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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#437 Wednesday, June 14, 2017

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Predictive Analytics to Predict & Prevent Collisions
----- Iranian Women Defy Cycling Fatwa
----- Economic Benefits of Lowering Congestion Via Cycling
----- NACTO: Green Light for Great Streets
----- New Street-Level Analysis of Biking Networks in 299 US Cities
----- Assessing Job Accessibility for Cyclists
----- Cycling Aspects of Austroads Guides (2017 Edition)
----- The Netherlands Busiest Cycle Route: Ave 32K People/Day
----- Video Analytics Towards Vision Zero Call for Volunteers
----- Respond to SRTS Survey National Partnership Survey
----- OpEd: The Unintended Consequences Of Bicycle Helmets

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- The Best Complete Streets Policies of 2016
----- Philadelphia, PA: Teaching Computer Skills to Access Bike Share
----- Minneapolis, MN: Expanding Bike Lane Network & Disability Access
----- Akron, OH: Part of 6-Lane Highway to be Covered by Trees
----- Portland, OR Regional SRTS Framework
----- Hartford, CT: BID Offers Free Roadside Assistance to Cyclists
----- PA Adds US Bicycle Route System Segment
----- Seattle, WA: More Who Ride Work Near Protected Bike Lanes
----- Baltimore, MD: Mayor Cuts Protected Bike Lane Width
----- OR Transpo Bill Falls Short on Safe Routes to School
----- Highland Park, MI Rail-Trail Segment Connects Detroit Loop

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Active Travel Behavior & Spatial-Temporal Land Use Mixing
----- Neighborhood Environment & Active Travel in Older Adults
----- Bike Network Effects on Safety & Ridership
----- Minneapolis, MN: Safety in Numbers for Cyclists?
----- Assessing the Effectiveness of Vision Zero
----- Demographic Analysis: Improving Ped Safety in Low Income Areas
----- Improving Transit Access for People Walking & Biking
----- Biking Preferences in Low-Income Areas May Vary by Race
----- Los Angeles, CA: Safety Analysis of Road Diet Corridors

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- Coming Soon: NACTO Urban Street Stormwater Guide
----- Design Your Town Online Interactive Resource
----- ADA Title II Action Guide for State & Local Governments
----- ANSI Standard on Accessible & Usable Buildings & Facilities
----- Relationship between Public Transport & Innovative Mobility
----- Datasets of State-Level HIA and HiAP Bills & Laws
----- Videos: Variations in Practice of Rumble Strips & Rumble Stripes
----- TRB Neighborhood Greenways Workshop Resources
----- Best Practices for Trails Crossings
----- Natural Surface Trails in Urban Environments
----- TRB Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Conference Summary

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS TO PREDICT & PREVENT COLLISIONS
-> Govtech reports according to a new study, cities may be able to collect data on dangerous driving behaviors and focus on unsafe areas before collisions ever take place. (Predicting and Preventing Traffic Casualties: Preliminary Mapping Analysis of New York City Driver Behavior Data and Collision Data: http://bit.ly/2spMmNi) Zendrive, developer of software that measures unsafe driving through smartphone sensors, partnered with New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering to compare hard braking and rapid acceleration habits and found a 71% correlation between crash sites and the examples of risky driver behavior. http://bit.ly/2spGBzc

IRANIAN WOMEN DEFY CYCLING FATWA
-> According to The Guardian religious leaders in Iran consider women on bicycles a threat to morality. But as traffic chokes the capital, Tehran, a counter-movement is growing. The question has become a hotly debated point in Tehran in recent months, as the city grapples with two truly dire problems: air pollution and traffic congestion, both some of the world’s worst. With cars choking Iran’s cities, campaigns to encourage cycling are picking up speed. http://bit.ly/2srvZQt

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF LOWERING CONGESTION VIA CYCLING
-> In its recap of Day 1 of the Velo-city Conference in Arnhem-Nijmegen, The Netherlands, the European Cyclists’ Federation described the economic benefits of lowering traffic congestion through cycling. The European FLOW (Furthering Less Congestion by Creating Opportunities For More Walking and Cycling) project is currently studying these effects. The aim is to put walking and cycling on an equal footing with motorized modes to tackle urban congestion, by developing a user-friendly methodology, and involving traffic modeling, to assess the effectiveness of walking and cycling measures. The Netherlands, faced with an expected rise of 40% in traffic jams, has already started the “Beter benutten” (“Optimizing Use”) program to improve accessibility in the 12 busiest regions of the country by optimizing the use of existing infrastructure. Promoting cycling is a central part of program, for example through smartphone apps, cycle highways or incentives to use e-bikes. Besides reducing congestion, there are a lot of other co-benefits, for example through reduced costs in the public health system. Also, see recaps of these other sessions: What Gets People Cycling?; Social Inclusion; and Cycling For All- What Does it Really Mean? http://bit.ly/2sq457j

NACTO: GREEN LIGHT FOR GREAT STREETS
-> Streetsblog USA reports the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), representing more than 50 urban transportation departments across the United States, is launching an initiative called Green Light for Great Streets (http://bit.ly/2t067rV) to identify what’s holding back implementation of smarter street designs at a consistent pace in cities around the country, and identify strategies for overcoming those barriers. Green Light for Great Streets will encourage urban design excellence by helping cities make changes that allow them to move from individual project delivery to a comprehensive program with a pipeline of transformative projects. With this work, city goals—like building a city-wide high-capacity transit network or redesigning streets to support increased pedestrian activity—will be achievable on a broad scale, rather than implemented on what is often now a piecemeal basis.http://bit.ly/2t0cmfk

NEW STREET-LEVEL ANALYSIS OF BIKING NETWORKS IN 299 US CITIES
-> Streetsblog USA reports PeopleForBikes has just made the first attempt to measure and compare local bike networks on a nationwide scale. (PlacesForBikes Bike Network Analysis Score: http://bit.ly/2t0d502) Using OpenStreetMap (a sort of Wikipedia for online maps) and the widely respected “level of traffic stress” methodology developed by Northeastern University’s Peter Furth, they developed digital records of the biking networks in 299 U.S. cities and assigned a numerical score to how well each one connects people to places. One major shortcoming: It’s blind to destinations that haven’t been entered in OpenStreetMap. One interesting phenomenon turned up by the BNA: Many of the top-scoring cities have very small populations. Some of them hardly have any actual bike lanes. http://bit.ly/2t0s4Ht

ASSESSING JOB ACCESSIBILITY FOR CYCLISTS
-> The University of MN Accessibility Observatory reports evaluating real-world bicycle access to destinations is a significantly more challenging problem than for other modes, since route planning by bicycle is significantly more sensitive to things like road type, speed limit, hills, and the presence (or lack) of dedicated infrastructure like bike lanes than route planning for cars or transit. They created a map showing bicycle accessibility to jobs within 30 minutes in the Twin Cities area, without accounting for where people actually would prefer to ride or avoid; the reality is likely significantly less geographically uniform. To account for this sensitivity among people interested in bicycling, the Observatory is working to adapt the bicycle level of traffic stress (LTS) framework to our research. (Low-Stress Bicycling and Network Connectivity: Low-Stress Bicycling and Network Connectivity) LTS assigns a “stress level” ranking to roadways based on data such as street width, number of lanes, speed limit, the presence of bike lane facilities, and other factors. The higher the stress level, the less likely people are to use the street for biking and the less likely people will be able to reach businesses and other destinations on that roadway by bike. http://bit.ly/2t08WZS

