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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#396 Wednesday, November 18, 2015

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Report: A Global High Shift Cycling Scenario
----- National Walking Summit Highlights
----- Canberra, Australia 5-Year Plan: Peds First, Cyclists Second
----- First State of the N American Bike/Walk Advocacy Movement
----- Equity in Safe Routes to School
----- Mexico City Superhero Wrestles For Pedestrians

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- Caltrans: Increasing Capacity Unlikely to Relieve Congestion
----- Nashville: MPO & CDC Collaborate on Healthy Community Design
----- Fargo: First Protected Bike Lane in ND
----- St. Louis: Pop-up Traffic Calming Demonstrations
----- Portland, OR: Silhouettes Mark Fatal Crashes & Safety Fixes
----- Chicago: 2014 Bikeways – Year in Review
----- San Francisco Debuts Raised Bike Path
----- LAB: Bike Friendly University & Bike Friendly Community Awards
----- Walk Bike Nashville Promotes Bicycle Friendly Businesses
----- Reflections from Atlanta’s 1st Chief Bicycle Officer

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Impacts of Walkable Neighborhoods & Transit on Heart Health
----- New Zealand: Reallocating Parking for Multi-modal Use & Placemaking
----- Bike-related Hospitalization Rates: Helmet Laws Not A Factor
----- Bike-sharing in Sun Belt Cities More Likely for Recreation
----- Why Americans Use Public Transportation Survey
----- What Boston Millennials Want
----- Left-Right Smart Growth Split Emotional Not Ideological

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Guide to Linking Transit Agencies and Land Use Decision-making
----- How to Use the Transportation Health Tool
----- Walk21 Conference Presentations and More
----- Open-source Smartphone App Collects More Robust Travel Behavior Data
----- Innovative Bicycle Parking Options
----- Sam Schwartz Book: Street Smart: The Rise of Cities and the Fall of Cars
----- Free Quality Photos of Everday Biking for Non-commercial Use
----- Coming Soon: SmartCross Pedestrian App

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

REPORT: A GLOBAL HIGH SHIFT CYCLING SCENARIO
-> Cycling plays a major role in personal mobility around the world, but it could play a much bigger role. A report, "A Global High Shift Cycling Scenario" (http://bit.ly/1MS0C4b), presents the potential for dramatically increasing bicycle and e-bike use in cities around the world. The report also includes a detailed exploration of the CO2 and cost benefits of a shift toward cycling. Download the supporting infographic, The Benefits of Shifting to Cycling: http://bit.ly/1SXEq9D

NATIONAL WALKING SUMMIT HIGHLIGHTS
-> Right now, poor, black and Latino Americans are injured and killed while walking at far higher rates than middle-class whites. That was a big theme of the recent National Walking Summit, which featured civil rights leaders along with US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. Equal access to good health–expanding from walking as a way to improve public health to walking as a human and civil right, a moral imperative–was a goal that resounded throughout the Summit. Check out highlights, statistics, and links for more information: http://bit.ly/1MRxOJ6

CANBERRA, AUSTRALIA 5-YEAR PLAN: PEDS FIRST, CYCLISTS SECOND
-> A recently released five-year planning strategy in Canberra, Australia, states transport should focus on "pedestrians first, cyclists second, public transport third then private vehicles" as part of creating "public places of the soul". The document calls for high quality public spaces and streets to be created through "placemaking" efforts, with a focus on collaboration with experts and promotion of design excellence and innovation. http://bit.ly/1MRLjbB

FIRST STATE OF THE N AMERICAN BIKE/WALK ADVOCACY MOVEMENT
-> Alliance for Biking & Walking recently released its "The State of the Movement" (http://bit.ly/1OeYgeD): a first-of-its-kind look at key metrics and trends within bike/walk advocacy across North America. The report helps advocates understand who they are, what their key priorities are, where their efforts are focused and how they are working to advance biking and walking in their communities. By identifying these initial benchmarks the Alliance aims to set an informed stage for a much larger and nuanced discussion about shared challenges, emerging trends and their best collective course forward. http://bit.ly/2122fm1

EQUITY IN SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL
->The Safe Routes to School movement has recognized that to successfully achieve core goals around increasing the number and safety of kids walking and bicycling to school, it is vital to direct resources and craft programs and policies in ways that address the needs of low-income kids and kids of color. Equity recognizes that different people have different barriers to living healthy, fulfilled lives and need policies, programs, and overall approaches with those various challenges and needs in mind. Equity means ensuring each person has access to what they need to thrive. Equity addresses the power imbalances and the lived differences that all too often generate disparate health, educational, and career outcomes for different people – effects that often emerge along lines of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, and disability. http://bit.ly/1S3FyYu

