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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#436 Wednesday, May 31, 2017

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Australian National Cycling Strategy Annual Report
----- Australian Transport Assessment and Planning Guidelines
----- NHTSA: 2015 Annual Traffic Safety Facts for Bicyclists
----- Outdated Headlights Put Drivers & Peds at Risk
----- German Test Ranks Cycling Conditions in 539 Towns & Cities
----- What the White House Budget Means for Biking
----- 3 Ways Proposed Fed Budget Hits Bike & Ped Spending
----- Trump Nullifies MPO Coordination & Planning Area Reform Rule
----- Connecting Scattered Bike Networks
----- No, Protected Bike Lanes Do Not Need to Cost $1M/Mi
----- Light Imprint for Walkable Green Infrastructure
----- Dutch Virtual Reality Simulator Creates Living Lab
----- Planting Flowers in Potholes to Prompt Attention
----- Walk Bike Places New Orleans 2018 Update

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- Panel: Claiming Your Identity in Boston's (MA) Bike Culture
----- 2017 ParkScore Released for 100 Largest US Cities
----- Honolulu, HI: Kids & Older Adults ID Age-Unfriendly Streets
----- Nashville, TN Mayor Plans for Improved Transit, Ped & Bike Conditions
----- Tricounty Charleston, SC Area Walk & Bike Plan
----- Washington, DC to Install 2nd Barnes Dance Ped Crossing
----- Henderson, NV: Older Adults Forced to Cross Dangerous Streets

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Narratives of Marginalized Cyclists’ Obstacles to Utilitarian Cycling
----- Getting Kids Moving Now Saves Billions Later
----- How Cycling & Walking to Work Affects Health
----- Impacts on Peds & Cyclists of Near-Miss Incidents
----- Big Data Shines Light on Bike & Ped Trips
----- US Bike Commuter maps & Data
----- TRB: Findability and Relevance of Transportation Information
----- Bike Share System Owners & Operators Equity Survey Insights
----- Higher Mass Transit Use, Lower Obesity Rates

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- APA Policy Guide on Aging in Community
----- Use Your Phone to Navigate Bike Routes Worldwide
----- FHWA STEP Program Promotes Ped Safety Countermeasures
----- ITE: Ped & Bike Safety in Parking Facilities
----- Bikes Designed Specifically for Kids
----- TRB: Managing Extreme Weather at Bus Stops

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL CYCLING STRATEGY ANNUAL REPORT
-> Austroads released an overview of progress made in 2016 towards the objectives of Australia’s National Cycling Strategy 2011-2016 (http://bit.ly/2qC54vU). The Strategy, which set the objective to double participation in cycling by 2016, has now been extended until the end of 2017. “National Cycling Strategy: Implementation Report 2016” (http://bit.ly/2r7kagu) notes State and Territory Governments spent $121.8 million to improve on-road and off-road cycling networks to key destinations in both urban and rural areas in 2016. It also reports rider fatalities were heavily skewed towards older riders. Of the 29 bicyclists killed in 2016, 86% were over 40 and 55% were over 60. This result is particularly significant given that cycling participation in Australia has been shown to decrease significantly with age. [29 bicyclists killed in Australia in 2016. See item below regarding the 818 cyclists killed in the US in 2015, the most current data available from NHTSA.]

AUSTRALIAN TRANSPORT ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING GUIDELINES
-> The “Australian Transport Assessment and Planning Guidelines” (ATAP) (http://bit.ly/2qC4aj0) include, for the first time, mode-specific guidance that provides parameters to assess active travel projects. Its mode specific guidance outlines the methodology for undertaking an economic appraisal of an active travel initiative. (http://bit.ly/2qCx02B) The Guidelines include background describing active travel including its relative importance and trip characteristics, and its implications for health and safety outcomes, a broad overview of active travel modeling and demand forecasting, and the benefits of active travel.

NHTSA: 2015 ANNUAL TRAFFIC SAFETY FACTS FOR BICYCLISTS
-> The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released the national fatalities and estimated injuries for bicyclists involved in traffic related crashes with motorized vehicles on U.S. public roadways in 2015 (the latest data available). Findings show that 818 bicyclists were killed, an increase of 12.2% over 2014, and accounted for 2.3 percent of all traffic fatalities during the year. An additional estimated 45,000 pedalcyclists were injured in crashes in 2015, which was not a significant change from the previous year. http://bit.ly/2qEkS1c

OUTDATED HEADLIGHTS PUT DRIVERS & PEDS AT RISK
-> USA Today reports about 2,500 pedestrians are killed at night every year crossing the road, in many cases because drivers can't see them because their headlights don't shine brightly enough. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety concluded last year, that two-thirds of lighting packages available on 21 small SUV models deliver “poor” performance. In addition, 10 mid-size cars' and 7 pickup truck headlight systems were deemed as poor. Outdated federal rules have blocked automakers from introducing adaptive beam headlamps that automatically adjust to oncoming traffic to reduce glare and help drivers see better, even though the technology is legal and available in Europe and Japan. At the same time, sleek styling and manufacturing mistakes on currently available systems has led to poor performance on the road, including excessive glare and insufficient light on the pavement. https://usat.ly/2qE5iCP

GERMAN TEST RANKS CYCLING CONDITIONS IN 539 TOWNS & CITIES
-> The European Cyclists’ Federation reports German member ADFC presented the 7th edition of its Fahrradklima-Test on cycling conditions in German towns and cities. With over 120,000 participants, ranking 539 cities, it is the largest study of its kind worldwide. The Fahrradklima-Test (literally "cycling climate survey") uses a consumer focused approach to evaluate the cycling policies and conditions of a city. Participants filling the survey are asked whether cycling in their city is comfortable or stressful, if cycle paths are maintained during winter or if they feel safe when cycling. This edition provides an interactive map displaying the results for all the cities and includes data from the previous edition. Financial support for the survey was provided by the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure as part of the implementation of the national cycling strategy for 2020. http://bit.ly/2qEeQNT