CYCLING ASPECTS OF AUSTROADS GUIDES (2017 EDITION)
-> “Cycling Aspects of Austroads Guides” contains planning, design and traffic management of cycling facilities information from Australia’s Austroads Guides, primarily the “Guide to Road Design” (http://bit.ly/2spt0YC), the “Guide to Traffic Management” (http://bit.ly/2spODb8) and the “Guide to Road Safety” (http://bit.ly/2spwqKQ). It provides an overview of planning and traffic management considerations and cross-references to other Austroads Guides and texts; a summary of design guidance and criteria relating to on-road and off-road bicycle facilities with cross-referencing to the relevant Austroads Guides; and information and cross-references on the provision for cyclists at structures, traffic control devices, construction and maintenance considerations and end-of-trip facilities. http://bit.ly/2spTDg1

THE NETHERLANDS BUSIEST CYCLE ROUTE: AVE 32K PEOPLE/DAY
-> According to Bicycle Dutch Vredenburg (the main east-west route in Utrecht) is part of The Netherlands’ busiest cycle route. On an average working day, some 32,000 people pass here on a bicycle. On one single occasion the city counted 37,000. On a very cold, wet day in April, a single hour count with the CounterPoint App (http://bit.ly/2t0grQs) tallied almost 4,000 people passing on their bicycles. Check out photos from the 1960s and now plus video and more detail at http://bit.ly/2t0DavS

VIDEO ANALYTICS TOWARDS VISION ZERO CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS
-> In a collaboration with organizations across North America, the City of Bellevue (WA), the University of WA and Microsoft are asking for the public's help in a cutting-edge effort to help prevent deaths and serious injuries from traffic crashes. Called "Video Analytics Towards Vision Zero," the project will tap new technologies to analyze traffic camera video footage available in many cities, and use near-miss collisions to predict where future crashes are likely to occur. Traffic engineers could then take corrective action to prevent them.

Project organizers are encouraging as many people as possible to help by watching traffic camera video and using tracking tools to identify objects and movements. The crowd-sourcing effort is critical to the project's success. http://bit.ly/2t0vFoC

RESPOND TO SRTS SURVEY NATIONAL PARTNERSHIP SURVEY
-> The Safe Routes to School National Partnership is conducting a national survey about and for Safe Routes to School program champions and volunteers. The goal is to explore what motivates and sustains those who volunteer their time for a Safe Routes to School Program, and to understand how Safe Routes to School coordinators manage and recruit volunteers. We hope this information will assist practitioners and advocates on various ways to develop, support, and sustain a Safe Routes to School program. The survey should take about 15-20 minutes.
Deadline: June 30, 2017, http://bit.ly/2t01spN

OPED: THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF BICYCLE HELMETS
-> “The Unintended Consequences of Bicycle Helmets” is the focus of a recent OpEd in Medpage Today. Its author notes it is almost impossible, in the US at least, to have an intelligent conversation about bicycle helmets. The universal view is that you have to be crazy not to wear one. He opines, “...the issue is far more complex than most people believe. It's a great example of unintended consequences, and that what seems obvious may not always be so...I am opposed to public health campaigns that focus on helmets, thereby implanting in people's minds the dangers of cycling. Instead, in my view, the public health agenda regarding cycling should be to promote the far greater health benefits of cycling. The overarching goal of any public health campaign should be to dramatically increase cycling in the US, thereby increasing physical activity and helping to reduce obesity and diabetes.” http://bit.ly/2sqW2aq


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

THE BEST COMPLETE STREETS POLICIES OF 2016
-> According to Smart Growth America, as of the end of 2016, more than 1,200 jurisdictions in the United States have made formal commitments to streets that are safe and convenient for everyone—no matter their age, income, race, ethnicity, physical ability, or how they choose to travel—by passing a Complete Streets policy. The 222 policies passed in 2016 are the strongest ever passed. When the National Complete Streets Coalition first analyzed Complete Streets polices in 2006, the median score was 34. In 2016, 51 policies scored a 90 or higher, including 3 policies that scored a perfect 100. (The Best Complete Streets Policies of 2016: http://bit.ly/2sqLQyO) The Coalition is in the process of updating its policy scoring rubric for next year’s review of new policies to give more weight to equity considerations as well as implementation.

PHILADELPHIA, PA: TEACHING COMPUTER SKILLS TO ACCESS BIKE SHARE
-> Next City reports last year, realizing digital literacy could be a barrier to participation, Philadelphia’s Indego bike-share system partnered with the City’s Office of Adult Education to offer a class they call “Digital Skills and Bike Thrills.” In it, mostly low-income students of a wide range of ages, educational and racial backgrounds learn how to navigate both city streets and common computer needs. Indego’s monthly pass sign-ups are done online. An app helps navigate stations and displays bike availability. Just checking out a bike requires some tech skills. In a city that has made big strides toward bike-share inclusivity — siting stations widely across the city, not just in wealthy or central locales, and offering a cash payment option — computer skills remained a potential obstacle. http://bit.ly/2t0LBay

MINNEAPOLIS, MN: EXPANDING BIKE LANE NETWORK & DISABILITY ACCESS
-> According to the StarTribune, many popular commercial corridors in Minneapolis, MN will eventually cede part of the roadway to designated lanes for bicycles. The shift is already fanning the debate about safety, traffic congestion and lost parking in front of shops and homes. But there's another concern: How can people with disabilities navigate these new streets safely? People used to be able to deploy their lifts and ramps onto a sidewalk or boulevard — now, they’re deploying them into the street and into the bike lane. Access is particularly challenging when bike lanes are protected from cars by poles or curbs. http://strib.mn/2sqTxoF

AKRON, OH: PART OF 6-LANE HIGHWAY TO BE COVERED BY TREES
-> CityLab reports a sunken six-lane Innerbelt connector obliterated downtown Akron in the 1970s. Next summer, it’s going to be covered in trees. Never fully completed, the 4.5-mile long freeway devastated historic black neighborhoods, cordoned off downtown from westbound foot traffic, and became a notoriously underused “road to nowhere” as Akron’s population dwindled. Thirty-five acres of highway are in the process of being decommissioned, and smaller, safer, surface streets are on the way to replace it. Once the road is right-sized to fit the relatively small stream of traffic it gets, though, about two dozen acres will be left over. Now, a quarter-million dollar project will invite locals aboard the asphalt to imagine how the rest of it could be readapted for the long term. With a $214,420 grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation's 2017 Knight Cities Challenge, the artist Hunter Franks will transform two acres of highway with lush trees, alluring light installations, and public events fully accessible for surrounding neighborhoods. http://bit.ly/2t0n1Xx

