bit.ly/1hMqzVW, free

Webinar or Attend in Person "The Trade-offs between Population Density and Households' Transportation-housing Costs"
Date: October 23, 2015, 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Haizhong Wang (Oregon State Univ.)
Host: TREC
Details: http://bit.ly/1GkQC28, free

Webinar "Best Practices for Online Public Engagement for Transportation Agencies"
Date: October 27, 2015, 1:00 pm - 1:45 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: MetroQuest
Details: http://bit.ly/1ZOOTsv, free

Webinar "Sustainability in the City of Portland (OR)"
Date: October 29, 2015, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Susan Anderson & Michael Armstrong (City of Portland, OR)
Host: Sustainable City Network & Crescent Electric Supply Co.
Details: http://bit.ly/1jQLJ6I, free

Webinar "The Economic and Fiscal Benefits of Walkable and Bikeable City and Town Centers"
Date: October 30, 2015, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Jim Cohen (Univ of MD College Park), Dennis Randolph (City of Grandview, MO), Carolyn Hope (City of Redmond, WA), Brian Ludicke (City of Lancaster, CA), Gustavo Castro (City of Orlando, FL) & Dean Ledbetter (NC DOT)
Host: Smart Growth Information Clearinghouse
Details: http://bit.ly/1Njpdxn, free

Webinar "FHWA efforts to make safer, more livable streets easier to build: Myths and proposed changes"
Date: November 2, 2015, 11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Presenters: FHWA staff
Host: State Smart Transportation Initiative
Details: http://bit.ly/1jT5rPb, free

Webinar "WHO's Health Economic Assessment Tool Focus on Cycling"
Date: November 5, 2015, 13:00 pm - 14:00 CET (7:00 am ET) repeats on November 10, 2015, 12:00 CET (6:00 am ET)
Presenters: Randy Rzewnicki (ECF)
Host: European Cyclists’ Federation
Details: http://bit.ly/1RV3BJw, free

Webinar "Accessible Trails"
Date: November 5, 2015, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET (credits available)
Presenters: Bill Botten (Access Board) & Jim Huck (National Park Service)
Host: US Access Board
Details: http://bit.ly/13YfYxd, free

Webinar "WHO's Health Economic Assessment Tool Focus on Cycling"
Date: November 10, 2015, 12:00 CET (6:00 am ET) (repeated from November 5, 2015)
Presenter: Randy Rzewnicki (ECF)
Host: European Cyclists’ Federation
Details: http://bit.ly/1RV3BJw, free

Webinar "Design and Methods of Natural Experiments in Transit and Physical Activity"
Date: December 10, 2015, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Brian Saelens (Univ. of WA), Barbara Brown (Univ. of UT) & Chad Spoon (Active Living Research)
Host: Active Living Research
Details: http://bit.ly/1MTcUJR, free


RESOURCES

BOOK: GABE KLEIN’S START-UP CITY
-> In his new book, "Start-Up City – Inspiring Private & Public Entrepreneurship, Getting Projects Done, and Having Fun" (http://bit.ly/1MN8kwL), entrepreneur, bureaucracy-shaker, futurist, and now author, Gabe Klein shows us how to make rapid change that will transform cities for the better. He reveals the secrets to his success, much of which is rooted in his start-up private-sector upbringing. Klein engagingly walks through eight lessons in how to get stuff done... http://bit.ly/1GkQZtG

APBP: ESSENTIALS OF BIKE PARKING
-> The Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals has released "Essentials of Bike Parking" (http://bit.ly/1GoUCyI) for people planning to purchase or install bike parking fixtures on a limited scale. Its brief, 12-page overview of APBP’s comprehensive Bicycle Parking Guidelines handbook (http://bit.ly/1jA2mnN) covers site planning for short- and long-term parking; installation; bicycle rack selection--including performance criteria, rack styles, and materials and coatings; and placement and spacing.

ONLINE STREETS AS PLACES RESOURCES
-> Project for Public Spaces has launched a new online Streets as Places resource to provide principles, tools, and examples to help ensure that the streets in our communities can live up to their full potential—as public stages where life unfolds, more than just a means of mobility. Check out the Power of 10+ Concept and 8 Principles for Fostering Streets as Places, and Nominate a Great Street. http://bit.ly/1W3oBOC

SRTS NATIONAL PARTNERSHIP SEARCHABLE RESOURCE DATABASE
-> Check out the Safe Routes to School National Partnership’s new website (http://bit.ly/1NmYlMV) featuring a resource database and search tool to help practitioners and organizations access more than 700 reports, fact sheets, webinars, case studies, and other tools that can help advance Safe Routes to School, active transportation, and healthy community design.

