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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#395 Wednesday, November 4, 2015

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Federal Transportation Update #1
----- Federal Transportation Update #2
----- New Transportation and Health Tool
----- Olso, Norway: Sets High Cycling Goals & Commits $500K, $1B Later
----- EcoMobility World Festival & Impact on Johannesburg, S Africa
----- Dutch System Identifies Open Bike Parking Spaces
----- Slow & Intentional Changes Transformed Amsterdam
----- Video: Danish Rush Hour Bike Traffic
----- Video Highlights: American Public Health Assn Annual Meeting
----- PWPBPP 2016 Updates

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- US DOT Ped Bike Road Safety Assessments Report
----- Savvy Seattle Sidewalk Gap Fixes + Voter Approved $930M Levy
----- Active Trans Launches Bold Chicago Cycling Plan
----- Detroit Repeals 3 Youth Cycling Ordinances
----- Website for Portland, OR Self-Reported Near Misses & Minor Crashes
----- New Cambridge, MA Bicycle Plan Online
----- CTDOT: New bike-ped Community Connectivity Program
----- Caltrans to Create First CA State Bicycle & Pedestrian Plan
----- Ways Smaller Cities Can Expand Shared Mobility

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- TRB Publishes Health and Transportation Research Issue
----- Canadian & Japanese Study: Narrower Lanes, Safer Intersections
----- Severe Injuries Up After NYC Added Protected Bike Lanes
----- Factors that Lead to Rapid Urban Innovations
----- Toolkit for Communities Using Health Data
----- Call For Papers on Walking, Walkability & Health

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Improve Government Through Health in All Policies
----- Transportation Leadership Certification for Nonprofit Leaders
----- Street Design Impact on Speed
----- Two Orton Family Foundation Reports Released
----- Know the Rules: An Overview of State Agency Rulemaking
----- Psychologist Reflects on Why Drivers Hate Cyclists

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

FEDERAL TRANSPORTATION UPDATE #1
by Mark Plotz
-> Today and tomorrow the House of Representatives will hear proposed amendments to the next transportation bill, the Surface Transportation Reauthorization and Reform Act (STRRA). The proposed legislation is a bipartisan effort that our friends at the League of American Bicyclists tell us preserves the funding streams and the local control provisions that were introduced with MAP-21. As you might imagine, there are several Representatives lining up amendments to remove from the bill all the things we like. For more details about STRRA, see the Safe Routes to School National Partnership's blog entry: http://bit.ly/1Plio0i.

To send your thoughts to your Representative about STRRA and the proposed amendments, go to http://bit.ly/1Sn2l1R. If you are girding yourself to square off with your bow-tie-wearing libertarian uncle at Thanksgiving dinner over road user fees, here's some debate prep on the current inadequacy of the gas tax: http://bit.ly/1LPn38b.

UPDATE: the amendments attacking TAP and Recreational Trails will not be heard on the House floor. Yay!

FEDERAL TRANSPORTATION UPDATE #2
by Mark Plotz
-> If what we want is a safe, balanced and sustainable transportation system that works for people of all ages and abilities, there are many paths to that outcome, and Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funding is but one. (For more about transportation funding misconceptions see http://1.usa.gov/1XOfdBj) Another path is to first do no harm by designing roads to fit their context, instead of giving them highway geometry. Before the public is a proposal from the Federal Highway Administration to do just that. You have until December 7 to submit your comments on the proposed rulemaking on Controlling Design Criteria. For more details see the prvious issue of CenterLines: http://bit.ly/1QaQcOl.

NEW TRANSPORTATION AND HEALTH TOOL
-> The new Transportation and Health Tool (http://1.usa.gov/1Nr14Xw) provides easy access to data practitioners can use to examine the health impacts of transportation systems. It provides data on 14 transportation and public health indicators for each state, metropolitan statistical area (MSA), and urbanized area (UZA). These indicators measure how the transportation environment affects health with respect to safety, active transportation, air quality, and connectivity to destinations. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. DOT jointly developed the tool in partnership with the American Public Health Association.

[Note: See Webinar section for November 9 webinar on the Transportation and Health Tool.]

