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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#402 Wednesday, February 10, 2016

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Climate and Transportation Non-Starter in Congress
----- Next-generation Workforce Influence Future Transportation
----- Victoria, Canada Aims to be Best Small Cycling City in the World
----- CycleLogistics European Inner City Goods Transport by Bike
----- One-wheel Motorized Electric Board

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- FDOT Releases Complete Streets Implementation Plan
----- Portland, OR: 1st to Make Protected Bike Lanes the Default
----- How Jimmy Became a Winter Bicyclist
----- Innovations in Transportation Policy States Should Consider
----- Track State Bike Legislation
----- 2016 Roadmap of State Highway Safety Laws
----- SD Considers Requiring Bikes Stop for Faster Vehicles
----- Minneapolis, MN Consider Drive-thru Restrictions for Ped Safety
----- Houston Mayor to TX DOT: Need New Transportation Paradigm
----- Austin, TX Polka Dots Reclaim Space for Peds
----- Kansas Rails-to-Trails Map Update
----- Palm Beach MPO - Regional Greenways and Trails Map

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Using Walk Score to Conduct Pedestrian Safety Studies
----- Shared Space Design: Safer & More Efficient for Peds & Motorists
----- Study: Sharrows Could Increase Risk of Injury
----- 10 Years of School-Transportation-Related Crash Data
----- Public Lighting & Pedestrians’ Perception of Safety & Well-being
----- Heat Mitigation Strategies & Ped Thermal Comfort
----- Automated Transit, Ped & Bike Facilities & Urban Travel Patterns
----- Improvements to Ped Crossings & Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacons

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- New York City DA’s Rarely Bring Charges in Ped or Bike Collisions
----- Fact Sheet: Using Transportation Alternative Program
----- Walking as a Practice for Other Than Transportation Report
----- Streets as Places Resources
----- Safe Routes to School Workshop & Training Catalog

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

CLIMATE AND TRANSPORTATION NON-STARTER IN CONGRESS
-> President Obama's proposal to impose a $10 tax on every barrel of oil and spend the money on advances in transportation is one of the most comprehensive attempts yet to address the climate impacts of moving people and freight from place to place. Linking climate policy and public works programs, however, is attempting to pave the way for a project not yet shovel-ready. No lame duck president whose party is the minority in both houses of Congress seriously expects dramatic, ideologically laden new policies to pass. And if there are two things that are hard to imagine Congress including in the budget for the fiscal year 2017, they are a broad new policy to control climate change and a big tax increase, let alone one hitting down-and-out producers of fossil fuels. http://bit.ly/1mlRjil

NEXT-GENERATION WORKFORCE INFLUENCE FUTURE TRANSPORTATION
-> The Role and Value of Transportation in America’s Economy report (http://bit.ly/1OEkiWv) highlights the need to develop a collective appreciation for the modern demands on the nation’s multimodal transportation system. One of the four thematic case studies reflective of the major sectors influencing current and future transportation is the next-generation workforce, or Millenials. This should be an important part of project planning and delivery discussions at state and local transportation agencies. Multiple studies have shown that Millenials exhibit a preference for urban residential and employment locations that offer multiple transportation options in addition to the car. This population group will make up 75 percent of the workforce by 2025, clearly having a strong influence on future transportation trends. If decision makers truly want to prioritize job growth in cities and urban regions, they need to provide the transportation options desired by this population. Rather than producing the typical written report, this NCHRP project centers on an interactive website, short videos, and white papers to highlight these key economic and demographic sectors. http://bit.ly/20V8ruQ

VICTORIA, CANADA AIMS TO BE BEST SMALL CYCLING CITY IN THE WORLD
-> In a spring 2015 strategy session, the city of Victoria identified cycling not simply a tool for transportation, but also its potential to promote equity, affordability, tourism, community building, public health, and the quality of life of its residents. The resulting roadmap, called #Biketoria, is being championed by newly-elected Mayor who went on the record to state their city will become "the best small cycling city in the world." An RFP to achieve this calls for constructing a "minimum grid" of eight protected bike lanes – between 20 and 25 km. that would put nearly all of Victoria’s 82,000 residents within 400 m. of a route – before the end of 2018. http://bit.ly/1QShOc9

