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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#403 Wednesday, February 24, 2016

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- $500M in TIGER Grants. Applications Due April 29
----- A Sidewalk Isn’t Enough
----- Snow Removal & Wheelchair Users
----- Clearing Snow from Protected Bike Lanes
----- Germany’s New Bike Highway
----- Copenhagen: Intelligent Signals to Reduce Cyclist Travel Time 10%
----- NHTSA Early Estimate of 2015 Traffic Fatalities
----- 13 Books Re How to Fight for & Build People-First Cities
----- European Employer Bike Commuting Promotion Tools
----- Comment on Draft National Physical Activity Plan
----- Registration Open for 5th Annual Bike to School Day Events

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- FY 2016 TAP & RTP Apportionments by State
----- Bicycle Friendly Businesses Named
----- Philadelphia, PA: New Mayor Bike Lane & Complete Streets Pledge
----- Story Map Documents Walkability On The Wasatch Front
----- Rural Iola, KS Passes Complete Streets Policy
----- San Diego, CA: Draft Downtown Mobility Plan
----- Arlington County, VA Bike Parking Tools

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- City Cyclists Net Significant Retail Spending
----- Review of 5 Active Transportation Surveillance Systems
----- More Bike Infrastructure, More Bike Commuters
----- New Infrastructure Changes Commute Mode Improves Health
----- Bike Score®, Urban Bikeability & Cycling Behavior
----- Student Transit Pass: Educational, Economic, Societal Benefits
----- Active Travel to & from School: Parent & Child Perceptions

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Creative Placemaking in Transportation online guide
----- Testing New Technology to Prevent Ped-Bus Crashes
----- London Considers More Bike-Friendly Truck Design
----- NHTSA Crash Quick Facts 2014
----- Barriers & Opportunities for 2-Year & 4-Year STEM Degrees
----- Small Town Smart Growth Economic Development Strategy Tool
----- Bikesharing in Europe, the Americas, and Asia
----- Guiding Principles for the Sustainability of Age-Friendly Community Efforts
----- Conductive Concrete Can De-ice Itself
----- Cement Alternative: Cheaper, Stronger & Quicker to Install

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

$500M IN TIGER GRANTS. APPLICATIONS DUE APRIL 29
-> U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx announced $500 million for transportation projects across the country under an eighth round of the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) competitive grant program. Like the first seven rounds, FY 2016 TIGER discretionary grants will fund capital investments in surface transportation infrastructure and will be awarded on a competitive basis for projects that will have a significant impact on the nation, a metropolitan area, or a region. The deadline for applications is April 29, 2016. http://bit.ly/20UeY7i

A SIDEWALK ISN’T ENOUGH
-> For decades, we’ve convinced ourselves that a sidewalk is good enough- that if we build a sidewalk, we’ve met the pedestrian’s needs. The truth is that a sidewalk is just the first step in meeting those needs. When we build a sidewalk that is sandwiched between a 40 mph street and a parking lot, we invite humans into a world designed for fast-moving machines, and most people aren’t comfortable with such an awkward invitation… Imagine if we could provide a score and standards for how attractive the walk environment is along a street. What if we scored the walkability of streets and flagged the blocks that are below an acceptable standard? We’d create the impetus for investment in the walkability of the street. We could also highlight blocks that score well so that others could use them as an example.

Measuring Urban Design: Metrics for Livable Places (http://bit.ly/1OueEoA) outlines a procedure for quantifying the urban design, and therefore, the walkability of a street. This methodology breaks urban design into five elements that have been proven to impact one’s willingness to walk: Imageability, Enclosure, Human Scale, Transparency, and Complexity. Each of these elements is measured, rated, and aggregated into an overall urban design score for the block. http://bit.ly/1mPz2uc

[See “Story Map Documents Walkability On The Wasatch Front” item in the Regional and Local Actions sections for one region’s use of the Measuring Urban Design: Metrics for Livable Places methodology.]

SNOW REMOVAL & WHEELCHAIR USERS
-> Parts of a city’s infrastructure are critical to the mobility of wheelchair users, but are often forgotten in the midst of chaotic cleanup efforts after a major snowstorm. Curb cuts and pedestrian ramps, for instance, are the only points of entry for a wheelchair onto a sidewalk. But even when these areas are shoveled after a storm, snowplows often pile the snow back on, once more prohibiting wheelchair access. http://bit.ly/1V6AOmy

[See also Effective Snow Removal for Pathways and Transit Stops and an Update from the Easter Seals http://bit.ly/1QbYJgJ.]