WHAT THE WHITE HOUSE BUDGET MEANS FOR BIKING
-> The League of American Bicyclists reports the White House released its full budget for fiscal year 2018 last week, which builds on the skinny budget — the earlier version released in March. The budget does not touch transportation alternatives, the major source of funding for bicycling and walking infrastructure. However, it does include some warning signs moving forward. The fact sheet on the Trump initiative argues that the Federal Government “inefficiently invests in non-Federal infrastructure” due to the “confusion about the Federal Government’s role in infrastructure.” It also states that the administration is seeking long-term reforms to change this. This is a warning sign because opponents of federal funding for biking and walking argue that bicycle and pedestrian projects are not in the federal interest. http://bit.ly/2qENiIm

3 WAYS PROPOSED FED BUDGET HITS BIKE & PED SPENDING
-> CityLab describes the ways Pres. Trump’s budget is bad for bicycling. USDOT’s highly competitive Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program would be eliminated. The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) would receive an 84% cut. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which passes on hundreds of millions of dollars from Congress to state and local programs designed to prevent chronic disease and obesity, would see spending for disease prevention and health promotion cut by $222 million. http://bit.ly/2qDWbSF

TRUMP NULLIFIES MPO COORDINATION & PLANNING AREA REFORM RULE
-> On May 12, 2017, Pres. Trump signed into law Senate Bill 496, which nullifies the rule issued by the Federal Highway Administration and Federal Transit Administration titled, “Metropolitan Planning Organization and Planning Area Reform.” http://bit.ly/2qEDdLn

CONNECTING SCATTERED BIKE NETWORKS
-> Streetsblog USA reports a Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center brief notes that for 20 to 30 years now, many cities have been laying down piecemeal bike infrastructure where it’s cheap and easy. (Defining Connected Bike Networks: http://bit.ly/2qDZx8d) This results in bike networks that are far less intuitive or comfortable than the cities’ driving networks. Shifting the focus toward the most important roads for bicycle connectivity, even if they require difficult tradeoffs may be more politically difficult, but if chosen well, promise bigger payoffs in ridership and safety. FHWA’s “Bike Network Mapping Idea Book” (http://bit.ly/2r98Pws) includes 23 examples of bike maps of different scales that can be used to figure out where the existing network is strong, where it’s weak, and what the most valuable new connections might be. http://bit.ly/2r93XHq

NO, PROTECTED BIKE LANES DO NOT NEED TO COST $1M/MI
-> PeopleForBikes reports the mistaken belief that a protected bike lane, like a sidewalk, has to cost $1 million per mile. This is not true. They use 3 infographics that describe the spectrum of changes via tactical urbanism; the breakdown of the relative costs of 14 types of bike lane separation; and a simple bar chart to put the cost of a high-quality protected bike lane in context with some other projects that cities regularly consider. http://bit.ly/2qED7U2

LIGHT IMPRINT FOR WALKABLE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE
-> Public Square reports in the public realm, the greenery to impervious pavement ratio—and how that relates to urban context—has an impact on quality of life and experience. Conventional suburban design tends toward heavy use of asphalt, with wide roads lined by parking lots, in relatively low-density areas. This engineering approach requires large and expensive stormwater mitigation. New urbanists have countered with techniques that lay far lighter on the land, an approach that could be called "Light Imprint," "lean," or simply "green infrastructure." This light approach to engineering the land, combined with good urban design, makes for appealing streets and public spaces while providing effective rainwater management. http://bit.ly/2qEFxSH

DUTCH VIRTUAL REALITY SIMULATOR CREATES LIVING LAB
-> The European Cyclists’ Federation reports Dutch NHTV has developed CycleSpex, a Virtual Reality Simulator, to research cyclists’ experience of infrastructure and the built environment. The Virtual Reality Simulator enables researchers and policymakers to visualize a wide arrange of scenarios of cycling experience in their cities. Prior to making big investments they can test potential solutions in a safe and controlled environment. This environment also allows end users to ask and register valuable data about cyclists’ behavior. Another advantage of the Virtual Reality Simulator is that it enables policy makers to improve based on citizens’ participation. The instrument can analyze the interaction with the infrastructure, the spatial environment and the cyclists experience with it for a large number of end users. http://bit.ly/2r9Ao8F

PLANTING FLOWERS IN POTHOLES TO PROMPT ATTENTION
-> My Modern Met repots people plagued by neglected potholes in cities around the world, from Chicago to London, have begun transforming unsightly cracks and holes into beautiful, miniature gardens. While these colorful tiny gardens don’t last long, they bring attention to unfilled potholes. See photos of this and other creative pothole-filling works of art. http://bit.ly/2r5xRfU

WALK BIKE PLACES NEW ORLEANS 2018 UPDATE
-> The Walk Bike Places international conference will be held in New Orleans, LA on September 16-19, 2018. (www.walkbikeplaces.org) For the next few months we will be busy developing conference themes in preparation for our Call for Proposals, which is set for December 13, 2017.