MEXICO CITY SUPERHERO WRESTLES FOR PEDESTRIANS
-> The traffic light turns red at the busiest pedestrian crossing in Mexico City, used by around 9,000 people every hour. Tonight, a driver stops his grey Peugeot exactly on the crossing where the masses are trying to pass. A masked man dressed in black, his black and white striped cape, flapping behind him goes to the car, flings his cape over his shoulder, and pushes the Peugeot backwards to make space. "My name is Peatónito, and I fight for the rights of pedestrians," he says. http://bit.ly/1MTyv6k


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

CALTRANS: INCREASING CAPACITY UNLIKELY TO RELIEVE CONGESTION
-> Transportation experts have repeatedly found that building new roads inevitably encourages more people to drive, which in turn negates any congestion savings—a phenomenon known as "induced demand." The California DOT (Caltrans) has linked to a policy brief outlining key research findings from years of study into induced demand (Increasing Highway Capacity Unlikely to Relieve Traffic Congestion: http://bit.ly/1NDk01a). What’s significant about the Caltrans acknowledgement is that induced demand creates something of a mission crisis for transportation agencies that spend most of their money on building new roads. http://bit.ly/1PErt4h

NASHVILLE: MPO & CDC COLLABORATE ON HEALTHY COMMUNITY DESIGN
-> The Centers for Disease Control’s Healthy Community Design Initiative (HCDI) is helping the Nashville Area MPO prioritize how it allocates approximately $6 billion of transportation funding over the next 20 years shaping the built environment across seven counties in North Central Tennessee, home to 1.5 million residents. Health topics in a transportation planning survey allowed the MPO and HCDI to identify particular neighborhoods that may benefit most from health-oriented transportation projects. The Integrated Transportation and Health Impact Modeling tool (http://bit.ly/1PNCvVd) suggests that even moderate levels of increased walking and biking (such as an additional half mile walk per day) could save 188 lives per year in the region and defray $200 million in direct and indirect costs related to illness. The Nashville MPO’s most recent regional transportation plan shows 70% of projects include support for biking and walking versus only 2% in the previous plan. http://1.usa.gov/1ltZWb0

FARGO: FIRST PROTECTED BIKE LANE IN ND
-> The City of Fargo added a protected bike lane as part of the reconstruction of NP Avenue between 10th Street and University Drive. The protected bike lane is the first in the state of North Dakota. http://bit.ly/1Sk5IWO

ST. LOUIS: POP-UP TRAFFIC CALMING DEMONSTRATIONS
-> Temporary medians, curb bump-outs and a roundabout were in place Tuesday in the JeffVanderLou neighborhood in St. Louis in hopes of illustrating that streets with slower traffic are safer streets. The so-called "pop-up traffic calming" demonstration was the fourth this fall. The traffic-slowing demonstrations are being done through the city’s Healthy Eating, Active Living Partnership and are being spearheaded by Trailnet, a group that advocates for better walking and biking in the St. Louis region. http://bit.ly/1SUH5B0

PORTLAND, OR: SILHOUETTES MARK FATAL CRASHES & SAFETY FIXES
-> On November 15, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, Portland area loved ones placed more than 130 white memorial silhouettes at crash sites along high crash corridors, each representing one man, woman, or child who died due to careless driving and unsafe road conditions over the last 10 years. Portland’s High Crash Corridors make up only 3% of the road network, but they are where 51% of people who died while walking were. The families hoped that these human figure memorials will remind all who pass to drive like they would want others to drive around their loved ones. By focusing on high crash corridors, these families cried out for urgent, crucial safety improvements such as complete sidewalks, protected bike lanes, guardrails, safe crossings, and speed reduction. http://bit.ly/1PzO0Ry

CHICAGO: 2014 BIKEWAYS – YEAR IN REVIEW
-> The City of Chicago and Chicago DOT "2014 Bikeways – Year in Review" (http://bit.ly/1MSi5JI) reports they installed 51.25 miles of new and restriped bikeways, including 36.50 miles of barrier- and buffer-protected bike lanes in 2014. Since May of 2011, CDOT has installed 85.50 miles of protected bike lanes throughout Chicago. http://1.usa.gov/20BG5Xi