CLEARING SNOW FROM PROTECTED BIKE LANES
-> Most protected bike lanes are too narrow for standard street snowplows. In researching the best equipment to use for clearing snow from protected bike lanes PeopleForBikes staff found winters are so different from city to city there is no single set of equipment they could recommend for most cities. See their equipment descriptions, recommendations for snow clearance service plans, and other lessons from their research. http://bit.ly/1Qvm9gF

GERMANY’S NEW BIKE HIGHWAY
-> Last November, politicians, environmentalists, and bicycling enthusiasts gathered in Mülheim in Germany’s Ruhr Valley to open the first 11 kilometers (7 miles) of a planned 100-kilometer biking highway that will run from Hamm to Duisburg. Thirteen feet wide and reserved exclusively for cyclists, the bike highway, dubbed RS1, will pass through cities, suburbs, farmland, and industrial areas, and connect four major universities, with part of its path following an abandoned railway line. The bike thoroughfare will also parallel a major highway, the A40. http://bit.ly/1OtSvXx

COPENHAGEN: INTELLIGENT SIGNALS TO REDUCE CYCLIST TRAVEL TIME 10%
-> Copenhagen will reportedly replace 380 traffic signals with intelligent lights that will prioritize the flow of buses and bicycles over cars at intersections. The sophisticated signals are expected to cut travel times for transit riders by 5 and 20 percent, and for cyclists by 10 percent. Copenhagenize sees the move as the latest effort in a larger paradigm shift away from car-first transport policy. Many signal corridors are already timed for bicycle “green waves”—a series of lights synchronized so riders don’t hit a red if they maintain a certain speed. http://bit.ly/1Q4zAEP

NHTSA EARLY ESTIMATE OF 2015 TRAFFIC FATALITIES
-> The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first nine months of 2015 shows that an estimated 26,000 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes, up 9.3% compared to the first nine months of 2014. http://1.usa.gov/1oEmBmN

13 BOOKS RE HOW TO FIGHT FOR & BUILD PEOPLE-FIRST CITIES

  1. -> Chris Hamilton recommends 13 books showing how to fight for and build people-first cities. “Start-up City – Inspiring Public and Private Entrepreneurship, Getting Projects Done and Having Fun” by Gabe Klein
  2. “Streetfight – Handbook for an Urban Revolution” by Janette Sadik-Khan (to be released March 8)
  3. “Happy City – Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design” by Charles Montgomery
  4. “Walkable City – How Downtown Can Save America One Step at a Time” by Jeff Speck
  5. “Bikenomics – How Bicycling Can Save the Economy” by Elly Blue... http://bit.ly/1T5ORLV

EUROPEAN EMPLOYER BIKE COMMUTING PROMOTION TOOLS
-> Several employers all over Europe have already been active in promoting cycling as a way of commuting to work among their employees. Check out the kind of campaigns did they use, and how they make cycling to work economically attractive. http://bit.ly/1TyeXFI

COMMENT ON DRAFT NATIONAL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PLAN
-> The National Physical Activity Plan Alliance calls for Public Comment on the draft revision of the National Physical Activity Plan. Comments are made via a survey format and are due by February 26, 2016. http://bit.ly/10Mrn5x

REGISTRATION OPEN FOR 5TH ANNUAL BIKE TO SCHOOL DAY EVENTS
-> Join tens of thousands of children, parents, school officials and community leaders nationwide on May 4th for National Bike to School Day. Bike to School Day is a national event that gives communities across the country the opportunity to join together in bicycling - or walking - to school on the same day. The national event is part of the movement for year-round safe routes to school and invites communities to explore bicycling to school as a healthy way for kids and families to make their school commute. Register your Bike to School event: http://bit.ly/15PtJyo. http://bit.ly/1STlhJ2


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

FY 2016 TAP & RTP APPORTIONMENTS BY STATE
-> Check out the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) FY 2016 Apportionments by state. TAP funds are available for the "current" plus 3 fiscal years. In a specific fiscal year, a State may obligate funds apportioned in the current and up to three previous fiscal years. The obligations in a specific fiscal year may range from negative amounts (if a State deobligated more than it obligated in that fiscal year), to significantly more than the apportionments (if a State obligates funds from prior fiscal years). http://1.usa.gov/1XLLFUp

Check out the FY 2016 Recreational Trails Program apportionment by state (except for Connecticut which opted out of the RTP set-aside): http://1.usa.gov/1SSF8Ie.