CYCLELOGISTICS EUROPEAN INNER CITY GOODS TRANSPORT BY BIKE
-> The "Recommendations on CycleLogistics for Cities" report (http://bit.ly/1WdVfxW), produced by the European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF), collected experiences of cities, civil society, bicycle and delivery industry, and partners in EU-projects. It provides innovative and thought-provoking recommendations based on first-hand experiences that cities and municipalities have with Cyclelogistics solutions currently in place in many EU Member States. A growing number of European cities have demonstrated the effectiveness and benefits to citizens and businesses of making the shift from traditional motorized logistics to Cyclelogistics. Deliveries by (e-)cycles and (e-)cargo-cycles can contribute to CO2-free urban centers. The baseline study of the European project, named CycleLogistics, show the clear potential of logistics by cycle: 51% of all motorized private and commercial trips in European cities related to the transport of goods can be switched to bikes.

ONE-WHEEL MOTORIZED ELECTRIC BOARD
-> Check out a video about the one-wheel motorized electric board (1:40) The one-wheel board helps you balance with an accelerometer and gyro sensors. It can accelerate up to 15 MPH even uphill. Future Motion Founder and CEO Kyle Doerksen says "We live in a time where transportation really needs some disruption. You know there’s tons of cars on the road and a lot of pollution and so designing a new kind of electric vehicle and sneaking it into the world as a really fun new toy is really our vision." http://cnnmon.ie/1JTwvu0


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

FDOT RELEASES COMPLETE STREETS IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
-> The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) adopted a Complete Streets policy to help make streets safer for everyone in the state. Its recently released "Complete Streets Implementation Plan" (http://bit.ly/20VeqA1) is an ambitious and comprehensive commitment to change the way roads are designed and built in Florida to make them safer for all types of travelers, while also promoting economic development and enhancing quality of life. FDOT developed the plan in partnership with Smart Growth America and our program the National Complete Streets Coalition over a period of nine months through SGA’s Multimodal Development and Delivery technical assistance process (http://bit.ly/1Qr37rT). http://bit.ly/1nTi0fv

PORTLAND, OR: 1ST TO MAKE PROTECTED BIKE LANES THE DEFAULT
-> Portland Transportation Director Leah Treat announced via an internal memo last fall, "Effective immediately, every time Portland road designers recommended a bike lane, they would need to make it a protected bike lane — or else explain why not." This new policy applies to all city-managed streets with average daily traffic of 3,000 motor vehicles or more. http://bit.ly/1La72Yl

(Memphis, TN has a similar standard for some streets but it allows either buffered or protected bike lanes: http://bit.ly/1KbDNcS.)

HOW JIMMY BECAME A WINTER BICYCLIST
-> Meet Jimmy, a very motivated participant in St. Paul, MN Transit for Livable Communities’ (TLC) Transportation Options program. He is a self-employed videographer and was already an avid transit user and walker who was interested in further reducing his transportation expenses. Jimmy worked with TLC on a transportation assessment that suggested he would benefit from bicycle ownership. Even though he was prepared for cold weather as a transit user, TLC recognized he needed additional gear for winter bicycling. They also realized his need for hauling heavy and fragile video equipment from one taping site to another. Referred to the Transportation Options program by another partner, Jimmy qualified for financial assistance. This winter, the staff at another partner organization helped Jimmy find the right size bicycle and then equip his new bike with lights, fenders, and studded tires. He now also has a used Burley bike trailer to haul his video equipment. To help prepare him for riding year round, they also shared a variety of useful printed resources. http://bit.ly/1Q3Amat

