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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#440 Wednesday, July 26, 2017

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- NTSB: Reducing Speeding-Related Crashes
----- British Public Health Touts 20 mph Limit to Improve Air Quality
----- Nijmegen, The Netherlands Best Bike City
----- Quick Makeover of a Mumbai, India Intersection
----- The Criminalization of Walking
----- Walking Summit & Links to Key Walking Resources & Research
----- London, England: Ped Smart Street Tech
----- Solar Panels in Ped Walkways & Street Furniture
----- What Keeps Bike Share White
----- Vancouver, BC Church Blesses Bikes, Transit Cards, Shoes
----- Driverless Future Challenge Entry Reclaims Public Space for Peds
----- Get Ready for PARK(ing) Day September 15

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- Solana Beach, CA: Transportation Fee For All New Development
----- Nashville, TN: 3-Foot Law for Motorists Passing Pedestrians
----- Park City, UT Launches 1st Fully Electric Bike-Share
----- Cambridge, MA Expands Protected Bike Lane Network
----- Measuring Vision Zero Success in Seattle, WA & New York City
----- Washington, DC: Ways to Keep Peds Safe from Terror Attacks
----- Sonoma County, CA: Safe Cycling Classes in Lieu of Bike Ticket Fine
----- Portland, OR Launches Public Adaptive Bike Rental Pilot
----- Seattle, WA: Balance of Cyclist, Disabled & Elderly Needs Questioned
----- Washington, DC: Road-to-Trail Brings Major Green Benefits
----- Silicon Valley, CA: Bicycling from the Lawyers’ Perspective

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Evaluating Transportation Diversity
----- More Transportation Choices, Better Health
----- Data Collection Bike to Assess Trails & Take Google Images
----- Economic and Health Benefits of Bicycling and Walking in CO
----- Study of Biking & Walking Impacts on UT Economy
----- Economic Impacts of ‘Quiet' Recreation” in SW UT
----- Analyzing the Impact of Public Transit Usage on Obesity
----- Transportation & Land Use as Social Determinants of Health
----- Studies Find Latinos & Family Biking Linked
----- Large-Scale Physical Activity Data, Walking & Obesity Rates

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- FHWA Interim Approval for Two-Stage Bicycle Turn Boxes
----- Active Transportation for Canada. Now! Website
----- Building Vision Zero Capacity through Empowerment & Funding
----- European Bike Sharing Position Papers
----- Policy Framework for Smart Public-use Bike Sharing
----- Common Position Paper on Unlicensed Dockless Bike Share
----- Video: The High Cost of Free Parking

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

NTSB: REDUCING SPEEDING-RELATED CRASHES
-> This week the National Transportation Safety Board released the results of its landmark safety study on reducing speeding-related passenger vehicle crashes and its 19 recommendations to specific agencies, states and organizations. Although speeding causes nearly the same number of deaths as alcohol, there is less awareness of its risks, and there are few negative consequences for this common driving behavior.

The study’s authors reviewed data on public attitudes, and questioned how speed limits are set and enforced. They interviewed federal regulators and state and local law enforcement, and looked at what’s working elsewhere. They reviewed technologies that help motorists monitor and limit their speed, and help law enforcement enforce the limits. And they looked at the safe system approach, which identifies layers of protection for the whole road environment [including people walking and cycling]. http://bit.ly/2v6iZkz (Reducing Speeding-Related Crashes Involving Passenger Vehicles: Synopsis available now at http://bit.ly/2v656TA. NTSB will release the full report in a few weeks.)

BRITISH PUBLIC HEALTH TOUTS 20 MPH LIMIT TO IMPROVE AIR QUALITY
-> The European Cyclists’ Federation reports the British National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, through its most recent publication, supports reducing urban speeds for better air quality. (Air Pollution: Outdoor Air Quality and Health: http://bit.ly/2vZMml5) Speed limits of 20 mph are increasingly acknowledged as an affordable tool to address air quality problems. What is interesting is the call for not using physical speed reduction measures. http://bit.ly/2vZN8yr