[See the March APBP webinar, "Understanding the Funding Process,” on March 16: http://bit.ly/20r4det.]

BICYCLE FRIENDLY BUSINESSES NAMED
-> The U.S. Department of State and a two-person pipe organ repair company are among the 73 new and renewing Bicycle Friendly Businesses (http://bit.ly/1QcgkoR) recognized by the League of American Bicyclists. There are now 1,132 Bicycle Friendly Businesses (BFBs) in 49 states and the District of Columbia (http://bit.ly/1QcgkoR). The next call for applications deadline is March 31, 2016 (http://bit.ly/1LbHH5B).

PHILADELPHIA, PA: NEW MAYOR BIKE LANE & COMPLETE STREETS PLEDGE
-> Philadelphia's new Mayor Jim Kenney pledged to build 30 miles of protected bike lanes in the next five years. This would be more protected bike lanes than any city but New York has currently built, enough to once again place Philly clearly among the nation's leaders for comfortable biking streets. Earlier this month, he announced the creation of the city's first Office of Complete Streets. The new commissioner of that office will be tasked with executing Kenney's campaign pledge to "break down silos and coordinate services amongst departments, such as streets, water, and police." (See the Infrastructure and Transportation section of the Mayor’s transition report for more details: http://1.usa.gov/1KJKK5f) http://bit.ly/1QvMstc

STORY MAP DOCUMENTS WALKABILITY ON THE WASATCH FRONT
-> Wasatch Front Regional Council (WFRC) created a story map (Walkability & Measuring Urban Street Design: http://arcg.is/1XMhjRQ) based on the methodology described in the book “Measuring Urban Design: Metrics for Livable Places” to document the walkability of over 1,200 blocks along most of the Wasatch Front. The story map tool is part of the implementation phase of the WFRC’s Wasatch Choice vision which builds off of the Wasatch 2040 plan. The story map identifies gaps in walkability while raising awareness of the benefits of active pedestrian nodes. It helps “people see where the walkable areas are and quantify why they are walkable.” The WFRC team hopes that the story map tool helps communities plan ways that improve air quality by reducing traffic congestion and prioritizing funding that promotes walking while helping steer cities away from investments that encourage car dependency. http://bit.ly/1QzbOGp

RURAL IOLA, KS PASSES COMPLETE STREETS POLICY
-> Iola just became the ninth city in Kansas to enact a Complete Streets policy (http://bit.ly/1QCRnIN) and is by far the smallest and most rural of the communities to embrace Complete Streets (population: 5,613). Its new Complete Streets Policy put into writing the standards and practices that the city was already following voluntarily. It passed unanimously. http://bit.ly/1p3avTY

[Note: nearly 900 complete streets policies have passed in the US, and the National Complete Streets Coalition has read them all. Stay tuned for their report describing the best policies of 2015: http://bit.ly/1mhxVUM]

SAN DIEGO, CA: DRAFT DOWNTOWN MOBILITY PLAN
-> The City of San Diego’s draft Downtown Mobility Plan (http://bit.ly/1Ousg3p) outlines a network laden with protected bike lanes, pedestrian greenways, curb bulb-outs, road diets and more. If the plan can make it from concept to construction, it will remake the city core for biking and walking. http://bit.ly/24nsogM

ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA BIKE PARKING TOOLS
-> End-of-trip and home-storage bike parking facilities encourage bicycling for both commuting and recreation. A 2012 Virginia Tech study of commuters in the Washington, D.C., region found those with access to bicycle parking at work were more than 1.5 times more likely to commute by bike than those without. That figure jumps to more than 4.5 times as likely to commute by bike if the parking is paired with shower and locker facilities. (Determinants of bicycle commuting in the Washington, DC region: The Role of Bicycle Parking, Cyclist Showers, and Free Car Parking at Work: http://bit.ly/1T6q8Xy)

Arlington County, VA recently released two complementary documents – its 2016 update to the Arlington Virginia Bicycle Parking Standards (http://bit.ly/1PANihq) and Management of Secure Bicycle Parking (http://bit.ly/1KJGSkD)– to help those involved in commercial development create successful bicycle storage for residents and employees. http://bit.ly/1RhvjQQ


THE RESEARCH BEAT

CITY CYCLISTS NET SIGNIFICANT RETAIL SPENDING
->Promoting cycling within cities can generate significant revenue gains for local businesses. According to a new study by the European Cycling Federation (Shopping by Bike: Best Friend of your City Centre: Cycling and Local Economies: http://bit.ly/1Qbqcz8), European cyclists spend an impressive 111 billion euros ($122.23B) in retail every year and if the share of cycling was doubled, this would create 28 billion euros ($30.83B) of additional revenues for city centers, towns and villages all over Europe.