OLSO, NORWAY: SETS HIGH CYCLING GOALS & COMMITS $500K, $1B LATER
-> Oslo, Norway created a strategy to achieve the following objectives by 2025: double the share of bicycle trips from 8% to 16%, increase its bicycle network from 180 km to 510 km (50 to 317 miles), and significantly increase residents’ satisfaction with its bike infrastructure. In September, the city approved 4.3 billion kronor (US$500,000) for a Bike Investment Plan. After 2025 the city plans to invest another 9 billion kronor (US$1 billion) in its bicycle network. http://bit.ly/1MGo8mn

ECOMOBILITY WORLD FESTIVAL & IMPACT ON JOHANNESBURG, S AFRICA
-> The EcoMobility World Festival 2015, organized by the City of Johannesburg in partnership with ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability was a month-long experiment of an eco-mobile urban transport system. It allowed commuters to leave their cars at home and encouraged the use of public transport, cycling and walking. Building on the already impressive transformations in the urban design of Sandton CBD (more dedicated bike lanes, refurbished and widened sidewalks, upgrading of public spaces), the Mayoral committee has approved further projects based on the experience of the Festival and feedback from residents. (See a short summary of the initial 10 days of the EcoMobility World Festival 2015: http://bit.ly/1Q5ekmr.)

The Johannesburg Declaration on Ecomobility in Cities (http://bit.ly/1l7tECs), prepared by ICLEI and the City of Johannesburg and endorsed by city leaders and experts from five continents, emphasizes that no greenhouse gas emissions reduction strategy is complete without the inclusion of low carbon urban transport solutions. http://bit.ly/1MgZsyK

DUTCH SYSTEM IDENTIFIES OPEN BIKE PARKING SPACES
-> The Netherlands has an estimated 18 million or more bikes. It’s often incredibly hard to find a place to park them. Even with enormous, multi-level bike parks, they’re constantly full and finding a place to park your bike — legally — is a nightmare.

The city of Utrecht has implemented a pilot system to guide cyclists to places they can easily park their bikes. It is a of a system of digital signs around the city that display the number of parking spaces open and reliably tell which bikes have been abandoned. http://bit.ly/1MUzqxH

SLOW & INTENTIONAL CHANGES TRANSFORMED AMSTERDAM
-> A new photo series, showing certain intersections in Amsterdam around the turn of the 20th century, then in the 1970s and 1980s, and finally today show how Amsterdam slowly—and intentionally—changed its car culture. http://bit.ly/1NdAbC7

VIDEO: DANISH RUSH HOUR BIKE TRAFFIC
-> At 8 a.m. in Copenhagen—when around half a million people bike to work—traffic jams look a little different. Watch a brief video of a typical intersection on a bridge leading to the city center. For every car, there are dozens of bikes. http://bit.ly/1MndWcb

VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSN ANNUAL MEETING
-> Couldn’t be at the American Public Health Association Annual meeting this week focused on Health in All Policies? Check out these videos to give you some highlights:

  1. The Amazing Power of Walking: Surgeon General Vivek Murthy discusses Step It Up! — his call to action on walking and walkable communities.
  2. Health in all policies: Linda Rudolph of the Public Health Institute discusses how a health in all policies approach is a necessary step in addressing health disparities and creating health equity.
  3. Advocacy is Critical: APHA hosted three panel discussions to help better understand how policy decisions are made and how we can be more effective in shaping those decisions.

http://bit.ly/1WvWbCl

PWPBPP 2016 UPDATES
by Mark Plotz
-> Next September 12-15, 2016, Vancouver BC will host the 19th Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place conference. We chose Vancouver as the host city for its world class active transportation infrastructure and its ambitious climate change and health improvements plans. The city continues scoring headlines for its livability initiatives, most recently (and impressively) with a City Council vote to tear down two of its viaducts: http://bit.ly/1My92Jn

On Thursday, November 19, Project for Public Spaces will be in Vancouver to kick off our pre-conference Speaker Series. Sam Goater of PPS and several local experts will explore the topic of Shared Spaces. Follow us on Twitter http://www.prowalkprobike.org