SAN FRANCISCO DEBUTS RAISED BIKE PATH
-> The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency has debuted its first-ever 2 inch raised bike path, providing one long (or two short) blocks of protection in the heart of downtown. The new lane is the first of several such paths they will build in crash locations. The idea is cyclists will choose the designated path over the sidewalk, and cars will find it more difficult to roam into cyclist territory. http://bit.ly/1QIpv3Q

LAB: BIKE FRIENDLY UNIVERSITY & BIKE FRIENDLY COMMUNITY AWARDS
-> The League of American Bicyclists announced this year’s Bicycle Friendly University awards for new designations as well as renewals. Stanford University again earned Platinum status and joined by new Platinum awardees Portland State University. Check out details of how each campus achieved this honor. http://bit.ly/1QtVSnO

The League also announced 55 new and renewing Bicycle Friendly Communities (http://bit.ly/1MSe6g4), including Platinum awardee Madison, WI. http://bit.ly/1WX11Jc.

Check out the lists of all Bicycle Friendly Communities, Businesses and Universities plus Bicycle Friendly State rankings: http://bit.ly/1Mm3MM7

WALK BIKE NASHVILLE PROMOTES BICYCLE FRIENDLY BUSINESSES
-> In 2015 Walk Bike Nashville launched its Travel Green program, which works with area businesses to promote active transportation by staff and customers. Many of these companies have applied to be Bicycle Friendly Businesses, through the League of American Bicyclists. As a result of their efforts, 14 new Nashville-area businesses have been recognized by the League as Bicycle Friendly Businesses. Nashville now ranks in the top 20 cities in the country in number of BFBs. Check out an interview with one of those businesses, Emma, Inc., about their application experience, the goals they set as a result, and the benefits of having become a Bicycle Friendly Business: http://bit.ly/1l5ufUP

REFLECTIONS FROM ATLANTA’S 1ST CHIEF BICYCLE OFFICER
-> Ten years ago, the notion of a chief bicycle officer for the city of Atlanta would have been laughingly dismissed as useless in the city known for urban sprawl and traffic. Atlanta’s first chief bicycle officer aims to double bike-facility mileage; create a connected, safe bike network; roll out a bike share system and double bike commutes — not just to support people on bikes, but to improve mobility for people who drive, bike, walk or take transit. Check out reflections from Atlanta’s first Chief Bicycle Officer Becky Katz: http://bit.ly/1QwrxUB


THE RESEARCH BEAT

IMPACTS OF WALKABLE NEIGHBORHOODS & TRANSIT ON HEART HEALTH
-> Two new studies suggest heart health may depend, at least in part, on the sidewalks and public transportation available in the community where you live. Both studies highlight the role that good urban planning and public policy can have on the health of average citizens. http://bit.ly/1QjnyM4

In one study (Moving to a Highly Walkable Neighborhood and Incidence of Hypertension: A Propensity-score Matched Cohort Study: http://bit.ly/1WYBDTr), people are less likely to have high blood pressure if they move to a "walkable" neighborhood that is designed to encourage walking while performing errands. The other study (Commuting by Public Transportation is Associated With Lower Prevalence of Excess Body Weight, Hypertension, and Diabetes: http://bit.ly/1SXNX0c) found that people who ride a bus or train to work are less likely to be overweight, or to have diabetes or high blood pressure.

NEW ZEALAND: REALLOCATING PARKING FOR MULTI-MODAL USE & PLACEMAKING
-> A recent New Zealand Transport Agency research report (The Costs and Benefits of Inner City Parking vis- à- vis Network Optimisation: http://bit.ly/1HVgmT)I) considers the costs and benefits of inner city curbside parking, versus the opportunity cost of the corridor space being allocated for other uses. Increasing demands for multi-modal transport networks that support efficient movement of people and goods, and greater emphasis on the amenity value of inner city streets, has created competition for road space. Curbside parking reallocation is a new use of road space (such as cycle lanes, public transport infrastructure, extra vehicle lanes, or pedestrianized shared spaces and better quality urban realms) that was previously occupied by vehicle parking spaces.