BIKE2WORK CAMPAIGNS IN 17 EUROPEAN COUNTRIES
-> Bike2Work is a European Union co-funded project lead by the European Cyclists' Federation to significantly shift from motorized commuting to bicycle commuting. Check out details of existing and past Bike2Work campaigns in 17 European countries: http://bit.ly/1LD50Qu.

BRITISH NATIONAL PROPENSITY TO CYCLE TOOL
-> The National Propensity to Cycle Tool (http://bit.ly/1N2nAEf) helps British transport planners to prioritize investments in new cycle-friendly infrastructure via an online system for assisting the decision making process at local, city and regional levels. The tool shows the current cycling rate across zones in the city of Leeds. It indicates where the highest concentration of cyclists is located and provides an interactive visualization of flows. The tool allows ‘visioning’ for long-term future and illustrates a variety of possible scenarios when specific barriers are removed – for example if one takes e-bikes into account, removes socio-cultural barriers, or ignores the fact that women cycle less than men. As a result, the tool can help target specific areas and routes with high cycling potential, and thus facilitate strategic long-term planning.

QUANTIFYING TRANSIT IMPACTS ON GHG EMISSIONS & ENERGY USE
-> Transit often fails to get the credit it deserves for reducing traffic and emissions. While it’s clear that even in places with low mode share, transit plays a role in raising densities—and thereby reducing travel distances—this relationship has been hard to quantify; conventional demand models simply take land use as an input. A new report, "Quantifying Transit’s Impact on GHG Emissions and Energy Use—The Land Use Component" (http://bit.ly/1PGenDX), examines VMT, fuel consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions from transportation across the nation and in metro areas. An accompanying calculator tool estimates the land use benefits of existing or planned transit projects. http://bit.ly/1NTKnoP

MEASUREUP ASSESSES PROGRAM IMPACT
-> MeasureUp (http://bit.ly/1PzqEuR) is a microsite of resources and tools to help you measure and describe your programs’ impact on families and communities and on factors related to health. MeasureUp provides examples, tools, and resources to help you make your case, without having to become an economist.

METRICS FOR HEALTHY COMMUNITIES: IMPACT ON HEALTH & WELL-BEING
-> Designed for cross-sector collaboration, Metrics for Healthy Communities (http://bit.ly/1GhDwD6) is a set of resources—from logic models to data sets—to get you started planning for and measuring the impact of neighborhood investments on community health and well being.

MAPPING CHILD OPPORTUNITIES FOR HEALTH BY NEIGHBORHOOD
-> The interactive Mapping Child Opportunity tool (http://bit.ly/1RVnEHI) lets you visualize how neighborhoods in the 100 largest U.S. cities fare on creating opportunities for children to be healthy physically, socially, and developmentally.

HOW DEVELOPERS CAN BUILD HEALTHIER PLACES TOOLKIT
-> How Developers Can Build Healthier Places toolkit (http://on.uli.org/1GhD9bF) of 21 evidence-based recommendations for improving health via the built environment. The recommendations are based on a rigorous literature review, with practical suggestions for implementing each. See a one-page description: http://on.uli.org/1MSZWvy.

SEARCHABLE SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY INDICATOR CATALOG
-> Sustainable Community Indicator Catalog (http://bit.ly/1jSHWWx) helps communities identify indicators that can measure progress toward their sustainability objectives. The indicators in this catalog focus on the relationships among land use, housing, transportation, human health, and the environment. Use this website to identify the indicators that are most closely aligned with the issues of greatest concern to your community.

RESPONSES TO FIVE COMMON WAYS ENGINEERS DEFLECT CRITICISM
-> A Strong Towns article identifies and responds to five common ways engineers deflect criticism. See also the classic Conversation with an Engineer video. http://bit.ly/1FXojqo


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS - 2016 National Road Research Alliance Conference, February 18, 2016, St. Paul, MN.
Deadline: October 31, 2015, http://bit.ly/1Mpsmey

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - 5th SRTS National Conference, April 5-7, 2016, Columbus, OH.
Deadline: October 31, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1MavpKn

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - Midwest Active Transportation Conference, May 21, 2016, La Crosse, WI.
Deadline: November 13, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1M6Q9No

-> CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS -Montana Bike Walk Summit, April 27-29, 2016, 2016, Missoula, MT.
Deadline: November 20, 2015, http://bit.ly/1QYjNsc

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - Oregon Active Transportation Summit, March 14-15, 2016, Portland, OR.
Deadline: November 30, 2015 by 5:00 pm PT, http://bit.ly/1Xj4wGq

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS — 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, November 16 - 19, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1KXYS8h