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

US DOT PED BIKE ROAD SAFETY ASSESSMENTS REPORT
-> Over the course of the last year, more than 1,500 people walked or got on bikes to take part in bicycle and walking safety assessments hosted by dozens of DOT field offices in every state. And while the assessments identified physical barriers such as missing curb cuts or crosswalks, they also made significant progress in identifying ways Federal, State, and local agencies can all work together to ensure pedestrian and bicycle safety. Check out what they did, what they found, and what they learned in the U.S. Department of Transportation "Pedestrian and Bicyclist Road Safety Assessments" report (http://1.usa.gov/1KXjxVv). http://1.usa.gov/1WvRtoc

SAVVY SEATTLE SIDEWALK GAP FIXES + VOTER APPROVED $930M LEVY
-> The cost to fill in gaps in sidewalks in some of the more recently annexed sections of Seattle was estimated at $3.6 billion. Check out some ideas for creating a complete sidewalk network on a budget from the city’s Pedestrian Master Plan (http://bit.ly/1MGD2cn). Some streets may need little more than a raised curb or line of parking stops to create a new dedicated walking space. Cheaper dyed and stamped asphalt sidewalks stretch budgets to allow more blocks of construction. Other streets could get a sidewalk on just one side of the street that is integrated with gardens to catch and filter rainwater. Sidewalks that filter toxins and divert rainwater from sewers and prevent overflows of raw sewage help meet public utilities goals and attract new funding partners. Yesterday, voters approved the $930 million Move Seattle levy (http://bit.ly/1WxJeCG) to implement these and other improvements. http://bit.ly/1RRginQ

See details of a proposal that increases sidewalk construction throughout Seattle using more cost-effective designs and materials; and proposes new public-private partnerships to incentivize sidewalk construction. Over the next nine years, the Seattle Department of Transportation is planning to construct 250 blocks of new sidewalks – both lower-cost and traditional – for the same price as 150 blocks of concrete sidewalks. http://bit.ly/1P0nikH

ACTIVE TRANS LAUNCHES BOLD CHICAGO CYCLING PLAN
-> The Active Transportation Alliance has launched Bikeways for All (http://bit.ly/1Q5hgzA), its new vision for cycling infrastructure in Chicago. It lays out a plan for creating an equitable, city-wide bicycling network that would allow people of all ages and abilities to get around efficiently and comfortably on a bike. The Bikeways for All routes would shrink fears of biking significantly because the routes would incorporate infrastructure proven to make newcomers to biking feel safe:

  1. Neighborhood Greenways: quiet streets enhanced for bicycle travel by calming car traffic and discouraging cut-through driving.
  2. Protected bike lanes: key streets between neighborhoods using physically-protected bike lanes to create an experience similar to riding on an off-street trail.
  3. Off-street trails: the ultimate low-stress biking experience -- recommended along the lakefront (to relieve congestion on the existing trail), the Chicago River, abandoned rail lines and other corridors. http://bit.ly/1PgYlA6

DETROIT REPEALS 3 YOUTH CYCLING ORDINANCES
-> The Detroit City Council unanimously repealed three city ordinances that restricted youth bicycling within the city. In brief, these ordinances prohibited bicyclists under age 12 from riding in the street even if they were with a parent or guardian. Bicyclists between ages 12 and 17 needed to carry a permission note with them. The penalty for violating either ordinance was the Detroit Police Department could ask parents that they withhold bicycling privileges for up to six months... http://bit.ly/1WyRSkv

WEBSITE: PORTLAND, OR SELF-REPORTED NEAR MISSES & MINOR CRASHES
-> Nathan Hinkle, a Portland engineer launched the NearlyKilled.Me website (http://bit.ly/1So5AGq) in June to give cyclists and people on foot in Portland a place to self-report their near misses and minor crashes with people driving. If people knew this intersection was unsafe," he wondered, "why did we let it get to the point where people are getting hurt there?" Reports detail incident location, who was in danger and what traffic violations the reporter believes were committed. Reports appear as bright yellow pins on Google Maps. Users have submitted nearly 500 so far. http://bit.ly/1MFXVo6

NEW CAMBRIDGE, MA BICYCLE PLAN ONLINE
-> The Cambridge, MA Bicycle Plan: "Toward a Bikeable Future" is now online (http://bit.ly/1GLhwks). It lays out a vision for where they as a city want to be. The fundamental guiding principle for this plan is to enable people of all ages and abilities to bicycle safely and comfortably throughout the city. This plan provides the framework for developing a network of Complete Streets and supporting programs and policies that will help meet this goal.