REVIEW OF 5 ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS
-> Five surveillance systems assess one or more components of active transportation. The “American Community Survey” and the “National Household Travel Survey” (NHTS) both assess the mode of transportation to work in the past week. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who reported walking or bicycling to work can be calculated. NHTS and the “American Time Use Survey” include 1-day assessments of trips or activities. With that information, the proportion of respondents who report any walking or bicycling for transportation can be calculated. The “National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey” and the “National Health Interview Survey” both assess recent (i.e., in the past week or past month) habitual physical activity behaviors, including those performed during active travel. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who report any recent habitual active transportation can be calculated.

Differences in construct definition and assessment technique resulted in widely discrepant prevalence estimates. The results in this report (Active Transportation Surveillance — United States, 1999–2012: http://1.usa.gov/1QOIS7M) suggest that the prevalence of active transportation varies by a factor of 10, based on the definition of the active transportation construct being assessed. Active transportation initiatives, such as Safe Routes to Schools and Complete Streets could use active transportation surveillance data to identify areas where these programs have had the greatest effect and identify best practices for others to follow.

MORE BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE, MORE BIKE COMMUTERS
-> “Bicycle Commuting and Facilities in Major U.S. Cities: If You Build Them, Commuters Will Use Them” (http://bit.ly/1Qbnud5) affirms that cities with higher levels of bicycle infrastructure (lanes and paths) witnessed higher levels of bicycle commuting. This study analyzed data from 43 large cities across the United States. This cross-sectional analysis improves on previous research by including a larger sample of cities, not including predominantly college towns, and using consistent data from the Bureau of the Census 2000 Supplemental Survey.

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE CHANGES COMMUTE MODE, IMPROVES HEALTH
-> “Changes in Mode of Travel to Work: A Natural Experimental Study of New Transport Infrastructure” (http://bit.ly/1WFxxLn) studied the effect of a major transport infrastructure project on commuters’ mode of travel, trip frequency and distance travelled to work. Researchers found new transport infrastructure promoted an increase in the share of commuting trips involving active travel and a decrease in the share made entirely by car. Further analysis will show the extent to which the changes in commute mode share were translated into an increase in time spent in active commuting and consequent health gain.

BIKE SCORE®, URBAN BIKEABILITY & CYCLING BEHAVIOR
-> “Bike Score®: Associations between Urban Bikeability and Cycling Behavior in 24 Cities” (http://bit.ly/24ozOQO) reports the new Bike Score index predicts some of the variability in cycling to work mode share, and can be used for research with similar utility to the popular Walk Score metric. Given the demonstrated significant and meaningful association across neighborhoods in diverse US and Canadian cities, Bike Score may be a valuable tool to aid with research and with planning for bicycle infrastructure and increasing bicycle mode in large studies. Further, this city-specific analyses showed some city level variation, suggesting that studies within a city should further investigate the suitability of this score and its component scores for their setting.

STUDENT TRANSIT PASS: EDUCATIONAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIETAL BENEFITS
-> In August 2013, all transportation-eligible Minneapolis high school students began using public transportation instead of yellow school buses under the Go-To Student Pass Program. The program, a partnership between Metro Transit and Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS), enables students to take unlimited rides on regular-route buses and light rail from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily during the school year. A just-released analysis of the program (Assessing the Impacts of Student Transportation on City Buses and Trains: http://bit.ly/1WHUvBE) documents a range of benefits—from better student attendance to financial savings to reduced vehicle mileage and emissions. http://bit.ly/1Rmfecx

ACTIVE TRAVEL TO & FROM SCHOOL: PARENT & CHILD PERCEPTIONS
-> “Stranger Danger, Cell Phones, Traffic, and Active Travel to and from Schools: Perceptions of Parents and Children” (http://bit.ly/1Tycvip) examined active travel modes, such as walking and bicycling, to and from school via parent and middle school student interviews. Analysis of qualitative data showed differences in adult versus child perceptions and the emergence of several themes related to the environment and children’s capacity for independence.