INNOVATIONS IN TRANSPORTATION POLICY STATES SHOULD CONSIDER
-> To remain economically competitive, states must invest in infrastructure. But even though 23 states have raised new transportation funding since 2012, exactly how states choose to do so matters more than ever. Legislators have critical choices ahead: continue pumping scarce dollars into a complex and opaque system based on outdated policies out of sync with today’s needs, or follow the lead of the states highlighted in this new Transportation for America report, "Twelve Innovations in Transportation Policy States Should Consider in 2016" (http://bit.ly/23WGs0j). http://bit.ly/1mscak1

TRACK STATE BIKE LEGISLATION
-> Alex Logemann, State + Local Policy Analyst for PeopleForBikes, reviewed more than 20,000 bills and 10,000 regulations proposed at the local and state level last year. Check out links to the 23 categories of state bike legislation that passed and what was proposed at the state level in 2015, and what's pending (thus far) for 2016.Thanks Alex! http://bit.ly/1PiXs9B

2016 ROADMAP OF STATE HIGHWAY SAFETY LAWS
-> Highway and auto safety improvements have been one of public health’s greatest victories over the past decade. But the number of people that died on American roads in 2015 increased by more than 8 percent, according to early results — while legislative activity in passing state auto and highway safety laws has decreased. The 2016 Roadmap of State Highway Safety Laws (http://bit.ly/1RoTyOZ) shows that states need to adopt 319 new laws to meet basic safety criteria. http://bit.ly/1KF1kCX

SD CONSIDERS REQUIRING BIKES STOP FOR FASTER VEHICLES
-> A group of legislators in South Dakota have introduced House Bill 1073 (http://1.usa.gov/1orAOCZ), an act formally titled, "An Act to require persons operating bicycles under certain conditions to stop and allow faster vehicles to pass." The certain conditions are when a person is riding a bicycle in a no-passing zone on a roadway that has no shoulder, or a shoulder of less than three feet. In this case, the person on the bike would have to stop the bike, move off of the roadway, and allow faster vehicles to pass. http://bit.ly/1NZcTzr

MINNEAPOLIS, MN CONSIDER DRIVE-THRU RESTRICTIONS FOR PED SAFETY
-> Some Minneapolis leaders want to clamp down on drive-thrus in favor of people traveling the city on foot. A change to city rules in its early stages would likely further restrict where drive-thrus could be installed in the city. "The streets where a lot of people are walking, on our transit corridors, maybe we don’t want to have drive-thrus at all," said Council Member Lisa Bender, who sponsored the proposal with Council Member Lisa Goodman. "If we do, we may want to strengthen our controls of them and minimize their impact on people walking." http://strib.mn/20l67LM

HOUSTON MAYOR TO TX DOT: NEED NEW TRANSPORTATION PARADIGM
-> Newly elected Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner gave a remarkable speech in Austin (Talking Points: http://bit.ly/1KbCfPV), calling on the state to change its transportation priorities and stop pouring billions into widening highways. Turner told the Texas Transportation Commission, the appointed board that leads Texas DOT, that the state needs a totally new transportation paradigm.

"It’s easy to understand why. TxDOT has noted that 97% of the Texans currently drive a single occupancy vehicle for their daily trips. One could conclude that our agencies should therefore focus their resources to support these kinds of trips. However, this approach is actually exacerbating our congestion problems. We need a paradigm shift in order to achieve the kind of mobility outcomes we desire," he said. "We need a paradigm shift in how we prioritize mobility projects. Instead of enhancing service to the 97% of trips that are made by single occupant vehicles, TxDOT should prioritize projects that reduce that percentage below 97%. TxDOT should support urban areas by prioritizing projects that increase today’s 3% of non-SOV trips to 5%, 10%, 15% of trips and beyond." http://bit.ly/1SI6L72

AUSTIN, TX POLKA DOTS RECLAIM SPACE FOR PEDS
-> One of the busiest intersections in Austin, Texas, has gotten a makeover. White stripes adorn the barren pavement that once made pedestrians hesitant to cross, poles separate pedestrian space from the roadways, and stop signs now sit at every corner. Then there are all the whimsical green and baby blue painted polka dots creating curb extensions. http://bit.ly/1Pu8d6G