CTDOT: NEW BIKE-PED COMMUNITY CONNECTIVITY PROGRAM
-> This week, CTDOT introduced its "Community Connectivity Program," to improve conditions for walking and bicycling to and within urban, suburban and rural community centers, and encourage more people to use these healthy and environmentally sustainable modes of travel. They will conduct Road Safety Audits to identify road safety issues and opportunities for improvement that range from short-term and low cost to long-range and higher cost. CTDOT is developing its process for municipalities to apply to participate in the program, and may have funds for local infrastructure projects. http://1.usa.gov/1k9zR0s

CALTRANS TO CREATE FIRST CA STATE BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN PLAN
-> Last week Caltrans announced the launch of its planning process for the first California State Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan (CSBPP). The visionary and comprehensive CSBPP will focus on improving safety and access for everyone across all modes, particularly bicycle and pedestrian. When completed in the upcoming year, the CSBPP will help guide future investments, such as Caltrans’ Active Transportation Program (ATP), which funds projects that take cars off the road, helping to clean the air, conserve our natural resources, and promote healthier, sustainable communities.

The CSBPP will provide a framework to guide the planning and development of non-motorized transportation on State facilities and maximize the use of future investments. It will also lead to improved connections between the State’s bicycle and pedestrian facilities with the existing network and other modes of transportation, as well as help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and vehicles miles traveled. The Plan will not replace existing policies and implementation plans at the regional and local levels. http://bit.ly/1H6TgJp

WAYS SMALLER CITIES CAN EXPAND SHARED MOBILITY
-> Most of the recent U.S. shared mobility growth is now in suburban areas outside the urban core, as well as in smaller, lower-density cities. Check out 5 ways to help smaller cities expand shared mobility and examples that illustrate them. http://bit.ly/1NcX2hc


THE RESEARCH BEAT

TRB PUBLISHES HEALTH AND TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH ISSUE
-> The theme for the Transportation Research Board’s most recent issue of its TR News is Public Health and Transportation: Innovation, Intervention, and Improvements. Check out these articles:

  1. Public Health and Transportation: Innovation, Intervention, and Improvements
  2. Why Public Health and Transportation: Setting the Stage
  3. Health Impact Assessment: Considering Health in Transportation Decision Making in the United States
  4. Measuring the Health Benefits of Walking and Bicycling: Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization Applies the Findings... plus several others. http://bit.ly/1Nc7Dca

CANADIAN & JAPANESE STUDY: NARROWER LANES, SAFER INTERSECTIONS
-> The Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers published a study (Narrower Lanes, Safer Streets: http://bit.ly/1MgNOE1) that found that crash rates and, more notably, side impact and turn-related crashes are lowest where the average lane widths at intersection approaches were between 10 and 10.5 feet. By analyzing vehicle-to-vehicle crashes at 70 signalized intersections in Toronto and 190 in Tokyo over four to five years, it found that intersections with lanes either narrower than 10 feet or wider than 10.5 feet had the highest crash rates. http://1.usa.gov/1XOzPsW

SEVERE INJURIES UP AFTER NYC ADDED PROTECTED BIKE LANES
-> Painted bicycle lanes don’t seem to make a dent in injuries and may even worsen their severity, according to a study presented in Boston this week at a national gathering of the American College of Emergency Physicians. The study found that the severity of injuries among bicyclists hit by cars actually appeared to go up after New York City installed those painted bike lanes, at least among patients brought to Bellevue Hospital Centers’ emergency department. Researcher Dr. Stephen Wall of New York University and Bellevue Hospital offers an immediate caveat, though: Bike lanes lead to increased volumes and may also lead to faster speeds. http://bit.ly/1Rk2gLu