NIJMEGEN, THE NETHERLANDS BEST BIKE CITY
-> CityLab reports last year, the Cyclists’ Union of the Netherlands voted Nijmegen the best bike city in the country. See the new Streetfilms documentary shot during Velo-City that describes why. Nijmegen is a mid-sized city where bikes boast an inner-city modal share of 60%. Since the 1970s, the city has replaced the downtown’s auto-centric streets with pedestrian pathways and bike lanes. To fend off vehicles, the core is protected by a network of automated bollards that lower only for transponder-equipped buses and delivery vans at certain times of day. High-quality, separated cycle tracks weave across the city and outside of it, drawing commuters from neighboring areas into work and school by bike. http://bit.ly/2vZwvD5

QUICK MAKEOVER OF A MUMBAI, INDIA INTERSECTION
NACTO's Global Designing Cities Initiative worked with city authorities to temporarily transform the Mithchowki intersection in Malad, Mumbai, a hotspot for road safety challenges in the city. With temporary barriers and colorful chalk, nearly half an acre of public space was reclaimed for pedestrians, all while making the intersection more legible for all road users. Check out the time-lapse video. http://bit.ly/2uAE99O

THE CRIMINALIZATION OF WALKING
VTPI News reports on an article in the University of Illinois Law Review that examines how walking is criminalized in the United States. It concludes that such policies reduce pedestrian liberty, increase automobile traffic and pollution, and create a disincentive for physical activity. In addition, the purported safety benefits of criminalizing walking pale in comparison to those of decriminalization. Further, in the context of currently vague child neglect laws, this article suggests a bright-line rule that would empower parents’ decision to allow their children to do the unthinkable: walk themselves to school. The Criminalization of Walking: http://bit.ly/2vZfCrM

WALKING SUMMIT & LINKS TO KEY WALKING RESOURCES & RESEARCH
Walking advocates once focused primarily on physical health —spurred by mounting evidence that physical activity is key to preventing disease—but now are stepping up to promote social, economic and community health. Their ultimate goal is to transform towns and neighborhoods across America into better places for everyone to live. A Streets MN article describes the themes of the 2017 National Walking Summit to be held in St. Paul, Minnesota September 13-15, 2017. (http://bit.ly/2a7hk08) It also summarizes and provides links to recent resources and studies related to walking and health, happiness, social justice, economic opportunities, connections between people, stronger communities, and the environment. http://bit.ly/2vZ0Dyb

LONDON, ENGLAND: PED SMART STREET TECH
-> New Atlas reports Bird Street, just off Oxford Street in London's West End has become the "world's first Smart Street." It merges pollution-busting and sustainable technology with a traffic-free shopping and dining experience. Shoppers cutting between Barret Street and Oxford Street can become walking power generators on a 10 sq m (107 sq ft) Pavegen walkway. (http://bit.ly/2v6HApu) Each of the company's V3 panel is reportedly capable of turning footsteps into 5 W of continuous power, while also gathering pedestrian flow metrics. Kinetic energy harvested will be converted to electricity and used to power street lamps and background bird sounds, as well as Bluetooth transmitters.

At one end of the street, a bespoke ClearAir bench (http://bit.ly/2v6Jari) sucks in air from behind, removes nasty gases such as nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter and then pumps cleaned air out of the sides and armrests. The water-based Airlite paints (http://bit.ly/2v6HIW0) in the zone strip the air of nitrogen oxides, munching on bacteria and repelling dust, with the company saying that 100 sq m of Airlite-painted surface "has the same NOx absorbing qualities as 100 m2 of mature tree-covered forests." http://bit.ly/2v6RreC

SOLAR PANELS IN PED WALKWAYS & STREET FURNITURE
-> New Atlas also reports Budapest, Hungary startup, Platio, developed a modular, self-contained paving panel that harvests the sun's energy to produce electricity. The panels have recently been rolled out in front of a shopping mall, at a harbor and integrated into public outdoor seating. Its PV-packed paving units are covered with high strength, anti-slip glass, are manufactured using recycled plastic waste and house all the necessary wiring and cables for quick install. The electricity produced helps reduce the need for grid power and provide public recharging opportunities for mobile devices. http://bit.ly/2v6EjpT

WHAT KEEPS BIKE SHARE WHITE
-> CityLab reports it’s no secret that bike-share systems across the country have an equity problem. Bike share works best in high-density, mixed-use neighborhoods. Even as systems have matured and expanded, the vast majority of users have remained wealthier and whiter than the cities these programs serve. In Washington, D.C., which has a population that is about 50% black, only 3% of Capital Bikeshare members were African American in 2012. By 2016, that share had grown by only one percentage point. The same survey found that Asians and Latinos were also severely underrepresented among Capital Bikeshare members.