KANSAS RAILS-TO-TRAILS MAP UPDATE
-> Check out the updated 2016 version of the Kansas Rails-to-Trails Map that was originally included with the 2013 Kansas Statewide Rail-to-Trails Plan. The 2016 edition shows progress on several trail projects, several new trail projects, and several new trail proposals, as well as a number of newly-identified low-use rail lines that may be candidates for future rail-to-trail projects that would preserve those right-of-ways as future transportation corridors. http://bit.ly/20opzah

PALM BEACH MPO - REGIONAL GREENWAYS AND TRAILS MAP
-> Check out the online Palm Beach MPO - Regional Greenways and Trails Map: http://arcg.is/1msfgob


THE RESEARCH BEAT

USING WALK SCORE TO CONDUCT PEDESTRIAN SAFETY STUDIES
-> Researchers in a recently published study (Use of Google Street View to Assess Environmental Contributions to Pedestrian Injury: http://bit.ly/1PkDLOG) sampled crash data at 532 New York City intersections, then conducted virtual street audits using the Computer Assisted Neighborhood Visual Assessment System (CANVAS). Auditors evaluated each location for about 10 minutes to determine the presence of crosswalks, sidewalks, curb cuts, pedestrian signals, pedestrian refuges, traffic calming, bus stops, billboards, sidewalk condition, and road condition. According the authors, field audits would take roughly 36 times longer to conduct. The team estimated pedestrian volumes using a New York-specific model that incorporates census data, commercial zoning data, and transit ridership data. They then compared those estimates to values from Walk Score (http://bit.ly/1SfES5X) and found that the two were highly correlated, suggesting that Walk Score could be a useful surrogate in places without pedestrian counts or models. http://bit.ly/1Xi4Hlh

SHARED SPACE DESIGN: SAFER & MORE EFFICIENT FOR PEDS & MOTORISTS
-> "Shared space" street design ditches signage, traffic lights, and the grade separation between sidewalk and roadbed. It calms traffic and heightens communication between drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists. Instead of following traffic signals on auto-pilot or speeding up to beat the light, motorists have to pay attention to their surroundings. A recent study found shared space design calms vehicle traffic and allow more freedom of movement for pedestrians with no increase in traffic injuries, and in the right conditions shared space also makes intersections more efficient for both pedestrians and motorists. (Shared Space: Could Less Formal Streets Be Better for Both Pedestrians and Vehicles? http://bit.ly/1TRy6Tg) http://bit.ly/20KqGXh

STUDY: SHARROWS COULD INCREASE RISK OF INJURY
-> Research in Chicago (The Relative (In)Effectiveness of Bicycle Sharrows on Ridership and Safety Outcomes: http://bit.ly/1LgoP06) found bike lanes were far more effective than sharrows in encouraging more cyclists to a given block. Blocks with sharrows had only "slightly larger" increases in bike commuting than places where no infrastructure was built, as well as the smallest percent change. The number of injuries that occurred per 100 cyclists in a given year decreased the most in areas that installed bike lanes, nearly 42 percent. Injuries in blocks with sharrows only declined about 20 percent—less of a decrease than occurred in blocks where no bike infrastructure was created at all, nearly 37 percent. These results suggest prioritizing bike safety means building separated bike lanes. http://bit.ly/1K7iycd

10 YEARS OF SCHOOL-TRANSPORTATION-RELATED CRASH DATA
-> From 2004 to 2013, there were 1,344 people killed in school-transportation-related crashes—an average of 134 fatalities per year. Occupants of school transportation vehicles accounted for 8 percent of the fatalities, and nonoccupants (pedestrians, bicyclists, etc.) accounted for 21 percent of the fatalities. Most (71%) of the people who lost their lives in these crashes were occupants of other vehicles involved in the crashes. There were 116 school-age pedestrians (18 or younger) who died in school transportation-related crashes. Sixty-two percent were struck by school buses, 5 percent by vehicles functioning as school buses, and 33 percent by other vehicles involved in the crashes. (School-Transportation-Related Crashes: http://1.usa.gov/1SfyLyV)