A decade ago New Orleans began asking, “Why doesn't New Orleans look more like Amsterdam?” They were wondering how to embrace water like the Dutch. For most of its 300 year history New Orleans has waged a pitched battle against the waters that surround it and the rain, which falls upon it. But the pump-it-dry approach came into question following Hurricane Katrina. Today, with a $141M HUD grant and guided by an ambitious and award-winning Urban Water Plan, New Orleans is embracing green infrastructure as a way to reduce runoff and recharge aquifers (groundwater depletion is causing the city to sink). http://bit.ly/2qEM53M


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

PANEL: CLAIMING YOUR IDENTITY IN BOSTON'S (MA) BIKE CULTURE
-> The Boston Cyclists Union reports the primary goal of a recent “Who Bikes Boston” panel was to give an opportunity for residents of color to share their experiences biking in the city, and in a setting specifically conceived for them. The secondary goal was to debate who gets to be called a cyclist. But the underlying goal was to push back against this idea that folks of color, especially Black people, don’t bike. Because they do. One panelist reported, “From my own experience as an Afro-Latina, a cyclist, and as a transportation advocate, biking in Boston does feel quite white. For some, this perception can lead to feeling alienated in present bike spaces that associate bikes with a certain race and socioeconomic status. So, it was very important that the panel feature both speakers of color and a facilitator of color in order to foster trust.” http://bit.ly/2r9HWbF

2017 PARKSCORE RELEASED FOR 100 LARGEST US CITIES
-> The Trust for Public Land Released its 2017 ParkScore Index (http://bit.ly/2qDgLCy), which rates park systems in the 100 Largest US cities. Rankings are based on three factors: 1) Park Access, which measures the percentage of residents living within a 10-minute walk of a park (approximately ½-mile); 2) Park Size, which is based on a city's median park size and the percentage of total city area dedicated to parks; and 3) Facilities and Investment, which combines park spending per resident with the availability of four popular park amenities: basketball hoops, off-leash dog parks, playgrounds, and recreation and senior centers.

ParkScore uses advanced GIS computer mapping technology to create digital maps evaluating park accessibility. Instead of simply measuring distance to a local park, ParkScore's GIS technology takes into account the location of park entrances and physical obstacles to access. For example, if residents are separated from a nearby park by a major highway, ParkScore does not count the park as accessible to those residents (unless there is a bridge, underpass, or easy access point across the highway). Esri and The Trust for Public Land collaborated on GIS design and implementation, helping to make ParkScore the most comprehensive park evaluation tool ever created. http://prn.to/2qDEh26

HONOLULU, HI: KIDS & OLDER ADULTS ID AGE-UNFRIENDLY STREETS
-> America Walks reports on one of its recent microgrant recipients in Honolulu, HI. (http://bit.ly/2iMvw38) Residents of the Plaza Assisted Living facility and area high school students are joining forces to make the city more walkable for people of all ages. As part of Honolulu Walks, more than 100 keiki and kupuna are taking photos of unsafe, age-unfriendly streets and pathways with digital cameras to explore ways to make the city's streets more "age-friendly." Later photos will be shared with city planners. This collaboration includes Plaza Assisted Living, President Theodore Roosevelt High School, 'Iolani School, Hawaii Public Health Institute, Better Block Hawaii, Project Dana Age-Friendly Honolulu, Honolulu Complete Streets, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa among other community partners. http://bit.ly/2qDcRtt

NASHVILLE, TN PLANS FOR IMPROVED TRANSIT, PED & BIKE CONDITIONS
-> Streetsblog reports Nashville, TN Mayor Megan Barry released Moving the Music City (http://bit.ly/2qDWgpg), an action plan yesterday that lays out an ambitious agenda to improve conditions for walking, bicycling, and transit. The plan calls for an expansion of frequent bus service, pedestrian safety improvements, bikeways, and adopting a Vision Zero agenda. http://bit.ly/2qDEe6x

TRICOUNTY CHARLESTON, SC AREA WALK & BIKE PLAN
-> With more than 2,187 crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists reported in the Charleston, SC tricounty area since 2010, the first priority when developing a unified walk and bike plan for the Lowcountry was safety. (Walk + Bike BCD: Berkley, Charleston, Dorchester: http://bit.ly/2qECcTT) Led by the Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester Council of Governments (BCDCOG) recently, the proposed regional plan comes after almost a year of study and public comment. To prioritize the routes and areas where improvements would most benefit communities and facilitate more active commuters, the project committee took a close look at the area’s most dangerous corridors for cyclists and pedestrians. They also looked at the areas in the region where demand for bike and pedestrian connectivity was greatest but infrastructure was most lacking. The committee developed a five-phase master plan that could be implemented over the next 30-40 years, but outlined a list of near-term upgrades. http://bit.ly/2qEH5vX

WASHINGTON, DC TO INSTALL 2ND BARNES DANCE PED CROSSING
-> The Washington Posts reports next month Washington, DC will install its second traffic signal that allows pedestrian crossings in every direction, including diagonally, — a move that prioritizes pedestrians over cars in a dense, multimodal neighborhood. The new signal will give pedestrians about 30 seconds to cross 14th and Irving Streets NW in any direction while all cars are stopped. The traffic signal known as a “Barnes dance” or “pedestrian scramble” is making a resurgence in urban areas across the country as people ditch cars in favor of walking and cycling. http://wapo.st/2qE3yti

HENDERSON, NV: OLDER ADULTS FORCED TO CROSS DANGEROUS STREETS
-> Streetsblog USA reports senior citizens in the sprawling Las Vegas, NV suburb of Henderson want a safe way to cross the street. Residents of the College Villas development, which provides affordable apartments for seniors, often walk to a nearby 7-11. But to get there, they have to cross College Drive, which has a 35 mph speed limit, plus two lanes of car traffic in each direction and turn lanes. The nearest crosswalk is a quarter-mile walk. A mid-block crosswalk with a flashing sign to alert motorists will go out to bid this summer. After the crosswalk is in, however, the problem is far from solved. Like most roads in suburban America, College Drive is built to move cars quickly. Blocks are long, lanes are wide, and crossings are few and far between. Many buildings either face away from the road or are surrounded by parking lots. http://bit.ly/2qDLvDn


THE RESEARCH BEAT

MARGINALIZED CYCLISTS’ OBSTACLES TO UTILITARIAN CYCLING
-> National Institute for Transportation and Communities reports research has demonstrated that everyday or utilitarian forms of cycling are most likely to generate positive population-level health impacts, yet significant deterrents to routine cycling remain, particularly for women and minorities. The primary objective of this project is to conduct a qualitative interview study that generates rich, narrative data regarding obstacles to routine or utilitarian cycling for women and minorities. “Narratives of Marginalized Cyclists: Understanding Obstacles to Utilitarian Cycling Among Women and Minorities in Portland, Oregon” http://bit.ly/2qDo5OE