A new Portland State study shows that residents of low-income, majority-minority neighborhoods have an overwhelmingly favorable view of bike share. (Evaluating Efforts to Improve the Equity of Bike Share Systems: http://bit.ly/2v6UQdM) What many residents of these neighborhoods lack is not a desire to ride, but information on discount programs, access to safe streets and protective gear, and reassurance about liability and hidden fees. Across all racial and income categories, the biggest impediment to riding is safety. And that means more than just fear of getting hit by a car: Low-income people of color were far more concerned than white people about being the victim of crime or harassment while riding a bike. http://bit.ly/2v6OpqZ

VANCOUVER, BC CHURCH BLESSES BIKES, TRANSIT CARDS, SHOES
-> The Vancouver, BC Courier reports a local Anglican Bishop presided over the second annual “bike blessing” as part of a weeklong “Faith Commuter Challenge.” Eleven Lower Mainland faith communities have signed up for the initiative, which coincides with Bike Month, and encourages worshippers and non-worshippers to reduce their carbon footprint by using means of transportation other than the almighty car. After several prayers and scripture readings, Skelton and local clergy led a procession of two-wheeled chariots out the front door of the church to a booth on the Burrard Street bike route. There, cyclists could get their trusty steeds anointed with chain oil or blessed with holy water, which also made its way to helmets, water bottles and the riders themselves. Transit users could have their Compass cards blessed, and those who preferred biped power had their shoes blessed, reinforcing the notion that they’ll never walk alone. http://bit.ly/2vZxPWa

DRIVERLESS FUTURE CHALLENGE ENTRY RECLAIMS PUBLIC SPACE FOR PEDS
-> ArchDaily reports the Driverless Future Challenge winning entry uses a plug-and-play system to reclaim public space for pedestrians. “Public Square” transforms New York City’s public realm for its streets and pedestrians. Designed by FXFOWLE and Sam Schwartz Engineering, the proposal was selected by a panel of New York City commissioners, for its response to the competition brief with a flexible system that accommodates a variety of public space typologies, while creating a harmonious coexistence between pedestrians, cyclists, and vehicles. http://bit.ly/2v7yLvF

GET READY FOR PARK(ING) DAY SEPTEMBER 15
-> Spaces to Places reminds readers that the third Friday in September is PARK(ing) Day, an annual worldwide event where artists, designers and citizens transform metered parking spots into temporary public parks, sometimes referred to as parklets. (See http://bit.ly/1BY9Jx1 to download the free The PARK(ing) Day Manual.) The mission of PARK(ing) Day is to call attention to the need for more urban open space, to generate critical debate around how public space is created and allocated, and to improve the quality of urban human habitat. Check out the article to see examples of parklets and read the steps to create a PARK(ing) Day parklet. http://bit.ly/2v7jNWv


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

SOLANA BEACH, CA: TRANSPORTATION FEE FOR ALL NEW DEVELOPMENT
-> The San Diego Union-Tribune reports the small city of Solana Beach, CA has approved a new fee that will spread the cost of future transportation projects across all new development — an approach rarely, if ever, taken by cities in California. The change will add $15,714 to the cost of a new single-family home and $11,206 for each new apartment in Solana Beach. The fee also will be applied on a square-footage basis to new commercial and industrial development. In all it should generate roughly $19 million — the amount the city estimates it will need to pay for bike lanes, pedestrian paths and other improvements needed to accommodate increased traffic. Less than 1 percent of the city remains undeveloped. http://bit.ly/2vZ0ESS

NASHVILLE, TN: 3-FOOT LAW FOR MOTORISTS PASSING PEDESTRIANS
-> The Walk Bike Nashville, TN Advocacy Update reports that the Metropolitan Council of the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County passed a bill that gives pedestrians the right-of-way on roads that lack sidewalks. Passing vehicles must give them three feet. This is one of the first bills of its kind in the country and sends an important message about the rights of people to walk in the city. ORDINANCE NO. BL2017-740: An ordinance amending Chapter 12.52 of the Metropolitan Code of Laws establishing a right for pedestrians to the use of certain streets: http://bit.ly/2v7fRoB