PUBLIC LIGHTING & PEDESTRIANS’ PERCEPTION OF SAFETY & WELL-BEING
-> "Impact of Public Lighting on Pedestrians’ Perception of Safety and Well-being" reports that intensely lit thoroughfares—those brightened by white LEDs, for instance, rather than yellow sodium lights—made people feel "safer and better." (http://bit.ly/1TbU2Jr) http://bit.ly/1NQtDcd

HEAT MITIGATION STRATEGIES & PED THERMAL COMFORT
-> Researchers found for improving the thermal comfort of pedestrians during the afternoon in unshaded locations, adding street trees was the most effective strategy. However, cool pavements were most significant for afternoon thermal comfort improvements in already shaded locations adjacent to streets. Green and cool roofs showed the lowest impact on the thermal comfort of pedestrians since they modify the energy balance at roof level, above the height of pedestrians. (Micrometeorological Simulations to Predict the Impacts of Heat Mitigation Strategies on Pedestrian Thermal Comfort in a Los Angeles Neighborhood: http://bit.ly/1SflYw2)

AUTOMATED TRANSIT, PED & BIKE FACILITIES & URBAN TRAVEL PATTERNS
-> "The Impact of Automated Transit, Pedestrian, and Bicycling Facilities on Urban Travel Patterns Summary Report" (http://1.usa.gov/1Q8sV1H) found that where environments are more urban in character with walkable neighborhoods, more accessible transit, and higher parking costs, streetscape improvements target commuters who have to spend more time walking across the neighborhood. Shifts in respondents’ mode choices occurred with a community shuttle with a bicycle lane. Urban design improvements with the shuttle and bicycle facilities, showed minimal further shifts. Extensive urban design improvements beyond the bike lane were tested, and none of them had a measurable impact on mode choice. Researchers also asked whether the presence of pedestrians, cyclists, and other transit users in greater numbers would affect traveler’s perceptions and shift mode choices to transit and it was not found to be an effect.

IMPROVEMENTS TO PED CROSSINGS & RECTANGULAR RAPID-FLASHING BEACONS
-> Researchers reviewed recent literature and pedestrian crash data to identify trends in pedestrian safety and in the effectiveness of crossing treatments. They also conducted a closed-course study and an open-road study to determine what characteristics of rapid-flashing beacons affected drivers’ ability to detect people or objects, as well as drivers’ likelihood of yielding to a pedestrian. The statistical evaluation determined that the shape of the beacon did not have a significant effect on drivers’ responses. However, a driver is more than three times as likely to yield when a beacon has been activated as when it has not been activated. (Investigating Improvements to Pedestrian Crossings with an Emphasis on the Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacon: http://1.usa.gov/1XhVZ6k)


QUOTES R US

"As sharrows do not provide designated space for bicyclists and do not enhance the overall bicycle network, all cities should (as many already have) begin to consider sharrows simply as signage as opposed to actual infrastructure. It is time that sharrows are exposed for what they really are, a cheap alternative that not only fails to solve a pressing safety issue, but actually makes the issue worse through a sense of false security."
—Researchers Nicholas Ferenchak and Wesley Marshall in a study presented at TRB that found sharrows could increase the risk of injury. http://bit.ly/1LgoP06 [See Research section for details]

"There is a growing body of research and experience across the U.S., North America and the world demonstrating the effectiveness and desirability of protected bicycle lanes to encourage more bicycle transportation. It is also a key element of our Vision Zero strategy for people when riding bicycles. That is why I am asking our engineers, project managers and planners to make protected bicycle lanes the preferred design on roadways where separation is called for. I am asking for this design standard for retrofits of existing roadways as well as to new construction."
—Portland, OR Transportation Director Leah Treat in an internal memo announcing their new protected bike lanes policy. http://bit.ly/1La72Yl

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

ULTIMATE POST-INTERNATIONAL WINTER BIKE TO WORK DAY REWARD: A HOT TUB HAMMOCK
After a wildly successful Kickstarter campaign you can now order your own hot tub hammock. The Hydro Hammock can be used as a hammock, hammock hot tub, as hot tub liner, as a hammock water bed, and as a swimming pool. http://bit.ly/1HlSg4u