PORTLAND, OR REGIONAL SRTS FRAMEWORK
-> According to the Alta Planning + Design Newsletter, Portland (OR) Public Schools estimate that more than 30% of students walk or bike to school daily. The Regional Safe Routes to School Framework (http://bit.ly/2t0VpRN) is the first step toward helping Oregon Metro develop regional policies and strategies for establishing and supporting Safe Routes to School initiatives across the region. http://bit.ly/2t0FPWu

HARTFORD, CT: BID OFFERS FREE ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE TO CYCLISTS
-> Streetsblog USA reports bicyclists in downtown Hartford, CT, have a new option if they need repairs on the go — the area’s business improvement district has launched a first-of-its-kind roadside assistance program. The Hartford BID appears to the be the first business district in the United States to offer it — for free, seven days a week. Anyone within its 55-block coverage area is eligible. Six of the BID’s on-street ambassadors have been trained to fix flats and do minor repairs. The goal is to encourage more people to get to work by bike by giving them peace of mind about any mechanical problems that might threaten to derail their commute. http://bit.ly/2sZQXTB

PA ADDS US BICYCLE ROUTE SYSTEM SEGMENT
-> The Adventure Cycling Association announced Pennsylvania’s first nationally designated bicycle route – U.S. Bicycle Route 50 – was officially approved in May by AASHTO, and makes Pennsylvania the 25th state to join the developing U.S. Bicycle Route System. The 163-mile route mostly follows off-road trails, including the popular Great Allegheny Passage, Montour Trail, and the Panhandle Trail. Cyclists can now ride 538 miles on U.S. Bicycle Route 50 from Washington, DC, to the Indiana/Illinois border. Once completed, the route will connect all the way to San Francisco. With the addition of USBR 50 in Pennsylvania, the U.S. Bicycle Route System expands to 11,726 miles and covers half the states in America. http://bit.ly/2slYn6f

SEATTLE, WA: MORE WHO RIDE WORK NEAR PROTECTED BIKE LANES
-> Mobility Lab reports people who work near Seattle, WA’s protected bike lanes ride to work more often. An analysis from nonprofit Commute Seattle recently found the seven employers with the highest rates of bike commuting are all within one block of a protected bike lane. Of the companies with the 15 highest biking rates, all are within five blocks of a protected bike lane or trail. http://bit.ly/2sriEre

BALTIMORE, MD: MAYOR CUTS PROTECTED BIKE LANE WIDTH
-> Streetsblog USA reports Baltimore, MD Mayor Catherine Pugh has given in to bikelash, downgrading a new protected bike lane while the city was in the process of installing it. Now, the bikeway will be redone as a patchwork of unprotected and too-narrow paths that fail to meet engineering standards — while resulting in dangerously wide car lanes that encourage speeding. One particular objection turned Pugh against the bike lane: firefighters cited the International Fire Code that requires 20 feet of unobstructed width for full-size fire trucks to navigate a street. However insistence on 20-foot widths for fire trucks was not an issue in converting other streets from parallel to angled parking to squeeze in more spaces or on historic streets throughout Baltimore that are less than 20 feet wide, with or without parked cars. Bike advocates worry the city will start using the 20-foot rule against other street safety projects. http://bit.ly/2t0l7Gi

OR TRANSPO BILL FALLS SHORT ON SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL
-> BikePortland (OR) reports staff and supporters from The Street Trust say a $8.2 billion transportation bill doesn’t do enough to fund Safe Routes to School. While lawmakers want to fast-track nearly $2 billion for a few freeway expansion projects in the Portland region, they want to dedicate just $10 million a year for 10 years to the Safe Routes to School program: to “improve sidewalks; reduce vehicle speeds; improve pedestrian and bicycle crossings; create or improve bicycle lanes; or improve traffic diversion” within a quarter-mile of schools. The money would also only be available to agencies and organizations that could come up with a 40% match. The Street Trust advocates adding an additional $6 million annually for classroom safety education, extending eligible funding to within a mile of schools, prioritizing Title I schools, and dropping the match requirement. http://bit.ly/2t0esfc

HIGHLAND PARK, MI RAIL-TRAIL SEGMENT CONNECTS DETROIT LOOP
-> Detroit Greenways Coalition announced it received a $5,000 Doppelt Family Trail Development Fund from the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy to raise awareness and build support for constructing the Inner Circle Greenway rail-trail segment within the city of Highland Park. The Inner Circle Greenway is the largest urban trail project in Michigan. It began as a community vision to use 8 miles of abandoned rail corridor to create a 26-mile loop trail that extended the Detroit RiverWalk and Dequindre Cut into the neighborhoods. However, 1.4 miles of the abandoned rail corridor is within the city of Highland Park. While the city of Detroit is still committed to acquiring this portion of the corridor, it does not have immediate plans to develop it. This is a critical trail connection that would have tremendous benefit to the local community as well as the overall trail itself. http://bit.ly/2sriJep


THE RESEARCH BEAT

ACTIVE TRAVEL BEHAVIOR & SPATIAL-TEMPORAL LAND USE MIXING
-> This research examines the relationship between land use mix and (a) pedestrian travel when considering the complementarity, composition, and configuration of land use types; (b) mode choice when mix is operationalized at varying geographic scales; and (c) active travel behavior when temporal availability of activity locations is incorporated into a mix metric. (Active Travel Behavior and Spatial-Temporal Land Use Mixing) Links to downloads of several related reports are also included at http://bit.ly/2sYH5td.

[See Webinar section for July 25 webinar on this topic.]

NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT & ACTIVE TRAVEL IN OLDER ADULTS
-> The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity published a study that systematically reviewed the literature on neighborhood physical environmental correlates of active transportation (AT) in older adults and applied a novel meta-analytic approach to statistically quantify the strength of evidence for environment-AT associations. Researchers found strong links between the neighborhood physical environment and older adults’ AT. Future research should focus on the identification of types and mixes of destinations that support AT in older adults and how these interact with individual characteristics and other environmental factors. Future research should also aim to clarify dose-response relationships through multi-country investigations and data-pooling from diverse geographical regions. “The Neighbourhood Physical Environment and Active Travel in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis” http://bit.ly/2srbu6p

BIKE NETWORK EFFECTS ON SAFETY & RIDERSHIP
-> Streetsblog USA asks which is more important to making a city great for biking: the number of high-quality bikeways, or whether they’re connected to each other? A new study from Spain published in Accident Analysis and Prevention found the amount of biking actually tracks most closely with the number of bikeways, while the safety of biking tracks most closely with the connectedness of bikeways. If you want lots of people biking safely, you eventually need both. (On the Effect of Networks of Cycle-Tracks on the Risk of Cycling. The Case of Seville: http://bit.ly/2t0ti5m) Researchers found bike network connectedness seems to immediately pay off in the form of lower risk to people biking. Every additional mile of protected bike lane somewhere in the city improved safety. But network connections improved safety most. http://bit.ly/2t09Ndj