QUOTES R US

“In the transportation context, creative placemaking is an approach that deeply engages the arts, culture, and creativity — especially from underrepresented communities — in planning and designing projects so that the resulting communities better reflect and celebrate local culture, heritage and values.”
—From “The Scenic Route: Getting Started with Creative Placemaking in Transportation” online tool recently released by Transportation for America, http://bit.ly/1Twnfh4

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

ULTIMATE COMMUTERS PARACHUTED INTO ENEMY TERRITORY W/ FOLDING BIKES
During World War II, British and Canadian paratroopers leapt out of airplanes behind enemy lines wearing parachutes and clutching specially made 23-pound folding bikes. Great photos. http://bit.ly/1Q7NpCm

NOW FOR A DIFFERENT KIND OF FOLDING BIKE
The Salamander Bicycle Stroller is a 7-speed, child-carrying bicycle that transforms into a stroller or back to a bike again in mere seconds—without moving the children. See the video for a demonstration of the quick conversion back and forth, and for a demonstration of the cargo bike/delivery cart version. http://bit.ly/1OrMJ8R


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

Call "Tapping into Youth Energy”
Date: February 25 2016, 3:00 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Mark Nahorney (Univ. of New England), Andrew Cimonetti (Univ. of VT student) & Ali Lightfoot (KVNF-Radio)
Host: Orton Family Foundation
Details: http://bit.ly/1UlUVyW, free

Webinar "Smart Strategies to Transform Commercial Districts”
Date: February 26, 2016, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Elizabeth Demetriou & Terry Benelli (LISC), Sandy Salzman (New Kensington CDC), Larisa Ortiz & Joel Bookman (MetroEdge)
Host: Smart Growth Network, LISC
Details: http://bit.ly/1KJoKYe, free

Webinar "A Sampling of Winter Maintenance Best Practices in Europe"
Date: February 29, 2016, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Martin Thomson (Transport Scotland), Kai Rune Lysbakken (Norwegian Public Roads Administration) & Dagfin Gryteselv (Norwegian Public Roads Administration)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1Qb0pal, free for TRB affiliates, $89 for others

Webinar "Fostering Livability on Commercial Highways and Arterial Streets"
Date: March 3, 2016, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Jack Ecklund (University Place, WA), Danny Pleasant (Charlotte, NC) & Rodney Vaughn (FHWA)
Host: Federal Highway Administration, Project for Public Spaces, & Sevatec
Details: http://bit.ly/1Qxkp6q, free, request an account to register by March 2 if outside USDOT

Webinar "Tactical Urbanism"
Date: March 8, 2016, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Anthony Garcia & Eric Katz (The Street Plans Collaborative)
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/1XLUZI5, free

Webinar "Innovation and NonTraditional (Transportation) Librarianship”
Date: March 10, 2016, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Steve Hanson (WA DOT)
Host: USDOT
Details: http://1.usa.gov/1oAngVz, free

Webinar "The Transportation Librarians Roundtable 100th Session!”
Date: April 14, 2016, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Miguel Figueroa (American Library Association)
Host: USDOT
Details: http://1.usa.gov/1oAngVz, free


RESOURCES

CREATIVE PLACEMAKING IN TRANSPORTATION ONLINE GUIDE
-> “The Scenic Route: Getting Started with Creative Placemaking in Transportation” online guide introduces creative placemaking to transportation planners, public works agencies and local elected officials who are on the front lines of advancing transportation projects. Creative placemaking harnesses the power of arts and culture to allow for more genuine public engagement — particularly in low-income neighborhoods, communities of color and among immigrant populations — in the development of transportation projects. Done right, creative placemaking can lead to both a better process and a better product, in this case integrating community-inspired art into the ultimate design of the project as so many of the case studies in this guide demonstrate. http://bit.ly/1Twnfh4

TESTING NEW TECHNOLOGY TO PREVENT PED-BUS CRASHES
-> Many of pedestrian-transit bus crashes involve left-turning bus operators reporting not seeing pedestrians in the crosswalk. The support pillar and the location of the rear-view mirror create a blind spot on the driver’s side of a transit bus. Transit agencies in Washington State are working with new technology developed by the firm Mobileye that detects the presence of pedestrians and warns the bus driver before a crash occurs. Information from this test can help improve bus safety nationwide. http://bit.ly/1UlSIU0