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

Webinar "Guidebook for Evaluating Pedestrian and Bicycle Performance Measures"
Date: February 11, 2016, 3:30 - 4:30 pm ET
Presenters: State DOT, Field Office, HQ, Local and MPO Practitioners
Host: FHWA
Details: http://1.usa.gov/1nSf0A0, free [Webinar full. Click to be added to waitlist]

Webinar "Release of online resource: The Scenic Route: Getting Started With Creative Placemaking in Transportation"
Date: February 17, 2016, 3:30 - 4:30 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Smart Growth America & Transportation for America
Details: http://bit.ly/1T7QVlP, free

Webinar "The New Federal Transportation Bill: What Does It Mean for the Walking Movement?"
Date: February 24, 2016, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: America Walks, Rails to Trails Conservancy & LOCUS
Details: http://bit.ly/20ns7FJ, free

Webinar "2016 Benchmarking Report Release"
Date: March 2, 2016, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Alliance for Biking and Walking
Details: http://bit.ly/1WbexnA, free

Webinar "Active Transportation & Anti-Displacement"
Date: March 10, 2016, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Alliance for Biking and Walking
Details: http://bit.ly/20IyNni, free

Webinar "Trails for Heroes: Healing our Military Veterans"
Date: March 24, 2016, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Jan Hancock (Hancock Resources LLC), Sirena Dufault (AZ Trail Assn), Debbi Fisher (Hope for Heroes Equine Therapy Consulting) , et al.
Host: American Trails
Details: http://bit.ly/1V2tUhS, $35 American Trails members / $55 nonmembers ($20 fee for CEU credit)

Webinar "Shared and Separated Off-street Paths"
Date: April 20, 2016, 3:00 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian & Bicycle Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/1K8NHLO, $50/site members, $85/site non-members

Webinar "Aspects of Equity"
Date: May 18, 2016, 3:00 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Host: Association of Pedestrian & Bicycle Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/23VSl6K, $50/site members, $85/site non-members


RESOURCES

NEW YORK CITY DA’S RARELY BRING CHARGES IN PED OR BIKE COLLISIONS
->As elected officials with extensive prosecutorial discretion and a prominent position, New York City’s district attorneys could establish a powerful deterrent against dangerous driving and change the culture on our streets. Unfortunately, the City’s D.A.s rarely bring charges after collisions caused by reckless, negligent and careless behavior, according to Transportation Alternatives’ report "Justice Denied: New York City’s District Attorneys Plead Out of Vision Zero" (http://bit.ly/1SfcEZ0)

After consulting with all five D.A.s’ offices over the course of six months, TransAlt researchers found that at least 10,000 motorists were prosecuted for driving while intoxicated in the past year, while fewer than 40 drivers were prosecuted for failing to yield to a pedestrian or bicyclist – even though failure to yield led to more than six times as many crashes as DWI. The City’s new Right of Way Law (Section 19-190) was used in only 3% of the 1,157 cases where it could have been applied. In 2015 about 4,000 New Yorkers had been killed or injured in hit-and-run crashes, but less than 1% of the drivers involved had been prosecuted. http://bit.ly/1T6bGgD

FACT SHEET: USING TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM
-> "Using the Transportation Alternatives Program to Improve Safety and Health in Your Community" (http://bit.ly/1Pke5Sd) helps communities understand how to use the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) to support healthy community design and active transportation. This fact sheet explains how TAP funding is allocated, how much money your state is expected to receive, and types of eligible projects that can be funded by TAP.