GETTING KIDS MOVING NOW SAVES BILLIONS LATER
-> Education Week reports fewer than 1 in 3 American children get enough exercise every week. If they don't get more active, more than 8 million will be obese by their 18th birthdays—and their health care and lost productivity as adults could cost the country close to $3 trillion, finds a new study in the journal Health Affairs. (Modeling The Economic And Health Impact Of Increasing Children’s Physical Activity In The United States: http://bit.ly/2pVwhfY) Researchers found fewer than 32 percent of children ages 8 to 11 get at least 25 minutes of strong physical activity at least three times a week. Using a computer simulation of all children in that age group nationwide, the researchers found that increasing the percentage of children who exercise regularly to 50 percent would cut the adult obesity rate and save nearly $22 billion in medical costs and lost productivity over their lifetimes. Getting at least 3 out of 4 kids active would save more than $40 billion. http://bit.ly/2pVvgEB

HOW CYCLING & WALKING TO WORK AFFECTS HEALTH
-> Yes! Magazine reports on the largest ever study into how cycling and walking to work affects your health. (Association Between Active Commuting and Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, and Mortality: Prospective Cohort Study: http://bit.ly/2p7tDRv) Published in the British Medical Journal, the results for cycling in particular have important implications. They suggest that councils and governments need to make it a top priority to encourage as many commuters to get on their bikes as possible. Researchers looked at 263,450 people with an average age of 53 who were either in paid employment or self-employed, and didn’t always work at home. Participants were asked whether they usually traveled to work by car, public transport, walking, cycling or a combination. They followed participants for about 5 years. They found that cycling to work was associated with a 41 percent lower risk of dying overall compared to commuting by car or public transport. Cycle commuters had a 52 percent lower risk of dying from heart disease and a 40 percent lower risk of dying from cancer. They also had 46 percent lower risk of developing heart disease and a 45 percent lower risk of developing cancer at all. Walking to work was not associated with a lower risk of dying from all causes. Walkers did, however, have a 27 percent lower risk of heart disease and a 36 percent lower risk of dying from it. http://bit.ly/2qENWFV

IMPACTS ON PEDS & CYCLISTS OF NEAR-MISS INCIDENTS
-> Streetsblog USA notes a new report from Houston attempts to gauge the impact of “near-miss” incidents there and how we think about street safety. Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research tabulated 133 near-miss incidents reported by volunteers over the course of a week in March. More than two-thirds were near-misses between cyclists and car drivers, while about one in three were between pedestrians and drivers. Check out a 2:19 minute video describing key findings and ways city leaders can work towards designing streets to reduce the likelihood of those close calls. (http://bit.ly/2qDGwCL) “Learning from Close Calls: A Glimpse into Near-Miss Experiences” http://bit.ly/2qDEQsX

BIG DATA SHINES LIGHT ON BIKE & PED TRIPS
-> The State Smart Transportation Initiative reports new applications in big data could soon let us understand precisely how people move around by bike and on foot, for all types of trips, almost anywhere in the country. SSTI has worked with several providers to better understand the available trip data and its useful applications. We recently tested preliminary pedestrian data, provided by StreetLight Data (http://bit.ly/2qF1pxm), with promising results. http://bit.ly/2qEwJfA

US BIKE COMMUTER MAPS & DATA
-> A CityLab article considers bicycle commuting data from several angles. It used commuting data compiled by the Census American Community Survey from 2011 to 2015 to create a map showing where bike commuters make up the largest percentage share of commuters and the largest raw numbers of riders. CityLab also provides a table that shows the top 25 large metros by the share of commuters who bike to work. However, the largest share of bicycle commuters are in smaller and medium-sized metros, mainly college towns.

It also conducted a correlation analysis between the share of workers who cycle to work and key economic and social and demographic characteristics of metros areas. It found the share of commuters who cycle to work is positively and significantly associated with higher density, more transit use, and less sprawl. Cycling is closely associated with density (.42) and use of public transit (.28), and it’s (strongly) negatively associated with the share of commuters who drive to work alone (-.59), an indicator of the deleterious costs of sprawl. http://bit.ly/2qE3BFh

TRB: FINDABILITY AND RELEVANCE OF TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
-> Transportation Research Board’s “Improving Findability and Relevance of Transportation Information” (Volumes I and II) (http://bit.ly/2r7zt8A) provides practices and tools to facilitate on-demand retrieval of useful information stored in project files, libraries, and other agency archives. The report defines a management framework for classification, search, and retrieval of transportation information; documents successful practices for organizing and classifying information that can be adapted to search and retrieval of the diversity of information a transportation agency creates and uses; develops federated or enterprise search procedures that an agency can use to make transportation information available to users, subject to concerns for security and confidentiality; and demonstrates implementation of the management framework, information organization and classification practices, and search procedures. Volumes I and II provide guidance and background information designed to assist agencies to tailor findability procedures and tools to meet their particular needs.

