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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#408 Wednesday, May 4, 2016

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Program Sneak Peak: 2016 Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place
----- USDOT National Performance Management Measures & Reactions
----- Call for Response: Women Cycling Survey 2016
----- First-Hand Lessons from Denmark for US DOT Secty. Foxx + 3 Mayors
----- Amsterdam to Appoint Bike Mayor
----- Paris Introduces Car-Free Sundays
----- Countering Falling Fuel Tax Revenue with Mileage Fees
----- Getting Bike Share Equity Right
----- How to Make Cities Healthier Places to Live
----- Happy Bike to School Day!

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- Boston Budget Invests in Vision Zero Plan
----- Boston Considers Lowering Speed Limit to 20 MPH
----- CT Senate: $500 Fine for Drivers Hitting Peds & Bikes in Crosswalks
----- Free National Summer Transportation Institute Career Camps
----- Virtual Bike Route Scouts in San Mateo & Santa Clara County, CA
----- Pittsburgh, PA: Parents & Childcare Providers Try-A-Bike Event
----- Bicycle Blessings, One Example

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Allegheny County, PA Crash Data Now Public
----- Influence of Crime-related Safety Perceptions on Walking
----- Counting the Uncounted in LA County, CA
----- New Modeling for Bike & Ped Traffic to Improve Planning, Safety
----- Importance of Cycling Tourism in Europe

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Lessons from Dutch Bicycle Network Planning & Facility Design
----- #SaveKidsLives 2020 Action Agenda
----- New NACTO Bike Share Siting Guide
----- New ULI Report: Active Transportation and Real Estate
----- Interactive Slide Presentation: Dangerously Incomplete Streets
----- Film Contrasts Japanese & U.S. Approaches to Children’s Travel
----- Vancouver, BC Doorings Caution-Zones Map
----- New Guide: The Future of Health is Local
----- Creative Finance for Smaller Communities
----- Reflections re Introduction of Autonomous Vehicles

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

PROGRAM SNEAK PEAK: 2016 PRO WALK/PRO BIKE/PRO PLACE
-> The 2016 Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place international conference features the latest research and best practices on building communities that are better for walking, better for biking, and are what people clearly recognize as places. Join us in Vancouver, British Columbia September 12–15 to see evidence everywhere of the region’s commitment to a healthier world: people are pedestrianizing streets, removing viaducts and designing walking and bicycling infrastructure to the standard of All Ages and Abilities.

If you are still asking yourself whether you want to make the trip to one of the most scenic, livable, and healthiest cities in the world, let this first program preview help make up your mind. Here’s a sneak peak of just seven of the over 200 workshop sessions on tap, including:

Taking Back Our Streets: Demystifying Shared Streets in America Shared Streets upend accepted road hierarchy by using design and materials to calm drivers and improve the walking experience. Join Dick van Veen as he discusses how this idea took root in Holland; Sarah Saviskas will explore how shared streets work, successful design techniques, and challenges for implementation in the United States; and Allison Duncan will discuss how cyclists perceive and travel through shared spaces... http://bit.ly/1TKC8eY

Follow the conference on Twitter @WalkBikePlaces. Subscribe to the conference newsletter for the latest updates: http://bit.ly/1OdHiMf. Register now: http://bit.ly/1SMWpy6. Early Bird Registration ends May 20th.

See you in Vancouver!

USDOT NATIONAL PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT MEASURES & REACTIONS
-> Several years ago, in the MAP-21 transportation law, Congress charged the USDOT with creating a system of performance measures for which state DOTs and major metropolitan areas will set goals for improvement – and then fund and build transportation projects that make progress towards those goals.

On April 22, USDOT released proposed new requirements for how states and metro areas will have to measure traffic congestion. There are eight proposed measures—and seven of them exclusively look at the speed of cars and trucks or traffic delays on major roads, many of which bisect small towns or are critical thoroughfares in our cities. The eighth is about traffic-related air pollution. (NPRM to Propose National Performance Management Measures to Assess Performance of the National Highway System, Freight Movement on the Interstate System, and the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program: http://1.usa.gov/1TKD6YB)

Check out an FHWA overview, links to a recorded Overview Webinar and System Performance Webinar, related slide presentations, and fact sheets: http://1.usa.gov/1NAIBV3.