FACTORS THAT LEAD TO RAPID URBAN INNOVATIONS
-> TransitCenter took a close look at the recent history of 30 U.S. cities to find the patterns that have led to rapid innovations in urban transportation: dedicated bus lanes, protected bike lanes, demonstration plazas. "A People's History of Recent Urban Transportation Innovation" (http://bit.ly/1RSv1io) reports their findings from Charlotte, Chicago, Denver, New York, Pittsburgh and Portland. http://bit.ly/1MarU0R

TOOLKIT FOR COMMUNITIES USING HEALTH DATA
-> The "Toolkit for Communities Using Health Data: How to Collect, Use, Protect, and Share Data Responsibly" (http://1.usa.gov/1PmaDqL) was created to support communities that are using data by promoting sound stewardship practices, while helping them avoid the missteps and potential harm that can result when data users do not follow sound data stewardship practices. The Toolkit briefly introduces each important principle of data stewardship for communities using health data. It provides both broad background information and tips for data users. Descriptions of stewardship principles are provided, along with checklists for each principle.

CALL FOR PAPERS ON WALKING, WALKABILITY & HEALTH
-> The Journal of Transport and Health is calling for papers for a special issue: "Walking and Walkability: A review of the Evidence on Health." The issue will document the health effects of walking and walkable communities in a wide range of areas and exploring the policy and environmental changes that can result in sustaining these effects. The Journal requests manuscripts in the following areas:

  1. Evaluation of or testing a new or unique program, policy, or project that aims to increase the number of individuals walking for recreation and/or transport.
  2. Define and assess walk-friendly policies, provide evidence that the policy or policies result in more pedestrian activity and can be implemented in other places.
  3. Examine benefits or unintended consequences of walking and walkability.

Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1NPBGt2


QUOTES R US

"If you engineer for the behavior that you want, that’s what you’re going to get. If you don’t, then you suffer the consequences of that, and you’ll need to do additional treatments afterwards. It comes from a partnership of all the stakeholders and coming to the conclusion that we want to develop the conditions that will achieve the behavior that you want on the street. That’s what we’re learning as we refine our methods."
—Dongho Chang, Seattle Traffic Engineer in a Smart Growth America interview that provides background details on recent projects. http://bit.ly/1LPB59V

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

SMARTPHONE DATA MAPS 20 CITIES’ POPULAR RUNNING ROUTES
As the number of smartphone apps that allow you to track your running, biking and other physical activity have surged, so has the amount of data available about how and where people exercise. Data from the app RunKeeper, created maps of the routes people run most often in 20 major cities around the U.S. and the world. http://wapo.st/1jKoWdd


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

Webinar "Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons"
Date: November 5, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Mike Cynecki (Lee Engineering)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1OkCadb, free

Webinar "Transportation and Health Tool: A New Tool for Integrating Health Into Transportation Planning"
Date: November 9, 2015, 2016, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Rebecca Higgins (US DOT) & Tegan Boehmer (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Host: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention & US DOT
Details: http://svy.mk/1MHigcs, free

Webinar "U.S. Federal Transportation Policy Update"
Date: November 10, 2015, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: League of American Bicyclists, Alliance for Biking & Walking, & Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/1KWz0Fi, free

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons"
Date: November 12, 2015, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Richard Nassi (Pima Association of Governments)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1OkCsRz, free

Webinar "Infill Strategies and Downtown Revitalization"
Date: November 18, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Darin Dinsmore (Crowdbrite) & Tony Lashbrook (City of Truckee, CA)
Host: Community Builders
Details: http://bit.ly/1GIa2P6, free

Webinar "Performance-Based Practical Design: Integration into Transportation Projects and Agency Practice"
Date: November 19, 2015, 3:00 - 4:30 pm ET
Presenters: Michael Matzke & Rodney Vaughn (FHWA), Nancy Boyd, (WA State DOT) & Kent Belleque & John P. Wolf (OR DOT)
Host: Federal Highway Administration
Details: Create an account to register at least a day in advance, http://bit.ly/1l7etJt, free

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Leading Pedestrian Interval"
Date: December 2, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Margaret Kubilins (VHB)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1Okei85, free