BIKE SHARE SYSTEM OWNERS & OPERATORS EQUITY SURVEY INSIGHTS
-> National Institute for Transportation and Communities reports while bike-sharing systems become increasingly common in US cities, questions about the equity of such systems are making their way to the forefront of the conversation. Bike share can provide a cheap and healthy means of transportation, but many systems are not serving the lower-income and minority populations who, arguably, could benefit most from having the additional travel option. A survey of 56 bike share system operators in the US offers an overview of how these equity concerns are being addressed. (Breaking Barriers to Bike Share: Insights on Equity from a Survey of Bike Share System Owners and Operators: http://bit.ly/2qDKgE2) The survey is part of a larger research effort, “Evaluating Efforts to Improve the Equity of Bike Share Systems.” (http://bit.ly/2qDocK2)

HIGHER MASS TRANSIT USE, LOWER OBESITY RATES
-> Healthy mass transit systems could contribute to healthier communities, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers that determined higher mass transit use was correlated with lower obesity rates in counties across the United States. The analysis found that for each 1 percent increase in a county’s population who frequently ride public transit, obesity rates dropped 0.2 percent. The study is published in the journal Preventive Medicine. “Analyzing the Impact of Public Transit Usage on Obesity” http://bit.ly/2qEBAxm


QUOTES R US

"The near-misses that bicyclists and pedestrians sometimes experience may affect their future travel decisions and prompt them to avoid roads they know are dangerous. That, in turn, could reduce the number of collisions at particular intersections. On paper, that could make an area seem safe, even if they aren’t. Thus, those areas could be overlooked if decisions about road safety are based crash incidents alone."
—Dian Nostikasari commenting on Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research report “Learning from Close Calls: A Glimpse into Near-Miss Experiences” (see Research section for details) http://bit.ly/2qDMh3e

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

APP FILLS WORLD WITH VIRTUAL STATUES OF NOTABLE WOMEN
Helping tell a more complete story of history, crowdsourced app The Whole Story (http://bit.ly/2qEzVIk) adds virtual statues of notable women to any location in the world. When a visitor holds up a smartphone as if taking a photo, the statue will appear in the position and location designated by the creator. To add a statue to the app, users are asked to add their design via their Facebook account and then anchor it in a precise real-world location. http://bit.ly/2qECF8v.


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
To better help you plan your continuing education activities, we list Webinars scheduled in the next month. Check our searchable master calendar at http://bit.ly/centerlines for opportunities farther in the future. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical.

NEXT UP

Webinar "Crowdfunding for Walkable Communities"
Date: June 1, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: ioby
Details: http://bit.ly/2qDdu66, free

Webinar "Determining the Appropriate Level of Safety Analysis for a Project"
Date: June 1, 2017, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: FHWA
Details: http://bit.ly/2qEGnib, free

Webinar " Innovative Financing for Public Transportation: Value Capture and Small-and Medium-sized Public Private Partnerships"
Date: June 7, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET, 1.5 AICP CMs
Presenters: Sasha Page (IMG Rebel) & Nathan Macek (WSP Parsons Brinckerhoff)
Hosts: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2oWhnab, free

Webinar "Linking Transportation and Health Goals: Resources for Practitioners"
Date: June 13, 2017, 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: ITE
Details: http://bit.ly/2qAFPKs, $99.00 Members/ $149 Non-members

Webinar "Tracking the Walking Path: Tools and Programs to Measure Walking and Walkability"
Date: June 14, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Geoffrey Battista (McGill University) & Kelly Rodgers (Streetsmart)
Hosts: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0lbB2, free

Webinar "Where the Duct Tape Meets the Road: Using Pop-Ups to Promote Safe Routes to School"
Date: June 15, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Grace Kyun (Trailnet), Jeff Knowles (Alta Planning + Design) & Marisa Jones (Safe Routes to School National Partnership)
Hosts: Safe Routes to School National Partnership
Details: http://bit.ly/2qEGQRB, free

Webinar "A Road Map for Age-Friendly Communities"
Date: June 16, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APA Planning Webcast Series
Details: http://bit.ly/2r5vjhG, free
[See Resources section for details about the APA Policy Guide on Aging in Community.]

Webinar "Beyond Counting - Putting the Data to Work for Better Planning and Evaluation"
Date: June 21, 2017, 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0pxrS, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members

Webinar "Planning and Preliminary Engineering Applications Guide to the Highway Capacity Manual: Part 2, Applications" (Part 1, Contents on May 30, 2017)
Date: June 28, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Tom Creasey (Stantec Consulting) & Paul Ryus (Kittelson & Assoc.)
Hosts: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2oXwvzO, free for TRB affiliates, $95/site for others

Webinar "A City in Transformation: A Look at St. Paul, MN"
Date: July 12, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0nW5o, free

Webinar "Restoring Public Access to Waterfronts"
Date: July 19, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0hZp7, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members

Webinar "Safety Fundamentals: Safety for All Road Users"
Date: July 20, 2017, 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: ITE
Details: http://bit.ly/2qAQowY, $99.00 Members/ $149 Non-members

Webinar "2017 National Walking Summit Preview"
Date: August 9, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0oJmY, free

Webinar "Incorporating Public Art into Transportation Corridors"
Date: August 16, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0qIaL, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members


RESOURCES

APA POLICY GUIDE ON AGING IN COMMUNITY
-> The two-page Aging in Community Policy Guide: Talking Points for Planners tool (http://bit.ly/2qApZPZ) breaks down APA's six guiding principles for navigating the economic, social, and health challenges that can arise when communities do not plan for the aging population. It also provides examples of some challenges older adults face and opportunities to address each one.

[See Webinar section for June 16 webinar on this topic and tool.]

USE YOUR PHONE TO NAVIGATE BIKE ROUTES WORLDWIDE
-> Adventure Cycling Association reports OpenCycleMap (http://bit.ly/2qDi1FQ), is a volunteer-run, wiki-based mapping project to map all of the designated bike routes in the world via interactive, digital maps. OpenCycleMap displays the major public bicycle route networks like the U.S. Bicycle Route System and EuroVelo Routes. (Over 11,000 miles of US Bicycle Routes have been approved in 24 states. When complete, the USBRS will encompass 50,000 miles of routes for cross-country travel and commuting by bicycle.) OpenCycleMap also partners with cities and states to display regional and local routes. See the article for specific tips in using this resource for planning and during a trip. http://bit.ly/2qDqXLn

[See Jobs section for Adventure Cycling Association’s open US Bicycle Route System Coordinator position.]