Submit your comments by August 20, 2016: http://1.usa.gov/1TKD6YB. Here’s a letter that can be electronically sent to USDOT Secty. Foxx on your behalf: http://bit.ly/24xktg2. Several national organizations provide their reactions:

Transportation for America: The USDOT proposal as introduced doubles down on outdated measures of congestion that will push local communities to spend scarce transportation dollars, attempting to "build their way out" of congestion. Check out their "Ten things to know about USDOT’s new proposal for measuring traffic congestion" and visual examples of the different needs of different types of roads at http://bit.ly/1T0TeYZ.

Safe Routes to School National Partnership: Unfortunately, in the newest batch of proposed performance measures, the US Department of Transportation is saying that what matters is moving as many cars as quickly as possible—and that people walking, bicycling, and taking transit aren’t even worth counting. It means that our "transportation system" in the eyes of the USDOT means roads and cars, not people and all the modes of transportation that make up that system. http://bit.ly/1rmurC7

League of American Bicyclists: If these draft rules are implemented, they will hinder the ability of local governments to implement complete streets, build protected bike lanes, etc. Even though Congress just instituted a complete streets policy for the National Highway System (Main streets, arterials and other major roads), FHWA wants to measure performance of the system using a measure for drivers only. It measures congestion by measuring delay for drivers, but gives no credit to states or metropolitan areas that invest in biking, walking or transit facilities that reduce congestion. Finally, the rule sets goals for measuring air pollutants from transportation, but doesn't include greenhouse gases. http://bit.ly/1UyfrwP

Smart Growth America: The rule as it is currently written would measure success in outdated ways leading to the continued use of outdated strategies, such as prioritizing fast driving speeds above all other modes of transportation and their associated benefits. It fails to consider people taking transit, carpooling, walking, and biking. It would also penalize communities where people live close to work, or travel shorter distances at slower speeds. Tell USDOT that #WeAllCount and the new rule should reflect that. http://bit.ly/1WsUXpi

CALL FOR RESPONSE: WOMEN CYCLING SURVEY 2016
-> The Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals is gathering input on cycling transportation issues, and identifying factors we need to address to encourage more people to cycle more places, more often. Women and girls, please take 6 to 8 minutes to tell your story, and share the link below with others. While APBP definitely appreciates that men and boys may have valuable views about this topic, this survey is by women for women to capture a snapshot in time. Its responses will provide an update and benchmark to APBP’s 2010 survey.
Deadline: May 19, 2016, http://svy.mk/1rtxRDE

[The free May 12 "Women Cycling Webinar Bicycling for a Lifetime" webinar will include a brief look at preliminary results from the 2016 Women Cycling Survey: http://bit.ly/1Msdu3l.]

LESSONS FROM DENMARK FOR US DOT SECTY. FOXX + 3 MAYORS
-> The Danish Minister of Transport and Building recently hosted a bike trip through Copenhagen for US DOT Secty. Foxx and the mayors of Austin, Portland, and South Bend. Before the bike ride the entire American delegation also visited Gehl Architects to get a glimpse of how Gehl’s world famous architecture has shaped Copenhagen towards a more bike friendly city. http://bit.ly/1SAlDmB. Read Secty. Foxx blog posts about his experiences and reflections: http://1.usa.gov/1NVgG7K and http://1.usa.gov/24xnzAv

AMSTERDAM TO APPOINT BIKE MAYOR
-> This summer, Amsterdam (The Netherlands) will go one step further to cement its reputation as the most bike-friendly city on the planet, appointing the world’s first ever bicycle mayor. This mayor will promote and protect cycling in the city, acting as a go-between connecting city hall, cyclists, community groups, and anyone who might be affected by new measures designed to improve citizens’ cycling experience. http://bit.ly/1NUYOds

PARIS INTRODUCES CAR-FREE SUNDAYS
-> Banning vehicles from parts of Paris beginning this Sunday—including the Champs Elysées—is part of an ongoing effort to curb pollution. The French city will ban car traffic along the Champs Elysées and nine other routes on the first Sunday of each month, adding to the 13 areas already announced as part of the "Paris Breathes" campaign. Another four zones will be pedestrian-only on Sundays during the summer. Last September, Paris’ "day without cars" brought levels of smog-causing nitrogen dioxide down by 40 percent in parts of the city. While one day per month will not, in and of itself, reduce air pollution to the necessary extent, it goes a long way toward encouraging a culture shift. http://bit.ly/26M8Tj8

COUNTERING FALLING FUEL TAX REVENUE WITH MILEAGE FEES
-> In the US, the national average gasoline and diesel tax rates has not increased since 1993. The Tax Policy Center found that if the gasoline tax had been indexed to inflation, tax rates would be higher in 41 states and the District of Columbia. In 2013, that additional revenue would have topped $100 million in 24 US states. Improvements in the fuel economy of new passenger vehicles not only erodes tax revenue, it is also regressive by penalizing those unable to afford newer vehicles. For all these reasons policymakers are considering tax system changes or the use of alternative mechanisms to create more revenue.