MINNEAPOLIS, MN: SAFETY IN NUMBERS FOR CYCLISTS?
-> Safety in numbers (SIN) refers to the observable effect where an individual pedestrian or bicyclist’s safety is correlated with the number of pedestrians or bicyclists in an area. People walking a riding a bike in those places in the city with more pedestrians or bicyclists have a lower risk of getting hit by a car. Which comes first, the safety or the numbers? If a place is safe for biking, more people may bike there (particularly if useful destinations are nearby); if more people are already biking somewhere, then drivers may be more on the lookout. Researchers at the University of MN explored whether this SIN effect shows up in Minneapolis’ crash and traffic data. The goal of their study was to predict crash rates between cars and bicycles at street intersections—based on car and bike traffic levels—and then assess whether areas of the city exist that have much higher per-bicyclist crash rates. Overall, the predictive accuracy was not very good, with an average error of 82.6% in trying to predict the number of crashes that would occur based on traffic volumes alone. They did, however, observe evidence of the SIN effect—for every 1% increase in bicycle traffic, there was only a 0.5% increase in the predicted number of crashes. http://bit.ly/2sqx0rW

ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VISION ZERO
-> Governing reports new data is emerging that gives policymakers a better picture of where Vision Zero is working. One recent analysis of Vision Zero in New York City found that the improvements did seem to be working. (Poverty and Progress in New York City XI: Vision Zero and Traffic Safety: http://bit.ly/2t01rSK) The Manhattan Institute, a conservative think tank, concluded that pedestrian and cyclist deaths at intersections with safety treatments decreased by 34% from 2009 to 2016—far exceeding the 3% decrease during the same time for intersections that did not get new safety features. Lower-income neighborhoods remain the most dangerous for pedestrians and cyclists, who are 9 percent more likely to be injured or killed in traffic accidents in the 10 poorest New York neighborhoods than in residential neighborhoods as a whole.

DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS: IMPROVING PED SAFETY IN LOW INCOME AREAS
-> To improve pedestrian safety in low-income areas, a FL DOT study 1) developed a demographics-based methodology that identified low-income areas that possess a combination of “pre-conditions” for greater pedestrian hazard, 2) identified major factors associated with pedestrian crash frequency and injury severity and quantified their relationships, and 3) produced recommendations for both engineering countermeasures and pedestrian safety education or outreach plans that will resonate with a given area’s demographics. “Application of Demographic Analysis to Pedestrian Safety” http://bit.ly/2sqfe81

IMPROVING TRANSIT ACCESS FOR PEOPLE WALKING & BIKING
-> According to the State Smart Transportation Initiative, New research from the Mineta Transportation Institute contributes essential insights into improving transit access for nonmotorized transportation. (Improving Livability Using Green and Active Modes: A Traffic Stress Level Analysis of Transit, Bicycle, and Pedestrian Access and Mobility: http://bit.ly/2srk4lA) Researchers assert that a city should develop a low-stress road network while balancing these improvements with the desire for efficient transit service.

Most transit riders walk or bike to bus and train stations. However, transit stations often are located along high-speed or multi-lane road networks that effectively limit access to transit for these travelers. Improving the safety and comfort of nonmotorized users could allow transit to capture a larger share of trips. http://bit.ly/2sruulg

BIKING PREFERENCES IN LOW-INCOME AREAS MAY VARY BY RACE
-> Blacks and Hispanics living in Roxbury, MA, a low-income Boston neighborhood, prefer riding on safe-from-traffic bicycle routes such as cycle tracks—rather than biking with traffic in roadways—and they want more secure places to park their bicycles to prevent theft, according to a new Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health study. (Biking Practices and Preferences in a Lower Income, Primarily Minority Neighborhood: Learning What Residents Want: http://bit.ly/2sqL7xg) Researchers conducted resident surveys to learn about their biking preferences and biking habits. http://bit.ly/2sqnh50

LOS ANGELES, CA: SAFETY ANALYSIS OF ROAD DIET CORRIDORS
-> A UCLA student’s master’s capstone project conducted for the Los Angeles DOT studied road diets and their effects on crashes in Los Angeles. This project analyzed changes in rates of collisions, injuries, and severe and fatal injuries on 5 streets that received the “classic” road diet treatment in Los Angeles between 2006 and 2009. These road diets experienced statistically significant reductions in crash and injury rates of 32.4% and 36.7%. “Who Wins When Streets Lose Lanes? An Analysis of Safety on Road Diet Corridors in Los Angeles” http://bit.ly/2sZKhog


QUOTES R US

"With this level of insight, city leaders no longer have to wait for crashes and casualties to occur. They can use the data to figure out when and where to deploy interventions that will deter specific behaviors that would otherwise lead to collisions (and) focus resources on deterring the behaviors at the highest risk locations and at the most crash-prone days and times."
—The conclusion of a study that used predictive analytics of drivers’ hard braking and rapid acceleration habits to find a 71% correlation between crash sites and risky driver behavior. “Predicting and Preventing Traffic Casualties: Preliminary Mapping Analysis of New York City Driver Behavior Data and Collision Data” http://bit.ly/2spMmNi

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

LEARNING FROM THE MUSEUM OF FAILURE SPARKS INNOVATION
Sweden’s Museum of Failure the museum is also a monument to innovation–and all the mistakes that go with it. Its founder notes “We glorify success so much, but at the expense of demonizing failure.” He believes that failure is a central component to coming up with new technology. But he’s sick of the lack of conversation about failure’s role in innovation.

There are two elements of organizational psychology at play in failure sparking innovation. First, there’s psychological safety—feeling comfortable enough to make mistakes within a group setting–like asking a stupid question or voicing criticism when everyone else is on board. This is a vital part of creativity, collaboration, and, yes, innovation. The other important role that failure plays is in enabling playfulness in work, which fuels organizational creativity. To be comfortable with failure means not being afraid to take risks. http://bit.ly/2sqCy5L.

DAZZLING PHOTOS LET YOU ORBIT EARTH ABOARD THE SPACE STATION
British astronaut Tim Peake spent 186 days orbiting Earth aboard the International Space Station. He compiled 150 of his thousands of photos of the planet he snapped while he was there into the recently released, Hello, Is This Planet Earth? http://bit.ly/2r30lnT.


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
To better help you plan your continuing education activities, we list Webinars scheduled in the next month. Check our searchable master calendar at http://bit.ly/centerlines for opportunities farther in the future. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical.

NEXT UP

Webinar "Where the Duct Tape Meets the Road: Using Pop-Ups to Promote Safe Routes to School"
Date: June 15, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Grace Kyun (Trailnet), Jeff Knowles (Alta Planning + Design) & Marisa Jones (Safe Routes to School National Partnership)
Hosts: Safe Routes to School National Partnership
Details: http://bit.ly/2qEGQRB, free

Webinar "A Road Map for Age-Friendly Communities"
Date: June 16, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APA Planning Webcast Series
Details: http://bit.ly/2r5vjhG, free
[See Resources section for details about the APA Policy Guide on Aging in Community.]