PARK CITY, UT LAUNCHES 1ST FULLY ELECTRIC BIKE-SHARE
-> Deseret News reports Park City, UT has launched the nation's first fully electric bike-share program. The first phase, operated by Canadian company Bewegen, will support 88 new pedal-assisted e-bikes, initially will be available at 9 charging stations. The lithium battery assisted-pedal system feels much like the cruise-control on a car going up a hill, adding the powered assistance with each rotation of the pedals. The assistance is enough to keep the roughly 80 pound bikes and their riders going at a top-speed of 14 mph for about 60 miles between charges. On the center of the handlebars, a display shows the riders their current speed. The launch of the new bike fleet fulfills the plan of a Summit County ballot initiative passed last November calling for an electric bike fleet. http://bit.ly/2vYCojJ

CAMBRIDGE, MA EXPANDS PROTECTED BIKE LANE NETWORK
-> The Boston Cyclists Union reports on June 26th, after hearing testimony from dozens of residents and business owners, the Cambridge, MA City Council passed an ordinance asking the City Manager "to accelerate the planning and installation of two or more protected bike lanes by September, produce a plan by October 2017 for the roll-out of protected bike lanes on all major city thoroughfares, and ensure that the Cambridge Bike Plan recommendations are fully implemented on all road projects." To add to this fantastic news, this week the City created a new stretch of protected bike lane on Mass Ave, as well as a 2-way protected bike lane on a stretch of Brattle Street in Harvard Square. http://bit.ly/2v75IIn

MEASURING VISION ZERO SUCCESS IN SEATTLE, WA & NEW YORK CITY
-> Vision Zero Network News reports two projects completed in Seattle and New York City demonstrate that a targeted approach to slow speeds and improved safety is working. One year after completion, the project efforts in Seattle showed a 40% reduction in crashes, and 30% reduction in injury crashes. In New York City speeds were reduced 21%, total crashes decreased 14%, and pedestrian and bicyclist crashes decreased 49% and 42%, respectively. http://bit.ly/2vZlu4t

WASHINGTON, DC: WAYS TO KEEP PEDS SAFE FROM TERROR ATTACKS
-> The Washington Post reports in Washington, DC, where scores of tourists and commuters walk the city streets daily, law enforcement officials are assessing new measures to prevent a London-inspired terror attack, where vehicles were used as weapons to mow down pedestrians. D.C. police, transportation and other city leaders declined to discuss specific tactics or any investments in protective measures, but measures elsewhere have included the installation of bollards and other barriers to separate traffic from pedestrians. http://wapo.st/2vZlFgl

SONOMA COUNTY, CA: SAFE CYCLING CLASSES IN LIEU OF FINE
-> The Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition reports tickets for most bicycling offenses – running a stop sign, riding without a helmet, riding on the wrong side of the road – currently cost $197. In Sonoma County cyclists can take one of their Safe Cycling classes (http://bit.ly/2vZFsw1) instead – at a much more reasonable cost of $10-20! You do have to go to traffic court to receive this option - it is NOT printed on the citation itself. http://bit.ly/2vZwMph

PORTLAND, OR LAUNCHES PUBLIC ADAPTIVE BIKE RENTAL PILOT
-> Portland, OR is launching a public bike rental pilot program for people with disabilities called Adaptive Biketown. It shares its name with the city’s Nike-sponsored bike-share system. The rental bikes will be available at affordable fares and can be checked out with a transit pass, but won’t be distributed in a network of stations like bike-share. The new Adaptive Biketown program will be operated as a rental service, not as a station-based bike share. It will offer a mix of tandems, hand-cycles, and three-wheeled bikes. The program is open to people with disabilities, seniors, and those who qualify for a TriMet honored citizen pass. Those who want to rent one must register in advance and the cost is $5 per hour or three hours for $12. About 10 bikes will be available at Kerr Bikes. http://bit.ly/2w05hfc