BIKE-RELATED HOSPITALIZATION RATES: HELMET LAWS NOT A FACTOR
-> A new study finds bicycle helmet laws do not seem to improve rider safety (Bicycling Injury Hospitalisation Rates in Canadian Jurisdictions: Analyses Examining Associations with Helmet Legislation and Mode Share: http://bit.ly/1MUxmW4). The authors gathered Canadian data on bicycle use, cycle-related hospitalization, and a number of other variables including helmet legislation in 11 jurisdictions with and without helmet laws. They found two factors to be statistically linked with bike hospitalizations. For all types of injuries, women experienced "substantially lower" hospitalization rates than men did, and lower rates of traffic-related injuries were associated with higher cycling mode shares. Researches did not find any connection between helmet laws and bike-related hospitalization rates. http://bit.ly/1Qhxbe7

BIKE-SHARING IN SUN BELT CITIES MORE LIKELY FOR RECREATION
-> A new report (Shifting Gears: Framing Bike-sharing Trends in Sun Belt Cities: http://bit.ly/1Qu23YV) finds that Sun Belt city residents are most likely to use bike-share programs for recreation, compared with users in the Midwest or Northeast, who regularly use the same programs for their daily commute. The report offers a richer understanding of how people use bike-share programs in lower-density and traditionally car-centric cities in the Sun Belt. http://bit.ly/1Yg7QCL

WHY AMERICANS USE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SURVEY
-> It’s not always available as a choice, but when it is millions of Americans choose to use public transportation rather than drive. The "Why Americans Use Public Transportation" survey (http://bit.ly/1OPN6QF) examines why they are making that choice. Listen to an interview with Michael Townes, HNTB’s transit sector market leader and a senior vice president, about the survey. (05:52) http://bit.ly/1MRI049

WHAT BOSTON MILLENNIALS WANT
-> A new survey (What Millennials Want: http://on.uli.org/1O1Xh3p, data available to Program Sponsors) reveals Boston millennials are far more interested in using public transportation than driving a car: 80 percent of young professionals in the Boston area said access to public transportation is "very important" when choosing a community or neighborhood in which to live. "Being able to walk to amenities" was very important to 75 percent of respondents, and bike lanes and bike paths are very important or somewhat important to 59 percent of them. Only 25 percent said the availability of on-street parking was a very important factor. http://bit.ly/1Y4AZAV

LEFT-RIGHT SMART GROWTH SPLIT EMOTIONAL NOT IDEOLOGICAL
-> A recent research report (Moral Intuitions and Smart Growth: Why do Liberals and Conservatives View Compact Development so Differently: http://bit.ly/1PzaemB) concluded residents’ views on land use and development patterns aren’t ideological, they’re emotional. And it could help explain why, despite the seemingly centrist appeal of smart growth – for liberals, social equity and environmental sustainability, for conservatives, economic opportunity and a less intrusive government – the urbanist movement has been disproportionately embraced by liberals.


QUOTES R US

"The health benefits of walking are so overwhelming that to deny access to that is a violation of fundamental human rights…Health disparities don’t just happen by accident. They are the tragic legacy of racism and unequal economic opportunity...Tell me your zip code and I can tell you how healthy you are. That should not be... All communities should have a right to a safe, sustainable, healthy, just, walkable community."
—Dr. Robert A. Bullard, opening keynote speaker at the recent National Walking Summit and founder of the Environmental Justice movement. http://bit.ly/1MRxOJ6

"If you have parks, playgrounds, community gardens, and wide sidewalks, you have good health outcomes. If you have walkable communities kids will do better in school...seniors will be healthier."
–Ron Sims, closing speaker at the recent National Walking Summit and sponsor of some of the first research identifying zip codes as a determinant of health. http://bit.ly/1MRxOJ6

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

OTTO THE SKATEBOARDING BULLDOG BREAKS GUINNESS WORLD RECORD
Watch Otto skateboard through a human tunnel 30 people long, to set the "longest human tunnel travelled through by a skateboarding dog" record. He leans left and right to steer, paws the ground for more speed, and makes it look so easy. http://bit.ly/1OPMpXN


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

Webinar "Performance-Based Practical Design: Integration into Transportation Projects and Agency Practice"
Date: November 19, 2015, 3:00 - 4:30 pm ET
Presenters: Michael Matzke & Rodney Vaughn (FHWA), Nancy Boyd, (WA State DOT) & Kent Belleque & John P. Wolf (OR DOT)
Host: Federal Highway Administration
Details: Create an account to register at least a day in advance, http://bit.ly/1l7etJt, free

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Leading Pedestrian Interval"
Date: December 2, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Margaret Kubilins (VHB)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center 
Details: http://bit.ly/1Okei85, free

Webinar "Practical Techniques for Successfully Communicating Technical Topics"
Date: December 2, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Shelley Row (Shelley Row Assoc.)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1SnoxsI, no fee for those affiliated with TRB, $49 site fee for others