LONDON CONSIDERS MORE BIKE-FRIENDLY TRUCK DESIGN
-> Out of eight bikers killed in collisions with vehicles in London last year, all but one collided with a truck. But London’s transportation agency says a relatively simple design addition to trucks could help reduce the number of cyclists hit by truck drivers: require trucks to have large, glass panels along their side doors, to give truck drivers a “panoramic” view of the road. http://bit.ly/1LFutc9

NHTSA CRASH QUICK FACTS 2014
-> Check out NHTSA’s Quick Facts 2014 related to motor vehicle and pedestrian crashes, fatalities and injuries. http://1.usa.gov/1LFjCiE

BARRIERS & OPPORTUNITIES FOR 2-YEAR & 4-YEAR STEM DEGREES
-> “Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways” reviews research on the roles that people, processes, and institutions play in 2-and 4-year STEM degree production. The study notes the factors that influence students’ decisions to enter, stay in, or leave science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors—quality of instruction, grading policies, course sequences, undergraduate learning environments, student supports, co-curricular activities, students’ general academic preparedness and competence in science, family background, and governmental and institutional policies that affect STEM educational pathways. http://bit.ly/1QesQrs

SMALL TOWN SMART GROWTH ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY TOOL
-> A new U.S. EPA report, “Framework for Creating a Smart Growth Economic Development Strategy: A Tool for Small Cities and Towns,” provides a step-by-step guide for small- and mid-size cities to develop an economic growth strategy, including through addressing the available transportation options. http://1.usa.gov/1mWpwWc

BIKESHARING IN EUROPE, THE AMERICAS, AND ASIA
-> “Bikesharing in Europe, the Americas, and Asia: Past, Present, and Future” (http://bit.ly/1PYmuv5) reports bikesharing has grown across the globe on five continents since 1965: Europe, North America, South America, Asia, and Australia. Today, approximately 100 bikesharing programs are operating in an estimated 125 cities.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR THE SUSTAINABILITY OF AGE-FRIENDLY COMMUNITY EFFORTS
-> How do we build on the age-friendly community movement's successes to date and accelerate sustainable progress at local, state, national, and international levels? Grantmakers In Aging (GIA) brought together national and international leaders to explore a variety of issues related to the concept and to its sustainability. Through key informant interviews, focus groups, and a two-day leadership summit held in September 2015 in Washington, DC, the authors of the Guiding Principles for the Sustainability of Age-Friendly Community Efforts report distilled best practices in sustainable age-friendly communities work. http://bit.ly/1Qc1GOo

CONDUCTIVE CONCRETE CAN DE-ICE ITSELF
-> Researchers at the University of Nebraska have developed an augmented concrete that can de-ice itself. The material is made by adding a small amount of steel shavings and carbon particles to the concrete mix, making it conductive enough to carry an electrical charge. It is due to be tested by the FAA next March and if successful, will potentially be used at airports. [How about bike lanes?] http://bit.ly/1QaKrCD

CEMENT ALTERNATIVE: CHEAPER, STRONGER & QUICKER TO INSTALL
-> Cortex is an easily transportable alternative to cement, in the form of rollable concrete sheets that are activated by water. Cortex is a comprised of four layers. On top is a water soluble fabric, which holds the cement in place during installation. Beneath this is the proprietary cement mix. Next there is a framework of 3D matting, and finally, a water-proof membrane. The combination makes it twice as strong as average concrete while using less material. The material comes rolled up, which saves on transportation costs. Once it has been laid out, water is added, causing the cement mix to form a gel and lock in place before setting. Cortex costs $4.50 per square foot, $2 less than normal concrete. http://bit.ly/20OwE9K


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - Walk 21, October 3-7, 2016, Hong Kong.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1YO1Q87

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - Special issue of Journal of Transport and Health: Walking and Walkability: A Review of the Evidence on Health
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1PwcbQ4

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS — 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, November 16 - 19, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1KXYS8h

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - The 9th Making Cities Liveable Conference, June 27-28, 2016, Melbourne, Australia.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1ShOKf5

-> CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS - RECx Partners Outdoors 2016, June 1, 2016, Washington, DC.
Deadline: March 15, 2016, http://bit.ly/1SaKP4h

-> CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS - 9th Annual Growing Sustainable Communities Conference, October 4-5, 2016, Dubuque, IA.
Deadline: March 15, 2016, http://bit.ly/1VDHJUx