Policymakers are considering moving from a fuel tax to a charge based on vehicle miles travelled (VMT). In the US the National Surface Transportation Infrastructure Finance Commission (NSTIFC) believes a VMT tax will not only generate more sustainable streams of revenue, but it will also lead to more efficient use of roadways. http://bit.ly/1XLhb4D

GETTING BIKE SHARE EQUITY RIGHT
-> When it comes to bike equity in the U.S., the focus on measuring participation rates for bike-share against population demographics misses several important points. Most critiques highlight data showing that low-income people and people of color are underrepresented in bike-share annual membership and thus conclude that funding bike-share is inequitable and inherently questionable. Using ridership as a measure of equity ignores the reality that bike-share programs get the highest ridership when they are in dense areas, matched with high-comfort bike lanes and connected to transit. These three factors are often missing in low-income areas and communities of color. http://bit.ly/1TwPATB

HOW TO MAKE CITIES HEALTHIER PLACES TO LIVE
-> One of an epidemiologist’s five areas we need to concentrate on to improve the health of future city dwellers is easier navigation. This includes adding more bike racks and protected bike lanes, as well as chicanes (barriers that create short curves or narrow spots in roads to slow traffic), and parklets (compact green spaces on sidewalks, where walkers can rest and relax). To improve pedestrian safety: curb extensions, better signage and more speed bumps. http://on.wsj.com/1Z5Aiqv

HAPPY BIKE TO SCHOOL DAY!
-> Bike to School events are taking place nationwide today and throughout the month of May. Check out the names and locations of the 2016 events registered at over 2,300 schools in 47 states: http://bit.ly/1Ttwqvf.


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

BOSTON BUDGET INVESTS IN VISION ZERO PLAN
-> Boston, MA Mayor Martin J. Walsh announced that strong measures aimed at ensuring safe and reliable travel on City of Boston streets will be a key component in his administration's proposed fiscal year 2017 budget. A total of $3.1 million is proposed for Vision Zero in FY17 and $9.3 million over the next three years. (Vision Zero is an international initiative to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.) The budget calls for $2 million in FY17 for the City's vast traffic signal network to ensure that appropriate maintenance, re-timing and upgrading may be accomplished in the upcoming year. Another $900,000 is allocated to advance the City's strategic bike network.

"Our streets should be welcoming and beautiful, and getting around our city should be predictable and comfortable," said Chris Osgood, City of Boston Chief of Streets. "That work - and this budget - starts with making our streets safe for everyone, whether you are walking, biking, taking the T or driving."

In the spring of 2015, Mayor Walsh committed to Vision Zero and appointed an inter-agency and inter-disciplinary Task Force that worked to produce an Action Plan by December. The Action Plan (http://bit.ly/1SYef3z) summarizes the progress that has been made to date and outlines the steps that will be taken to achieve the City's Vision Zero goals.

The creation of a Rapid Response Team is one action item that has already been implemented. The Team, made up of Vision Zero Task Force members, now responds to critical and fatal crash locations to analyze the cause of a crash and gain insight to bring about corrective action. Recent progress also includes the introduction of a Transportation Safety Concerns Map (http://bit.ly/1TlE3DE), an online tool that allows visitors to identify locations where they have concerns about traffic safety. http://bit.ly/1QS1e77

BOSTON CONSIDERS LOWERING SPEED LIMIT TO 20 MPH
-> The Boston, MA City Council met to discuss changing the speed limit from 30 mph to 20 mph in thickly settled roads and business districts. If the proposal is passed, it would not lower the speed limit right away because the City of Boston does not have that power. This proposal would officially petition the state legislature to give the city the ability to lower its speed limit. http://fox25.com/1MLeAY4

CT SENATE: $500 FINE FOR DRIVERS HITTING PEDS & BIKES IN CROSSWALKS
-> Drivers who strike pedestrians and bicyclists in crosswalks would be assessed $500 fines in addition to criminal charges, under a bill that won final, unanimous approval in the Connecticut Senate. The bill, which Stamford lawmakers sought this year after recent fatalities in that city, goes to Gov. Dannel P. Malloy for final review. The new law would raise the current $181 fine to $500. (sHB 5403: An Act Increasing Penalties for Failure to Yield to Pedestrians in Crosswalks and Failure to Exercise Due Care to Avoid Hitting a Pedestrian or Cyclist: http://1.usa.gov/26T1uP2)