FHWA STEP PROGRAM PROMOTES PED SAFETY COUNTERMEASURES
-> FHWA reports in its Human Environment Digest reports its Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) Program is the Every Day Counts (EDC-4) Innovation of the Month. (http://bit.ly/2qQSgWP) The program highlights five proven countermeasures to allow pedestrians to safely cross the road at uncontrolled locations. These countermeasures include road diets, pedestrian hybrid beacons, pedestrian refuge islands, raised crosswalks, and crosswalk visibility enhancements.

ITE: PED & BIKE SAFETY IN PARKING FACILITIES
-> Relatively few studies have examined pedestrian and bicycle crashes in parking facilities, and crashes that occur there are often excluded from municipal or corridor pedestrian and bicycle safety studies. An ITE committee studied this issue and generated an informational report. “Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety in Parking Facilities” (http://bit.ly/2qAtRjO) provides detailed information on the problem of pedestrian and bicycle crashes in surface and multi-level parking facilities, and offers best practices to enhance the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists in these facilities. It also summarizes best practices to address the problem of pedestrian slips, trips, and falls in parking facilities. Although this issue was not the central focus of the committee, it is an important component of parking facility safety and must be considered in parking facility design and maintenance.

BIKES DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY FOR KIDS
-> CityLab reports most kids’ bikes are incredibly heavy—sometimes even heavier than adult bikes—and their brake levers were difficult for small hands to reach and operate. Islabikes—the first company dedicated exclusively to children’s bikes offers bikes for all ages—from toddlers to teens—starting with balance bikes, which lack pedals or chains. These allow small children to learn how to balance so they’re better prepared when they graduate to pedals. The company designs each bike ergonomically, providing, for instance, smaller, lighter brake levers and slimmer handlebars to suit a child’s grip. Islabikes are expensive: a balance bike costs $250, and some of the models for older kids run over $1,000. While the company’s devotees note that the resale value is high. Islabikes is producing a series that it will rent. http://bit.ly/2qEizeq

TRB: MANAGING EXTREME WEATHER AT BUS STOPS
-> Transportation Research Board’s “Managing Extreme Weather at Bus Stops” (http://bit.ly/2r7nsA1) documents current practices of transit systems to determine methods and procedures used for maintaining transit stops and associated infrastructure during and following extreme weather events. This synthesis provides a state-of-the-practice report on transit systems' management of extreme weather events; associated planning; management responsibilities; efforts to respond; standards and specifications; associated legal claims; and communication with customers.


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> Call for Abstracts - 10th International Urban Design Conference, November 13-15, 2017, Queensland, Australia
Deadline: July 31, 2017, http://bit.ly/2p7vs0B

-> CALL FOR PAPERS -The History of Bicycle Transportation and Planning for lectern or poster presentation at the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting January 7-11, 2018, Washington DC.
Deadline: August 1, 2017 (Call opens June 1), http://bit.ly/2r8k7AZ

-> Call for Abstracts - Applying Census Data for Transportation, November 14-16, 2017, Kansas City, MO
Deadline: August 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2oWI6Ui

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 12th Access Management Conference, July 17-19, 2018, Madison, WI.
Deadline: September 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2p7sNUC