Webinar "The Role of Trails in Healthy Community Design"
Date: December 3, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Mark Fenton (Consultant)
Host: American Trails
Details: http://bit.ly/1KX4yuP, $35 for American Trails members, $55 for non-members

Live Stream Seminar "Cargo Cycles for Local and Last Mile Delivery: Lessons from New York City"
Date: December 4, 2015, 3:00 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: TREC
Details: http://bit.ly/1kE3wz5, free

Webinar "The Role of MPOs in Funding SRTS"
Date: December 8, 2015, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Margaret Boone (Maricopa Assn of Governments), Raymond Hess (Regional Transportation Commission of Southern NV), Karla Weaver (North Central Texas COG) & Margo Pedroso (Safe Routes to School National Partnership)
Host: National Center for Safe Routes to School
Details: http://bit.ly/1j75s1d, free

Webinar "Future Directions for Multimodal Research and Practice"
Date: December 9, 2015, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Kristine Williams (Univ. of South FL), Darby Watson (Seattle DOT), John Gordon (Metro) & Tiffany Chu (Remix)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1SX2xFx, free for TRB affiliates, $49 for others

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Lighting Strategies for Pedestrian Safety"
Date: December 15, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Michael Cynecki (Lee Engineering)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center 
Details: http://bit.ly/1FSPJOz, free

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Traffic Calming"
Date: December 17, 2015, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Peter Lagerwey (Toole Design Group)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1jNpQp3, free

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Roundabouts"
Date: January 6, 2016, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Hillary Isebrands (FHWA Resource Center)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/1LibUJV, free

Webinar "Countermeasure Strategies for Pedestrian Safety: Pedestrian Safety at Transit Locations"
Date: January 20, 2016, 1:00 -2:30 pm ET (1.5 CM credits)
Presenters: Dan Nabors (VHB)
Host: Federal Highway Administration & Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center 
Details: http://bit.ly/1FWgS2C, free

Webinar "Using the Updated TRID Interface" (TRB’s comprehensive bibliographic resource on transportation research information)
Date: January 26, 2016, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Bill McLeod & Elaine Ferrell (TRB)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1MRRmgt, free


RESOURCES

HOW TO USE THE TRANSPORTATION HEALTH TOOL
-> Check out the USDOT one pager on how to use the new Transportation Health Tool. This tool provides easy access to state and metropolitan area data that describe how the transportation environment affects safety, active transportation, air quality, and connectivity to destinations. It also provides information and resources about the links between transportation and health, and strategies to improve public health through transportation planning and policy. http://1.usa.gov/1j6Rs7M

GUIDE TO LINKING TRANSIT AGENCIES AND LAND USE DECISION-MAKING
-> A new guidebook (Linking Transit Agencies and Land Use Decision-making: An Effective Interactions Guidebook for Transit Agencies: http://bit.ly/1MWTXro) addresses the connections among transit, land use planning, and development decision-making by answering the following questions: 1) What can transit agencies do to become more meaningful participants in land use decision-making? and 2) When and how is it worthwhile for transit agencies to get involved? Through literature reviews, an inventory of existing land use and transit practices and tools, outreach to stakeholders through surveys and interviews, and case studies of effective transit agencies, it has determined five necessary preconditions for success to enhance a transit agency’s involvement in land use decisions.

WALK21 CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS AND MORE
-> Check out the 2015 Walk21 conference shared presentations (http://bit.ly/1HYfQ1V), visionaries submissions (http://bit.ly/1b585x8), all the walking stories (http://bit.ly/2126nSO), and links to the image database (http://bit.ly/1NbjL2Z).

OPEN-SOURCE APP COLLECTS MORE ROBUST TRAVEL BEHAVIOR DATA
-> The Daynamica open-source smart phone app makes it easier and less costly to collect travel behavior data and provides richer, more accurate data than traditional methods. It combines smart phone GPS sensing with advanced statistical and machine learning techniques to detect, identify, and summarize attributes of daily activity and travel. The app then allows users to view and annotate information at their convenience. http://bit.ly/1NaZmeh

INNOVATIVE BICYCLE PARKING OPTIONS
-> Check out examples of innovative bicycle parking options from around the world. For example, the German-designed Radhaus bike tower is 10.5 meters (34 feet) high but occupies only 55 square meters (592 square feet) of surface area. Able to hold up to 120 bikes, it features individual parking boxes accessible by a chip card. The tower, which can be accessed by 12 cyclists at the same time, has three stories and is a modular design that can be assembled within 2-3 weeks... http://bit.ly/1QLItXk