Webinar "Practical Techniques for Successfully Communicating Technical Topics"
Date: December 2, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Shelley Row (Shelley Row Assoc.)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1SnoxsI, no fee for those affiliated with TRB, $49 site fee for others

Webinar "The Role of Trails in Healthy Community Design"
Date: December 3, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Mark Fenton (Consultant)
Host: American Trails
Details: http://bit.ly/1KX4yuP, $35 for American Trails members, $55 for non-members

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Lighting Strategies for Pedestrian Safety"
Date: December 15, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Michael Cynecki (Lee Engineering)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1FSPJOz, free

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Traffic Calming"
Date: December 17, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Peter Lagerwey (Toole Design Group)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1jNpQp3, free

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Roundabouts"
Date: January 6, 2016, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Hillary Isebrands (FHWA Resource Center)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1LibUJV, free

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Pedestrian Safety at Transit Locations"
Date: January 20, 2016, 1:00 -2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Dan Nabors (VHB)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1FWgS2C, free


RESOURCES

IMPROVE GOVERNMENT THROUGH HEALTH IN ALL POLICIES
-> To achieve a healthy community, every part of government has a role to play. That’s the idea behind "Health in All Policies": to adopt a collaborative approach to policymaking and improve the health of a community. ChangeLab Solutions has created a toolkit for building healthier communities through more collaborative and efficient policymaking. It includes best practices and lessons learned from community leaders. Download their guide, model policies, and presentation. http://bit.ly/1MH7mDQ

TRANSPORTATION LEADERSHIP CERTIFICATION FOR NONPROFIT LEADERS
-> In partnership with the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, Transit for Livable Communities is focused on rethinking transportation in the workplace. Their Transportation Leadership Certification program celebrates nonprofits for implementing transportation best practices related to benefits, commuting, workday travel, and options for visitors and constituents. Nonprofits enrolling in the program receive an assessment of their current conditions and options, attend a Transportation Leadership Certification workshop, and create an action plan with goals for shifting trips and encouraging options other than driving. http://bit.ly/1OawX82

STREET DESIGN IMPACT ON SPEED
-> The design of a street, more so than any posted speed limit sign, invites drivers to go fast or slow. See Wes Craiglow’s meme of an example of an overbuilt street, and another of a "right-sized" street patched together. One street, located in a new suburban development, is 36 feet curb-to-curb—the same dimensions as minor arterials, with two 12-foot travel lanes and 12-foot turn lane. "We built a minor arterial in a single-family residential area," he says. The block is a full quarter-mile between intersections, inviting cars to speed from end to end, and the driveways hold about four cars each, meaning there’s no street parking to calm traffic. "You take away the trees, you take away the sidewalks, and you have created a racetrack environment." http://bit.ly/1SmVDZU

TWO ORTON FAMILY FOUNDATION REPORTS RELEASED
-> The Orton Family Foundation has released two resources: the revised 2nd edition of its "Community Heart & Soul Field Guide" (http://bit.ly/1l7C9xb, publication is free, but registration is required), and its "Using Storytelling in Community Heart & Soul" guide.

The "Using Storytelling in Community Heart & Soul" guide (http://bit.ly/1MhiIMx) offers a step-by-step approach to incorporating storytelling into your town’s Community Heart & Soul process in a way that gets the information needed for meaningful and successful results. Here's why storytelling matters to your community’s heart and soul. Storytelling within Community Heart & Soul:

  1. Raises awareness and interest in Heart & Soul and brings community action to life
  2. Draws in new, underrepresented or difficult-to-reach voices
  3. Reveals what matters most to residents about the community
  4. Builds greater understanding, trust and relationships
  5. Heals divisions, bridges differences
  6. Brings meaning to local data, numbers and community trends.

KNOW THE RULES: AN OVERVIEW OF STATE AGENCY RULEMAKING
-> "Know the Rules: An Overview of State Agency Rulemaking" (http://bit.ly/1Ndhbni) is a primer that provides an overview of formal rulemaking at the state level to help advocates participate in the process. It outlines the three steps of the rulemaking process to highlight opportunities for input. It also includes tips to help advocates track the rule’s progress, educate the public about the issue, and mobilize their networks.