Webinar "The Near Miss Project: Quantifying Cyclist Comfort and Safety"
Date: June 19, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Rachel Aldred (Near Miss Project)
Hosts: NACTO
Details: http://bit.ly/2sV5TCc, free

Webinar "Using Form-Based Codes to Create Vibrant, Walkable Communities"
Date: June 21, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Chris Zimmerman of the Form-Based Codes Institute and Smart Growth America
Hosts: Smart Growth Network
Details: http://bit.ly/2sqYTAc, free

Webinar "Beyond Counting - Putting the Data to Work for Better Planning and Evaluation"
Date: June 21, 2017, 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0pxrS, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members

Webinar “Healthy People 2030 Development: An Informational Webinar”
Date: June 22, 2017, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Presenters: Nico Pronk (Health Partners), Therese S. Richmond (Univ. of PA School of Nursing), Don Wright & Carter Blakey (US Dept. of Health and Human Services )
Hosts: American Public Health Association & US Dept. of Health and Human Services
Details: http://bit.ly/2srq6Td, free

Webinar “Extraordinary Hikes for Ordinary People: Celebrating the National Trails System”
Date: June 22, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Bob and Martha Manning (50th Anniversary of the National Trails System)
Hosts: American Trails
Details: http://bit.ly/2t0iwMz, free

Networking Call "Physical Activity and Community Design: Low-Cost Community Design Interventions that Support Physical Activity: Creative Placemaking and Pop-Up Demonstration Projects"
Date: June 22, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Kelly Cornett (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Hosts: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Details: Call-In Number: 866-581-9669, Participant Code: 31358597. Presentation materials: http://bit.ly/2smdpJB, free

Webinar "Planning and Preliminary Engineering Applications Guide to the Highway Capacity Manual: Part 2, Applications" (Part 1, Contents on May 30, 2017)
Date: June 28, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Tom Creasey (Stantec Consulting) & Paul Ryus (Kittelson & Assoc.)
Hosts: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2oXwvzO, free for TRB affiliates, $95/site for others

Webinar “NACTO Urban Street Stormwater Guide”
Date: June 29, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: NACTO, River Network & Island Press representatives
Hosts: NACTO
Details: http://bit.ly/2t0sQUN, free

Webinar "A City in Transformation: A Look at St. Paul, MN"
Date: July 12, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0nW5o, free

Webinar "Restoring Public Access to Waterfronts"
Date: July 19, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0hZp7, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members

Webinar "Successful Practices and Training Initiatives to Reduce Accidents and Incidents at Transit Agencies"
Date: July 19, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Lisa Staes & Jodi Godfrey (Center for Urban Transportation Research)
Hosts: National Transit Institute
Details:  http://bit.ly/2sZcKKT, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members

Webinar “Getting to “Yes” on Greenway Trails in Your Community”
Date: July 20, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Casey Kempenaar (City of Citrus Heights, Planning Department), Mike Dour (City of Roseville), Jim Konopka (Trails, Folsom) & Kate Kirsh (Foothill Associates)
Hosts: American Trails
Details: http://bit.ly/2t0CvdQ, fee or free depends on type of membership or non-member status

Webinar "Safety Fundamentals: Safety for All Road Users"
Date: July 20, 2017, 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: ITE
Details: http://bit.ly/2qAQowY, $99.00 Members/ $149 Non-members

Webinar "Land Use Mix and Pedestrian Travel Behavior: Advancements in Conceptualization and Measurement"
Date: July 25, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Steven Gehrke (Portland State University)
Hosts: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/2sZ7EP4, free

Webinar “Accessibility Guidance for Roundabouts and Channelized Turn Lanes”
Date: July 26, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: Bastian Schroeder & Lee Rodegerdts (Kittelson & Associates, Inc.) & Janet Barlow (Accessible Design for the Blind)
Hosts: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2t0zs5g, $105

Webinar "Bike Share Equity"
Date: August 1, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET **Date may change**
Presenters: Nathan McNeil (Portland State University)
Hosts: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/2sZazHw, free

Webinar "2017 National Walking Summit Preview"
Date: August 9, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0oJmY, free

Webinar "Incorporating Public Art into Transportation Corridors"
Date: August 16, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0qIaL, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members


RESOURCES

COMING SOON: NACTO URBAN STREET STORMWATER GUIDE
-> Later this month NACTO will release its “Urban Street Stormwater Guide,” a first-of-its-kind collaboration between city transportation, public works, and water departments to advance the discussion about how to design and construct sustainable streets. The Urban Street Stormwater Guide will provide cities with national best practices for sustainable stormwater management in the public right-of-way, including core principles about the purpose of streets, strategies for building inter-departmental partnerships around sustainable infrastructure, technical design details for siting and building bioretention facilities, and a visual language for communicating the benefits of such projects. The guide will shed light on effective policy and programmatic approaches to starting and scaling up green infrastructure, provides insight on innovative street design strategies, and proposes a framework for measuring performance of streets comprehensively. http://bit.ly/2t0rdXf

[See Webinar section for a June 29 webinar about the Urban Street Stormwater Guide.]

DESIGN YOUR TOWN ONLINE INTERACTIVE RESOURCE
-> RPA launched Design Your Town – an interactive web-based resource for citizen planners, professionals and anyone concerned about the quality of the villages and landscapes where they live. This website has attractive and sustainable designs for different kinds of places as well as the details, policies and regulations needed for implementation. You can start by picking the kind of place you want to fix – from downtowns to rural villages – or by searching through best practices for landscape design, connectivity and mixed-use development. http://bit.ly/2spCHGr

The most recent US Access Board newsletter provides details of two accessibility resources. (http://bit.ly/2sVix42)

1) ADA TITLE II ACTION GUIDE FOR STATE & LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
-> The New England ADA Center released its online ADA Title II Action Guide for State and Local Governments (http://bit.ly/2sVC98f) to help public sector entities understand and fulfill their obligations under the law. (Title II, Subtitle A covers all programs, services, and activities of state and local government and Subtitle B contains requirements for public transportation systems such as regional transit authorities.) The guide explains provisions in Title II , including requirements for effective communication and access to facilities and programs. It also describes actions that state and local governments must take, such as appointing an ADA Coordinator, establishing grievance procedures, conducting self-evaluations, and implementing transition plans. The material includes sample documents and self-evaluation forms, answers to frequently asked questions, and best practices.

2) ANSI STANDARD ON ACCESSIBLE & USABLE BUILDINGS & FACILITIES
-> The American National Standards Institute recently approved the 2017 edition of the ICC A117.1 Standard on Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities. (print copies available later this month: http://bit.ly/2sVnDgT) This voluntary consensus standard, which provides technical provisions for accessible spaces and elements in facilities, is referenced by the International Building Code (IBC). Among other enhanced requirements, the new edition includes new provisions covering components in public rights-of-ways such as curb ramps, blended transitions, detectable warnings, and on-street parking.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PUBLIC TRANSPORT & INNOVATIVE MOBILITY
-> The International Transport Forum released a report that investigates the convergence of public transportation and mobility solutions, such as ride services, car- and bicycle-sharing, app-enabled on-demand micro-bus services, and platforms that connect app-using travelers and drivers. The research examines the role of public authorities in ensuring this convergence supports commercial innovation as well as public policy objectives. It also explores where action may be needed to ensure that this convergence does not lead to reduced mobility options for those that have difficulty using existing transportation modes. “Shaping the Relationship between Public Transport and Innovative Mobility” http://bit.ly/2spy2Vg