FREE NATIONAL SUMMER TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE CAREER CAMPS
-> FHWA’s National Summer Transportation Institute (NSTI) promotes awareness of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) educational and career opportunities among disadvantaged and at-risk high school students around the country. The NSTI is free for students who have an interest in learning more about career opportunities in transportation and how they might pursue post-secondary education concentrating on some aspect of it. The program is typically two to four weeks, and host sites conduct both residential and non-residential programs. http://1.usa.gov/1Y7dkPr. Some institute site application deadlines have passed. Below are examples of sites still accepting applications. Search via your browser for possible others in your region.

VIRTUAL BIKE ROUTE SCOUTS IN SAN MATEO & SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CA
-> The Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition recently launched its Virtual Bike Route Scouts, a personalized route advice and assistance program for trips in San Mateo and Santa Clara County. Fill out an online route request form (http://bit.ly/1VJJTW6) and a Route Scout familiar with the location of your ride will create a bike-friendly route for you. It'll include a map, turn-by-turn directions, and any advice they might have to make your ride a smooth one. http://bit.ly/1Nl90LY

PITTSBURGH, PA: PARENTS & CHILDCARE PROVIDERS TRY-A-BIKE EVENT
-> At the Family Try-A-Bike event on May 21 volunteers will bring a wide range of family biking equipment for bike-loving parents and childcare providers to test. Ever wonder, "What kind of bike and equipment should I get for biking with my kids?" The answer is that it's all about you, your kiddos, and your comfort. This is an opportunity to try different bicycles and bicycle attachments that help you carry children on bicycles. http://bit.ly/1OdK83I

BICYCLE BLESSINGS, ONE EXAMPLE
-> Many faith communities offer bicycle blessings. Here are details from one near Black Earth, WI. Vermont Lutheran Church holds an annual blessing of bicycles on a Sunday in May. (Read the Bicycle Blessing here: http://bit.ly/1W8D9Sa) This rural community is home to occasional animosity between resident motorists and cyclists. The event, near the start of the cycling season, includes a pancake breakfast to help motorists and cyclists get to know each other and reconcile the community. The breakfast also raises funds for the non-profit DreamBikes and youth mechanics from that local shop are also available for maintenance and minor repairs. http://bit.ly/1WI4oBj


THE RESEARCH BEAT

ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PA CRASH DATA NOW PUBLIC
-> The Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center (WPRDC) just released all of PennDOT’s Allegheny County crash data, from 2004-2014, to the public. Fields include information that a responding officer collects at the scene, such as location, whether the person was a bicyclist or pedestrian, type of impact, impairment, among other factors. Bike PGH reports on trends found in the data and why public access to this information is a game changer. The data bring up more questions than it answers, which is exactly what we want. Citizens can now look at data and create visualizations to help understand what is happening on Pittsburgh streets. http://bit.ly/1rTWn19

INFLUENCE OF CRIME-RELATED SAFETY PERCEPTIONS ON WALKING
-> While many cross-sectional studies have studied whether perceptions of crime are related to time spent walking, the findings to date are inconclusive, and few longitudinal or prospective studies exist. This study (Safe Residential Environments? A Longitudinal Analysis of the Influence of Crime-related Safety on Walking: http://bit.ly/1WIeeDe) used longitudinal data from the RESIDential Environments Project (RESIDE) to examine the relationship between perceptions of crime-related safety and leisure time spent walking in the local neighborhood. Participants in the RESIDE study in Perth, Australia, completed a questionnaire assessing neighborhood perceptions of crime-related safety and walking behaviors before moving to their new neighborhood and again approximately one, three, and seven years after relocating. They found that every one-point increase on the five-point Likert scale addressing safety perception was associated with an 18-minute increase in time spent walking per week. This study indicates that community social and physical environmental interventions that foster residents’ feelings of safety are likely to increase recreational walking and produce public health gains.