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

ON THE HORIZON

-> June 2-4, 2017 - Bike Travel Weekend
http://bit.ly/2rpfTDf
-> June 3, 2017 - National Trails Day
http://bit.ly/1PtLgW0
-> June 6, 2017 - Small Town and Rural Multimodal Networks Guide Training, Bend, OR
http://bit.ly/2oZOKVa
-> June 7-10, 2017 - International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA),Victoria, BC, Canada.
http://bit.ly/2ddUm8N
-> June 11-15, 2017 - Mobility Rising CTA Expo, Detroit, MI.
http://bit.ly/2gFUEuZ
-> June 12, 2017 - Scientists for Cycling Colloquium, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
http://bit.ly/2p06MGX
-> June 13-16, 2017 - Velo-city 2017 Arnhem-Nijmegen, Arnhem and Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
http://bit.ly/1XVRoKZ
-> June 14-15, 2017 - Vision Zero Conference 2017, Stockholm, Sweden
http://bit.ly/2p08uIi
-> June 17-20, 2017 - Canadian Institute of Planners National Planning Conference, Calgary, Canada
http://bit.ly/2gG9amn
-> June 19-22, 2017 - 12th ITS European Congress, Strasbourg, France
http://bit.ly/2pzxFW7
-> June 21-23, 2017 - International Conference on Ambulatory Monitoring of Physical Activity and Movement, Bethesda, MD.
http://bit.ly/2ltByYp
-> June 26-29, 2017 - APBP Professional Development Seminar, Memphis, TN.
http://bit.ly/2cuj8CD
-> June 27-29, 2017 - International Conference on Transport and Health, Barcelona, Spain.
http://bit.ly/2gwlBxA
-> June 28-30, 2017 - PlacesForBikes Conference 2017, Madison, WI
http://bit.ly/2jo6oC1
-> June 28-30, 2017 - National Regional Transportation Conference, Denver, CO
http://bit.ly/2r5VwwL
-> July 2-15, 2017 - Initiative for Bicycle & Pedestrian Innovation Sustainable Transportation in the Netherlands Study Tour
http://bit.ly/2k1cd5y
-> July 3-6, 2017 - World Symposium on Transport and Land Use Research 2017, Brisbane, Australia.
http://bit.ly/1TeCGNp
-> July 8-11, 2017 - 2017 Esri Imaging & Mapping Forum, San Diego, CA.
http://arcg.is/2nLau7H
-> July 10-11, 2017 - 10th Making Cities Liveable Conference, Brisbane, Australia
http://bit.ly/1goazoz
-> July 12-13, 2017 - Integrating Bike-Ped Topics into University Transportation Courses, Initiative for Bicycle & Pedestrian Innovation, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2k1pYRD
-> July 14-18, 2017 - Conference of Minority Transportation Officials, Detroit, MI
http://bit.ly/2r5QTmj
-> July 24-26, 2017 - 22nd International Symposium on Transportation and Traffic Theory (ISTTT), Chicago, IL.
http://bit.ly/24PdyPd
-> July 27-28, 2017 - 8th International Visualization in Transportation Symposium: Visualization in Action, Washington, D.C.
http://bit.ly/2dlh6Io
-> July 29 - August 2, 2017 - Greater, Greener 2017: Parks Connecting Cities, Cultures and Generations, Minneapolis & St. Paul, MN.
http://bit.ly/2nQO44G
-> July 31 - August 4, 2017 - Comprehensive Bikeway Design 2.0, Initiative for Bicycle & Pedestrian Innovation, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2k1qyPj
-> August 8, 2017 - 7th Annual Silicon Valley Bike Summit, Mountain View, CA
http://bit.ly/2qEIO4r
-> August 20-24, 2017 (NOTE NEW DATE) - 1.0 Workshop: Fundamentals of Bikeway Planning & Design, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2k1fPoj
-> September 11-12, 2017 - TREC Transportation & Communities Summit, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2oZTk5V
-> September 11-13, 2017 - 2nd Transportation Research Board Conference on Transportation Needs of National Parks and Public Lands: Partnerships for Enhancing Stewardship and Mobility, Washington, D.C.
http://bit.ly/2fb3YUg
-> September 13-15, 2017 - National Walking Summit, St. Paul. MN.
http://bit.ly/2a7hk08
-> September 15, 2017 - New York State Bike Summit, Albany, NY.
http://bit.ly/2ltfj4K
-> September 16-20, 2017 - Governors Highway Safety Association Annual Meeting, Louisville, KY
http://bit.ly/2mu32MO
-> September 17-20, 2017 - Rail~Volution 2017, Denver, CO.
http://bit.ly/S0xyxe
-> September 19-21, 2017 - International Cycling Conference 2017, Mannheim, Germany
http://bit.ly/2oYZ00b
-> September 19-22, 2017 - Walk21 Calagry 2017, Calgary, Canada
http://bit.ly/2gwJJ6c
-> September 21-22, 2017 - 6th International Cycling Safety Conference (ICSC), Davis, CA.
http://bit.ly/2jUmGQa
-> September 24–25, 2017 - West Virginia Bike Summit, Morgantown, WV.
http://bit.ly/2lt6w2s
-> September 26-29, 2017 - 14th International Conference on Urban Health, Health Equity: The New Urban Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals, Coimbra, Portugal
http://bit.ly/2jyEdAu
-> October 1-3, 2017 - Southeast Greenways and Trails Summit, Durham, NC.
http://bit.ly/2nQH2x5
-> October 2, 2017 - Colorado Bicycle Summit, Denver, CO.
http://bit.ly/2kHfGdZ
-> October 3-4, 2017- 10th Annual Growing Sustainable Communities Conference, Dubuque, IA.
http://bit.ly/2ltAOSZ
-> October 3–6, 2017 - California Bicycle Summit, Sacramento, CA.
http://bit.ly/2p0dcG1
-> October 4, 2017 - International Walk to School Day
http://bit.ly/1HFSofq
-> October 6-8, 2017 - Youth Bike Summit, Arlington, VA & Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/2jyEG3b
-> October 11-14, 2017 - Placemaking Week 2017, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
http://bit.ly/2lVa6ly
-> October 14-16, 2017 - I AM Traffic 2, St. Louis, MO
http://bit.ly/2r5YL7h
-> October 17-20, 2017 - Asia Pacific Cycling Congress, Christchurch, New Zealand
http://bit.ly/2oM5lgp
-> October 20-23, 2017 - American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA.
http://bit.ly/1OrYqwK
-> October 29 - November 2, 2017 - ITS World Congress: Integrated Mobility Driving Smart Cities, Montréal, Canada
http://bit.ly/2k1c563
-> October 30-November 2, 2017 - NACTO Designing Cities 2017, Chicago, IL.
http://bit.ly/2fwJOG1
-> November 2, 2017 - CTS 28th Annual Transportation Research Conference, Minneapolis, MN.
http://bit.ly/1o0DfWn
-> November 3–4, 2017 - North Carolina Bike Summit, Wilmington, NC.
http://bit.ly/1fgGco2
-> November 14-16, 2017 - Using Census Data for Transportation Applications Conference, Kansas City, MO.
http://bit.ly/2kJRvf2
-> December 5-7, 2017 - Brownfields 2017: Sustainable Communities Start Here, Pittsburgh, PA.
http://bit.ly/2kkICs9

NEW & FURTHER OUT: See http://bit.ly/centerlines for other events more than six months from now.
-> September 16-19, 2018 - Walk/Bike/Places Conference (formerly Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place), New Orleans, LA
http://bit.ly/2oWTtf2


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> 2 JOBS - SEATTLE NEIGHBORHOOD GREENWAYS, SEATTLE, WA
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is a grassroots, walking and biking focused, non-profit that has been improving Seattle neighborhoods since 2011. They strongly encourage applications from people who have historically been underrepresented in walking and biking advocacy, nonprofit work, and the transportation sector.