DATASETS OF STATE-LEVEL HIA AND HIAP BILLS & LAWS
-> The Policy Surveillance Program provides 4 longitudinal, empirical legal datasets exploring state-level Health Impact Assessments (HIAs) and Health in All Policies (HiAP) bills and laws that were introduced, enacted and/or amended between January 1, 2012 - December 31, 2016. HIAs and HiAP approaches incorporate public health considerations into decision-making across a range of sectors, and identify the potential positive and negative health impacts of a proposed law, development project, plan, or other policy, prior to its final approval and implementation. They examine the impact of proposed decisions on social, physical, and economic factors that can affect health, examine how certain population groups may be disproportionately affected by a given decision, and seek to engage multiple stakeholders (both governmental and nongovernmental) to improve health equity and decision-making. http://bit.ly/2t0AlLk

VIDEOS: VARIATIONS IN PRACTICE OF RUMBLE STRIPS & RUMBLE STRIPES
-> The Transportation Research Board recorded a series of videos in May 2017 that features research from the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)'s “Synthesis 490: Practice of Rumble Strips and Rumble Stripes” (http://bit.ly/2t05LBx). The research summarizes the current practices used by states when installing rumble strips and rumble stripes (pavement marking lines painted on the rumble strips to increase visibility during inclement weather conditions). The series explores variations in practice in terms of design, criteria, locations for installation, maintenance, perceived benefits, communication of benefits, and other issues. The videos are available on-demand at no cost. http://bit.ly/2t0d8sB. The slides are available at: http://bit.ly/2t0auTG.

TRB NEIGHBORHOOD GREENWAYS WORKSHOP RESOURCES
-> Neighborhood greenways (also called "bicycle boulevards", "local street bikeways", "quiet streets", etc) are growing in popularity as a tool for encouraging bike use on low-traffic streets without dedicated bike facilities, while also introducing traffic calming elements to enhance pedestrian comfort and liveability. However, treatments vary and there is little research on the comparative effectiveness of specific elements. At this year’s TRB Annual Meeting in Washington DC (Jan 2017) a half-day workshop was held to review the current state of research and practice for neighborhood greenways in North America and elsewhere in the world. Presentations and workshop notes: http://bit.ly/2srggkk

BEST PRACTICES FOR TRAILS CROSSINGS
-> American Trails reports MN DOT published “Best Practices Synthesis and Guidance in At-Grade Trail-Crossing Treatments.” (http://bit.ly/2srfGD5) It provides guidance on safety treatment applications at trail crossings, which have frequently been the sites of bicycle, pedestrian, and snowmobile crashes. It includes principles of user-friendly trail-crossing designs and a toolbox of categorized treatments widely used in the US.

NATURAL SURFACE TRAILS IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS
-> American Trails reports that Benchmark Trails, Inc. shared its presentation on "Natural Surface Trails in Urban Environments." It includes design and construction details, wetland issues, and many photos. Several case studies on several North Carolina trail systems are included. http://bit.ly/2t0KgR7

TRB PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE SAFETY CONFERENCE SUMMARY
-> The Transportation Research Board published its “Proceedings on the Web 21: Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety: Summary of the 10th University Transportation Centers Spotlight Conference” (http://bit.ly/2srs3yV) held last December. The conference highlighted research associated with pedestrian and bicyclist safety, and included plenary sessions focused on the role of policy and guidance, emerging and future technologies, behavior change, and equity. For PowerPoint presentations and video recordings, click on the title within the Conference Agenda at http://bit.ly/2srKrIj.


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - California Bike Summit, October 3-6, 2017, Sacramento, CA
Deadline: June 15, 2017, http://bit.ly/2sqjdBt

-> CALL FOR LIGHTNING TALK PRESENTERS (5-minute talk) - Esri User Conference, July 10-14, San Diego, CA
Deadline: June 16, 2017, http://arcg.is/2t0K0Sj

-> CALL FOR PRESENTATION IDEAS - 2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference, February 1-3, 2018, San Francisco, CA
Deadline: June 30, 2017, http://bit.ly/2sqHqbd

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 10th International Urban Design Conference, November 13-15, 2017, Queensland, Australia
Deadline: July 31, 2017, http://bit.ly/2p7vs0B

-> CALL FOR PAPERS -The History of Bicycle Transportation and Planning for lectern or poster presentation at the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting January 7-11, 2018, Washington DC.
Deadline: August 1, 2017 (Call opens June 1), http://bit.ly/2r8k7AZ

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - Applying Census Data for Transportation, November 14-16, 2017, Kansas City, MO
Deadline: August 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2oWI6Ui

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 2018 Active Living Research Annual Conference, February 11-14, 2018, Banff, Canada
Deadline: August 24, 2017, http://bit.ly/1FSW3BQ

-> INVITATION FOR CONSULTANT LETTERS OF INTEREST - The Transportation Research Board Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP)
Deadline: August 25, 2017, http://bit.ly/2sYQgdf

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 12th Access Management Conference, July 17-19, 2018, Madison, WI.
Deadline: September 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2p7sNUC