COUNTING THE UNCOUNTED IN LA COUNTY, CA
-> UCLA’s Lewis Center partnered with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health to process and analyze data from automatic counters installed at 30 sites in low-income communities in Los Angeles County. An analysis of 6 locations in Cudahy, CA, revealed a strong pedestrian pattern related to school departure and arrival. These data represent a new level of quality in the Los Angeles region; previously, count data has been limited to short-duration manual tallies. They have published reports on bicycle and pedestrian counts in Carson (http://bit.ly/1WI9HAP), Cudahy (http://bit.ly/1Zc7OeN), and the San Gabriel Valley (http://bit.ly/1QS30VV). http://bit.ly/1Sknh8B

NEW MODELING FOR BIKE & PED TRAFFIC TO IMPROVE PLANNING, SAFETY
-> Transportation planners need a better idea of how many people are using nonmotorized transportation and what their exposure to risk is. A research team at the Roadway Safety Institute is working to develop new methods and tools to help transportation engineers estimate bicycle and pedestrian traffic volumes and assess these nonmotorized travelers’ exposure to risk. The team has collected bicycle and pedestrian counts in several Minnesota case communities, ranging in size from the large Twin Cities metropolitan area to much smaller cities such as Grand Marais and Bemidji. Because most studies of exposure and risk have occurred in larger urban areas, the results from the smaller communities to be particularly useful.

Researchers are developing models to adjust and extrapolate the data to measure the average annual daily number of bicyclists and pedestrians for specific road segments and networks. They are also creating models that estimate exposure to risk for nonmotorized traffic and then combining those models with traffic volume estimates to help predict and better understand potential for being involved in a crash or other hazardous situation. This information will help illustrate the need for countermeasures or different traffic controls at specific locations. http://bit.ly/23Cqwzs

IMPORTANCE OF CYCLING TOURISM IN EUROPE
-> A European Commission report of a recent survey highlights the importance of cycling tourism in the general tourism market. Participants were asked for their reasons to go on holiday. The answer ‘doing some sports-based activities’ was chosen by 12% of respondents and cycling was named as an example of such an activity. According to the latest numbers from the German cyclists’ federation, ADFC, cycling tourism in Germany represents 10% of the German tourism market in terms of revenues and the number of Germans having taken cycling holidays grew by 11% between 2014 to 2015. http://bit.ly/1NiOig0

Check out more studies on the importance of European cycling tourism plus one from Washington state: http://bit.ly/1pXzXKG.


QUOTES R US

From an Urban Land article, "More Open Space, Walkability, and Multifamily Are Future of Suburbs" (http://on.uli.org/1rT2Jha):

"Desirable communities make it easy to get where you want to without a car. Biking and walking infrastructure ‘is the first amenity we put in new communities.’"
—Tyler Niess, chief marketing officer for Crescent Communities in Charlotte, NC on what makes a good suburb

"Walkability is ‘in many ways the cheapest and highest return’ in a community. The commonalities of successful suburbs are place making, aesthetics, and multimodal options."
—Adam F. Ducker, RCLCO managing director and moderator of the "Next Stop Suburbs" session at the ULI Spring Meeting in Philadelphia

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

Check out video of a British inventor’s test rides of his hover bike, jet bike (complete with awesome flames), and ice bike among other contraptions. http://wapo.st/1rOazZr (The Cake-O-Matic could definitely us some help from Wallace and Gromit: http://bit.ly/1eUOjl2!)


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
For a searchable calendar of webinars, webcasts and seminars in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

Webinar "Accessible Pedestrian Signals"
Date: May 5, 2016, 2:30 - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Melissa Andersen, Bruce Friedman & Scott Windley
Host: U.S. Access Board
Details: http://bit.ly/1NUFJrN, free

Webinar "Computerized Crash Reports Usability and Design Investigation"
Date: May 10, 2016, 12:00 - 1:00 pm ET
Presenters: Nichole Morris (Univ of MN) & Kathleen Haney (MN Dept of Public Safety)
Host: Road Safety Institute & Midwest Transportation Center at Iowa State University
Details: http://bit.ly/1OdFgM5, free

Webinar "U.S. Federal Policy Briefing"
Date: May 10, 2016, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Caron Whitaker (League of American Bicyclists), Christy Kwan (Alliance for Biking & Walking) & Kit Keller (Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals)
Host: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/1rucli3, free

Webinar "Measurement of Physical Activity"
Date: May 17, 2016, 10:00 - 11:00 am ET
Presenters: Catrine Tudor-Locke (UMAss Amherst) & Gregory Welk (Iowa State Univ)
Host: International Society for Physical Activity & Health
Details: http://bit.ly/1T0II4d, free

Webinar "SHRP2 Naturalistic Driving Study Pooled Fund"
Date: May 17, 2016, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Research teams from FL DOT, MI DOT & WA State DOT with VA Tech Transportation Institute
Host: US DOT
Details: http://1.usa.gov/1ZaHvFD, free