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 2016 Urban and Regional Information Systems Association GIS and Health Symposium, June 1-3, 2016, Washington, DC.
Deadline: March 15, 2016, http://bit.ly/1VDKVPZ

-> Call for Speakers - Rail~Volution 2016, October 9-12, 2016, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA.
Deadline: March 24, 2016, http://bit.ly/1KJrswL

-> CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - American Recreation Coalition Great Outdoors Month Video Competition
Deadline: April 23, 2016, http://bit.ly/1lRLw3M

-> CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - Student Video Competition (Cash Prizes), Transportation and Communities Summit, September 8-9, 2016, Portland, OR.
Deadline: June 15, 2016 by 7:00 PM ET, http://bit.ly/1ST7xy3

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> June 1-3, 2016 - 2016 Urban and Regional Information Systems Association GIS and Health Symposium, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1ST9tX5
-> September 8-9, 2016, 2016 Transportation and Communities Summit, Portland, OR.
http://bit.ly/1OubLnQ
-> October 4-5, 2016, 9th Annual Growing Sustainable Communities Conference, Dubuque, IA.
http://bit.ly/1DfsQyk


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: US DOT TIGER DISCRETIONARY GRANTS
The FY 2016 Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) competitive grant program offers $500 million for transportation projects across the country. These discretionary grants will fund capital investments in surface transportation infrastructure and will be awarded on a competitive basis for projects that will have a significant impact on the nation, a metropolitan area, or a region. The grant program will focus on capital projects that generate economic development and improve access to reliable, safe and affordable transportation for communities, both urban and rural.
Deadline: April 29, 2016, http://1.usa.gov/1LFmYCe

-> JOB - PROJECT COORDINATOR/PEDESTRIAN COORDINATOR, AUSTIN, TX
The Austin Transportation Department (ATD) seeks a talented Project Coordinator / Pedestrian Coordinator to lead policy implementation, project development, planning efforts and programs related to active transportation, with a focus on pedestrian initiatives. The ideal candidate is passionate about active transportation and has an in-depth understanding of best practices inurban design and transportation.
Deadline: February 29, 2016, http://bit.ly/1OocGpQ

-> JOB - RFT BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN COORDINATOR, BLOOMINGTON, IN
This position serves as Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator for the City of Bloomington and the Bloomington/Monroe County Metropolitan Planning Organization (BMCMPO), with primary responsibility for the development and implementation of bicycle and pedestrian transportation plans, projects and programs.
Deadline: March 1, 2016 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/20OauiF

-> JOB - CLIMATE PROGRAM OFFICER, MOBILITY; BARR FOUNDATION, BOSTON, MA
Founded in 1997, the Boston-based Barr Foundation is one of the largest private foundations in New England, with assets of more than $1.6 billion and combined grantmaking to date of $700 million. Barr made a five-year commitment to help Boston and Massachusetts accelerate efforts to reach emissions’ reductions goals, emphasizing energy, transportation, and land use. The Barr Foundation is seeking a program officer to work within the Mobility focus area of its Climate Program. The goal of the Mobility focus area is to reduce transportation-related emissions by: (1) modernizing our transportation system, and (2) accelerating the development of low-carbon communities. Since 2010, the Foundation has been instrumental in strengthening the advocacy community, supporting research, and advancing policy in pursuit of sustainable transportation and smart growth in the region.
Deadline: March 1, 2016, http://bit.ly/1TC4Alx

-> JOB - ENGINEER-STATE BIKE/PED COORDINATOR, IL DOT, SPRINGFIELD, IL
The Illinois Department of Transportation seeks a civil engineer (Active license as an Illinois PE required) to serve as the state bike/ped coordinator. This position is accountable for the development, implementation, and interpretation of the engineering policies which govern the design of bicycle and pedestrian facilities. Implementation of policy is accomplished through revisions of the Bureau of Design & Environment Manual and by teaching/hosting courses on bicycle and pedestrian design. This position is also accountable for the management of the Recreational Trails Program and state-sponsored trail projects funded by the Illinois Transportation Enhancement / Transportation Alternatives Program.
Deadline: March 4, 2016 by 4:30 pm CT, http://1.usa.gov/1Lb1Cld