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

ON THE HORIZON

-> June 17-20, 2017 - Canadian Institute of Planners National Planning Conference, Calgary, Canada
http://bit.ly/2gG9amn
-> June 19-22, 2017 - 12th ITS European Congress, Strasbourg, France
http://bit.ly/2pzxFW7
-> June 21-23, 2017 - International Conference on Ambulatory Monitoring of Physical Activity and Movement, Bethesda, MD.
http://bit.ly/2ltByYp
-> June 22-23, 2017 - The Walkable City, Harvard University Campus, MA
http://bit.ly/2ltByYp
-> June 26-29, 2017 - APBP Professional Development Seminar, Memphis, TN.
http://bit.ly/2cuj8CD
-> June 27-29, 2017 - International Conference on Transport and Health, Barcelona, Spain.
http://bit.ly/2gwlBxA
-> June 28-30, 2017 - PlacesForBikes Conference 2017, Madison, WI
http://bit.ly/2jo6oC1
-> June 28-30, 2017 - National Regional Transportation Conference, Denver, CO
http://bit.ly/2r5VwwL
-> July 2-15, 2017 - Initiative for Bicycle & Pedestrian Innovation Sustainable Transportation in the Netherlands Study Tour
http://bit.ly/2k1cd5y
-> July 3-6, 2017 - World Symposium on Transport and Land Use Research 2017, Brisbane, Australia.
http://bit.ly/1TeCGNp
-> July 8-11, 2017 - 2017 Esri Imaging & Mapping Forum, San Diego, CA.
http://arcg.is/2nLau7H
-> July 10-11, 2017 - 10th Making Cities Liveable Conference, Brisbane, Australia
http://bit.ly/1goazoz
-> July 12-13, 2017 - Integrating Bike-Ped Topics into University Transportation Courses, Initiative for Bicycle & Pedestrian Innovation, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2k1pYRD
-> July 14-18, 2017 - Conference of Minority Transportation Officials, Detroit, MI
http://bit.ly/2r5QTmj
-> July 24-26, 2017 - 22nd International Symposium on Transportation and Traffic Theory (ISTTT), Chicago, IL.
http://bit.ly/24PdyPd
-> July 27-28, 2017 - 8th International Visualization in Transportation Symposium: Visualization in Action, Washington, D.C.
http://bit.ly/2dlh6Io
-> July 29 - August 2, 2017 - Greater, Greener 2017: Parks Connecting Cities, Cultures and Generations, Minneapolis & St. Paul, MN.
http://bit.ly/2nQO44G
-> July 31 - August 4, 2017 - Comprehensive Bikeway Design 2.0, Initiative for Bicycle & Pedestrian Innovation, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2k1qyPj
-> August 8, 2017 - 7th Annual Silicon Valley Bike Summit, Mountain View, CA
http://bit.ly/2qEIO4r
-> August 20-24, 2017 (NOTE NEW DATE) - 1.0 Workshop: Fundamentals of Bikeway Planning & Design, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2k1fPoj
-> September 11-12, 2017 - TREC Transportation & Communities Summit, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2oZTk5V
-> September 11-13, 2017 - 2nd Transportation Research Board Conference on Transportation Needs of National Parks and Public Lands: Partnerships for Enhancing Stewardship and Mobility, Washington, D.C.
http://bit.ly/2fb3YUg
-> September 13, 2017 - KC Regional Safe Routes to School Summit, Kansas City, KS
http://bit.ly/2srnMeT
-> September 13-15, 2017 - National Walking Summit, St. Paul. MN.
http://bit.ly/2a7hk08
-> September 14-15, 2017 - NACTO Sister Cities Roadshow—New Haven, CT
http://bit.ly/2t0qsgF
-> September 15, 2017 - New York State Bike Summit, Albany, NY.
http://bit.ly/2ltfj4K
-> September 16-20, 2017 - Governors Highway Safety Association Annual Meeting, Louisville, KY
http://bit.ly/2mu32MO
-> September 17-20, 2017 - Rail~Volution 2017, Denver, CO.
http://bit.ly/S0xyxe
-> September 19-21, 2017 - International Cycling Conference 2017, Mannheim, Germany
http://bit.ly/2oYZ00b
-> September 19-22, 2017 - Walk21 Calagry 2017, Calgary, Canada
http://bit.ly/2gwJJ6c
-> September 21-22, 2017 - 6th International Cycling Safety Conference (ICSC), Davis, CA.
http://bit.ly/2jUmGQa
-> September 24–25, 2017 - West Virginia Bike Summit, Morgantown, WV.
http://bit.ly/2lt6w2s
-> September 26-27, 2017 - 11th University Transportation Center (UTC) Spotlight Conference: Rebuilding and Retrofitting the Transportation Infrastructure, Washington, DC
http://bit.ly/2sYSDwq
-> September 26-28, 2017 - National Recreation and Park Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA
http://bit.ly/2sqO54R
-> September 26-29, 2017 - 14th International Conference on Urban Health, Health Equity: The New Urban Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals, Coimbra, Portugal
http://bit.ly/2jyEdAu
-> October 1-3, 2017 - Southeast Greenways and Trails Summit, Durham, NC.
http://bit.ly/2nQH2x5
-> October 2, 2017 - Colorado Bicycle Summit, Denver, CO.
http://bit.ly/2kHfGdZ
-> October 2-3, 2017 - SOPHIA’s 2017 Practitioner Workshop, Washington, DC
http://bit.ly/2t0Bd2G
-> October 2-4, 2017, EcoMobility World Congress, Kaohsiung, Chinese Taipei
http://bit.ly/2srk1Gh
-> October 3-4, 2017- 10th Annual Growing Sustainable Communities Conference, Dubuque, IA.
http://bit.ly/2ltAOSZ
-> October 3–6, 2017 - California Bicycle Summit, Sacramento, CA.
http://bit.ly/2p0dcG1
-> October 4, 2017 - International Walk to School Day
http://bit.ly/1HFSofq
-> October 6-8, 2017 - Youth Bike Summit, Arlington, VA & Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/2jyEG3b
-> October 11-14, 2017 - Placemaking Week 2017, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
http://bit.ly/2lVa6ly
-> October 14-16, 2017 - I AM Traffic 2, St. Louis, MO
http://bit.ly/2r5YL7h
-> October 17-20, 2017 - Asia Pacific Cycling Congress, Christchurch, New Zealand
http://bit.ly/2oM5lgp
-> October 20-23, 2017 - American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA.
http://bit.ly/1OrYqwK
-> October 29 - November 2, 2017 - ITS World Congress: Integrated Mobility Driving Smart Cities, Montréal, Canada
http://bit.ly/2k1c563
-> October 30-November 2, 2017 - NACTO Designing Cities 2017, Chicago, IL.
http://bit.ly/2fwJOG1
-> November 2, 2017 - CTS 28th Annual Transportation Research Conference, Minneapolis, MN.
http://bit.ly/1o0DfWn
-> November 3–4, 2017 - North Carolina Bike Summit, Wilmington, NC.
http://bit.ly/1fgGco2
-> November 14-16, 2017 - Using Census Data for Transportation Applications Conference, Kansas City, MO.
http://bit.ly/2kJRvf2
-> December 5-7, 2017 - Brownfields 2017: Sustainable Communities Start Here, Pittsburgh, PA.
http://bit.ly/2kkICs9

NEW & FURTHER OUT: See http://bit.ly/centerlines for other events more than six months from now.
-> February 11-14, 2018 - 2018 Active Living Research Annual Conference, Banff, Canada
http://bit.ly/2b7TrKP
-> September 16-19, 2018 - Walk/Bike/Places Conference (formerly Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place), New Orleans, LA
http://bit.ly/2oWTtf2
-> April 28 – May 1, 2019 - American Trails 24th International Trails Symposium, Syracuse, NY
http://bit.ly/2t13SVa


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS GRANTS
The Health Impact Project will support at least four, two-year grants for amounts up to $100,000 each in the following states: AL, AR, CA, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NM, NC, SC, TN, TX, and WV. The online application system will open in July 2017. The goals of this funding opportunity are to: 1) Support the use of health impact assessment (HIA) to improve health where it is shapedÑin families, neighborhoods, schools, and jobs; and 2) Build the capacity of organizations to conduct HIA to bring both health evidence and community voice to decisions made in sectors outside of health care. Participate in the Health Impact Project Funding Announcement Webinar on June 20, 2017 from 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm ET for more details: http://bit.ly/2t0LcVN.
Deadline: September 15, 2017 by 8:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/2t0yW7w

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS - MEET ME AT THE PARK GRANTS
Through Meet Me at the Park, the National Recreation and Park Association in collaboration with The Walt Disney Company invite park and recreation agencies in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. Territories to share their best ideas on increasing access to play spaces for children and families. Agencies with the most innovative and impactful project ideas will receive grants to build their projects. Review a recorded webinar that provides an overview of grant requirements and frequently asked questions: http://bit.ly/2spJIXK.
Deadline: June 23, 2017 by 11:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/2sq3oLl

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS - AARP COMMUNITY CHALLENGE
The AARP Community Challenge will fund projects to help to enhance the quality of life for all people of all ages. If your age-friendly community idea is big, no project is too small. Projects can range from short-term activities costing a few hundred dollars to sizable efforts that might need thousands. See ideas for possible projects at http://bit.ly/2t0Au1n. Projects must be completed by December 1, 2017.
Deadline: June 30, 2017 by 11:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/2t0vzxv

-> CALL FOR NOMINATIONS - TRB TRANSIT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM OVERSIGHT PANEL MEMBERS
The Transportation Research Board Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) is soliciting nominations for members of panels that will oversee individual TCRP Synthesis research projects as part of its fiscal year 2017 activities. Nominees should have expertise directly relevant to the issues being addressed by the project, and applicants can nominate themselves. The nomination of women and minority candidates is encouraged.
Deadline: July 7, 2017, http://bit.ly/2sYQgdf

[See Share What You Know section for related Invitation for Consultant Letters of Interest.]