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> November 14, 2015, TransportationCamp NYC 2015, New York, NY.
http://bit.ly/1jSCh2F
-> January 9, 2016, TransportationCamp DC 2016, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1ORKz6L
-> January 24-25, 2016, West Virginia Bike Summit, Charleston, WV.
http://bit.ly/1MSSkt4
-> March 14-15, 2016, Oregon Active Transportation Summit, Portland, OR.
http://bit.ly/1Ln7Wmd
-> April 2-5, 2016, American Planning Association 2016 National Planning Conference, Phoenix, AZ.
http://bit.ly/1Fm9Rar
-> April 18, 2016, 2015 New Mexico Bicycle Education Summit, Albuquerque, NM.
http://bit.ly/1Ln6FeT
-> May 21, 2016 - Midwest Active Transportation Conference, La Crosse, WI.
http://bit.ly/1hSLkzs


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> RFP - DEVELOPMENT OF DIFFERENTIAL CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING APPROPRIATENESS OF "SIDE PATH" APPLICATIONS FOR BICYCLE USE, MI DOT
Development of Differential Criteria for Determining Appropriateness of "Side Path" Applications for Bicycle Use (http://1.usa.gov/1RmGNBt): MI DOT seeks quantitative assessment (Metrics) to determine when on-road facilities are appropriate in addition to side-paths in urban and suburban environments to accommodate bicyclists, and better understand bicycle crashes’ frequency, location, bicyclists’ direction of travel and speed and severity of sidewalk/side path crashes versus on roadway crashes—among other objectives
Deadline: November 30, 2015, http://1.usa.gov/1XiScWU

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - BIKE PARKING DESIGN COMPETITION
Is there a design solution that provides high-density, accessible, cost-effective bicycle parking in the urban context? The Kendall Square EcoDistrict in Cambridge, MA is seeking design teams to help create innovative, functional bicycle parking that is high-density, accessible, and cost-effective. They are hosting a design competition to envision what better bike parking could look like in Kendall Square as well as offer designs that could be applied to other cities.
Deadline: January 29, 2016 by 5:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1jzZash

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES IN THE SOUTH & APPALACHIA
The Health Impact Project will award seven grants of up to $45,000 to help communities identify their most pressing health equity challenges and the factors outside of the health care sector that help drive them (for example, housing or education). Grantees will develop outcome-based goals and a clear, community-driven plan of action to improve health equity. Grants available in AL, AR, KY, LA, MS, TN & WV.
Deadline: November 13, 2015, http://bit.ly/1M7iR72

-> JOB - BICYCLE / PEDESTRIAN PROGRAM COORDINATOR (PART-TIME), CITY OF VENICE, FL
The Bicycle / Pedestrian Program Coordinator coordinates the development and implementation of a bicycle and pedestrian transportation program to promote mobility and safety for the City of Venice.
Deadline: October 23, 2015, http://bit.ly/1ZX1NVv

-> JOB - EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, TRANSIT FOR LIVABLE COMMUNITIES,
This full-time position will lead Transit for Livable Communities (TLC) efforts to transform Minnesota’s transportation system through policy change, institutional and organizational change, and changing the built environment. The next Executive Director will continue TLC’s existing work, while growing TLC’s impact by increasing our geographic and programmatic footprint. The person in this role is the driving force for the organization, doing some programmatic work, while providing leadership and oversight on the organization’s breadth of work and outcomes to ensure that TLC is respected for its vision, quality of work, and commitment to system transformation through broad and deep partnerships.
Deadline: Initial screening extended to October 30, 2015, http://bit.ly/1Kzx9r7

-> JOB - GENERAL MANAGER, SPOKIES BIKE SHARE, OKLAHOMA CITY, OK
The Spokies Bike Share OKC General Manager will be the key local leader to operate and maintain the bike share system. Under the COO and CEO, the General Manager will also be the leader in implementation of the new equipment and software, working with the selected vendor. The system currently consists of eight stations and approximately 30 bicycles. A request for proposals will be issued in Q4 2015 for new system equipment and software. System replacement is anticipated for 2016 and expansion is desired from there.
Deadline: October 31, 2015, http://bit.ly/1GSokHq

-> JOB - ASSISTANT PROFESSOR - TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH, UNIV. OF TX AT AUSTIN
The Graduate Program in Community and Regional Planning in the School of Architecture at The University of Texas at Austin invites applications for the tenure track position of Assistant Professor to begin fall 2016. The successful candidate will have a Ph.D. in planning or a related field and preferably a professional Master’s degree in planning and/or practice experience. They seek a candidate who can offer courses in transportation planning and public health or healthy cities but they will consider candidates with other transportation planning specialties.
Deadline: Application review begins November 15, 2015, http://bit.ly/1kq0jCW

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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