-> JOB - BICYCLE PROGRAM COORDINATOR, UNIVERSITY OF NC WILMINGTON
The Bicycle Coordinator responsibilities include: administer and coordinate bicycle related transportation activities along with building internal and external partnerships, and managing associated projects; promote and encourages bicycling as a mode of transportation on campus; advocate for the rights and responsibilities of campus bicyclists; and assist in the development and updating of the campus bicycle master plan in conjunction with the University’s Multi-Modal Transportation Plan.
Deadline: March 4, 2016, http://bit.ly/1RVDqoo

-> JOB - FAMILIES FOR SAFE STREETS ORGANIZER, TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES, NEW YORK, NY
In 2014, Transportation Alternatives partnered with families impacted by traffic violence to form Families for Safe Streets (FSS). This new TransAlt project gives New Yorkers who have lost loved ones or been injured in traffic crashes the opportunity to receive support services as well as to channel their grief into action. The FSS Organizer will play a critical role in supporting existing FSS members, growing the group by reaching other New Yorkers impacted by traffic violence, and coordinating new support service activities. We seek a motivated, energetic person with experience in community organizing who understands the power that building a membership like this can have on policy and culture change. Applicants should be familiar with current local and state politics, have experience in political and/or community organizing and have a strong affinity for the mission of Transportation Alternatives.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/1oWDglq

-> JOB - PROGRAM ASSOCIATE, SMART GROWTH AMERICA, WASHINGTON, DC
Smart Growth America is seeking an enthusiastic candidate to support the work of several programs, including the Local Leaders Council, the National Transit-Oriented Development Technical Assistance Program, and other community technical assistance programs. The work will especially be focused on coordinating peer networks of local government officials. There is also an administrative component related to grants management.
Deadline: Applications accepted on a rolling basis until position filled, http://bit.ly/1oGBxRt

-> 2 JOBS – BIKEWALKKC, KANSAS CITY, KS (POSSIBLE RELOCATION ASSISTANCE)

COMMUNITY PLANNING MANAGER
BikeWalkKC is seeking a planner to ensure the success of several neighborhood-scale planning projects and manage ongoing efforts to design a better built environment for walking and bicycling. They are looking for a person with technical expertise in community planning, active transportation, public and institutional policy, and geographic information systems. Deadline
Deadline: Open until filled (posted February 19), http://bit.ly/1QCvSYy

COMMUNITY MOBILIZATION MANAGER
BikeWalkKC is in search of a Community Mobilization Manager to oversee grass roots community outreach efforts who will also ensure that equity and inclusion are central to their ongoing activities. They are looking for a person with extensive experience and expertise in community organizing and outreach, public policy, and public health outcomes.
Deadline: Open until filled (posted February 19), http://bit.ly/21exA7p

-> JOB - COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT MANAGER, LOCAL MOTION, BURLINGTON, VT
The Community Engagement Manager is Local Motion’s lead for building and activating a statewide network of relationships with community partners and local advocates. The Community Engagement Manager’s core responsibility is to build the capacity of local groups and individuals across Vermont to promote and advocate for walking and biking in their communities.
Deadline: Open until filled, interview begin the week of February 22, 2016, http://bit.ly/1STbpz5

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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Editor Emeritus & Founding Editor: John Williams
Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston

Contributors: AASHTO Daily Transportation Update; Active Transport for Cities; AJPH; Alliance for Biking & Walking: People Discussion Group; Michael Andersen; Ed Barsotti; Aria Bendix; Jay Bennett; Bike Walk Montana News & Notes; BioMed Central; Building Salt Lake; CTS Catalyst; CityLab; Josh Cohen; Laura Dierenfield; The Direct Transfer Daily; Mary Ebeling; ECF General Newsletter; environment 360; Fast Lane; gizmag; Charles Green; @ChrisRHamilton; Healthy Community Design News; H+T--Friends Digest; Eric Jaffe; Kansas Cyclist; Jon Larsen; Mobility Lab Express; Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; National Center for Safe Routes to School; Next City; Nick Lavars; PeopleFor Bikes; Popular Mechanics; Public Health Newswire; Isaac Riddle; Randy Rasa; Eric Rogers; Michael Ryan; Christian Schwägerl; Simply Hired; Smart Growth Information Clearinghouse; Springwise; State Smart Transportation Initiative; Strong Towns; Thrive Allen County; Teresa Townsend; Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board; TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter; -Jason Van Driesche; Robbie Webber; Meghan Winters & Big Mama Thorton.


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