Webinar "International Social Marketing and Behavior Change Course Fair Webinar 1 of 2"
Date: May 18, 2016, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Matthew Wood (Univ of Brighton, England), Doug McKenzie-Mohr (MacKenzie-Mohr & Assoc), Peter Mitchell (Salter>Mitchell | Marketing for Change), Jay Kassirer (Cullbridge Marketing & Communications) & Danielle Caldwell (Westminster College)
Host: International Social Marketing Association
Details: http://bit.ly/1W6HdBO, free for members, $50 for non-members

Webinar "Trails and Towns Together: How Communities Capitalize on Trail Tourism"
Date: May 19, 2016, 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: William Prince (The Progress Fund), Rita Hennessy (National Park Service) & Amy Camp (Cycle Forward)
Host: American Trails
Details: http://bit.ly/1TKBVsm, $35 members / $55 nonmembers

Webinar "International Social Marketing and Behavior Change Course Fair Webinar 2 of 2"
Date: May 19, 2016, 8:00 - 9:30 pm ET
Presenters: Ross Gordon (Macquarie Univ), Kathy Anderson (USF), Timo Dietrich (Griffith Univ), Nedra Weinreich (Social Marketing Univ) & Philip Winters (USF)
Host: International Social Marketing Association
Details: http://bit.ly/1W6HdBO, free for members, $50 for non-members

Webinar "Enhancing Active School Travel with Public Transit"
Date: May 26, 2016, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Jon Ledeboer (Minneapolis Public Schools) & Kimberly Rice (Boston Public Schools)
Details: http://bit.ly/1pZVIcM, free

Webinar "Impact of Mega Events on Urban Growth through Sustainable Transportation Solutions"
Date: June 2, 2016, 2:00 - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Eva Kassens-Noor (MI State Univ), Jamie Mackey (UT DOT) & Laurel Radow (FHWA)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/21v7sBy, free for TRB affiliates, $95 for others

Webinar "Making the Connection: Changing Climate through Healthy Community Design and Transportation"
Date: June 7, 2016, 1:30 - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Richard Jackson (UCLA) & James Whitehead (American College of Sports Medicine)
Host: American Public Health Association & ecoAmerica
Details: http://bit.ly/1SMOGjB, free

Webinar "U.S. Federal Policy Briefing"
Date: July 12, 2016, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Caron Whitaker (League of American Bicyclists), Christy Kwan (Alliance for Biking & Walking) & Kit Keller (Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals)
Host: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/1rucli3, free

Webinar "U.S. Federal Policy Briefing"
Date: November 15, 2016, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Caron Whitaker (League of American Bicyclists), Christy Kwan (Alliance for Biking & Walking) & Kit Keller (Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals)
Host: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/1rucli3, free


RESOURCES

LESSONS FROM DUTCH BICYCLE NETWORK PLANNING & FACILITY DESIGN
-> A new FHWA report (Bicycle Network Planning & Facility Design Approaches in the Netherlands and the United States: http://1.usa.gov/1Zb1uUN) explores similarities and differences in the approach to bicycle network planning and facility design in the Netherlands and the United States. It includes a brief historical overview as context for a discussion about bicycle planning and design approaches and physical infrastructure. Following a high level discussion of respective design approaches, this report highlights four themes observed in practice in Holland that are applicable to the U.S.:

1. Prioritize Seamless and Efficient Bicycle Movement
2. Trust in Users and in the Adaptability of the Transportation System
3. Design for the Behavior You Want to See
4. Prioritize Network Connectivity...

#SAVEKIDSLIVES 2020 ACTION AGENDA
-> Over a million people signed the international Child Declaration for Road Safety. The #SaveKidsLives 2020 Action Agenda outlines five key priorities cut road deaths worldwide in half in the next five years:

1. A safe journey to school for every child including safe roads and speed management around every school.
2. Safe school transport including seatbelts on all school buses.
3. Motorcycle helmets for all children where two-wheelers are the main family transport.
4. Vehicles safe for children and action to promote child restraints.
5. Enforcement and action against drink-driving.
http://bit.ly/1NKgd8t

NEW NACTO BIKE SHARE SITING GUIDE
-> The new "NACTO Bike Share Siting Guide" (http://bit.ly/1W80F1H) highlights best practices in station placement and design. Well-planned bike share stations can improve the pedestrian experience, help reduce traffic fatalities, and reduce inequity in cities’ transportation networks. Getting station placement right is integral to the success of a bike share system. Planners and community groups can use this new guidance to help design and advocate for better, easy-to-access bike share station locations and safer streets.