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS - PEOPLEFORBIKES COMMUNITY GRANT PROGRAM
The PeopleForBikes Community Grant Program supports bicycle infrastructure projects and targeted advocacy initiatives that make it easier and safer for people of all ages and abilities to ride.
Deadline for Online Letter of Inquiry: July 21 2017, http://bit.ly/2t0CUNv

-> RFP - PARTNERS FOR PLACES, ROUND ELEVEN
The Funders Network Partners for Places matching grant program creates opportunities for cities and counties in the United States and Canada to improve communities by building partnerships between local government sustainability offices and place-based foundations. National funders invest in local projects to promote a healthy environment, a strong economy, and well-being of all residents. Through these projects, Partners for Places fosters long-term relationships that make urban areas more prosperous, livable, and vibrant. The grant program will provide partnership investments between $25,000 and $75,000 for one year projects, or $50,000 and $150,000 for two year projects, with a 1:1 match required by one or more local foundations.
Deadline: July 31, 2017 by 11:59 pm in any time zone, http://bit.ly/25AwLbo

-> JOB - COMMUNITY ADVOCACY COORDINATOR, BICYCLE COALITION OF MAINE
The Bicycle Coalition of Maine is seeks a Community Advocacy Coordinator to provide assistance coordinating and expanding their mission-central work with local bicycle and pedestrian advocates around the state. The position will manage our nationally recognized Community Spokes Program, mobilizing, training, and supporting local champions who want to become community leaders for bicycle, pedestrian, and active transportation issues.
Deadline: June 14, 2017, http://bit.ly/2spUOfF

-> JOB - BICYCLE/PEDESTRIAN COORDINATOR, FL DOT IN DELAND, FL
Florida DOT seeks a Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator to, among other duties, perform engineering reviews and evaluations of project scopes and plans at various stages of development to ensure that bicycle/pedestrian facilities are effectively designed and integrated in accordance with State policy and standards and are consistent with applicable bicycle/pedestrian plans.
Deadline: June 15, 2017, http://bit.ly/2r0484u

-> JOB - MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNER, MANATEE COUNTY GOVERNMENT, BRADENTON, FL
This classification applies transportation planning principles in the analysis, review, and reporting of land use impacts on multimodal transportation needs.
Deadline: June 19, 2017 by 11:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/2sqxQ7Q

-> JOB - DIRECTOR - BIKE ANCHORAGE, AK FROM YOUR OWN OFFICE
Bike Anchorage seeks a dynamic and highly motivated individual to advance their organizations commitment to making Anchorage more bicycle friendly. The Bike Anchorage Director will focus on program management, communications, policy development, research, partnership building, fundraising, volunteer management, and administration. This 20-hour/week position has the potential for growth with the organization.
Deadline: June 23, 2017, http://bit.ly/2srrplc

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PLANNER, CITY OF DES MOINES, IA
The Transportation Planner takes the lead role on multiple transportation planning projects and programs. Among duties, this position works on assigned phases of transportation projects, including that of a project manager for multi-modal transportation project planning and preliminary concepts; serves as the City's subject and technical matter expert on walking and on-street bicycling; develops and provides implementation of bicycle and pedestrian traffic routes; and manages short- and long-term issues to address and improve bicycle and pedestrian transportation.
Deadline: July 3, 2017 by 5:00 pm CT, http://bit.ly/2sqjKUl

-> 2 JOBS - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL ORGANIZERS, WALK SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Walk San Francisco seeks 2 Safe Routes to School Organizers to engage school communities (parents/caregivers, children, teachers, and administrators) to increase the number of families and youth walking, biking, and taking transit to school. The Organizers will also empower and train parents/caregivers at a specific number of schools or via SRTS Neighborhood Task Forces to advocate for safety improvements around schools. Additionally, Organizers will implement the City Streets Investigators (CSI) curriculum that teaches elementary school students critical-thinking skills to evaluate streets and develop real-world solutions for the root cause of preventable traffic crashes dangerously designed streets.
Deadline: Applications considered on a rolling basis, hone interviews begin the week of June 26, http://bit.ly/2spSsNK

-> JOB - TEMPORARY PROGRAM COORDINATOR - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL AT THE AMERICAN FAMILY CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, MADISON, WI
The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program aims to increase active transportation to Dane County schools. Increasing opportunities for students and families to walk and bike to school improves health and safety, decreases tardiness, and promotes a culture of wellness. Work Schedule: 80% FTE, 32 hours per week. Bilingual in Spanish is preferred.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2t07ebc

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


HOUSEKEEPING

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Founding Editor: In Memoriam John Williams.

Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston

Contributors: AARP Livable Communities Newsletter; AASHTO Daily Transportation Update; Access Currents; Adventure Cycling Association; Alliance for Biking & Walking: People Discussion Group; Alta Planning + Design Newsletter; America Walks; American Trails; Michael Andersen; ANSI; Apple News; Arch Daily; Association of Bicycle & Pedestrian Professionals Listserve; Emiko Atherton; Austroads; Paula Bawer; Bicycle Dutch; Bicycle Friendly America Update; BikePortland; Laura Bliss; Madeline Brozen; Froso Christofides; City of Bellevue; CityLab; Co.Design; CTS Catalyst; Susan M Di Benedetto; Christopher Douwes; Mary Ebeling; ECF General Newsletter; FHWA; The FundersÕ Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities; Governing; Govtech; Nancy Grant; The Guardian; Lindsey Hajduk; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Health Impact Project; H+T Friends Digest; Larry Husten; International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity; Peter Jacobsen; Jen Kinney; Glen Koorey; Grace Kyung; League of American Bicyclists; Franz Loewenherz; Anne Lusk; Jonathan Maus; Medpage Today; Lisa McKinney; Stephen Miller; Mobility Lab; Kate Moening; Montana Associated Technology Roundtables; Brendan Murphy; NACTO; National Recreation and Park Association; Emma Nelson; PeopleForBikes; PHYS-ACT@LISTSERV.SC.EDU; Planetizen; Project for Public Spaces Weekly Placemaking Round-Up; Jessica Roberts; Adam Russell; Safe Routes to School National Partnership; Katherine Schwab; Todd Scott; Smart Growth America; Smart Growth Information Clearinghouse; Smart Growth Online; Dave Snyder; SSTI e-newsletter; StarTribune; Streetsblog USA; TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter; United States Access Board; US DOT; Daniel C. Vock; Walk San Francisco; The Washington Post; Wired; Zendrive.


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