SAM SCHWARTZ: STREET SMART: THE RISE OF CITIES AND THE FALL OF CARS
-> Sam Schwartz spent two decades as New York City’s Traffic Commissioner and its Department of Transportation’s Chief Engineer and, since 1995, running the world-renowned engineering firm, Sam Schwartz Engineering. His new book, "Street Smart: The Rise of Cities and the Fall of Cars," praises urban spaces and multimodal transportation. It also recognizes the impacts of millennials choosing to live in denser, more walkable areas and choosing to drive less. Check out an interview with Sam Schwartz: http://bit.ly/1kDSdXE

FREE QUALITY PHOTOS OF EVERDAY BIKING FOR NON-COMMERCIAL USE
-> Check out the quality photos PeopleForBikes released of ordinary people biking and great bike infrastructure you can use free under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial license. Please credit the photographer where noted and PeopleForBikes. http://bit.ly/1QtIwrt

COMING SOON: SMARTCROSS PEDESTRIAN APP
-> The SmartCross smart phone app will interface with traffic lights and will receive information about the pedestrian signal. Sending signals between the pedestrian’s phone and the nearest traffic signal box, the app will send an alert to notify pedestrians when they have the signal to cross. In addition to providing an alert when it's safe to walk, the application also will give users the ability to request the pedestrian signal. It will provide audio, visual and haptic (typically vibration) feedback so pedestrians approaching a crosswalk with their heads down will know to stop at the curb. SmartCross is currently under further development but will soon be available to iPhone and Android users. http://1.usa.gov/1LkCNwg


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS - Montana Bike Walk Summit, April 27-29, 2016, 2016, Missoula, MT.
Deadline: November 20, 2015, http://bit.ly/1QYjNsc

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - Oregon Active Transportation Summit, March 14-15, 2016, Portland, OR.
Deadline: November 30, 2015 by 5:00 pm PT, http://bit.ly/1Xj4wGq

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS- International Conference on Transport & Health, June 13-15, 2016, San Jose, CA.
Deadline: January 17, 2016 by 11:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/20tu866

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS — 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, November 16 - 19, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1KXYS8h

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> January 23, 2016, Iowa Bike Expo, Des Moines, IA.
http://bit.ly/1MRYHN1
-> January 24-25, 2016, West Virginia Bike Summit, Charleston, WV.
http://bit.ly/1MSSkt4
-> March 9-11, 2016, Texas Trails & Active Transportation Conference, Houston, TX.
http://bit.ly/1WYwIBR
-> June 13-15, 2016, International Conference on Transport & Health, San Jose, CA.
http://bit.ly/1NqUalg
-> July 15-17, 2016, Montana Bicycle Celebration, Adventure Cycling Association’s 40th Anniversary, Missoula, MT.
http://bit.ly/1MU4ygA
-> September 12-15, 2016, Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place 2016, Vancouver, BC.
http://www.prowalkprobike.org
-> October 9-12, 2016, Rail~Volution 2016
http://bit.ly/S0xyxe


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - YOUNG ADULT BIKE TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP, ADVENTURE CYCLING ASSOCIATION
Four Young Adult Bike Travel Scholarship awards will be offered in two separate categories, "Intro to Bike Travel" and "Outdoor Leadership," based on need and experience level to adults aged 18 to 25. Both tracks are designed to support riders and cover the cost of attending one of Adventure Cycling’s education courses. Upon completion, scholarship recipients will apply what they’ve learned to an outreach activity of their choice in their own communities to promote bicycle touring.
Deadline: December 31, 2015 by midnight ET, http://bit.ly/1SXuFIx

-> JOB - ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLANNER, SANDAG, SAN DIEGO, CA
The Active Transportation Planner will work with a broad cross-section of disciplines within SANDAG (San Diego Association of Governments) including engineering and construction teams, communications, and transportation demand management (TDM) to coordinate projects, programs, and studies related to the development and implementation of active transportation projects identified in the Bike EAP and San Diego Forward: The Regional Plan.
Deadline: December 4, 2015 by 5:00 pm PT, http://bit.ly/1klvFdX

-> SUMMER INTERNS - VARIOUS ENGINEERING, PLANNING & ARCHITECTURE DISCIPLINES, CITY & COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Interns will gain on-the-job experience under the guidance of experienced professional engineers, architects, planners and surveyors. At the time of filing, the applicant must be in an accredited Engineering, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Planning, or Computer Science/Information Services Program at a university or a related field at a community college.
Deadline: February 10, 2016, http://bit.ly/1SCD9DY

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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