1) COMMUNITY ORGANIZER
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways seeks a full time community organizer to lead grassroots organizing and advocacy campaigns. This person will recruit, develop, and retain volunteers; provide support, guidance, knowledge, encouragement, and organization for our twenty neighborhood-based groups; and run six to seven annual advocacy campaigns. They’re looking for someone with experience with volunteer management and community organizing, and with running advocacy campaigns.
Deadline: June 8, 2017 by 5:00 pm PT, http://bit.ly/2qEMl2z

2) COMMUNICATIONS-DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways seeks a full time Development and Communications Coordinator to lead fund development and communication efforts. This person will develop and manage fund development plan; donor management efforts; and online presence and communications. They’re looking for someone with experience managing fund development programs, marketing and public relations, and an ability to work independently with general guidance.
Deadline: June 8, 2017 by 5:00 pm PT, http://bit.ly/2qENhUV

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER - TPAC ADMINISTRATOR, RALEIGH, NC
The Wake County Transit Plan was adopted in 2016, and a successful referendum established a half-cent funding source to implement the plan. The governance agreement for the funding source established a Transit Planning Advisory Committee (TPAC) comprised of representatives from each municipality in Wake County, the County itself, and other agencies such as the Capital Area MPO, GoTriangle regional transit agency, NC State University and Research Triangle Park. The Capital Area MPO was appointed by the TPAC as the lead agency responsible for administering the TPAC. The TPAC Administrator will lead the implementation efforts of the Wake County Transit Plan through day-to-day coordination of the TPAC.
Deadline: June 9, 2017 by 11:59 PM ET, http://bit.ly/2r5BToi

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER II, FAIRFAX COUNTY, VA
As part of the Capital Projects Section, the Transportation Planner II is responsible for all aspects of project management and coordination for multi-modal transportation projects. Coordinates the development, design, and review of transportation projects, plans, and feasibility studies. This include intersection, roadway, and multi-modal projects, such as pedestrian, bicycle, transit, and parking facilities. Reviews transportation facility design plans and resolves project issues. Develops scopes for new projects which include developing project cost estimates. Reviews traffic studies, data and performs transportation planning analysis. Prepares technical reports, correspondence and other written documents. Coordinates project development with residents, agencies, and elected officials.
Deadline: June 9, 2017 by 5:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/2qDsQaK

-> JOB - PROJECT PLANNER/SRTS PROGRAMS COORDINATOR, TOOLE DESIGN GROUP, BERKELEY, CA
Toole Design Group seeks an experienced planner and project manager to lead multiple SRTS programs and projects, ranging from individual school plans to establishing national best practices.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2r7WMzc

-> JOB - US BICYCLE ROUTE SYSTEM COORDINATOR, ADVENTURE CYCLING ASSOCIATION, MISSOULA, MT
Adventure Cycling Association seeks an energetic and detail-oriented project manager to help implement U.S. Bicycle Routes and improve bicycle travel conditions in North America. The U.S. Bicycle Route System Coordinator will manage the development of an officially recognized bicycle route network, called the U.S. Bicycle Route System (USBRS).
Deadline: Open until filled, http://bit.ly/2sb9zj8

-> JOB - SENIOR TRANSPORTATION ADVISOR, APPALACHIAN REGIONAL COMMISSION, WASHINGTON, DC
This position serves as the senior transportation advisor for the Appalachian Regional Commission. The position has lead responsibility for the Commission's transportation-related economic development activities, and provides critical oversight of the Appalachian Development Highway System, a 3,090-mile system of modern highways that connects Appalachia with the Interstate Highway System, and serves as the cornerstone of ARC's transportation economic development efforts. The position provides strategic leadership regarding completion of the remaining corridors of the ADHS, serving as liaison with the 13 Appalachian state highway agencies and the Federal Highway Administration, and provides oversight and monitoring of the use of ARC funds in highway programs. This position also explores and coordinates efforts to recognize the importance of all aspects of transportation in the Appalachian Region, including consideration of a "Complete Streets" approach to transportation, improving pedestrian and bicycle facilities and recognizing the role of streetscape improvements in the revitalization of Appalachia's cities and towns.
Deadline: Open until authorized, http://bit.ly/2qDmGHM

-> JOB - BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS MANAGER, LOCAL MOTION, BURLINGTON, VT
Local Motion is looking for a Business Partnerships Manager to help businesses and organizations around Vermont attract and retain employees and customers by becoming more walk and bike friendly. You will build their network of business members, assist them with Bicycle Friendly Business recognition, organize “Everyday Bicycling” workshops at workplaces, manage Local Motion’s Valet Bike Parking service, and provide bike parking consultation to municipalities and businesses.
Deadline: Open until filled, http://bit.ly/2qEp1Cd

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


HOUSEKEEPING

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Founding Editor: In Memoriam John Williams.

Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston

Contributors: AARP Livable Communities Newsletter; AASHTO Daily Transportation Update; Adventure Cycling Association; Liz Ahlberg Touchstone; America Walks; American Planning Association Transportation Planning Division; Michael Andersen; Apple News; Arch Daily; Association of Bicycle & Pedestrian Professionals Listserve; Austroads; Bicycle Dutch; Bicycle Friendly America Update; Bicycling; Laura Bliss; Nathan Bomey: Boston Cyclists Union; Carlos Celis-Morales; The Charleston City Paper; CityLab; ECF General Newsletter; Education Week; Richard Florida; FHWA; Jason Gill; Nate Graham; Human Environment Digest; Illinois News Bureau; Angela Johnson; Mimi Kirk; League of American Bicyclists; LinkedIn Urban Planning Group; Livability Communities Newsletter; Chris McCahill; Margaux Mennesson; Stephen Miller; Chloé Mispelon; Montana Associated Technology Roundtables; My Modern Met; NACTO; National Institute for Transportation and Communities; Dian Nostikasari; Public Square; Charlie Otto; Gordon Padelford; PeopleForBikes; Wendy Phelps; Project for Public Spaces Weekly Placemaking Round-Up; Public Health Newswire; Kelly Richman-Abdou; Carolien Ruebens; Safe Routes to School National Partnership; Glissette Santa; Smart Growth America; Smart Growth Information Clearinghouse; Smart Growth Online; Sarah D. Sparks; Springwise; SSTI e-newsletter; Star Advertiser; Perry Stein; Robert Steuteville; Streetsblog USA; Ginny Sullivan; TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter; The Trust for Public Land; The Urban Edge; USA Today; US DOT; Jason Van Driesche; The Washington Post; Dustin Waters; Caron Whitaker; Marlene Wiles; Robert Wilson; Wired; Yes! Magazine.


CONTACT US

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