PSYCHOLOGIST REFLECTS ON WHY DRIVERS HATE CYCLISTS
-> Listen to a recent 10:30 cbc.ca radio broadcast that asks psychologist Ian Walker to reflect on why drivers hate cyclists. Walker has researched how drivers respond to cyclists on the road. http://bit.ly/1MgAJKS


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - Midwest Active Transportation Conference, May 21, 2016, La Crosse, WI.
Deadline: November 13, 2015 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1M6Q9No

-> CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS - Montana Bike Walk Summit, April 27-29, 2016, 2016, Missoula, MT.
Deadline: November 20, 2015, http://bit.ly/1QYjNsc

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - Oregon Active Transportation Summit, March 14-15, 2016, Portland, OR.
Deadline: November 30, 2015 by 5:00 pm PT, http://bit.ly/1Xj4wGq

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS- International Conference on Transport & Health, June 13-15, 2016, San Jose, CA.
Deadline: January 17, 2016 by 11:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/20tu866

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS — 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, November 16 - 19, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1KXYS8h

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> November 13-14, 2015, Share the Road Celebration of Cycling, Clermont, FL
http://bit.ly/1Q4Zsoc
-> November 14, 2015, 2015 Massachusetts Trails Conference, Leominister, MA.
http://1.usa.gov/1Nqsj4A
-> June 13-15, 2016, International Conference on Transport & Health, San Jose, CA.
http://bit.ly/1NqUalg
-> July 15-17, 2016, Montana Bicycle Celebration, Adventure Cycling Association’s 40th Anniversary, Missoula, MT.
http://bit.ly/1MU4ygA
-> September 12-15, 2016, Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place 2016, Vancouver, BC.
http://www.prowalkprobike.org
-> October 9-12, 2016, Rail~Volution 2016
http://bit.ly/S0xyxe


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS - CULTURE OF HEALTH PRIZE, ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION
The RWJF Culture of Health Prize recognizes and celebrates communities that have placed a priority on health and are creating powerful partnerships and deep commitments to make change -- change that will enable all in our diverse society to lead healthier lives now and for generations to come. Up to 10 winning communities will each receive a $25,000 cash prize and have their success stories celebrated and shared broadly to inspire locally-driven change across the nation. The Prize recognizes work that has already been accomplished.
Deadline: November 12, 2015 by 3:00 pm ET, http://rwjf.ws/1Snw36N

-> REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS - TRANSPORTATION LEADERSHIP ACADEMY 2016 ON PERFORMANCE MEASURES
In partnership with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), T4America will provide a new year-long training academy for metro regions that are hoping to learn more about the emerging practice of performance measurement. This Transportation Leadership Academy will provide participants at the metropolitan level with the tools and support they need to set up a system for measuring performance to guide their planning and project selection processes.
Deadline: November 13, 2015, http://bit.ly/1SnDxXt

-> REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS - TO RECEIVE DESIGN EXPERTISE & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE, CITIZENS' INSTITUTE ON RURAL DESIGN
The Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design is a National Endowment for the Arts leadership initiative in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Project for Public Spaces, Inc., along with the Orton Family Foundation. CIRD provides communities access to the resources they need to convert their own good ideas into reality.

CIRD offers annual competitive funding to six small towns or rural communities to host a two-and-half day community development and design workshop. Successful applicants will receive a $10,000 stipend (that must be matched one-to-one) in addition to in-kind professional design expertise and technical assistance valued at $35,000. Pre-application assistance webinars on November 10 and December 10.
Deadline: January 12, 2016 by 11:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1HqsNBi

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER, SANTA CLARA VALLEY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY, SAN JOSE, CA
This position supports several efforts within Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority's Long Range and Congestion Management Agency Work Unit, including the Pedestrian and Bicycle Program, the Complete Streets Program, and long-range transportation planning. Applicants should have experience in multimodal transportation planning, data analysis, and design, with a focus on pedestrian and bicycle modes.
Deadline: November 6, 2015, 4:00 pm PT, http://bit.ly/1krxaGW