NEW ULI REPORT: ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION AND REAL ESTATE
-> The Urban Land Institute has released "Active Transportation and Real Estate: The Next Frontier" (http://on.uli.org/1TKxKga), a report exploring the interconnections between walking, bicycling, and real estate. Check out the examples of real estate developments that designed for active transportation, and examples of "catalytic bike and ped infrastructure projects" that had positive economic impacts, supported or spurred real estate development, increased property values, and helped achieve public health and the environmental goals.

INTERACTIVE SLIDE PRESENTATION: DANGEROUSLY INCOMPLETE STREETS
-> AARP has created Dangerously Incomplete Streets, a 15-slide presentation that asks viewers to look at photos and read about what they see. Then prompts them to think about the roadways near them. http://bit.ly/1SJb6Va

FILM CONTRASTS JAPANESE & U.S. APPROACHES TO CHILDREN’S TRAVEL
-> "The Slow Way Home" is a documentary film about walking and biking to school in Japan and in one US community in Oregon that has been airing in some U.S. PBS markets recently. The way children travel to school structures daily life for families around the world--but the means differs dramatically. In Japan 98 percent of children walk to school every day, unaccompanied by a parent. In the United States just 13 percent of children walk or bike to school, and most are driven to school by a parent. "The Slow Way Home" explores this divergence, examining how American families have largely given up on keeping our streets and public spaces safe enough for children, while Japanese communities have mobilized to keep their streets safe and walkable, not only for children but for everyone in society. Seen through both a historical and contemporary framing, "The Slow Way Home" is an uplifting examination of differences in culture that provides both insight into a distressing trend in American society and simultaneously offers hope for change. http://bit.ly/1TtCfc8

VANCOUVER, BC DOORINGS CAUTION-ZONES MAP
-> BikeMaps.org helps to make cycling safer by providing municipalities, the Province and other stakeholders with a supplementary database on cycling incidents reported by citizens. In addition to assisting municipalities with planning safer streets, BikeMaps.org can provide cyclists with the latest information on safety hot-spots. They compiled collision data to develop a list of dooring caution zones in the City of Vancouver. Doorings were the most prevalent type of cycling collision reported through official reports. http://bit.ly/1NND0Ls

NEW GUIDE: THE FUTURE OF HEALTH IS LOCAL
-> A new guide (The Future of Health is Local: A Field Guide for Health Sector Leadership: http://bit.ly/24xu46j) gives health care providers and others gives health care providers actionable tools and examples on how to align the non-clinical assets of their organizations — such as procurement, employment, and investment — with local economic development strategies that can improve human health and revitalize local communities. The tools that are working to build strong local economies are the same as what is working to improve health in people and communities.

CREATIVE FINANCE FOR SMALLER COMMUNITIES
-> A new Urban Land Institute (ULI) report (Reaching for the Future: Creative Finance for Smaller Communities) explores the ability of smaller communities to leverage their strengths; position themselves as attractive places to live, work and invest; and use innovative partnerships and financing to gain a competitive edge. http://on.uli.org/1rPNiq5

REFLECTIONS RE INTRODUCTION OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES
-> In a recently released video interview, John Wetmore interviews Barry Wellar about his reflections related to the introduction of autonomous vehicles and vulnerable pedestrians. "Autonomous Vehicles" Episode 233 of Perils for Pedestrians: http://bit.ly/1TtsF99


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - GeoDesign Summit Europe, November 1-2, 2016 - 2016, Delft, Netherlands.
Deadline: May 16, 2016, http://bit.ly/1VJDKcn

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - 2016 Trafinz Conference, November 16-18, 2016, Tauranga, New Zealand.
Deadline: June 13, 2016, http://bit.ly/1ru5OE3

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - Journal of Case Studies in Transportation Policy Special Issue: Understanding Governance at the Nexus of Transportation and Environmental Health
Deadline: August 1, 2016, http://bit.ly/1PqQT17