WALKING AS A PRACTICE FOR OTHER THAN TRANSPORTATION REPORT
-> "The Walking as a Practice: Walking for Health, Connection, Community or a Cause" report (http://bit.ly/1XhFwPu) outlines four categories that identify how individuals and organizations across the United States of America are engaging in the practice of walking for reasons other than transportation, and provides case study illustrations of each:

  • Personal Health and Connection
  • Motivational Campaigns and Workplace Wellness
  • Inward and Outward Journey
  • Causes and Social Justice. http://bit.ly/1o0ofii

STREETS AS PLACES RESOURCES
-> Check out Project for Public Spaces Streets as Places action items, case studies, suggestions, and ideas for individuals, communities, and governments to create better streets. http://bit.ly/1W3oBOC

SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL WORKSHOP & TRAINING CATALOG
-> Check out the Safe Routes to School National Partnership catalog of workshops and trainings on Safe Routes to School, shared use, active transportation, transportation finance, and community engagement. (2016 Safe Routes Learning Center: Workshop and Training Catalog: http://bit.ly/1V2Lgv9) They offer the workshops and trainings to organizations and communities through grant-funded programs and on a consulting services basis. http://bit.ly/23W9sWe


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 2016 Transportation Planning and Air Quality Conference, August 4 - 5, 2016, Minneapolis, MN.
Deadline: February 15, 2016, http://bit.ly/1O2gnRY

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - Youth Bike Summit, May 27-29, 2016, St. Paul, MN.
Deadline: February 12, 2016, http://bit.ly/1SisW1v

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - American Public Health Association Annual Meeting & Expo, October 29 - November 2, 2016, Denver, CO.
Deadline: February 22-26, 2016—dependent on section, http://bit.ly/1JIMsh0

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - Walk 21, October 3-7, 2016, Hong Kong.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1YO1Q87

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - Special issue of Journal of Transport and Health: Walking and Walkability: A Review of the Evidence on Health
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1PwcbQ4

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS — 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, November 16 - 19, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1KXYS8h

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - The 9th Making Cities Liveable Conference, June 27-28, 2016, Melbourne, Australia.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1ShOKf5

-> CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS - RECx Partners Outdoors 2016, June 1, 2016, Washington, DC.
Deadline: March 15, 2016, http://bit.ly/1SaKP4h

-> CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - American Recreation Coalition Great Outdoors Month Video Competition
Deadline: April 23, 2016, http://bit.ly/1lRLw3M

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> February 12, 2016, International Winter Bike to Work Day
http://bit.ly/1Q3AsPf
-> March 5 - 11, 2016 - Sustainable Trails Conference, Knoxville, TN
http://bit.ly/1SHSO9o
-> April 16 - 17, 2016 - International Cargo Bike Festival 2016, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
http://bit.ly/23Wvat2
-> September 13 - 21, 2016, 2016 Physical Activity and Public Health Courses, Columbia, SC.
http://bit.ly/1PNkXsW
-> February 8 -10, 2017, Winter Cycling Congress – Congrès sur le vélo d’hiver, Montréal, Canada.
http://bit.ly/20UzkPQ


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS - STRENGTHENING INCLUSIVE COORDINATED TRANSPORTATION PARTNERSHIPS TO PROMOTE COMMUNITY LIVING
The mission of the Transit Planning for All project, sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Community Living, is to demonstrate the value that inclusive processes can bring to transportation. The project announces the availability of funding for community-based demonstration programs. The purpose of this funding opportunity is to encourage development of an inclusive coordinated transportation system in which people with disabilities and older adults actively participate in both advisory and decision-making capacities. While the intention is the development of inclusionary processes and plans, the secondary expectation is that inclusion will result in identifiable and measurable changes in the transportation system that respond to the needs and preferences of older adults and people with disabilities.
Deadline: March 18, 2016, http://bit.ly/1nSeKRm

-> CALL FOR NOMINATIONS - COALITION FOR RECREATIONAL TRAILS ANNUAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS
The Annual Achievement Awards to recognize outstanding trail projects funded by the RTP will be presented on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. in June. CRT will encourage members of Congress to attend to help honor the outstanding achievements of their constituents.
Deadline: April 4, 2016, http://bit.ly/1TbItCc