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER, CITY OF ST. PETERSBURG, FL
This is beginning level professional and technical position will work in the development, implementation and administration of a variety of City transportation plans, programs and projects. Work involves preparing studies and performing work tasks relating to multimodal transportation systems, transportation corridors, small area plans, land use and transportation coordination, and capital projects that serve motorists, transit patrons, bicyclists and pedestrians.
Deadline: November 6, 2015, 4:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1LPsLqC

-> JOB - ALTERNATE TRANSPORTATION MANAGER, UNIV. OF ARIZONA, TUCSON, AZ
The Alternate Transportation Manager will manage the overall alternative transportation programs for Parking and Transportation Services with an emphasis on quality customer service and cost effectiveness. The areas of responsibility include the campus shuttle system, the disabled cart service, submission and management of Federal, State and local grants, the annual employee travel reduction survey, the campus bicycle programs and other alternative transportation programs.
Deadline: Review begins on November 9, 2015, http://bit.ly/1RRDwdx

-> 2 JOBS, LOVE TO RIDE, ATLANTA, GA (POSSIBLE LOCATION FLEXIBILITY)
Love to Ride is the online platform that gets more people riding and supports people new to riding to ride more often.

PRODUCT MANAGER
They are looking for an experienced Product Manager who can join their team and lead the direction of the Love to ride platform. The role will encompass both the strategic direction and the day-to-day management of the Love to Ride platform and platform team.
Deadline: November 9, 2015, http://bit.ly/1OnYfYN

MARKETING MANAGER
They are looking for a highly experienced Marketing Manager who can join their team and lead the marketing and growth of Love to Ride. The role will encompass both the strategic planning and the implementation of their marketing and growth campaigns. As part of a small team of 12 full time staff in a growing tech company, you’ll be ready and willing to jump in, contribute to the execution of our business plan and do what needs to be done to market and grow Love to Ride around world.
Deadline: November 9, 2015, http://bit.ly/1NqLsU2

-> JOB - PRESIDENT & CEO, RIDE, NEW ORLEANS, LA REGION
The President & CEO of RIDE is an agent of change who will develop cross-sector coalitions and partnerships to win advocacy campaigns that advance world class regional transit for greater New Orleans and beyond. This key position will be responsible for steering RIDE through a strategic expansion of services and geographic growth.
Deadline: November 13, 2015, http://bit.ly/1iCsQ6D

-> JOB - NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROJECT MANAGER, SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL NATIONAL PARTNERSHIP VIA A HOME OFFICE
The Nutrition and Physical Activity Project Manager is responsible for supporting public policy campaigns at state and local levels to increase policies and funding in support of healthy communities that encourage physical activity and healthy eating. This position brings nutrition-related expertise to our team, and will take the lead in developing our work at the intersection of healthy eating and active living. Bringing an equity lens to all work, the position will work with local and state leaders to identify, develop and collaborate on advocacy campaigns. Qualifications include knowledge of nutrition public policy landscape, excellent research and writing abilities, and fluency in health equity.
Deadline: November 16, 2015, interviews scheduled on a rolling basis, http://bit.ly/1Wvvlue

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION ANALYST, CITY OF SOMERVILLE, MA
The Transportation Analyst performs technical analysis and advises senior staff on transportation planning; traffic engineering and urban design issues to ensure that public and private investment advance the City's goal to become the most walkable, bikeable, transit accessible city in the nation. Projects worked on may include those relating to transportation operations, safety, planning, and design.
Deadline: November 23, 2015, http://bit.ly/1NPFbzz

-> JOB - ENGINEERING MANAGER, CITY OF CAMBRIDGE, MA
The Engineering Manager leads and manages the Department's engineering unit, overseeing traffic signals, signs, and pavement markings; manages and coordinates consultant studies and designs; performs data collection; assists in development review; provides design guidance to other City departments; and addresses resident concerns. Functions as a key member of the Traffic, Parking, and Transportation Department's senior management team, assisting in implementing the Department's key strategic safety, mobility, and community initiatives, preparing for future change, and providing excellent customer service.
Deadline: November 30, 2015, by 8:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/1MgxZ0j

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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