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

NEW THIS ISSUE

-> May 8, 2016 - CycloFemme, Mothers’ Day women’s rides worldwide.
http://bit.ly/1lDQWtW
-> May 16-20, 2016, Bike to Work Week
http://bit.ly/21rW75g
-> May 20, 2016 - National Bike to Work Day
http://bit.ly/21rW75g
-> June 13-15, 2016, National Regional Transportation Conference, Chattanooga, TN.
http://bit.ly/1rg4wMx
-> June 20-21, 2016 - 2016 Oregon Safe Routes to School Conference, Eugene, OR.
http://bit.ly/1rTA9wm
-> September 16–17, 2016, North Carolina Bike Summit, Asheville, NC.
http://bit.ly/1fgGco2
-> November 1-2, 2016 - 2016 GeoDesign Summit Europe, Delft, Netherlands.
http://bit.ly/1ZbJcCM
-> November 16-18, 2016, 2016 Trafinz Conference, Tauranga, New Zealand.
http://bit.ly/1Y74KAv
-> May 7-10, 2017, 2017 International Trails Symposium, Dayton, OH.
http://bit.ly/1SthaRq
-> October 1-31, 2017 - EcoMobility World Festival 2017, Kaosiungm Chinese Taipei.
http://bit.ly/1W8lSsd


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> RFP – CREATE TRB GUIDE TO EQUITY ANALYSIS IN REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION PLANNING PROCESSES
TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) has released a request for proposals to develop a reference guide that identifies and describes how equity in public transportation can be analyzed through an integrated participatory and quantitative approach. The guide will be designed to be adaptable to planning and development at local and regional levels. For purposes of this study, equity analysis refers to both the Title VI and environment justice processes.
Deadline: June 16, 2016, http://bit.ly/24p1RSH

-> JOB - MOBILITY ENGINEER, CITY OF PITTSBURGH, PA
The City of Pittsburgh plan to hire a Mobility Engineer to focus on the movement of people through the City with increased awareness toward pedestrians, cyclists and the disabled. The person in this position designs and manages the construction of bicycle and pedestrian improvements; traffic calming elements; and ADA improvements, including curb ramps, removal of steps or other obstructions and accessible traffic signal improvements; among other duties.
Deadline: May 9, 2016, http://bit.ly/1TtuN0P

-> JOB - DATA TECHNICIAN, ITRE, RALEIGH, NC
The Institute for Transportation Research and Education (ITRE) seeks a Data Technician to monitor bicycle and pedestrian count data that is being continuously collected from counters installed across North Carolina. The scope of work includes: using vendor software to extract, interpret, and develop reports based on the data; regularly researching data gaps and perform relevant data assessments; identifying and monitor potential equipment malfunctions; regularly conducting quality control and assurance checks, and determining the status of flagged data as valid, invalid, or atypical, among other duties.
Deadline: May 10, 2016 by 5pm ET, http://bit.ly/1pN6tPA

-> Job - Complete Streets Design Engineer, RPM Transportation Consultants, Nashville, TN
RPM Transportation Consultants is looking for an experienced and highly motivated Complete Streets Design Engineer with a minimum of 3 years of progressively responsible experience in traffic engineering and design, a Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering, and registration as a professional engineer in Tennessee. Key capabilities should include knowledge and experience in complete streets design, traffic signal design, preliminary engineering and PS&E for roadways, intersections, and related transportation projects.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/1NjF2Iy

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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Editor Emeritus & Founding Editor: John Williams
Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston

Contributors: AASHTO Daily Transportation Update; Eillie Anzilotti; Association of Bicycle & Pedestrian Professionals Listserve; BikeMaps.org; Bike PGH; CityLab; ctpost; CTS Catalyst; Cycling Embassy of Denmark; Ken Dixon; @dnproulx; Alex Dodds; ECF General Newsletter; Preston J. Elliott; EuroVelo; FastLane; Kate Fillin-Yeh; Fox25 WFXT; Anthony Foxx; Sandra Galea; @GreenLaneProj; Michael Henrich; ITS International; Kristy Jackson; Jay Kassirer; Kit Keller; Kaiser Permanente; League of American Bicyclists; Livable Communities e-Newsletter; Margaux Mennesson; Kathleen McCormick; Kathryn McNutt; The Messenger; News from the UCLA Lewis Center; NewsOK; Next City; Tyler Norris; Eric G. O’Rear; Feargus O’Sullivan; Perils for Pedestrians; Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health; Safe Routes to School National Partnership; SHRP2 Solutions Email Alert; Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition e-Bulletin; Smart Growth Network Newsletter; Sustainable City Network; This Week @ APBP; Transportation for America; TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter; Wallace E. Tyner; @UNRSC; Urban Land; The Wall Street Journal; The Washington Post; Barry Wellar; John Wetmore; Caron Whitaker.


CONTACT US

©2016 - NCBW | The National Center for Bicycling & Walking is a program of Project for Public Spaces, Inc. http://www.bikewalk.org/contact.php