-> CALL FOR NOMINATIONS – AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION AWARDS
Nominate a colleague who exemplifies outstanding contributions to preventing illness and injury to one of ten awards. Membership is not required for nomination to several of APHA’s awards. The awards will be presented at APHA’s 2016 Annual Meeting and Expo, Oct. 29–Nov. 2 in Denver.
Deadline: May 6, 2016, http://bit.ly/20nCl8U

-> JOB - BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN PLANNER, HENNEPIN COUNTY, MINNEAPOLIS, MN
The Bicycle and Pedestrian team is seeking a strategic, flexible, and creative thinker to join their team as a Bicycle and Pedestrian Planner. This position will carry out planning activities, technical analysis and assist in the implementation of the county's adopted bicycle and pedestrian transportation plans. Duties and responsibilities of this position include: working with Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator and Public Works staff to implement Hennepin County pedestrian and bicycle transportation plans and integrate with other county plans.
Deadline: February 19, 2016 by 5:00 pm CT, http://bit.ly/1V2FBFq

-> JOB - PLANNER II, ORANGE COUNTY, FL (RE-POSTED)
Orange County Transportation Planning Division (Orlando, FL) is seeking a Planner II to lead projects related to the County's new pedestrian safety initiative (including a Pedestrian/Bicycle Safety Action Plan), multimodal corridor planning, Complete Streets, and related initiatives. The Division has an interdisciplinary team that is actively engaged with state, regional, and local partners to promote multimodal transportation and to address Orlando’s pedestrian and bicyclist safety issues. This is a mid-level professional transportation planning position, which provides highly technical research assistance to the Planner III and Chief Planner. Under limited supervision, the position conducts research and analysis, generates reports, and manages and completes the work program elements of the respective section. This position also prepares and compiles information for formal planning presentations to various advisory boards and stakeholder groups.
Deadline: February 23, 2016, http://bit.ly/1M3HSOk

-> JOB - MANAGER GLOBAL PEDESTRIAN SAFETY, SAFE KIDS WORLDWIDE
As a member of the Global Road Safety team, the manager will plan, develop and implement the international pedestrian safety program in collaboration with the chief program officer, corporate sponsors and Global Network member representatives. Collaborate in the future development of the global road safety program and provide oversight and direction to the supporting departments in order to meet program goals. Performs the program evaluation analysis and presents recommendations for program improvements. Promotes the participation of Global Network countries and other appropriate groups in the annual program. Serves as the liaison between the Safe Kids member countries, Safe Kids headquarters staff, and sponsor. Networks with other road safety agencies, associations and professionals to further enhance the program content. Domestic and international travel required.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/1X8TLq1

-> JOB - EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NEIGHBORHOOD BIKE WORKS, PHILADELPHIA, PA
Neighborhood Bike Works (NBW), a nonprofit organization, seeks a full time Executive Director to oversee, develop, and inspire a collaborative vision for NBW’s youth and adult programs while also managing NBW’s fundraising and administrative systems. In 2016, NBW will build on recent growth and a successful relocation to a new community shop and bike education hub. NBW will also celebrate 20 years of using bikes as the hook to engage youth in positive out of school time activities. By learning bike mechanics and exploring the city by bike, young people at NBW build life skills and healthy habits, and gain leadership experience. Based in West Philadelphia, we primarily serve youth of color from low-income communities. In addition to our youth programs, NBW provides a DIY bicycle workshop space for adults as well as community outreach programs to promote cycling.
Deadline: None provided—job to begin in May, http://bit.ly/20KerKk

-> JOB - EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, QUEEN CITY BIKE, CINCINNATI, OH
Queen City Bike, the bicycle advocacy organization for Greater Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky and Southeast Indiana, is seeking a part-time Executive Director (average 30 hours/week). The Executive Director represents QCB to the public, local businesses and government agencies in many ways: leading presentations, setting up events, hands-on instruction for children and adults, participating with other groups, gathering success stories from bike advocacy groups around the country, and managing established programs like Bike Month. The ED for Queen City Bike is the champion for a healthy, active, environmentally responsible lifestyle as a direct benefit tied to Greater Cincinnati’s bicycling movement.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/1ETF8Su

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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