SEATTLE, WA: BALANCE OF CYCLIST, DISABLED & ELDERLY NEEDS
-> KIRO-TV in Seattle, WA reports a woman who uses a walker claims the Seattle DOT shows preferential treatment to bicyclists at the expense of the disabled and elderly. Construction to create a protected bike lane in front of her condo eliminated the three-minute load zone she had used to access ride-share services. She also protested that she knew nothing of the project until it was finalized and asks S-DOT project planners to consider people who are handicapped and those who are elderly before planning projects that impact them. S-DOT responded they had been working for over a year to ensure pick up, drop off and deliveries can continue along the project corridor. They are relocating a load zone around the corner, about 100 feet from the front door. http://kiro.tv/2vZD2xk

WASHINGTON, DC: ROAD-TO-TRAIL BRINGS MAJOR GREEN BENEFITS
-> Rail-Trail eNews reports when a roadway washed away in Washington, D.C.’s Rock Creek Park, the new Klingle Trail eventually took its place. With it came cleaner water ways, a more connected community and an incredibly scenic escape downtown. Sustainably designed trail systems can work to solve transportation and environmental issues while benefiting the environment and surrounding community. This trail includes a stormwater design with permeable pavement and bio swales, and provides increased off-road access between the eastern and western part of the city. http://bit.ly/2vZkIEB

SILICON VALLEY, CA: BICYCLING FROM THE LAWYERS’ PERSPECTIVE
-> The Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition asked several lawyers for their professional advice on a few key questions and reports the major themes that emerged. http://bit.ly/2v75Urd


THE RESEARCH BEAT

EVALUATING TRANSPORTATION DIVERSITY
-> VTPI News has released a report that examines consumer demands for various travel options, transport diversity benefits, and methods for evaluating optimal transport system diversity. “Transportation diversity” refers to the variety of mobility and accessibility options, including various modes, services and destinations. Multimodal planning that increases transport system diversity tends to increase efficiency, equity and resilience, and achieves specific planning goals. “Evaluating Transportation Diversity: Multimodal Planning for Efficient and Equitable Communities” http://bit.ly/2vBE5nL

MORE TRANSPORTATION CHOICES, BETTER HEALTH
-> Public Square reports a recently released nationwide study published in the International Journal of Sustainable Transportation strongly correlates greater transportation "modal diversity" with better health for the population as a whole. (Commute Mode Diversity and Public Health: A Multivariate Analysis of 148 US Cities: http://bit.ly/2vZk9ur) The study of 148 US metro areas is robust and broad, measuring 12 public health and quality of life indicators against commuting mode share (the portion of commuters who do not drive an automobile alone to work, which ranges from 11% to 36% in the metro areas studied). The results indicate a positive relationship between higher mode share and public health outcomes including healthier behaviors, more leisure quality, more access to exercise, less sedentary living and obesity, more years of potential life lost (an indicator of longevity), and higher birth rates. http://bit.ly/2vZMBfR

DATA COLLECTION BIKE TO ASSESS TRAILS & TAKE GOOGLE IMAGES
-> The Des Moines, IA MPO, in partnership with the Iowa Department of Public Health and Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, recently deployed the Iowa Data Bike. (http://bit.ly/2vZjxoJ) This bike-based data-collection vehicle uses an electric-assist bicycle, an iPhone, and an iPhone app designed to detect pavement conditions, and then to collect pavement-condition data for all paved trails within Central Iowa. This data will help inform a long-term maintenance strategy for the trail network. The Data Bike will also collect 360-degree imagery along trails for Google Street View. Unlike the street network, for which pavement-condition data are regularly collected, there are no pavement-condition data being collected for the paved trail network. Nor is there a means for collecting trail pavement-condition data, as the equipment used on roadways is too large and requires too high of speeds to be used on trails.

ECONOMIC AND HEALTH BENEFITS OF BICYCLING AND WALKING IN CO
-> American Trails reports a new State-sponsored study looks at the economic and health benefits of bicycling and walking in Colorado. (Economic and Health Benefits of Bicycling and Walking: State of Colorado: http://bit.ly/2v76Uf4) The total economic and health benefits of walking calculated for the state is approximately $3.2 billion, and $1.6 billion for bicycling. Based on estimates from the HEAT model, bicycling in Colorado currently helps prevent about 50 deaths per year. This translates into about $511 million in annual health benefits from bicycling. Walking in Colorado currently helps prevent about 285 deaths per year. This translates into about $2.7 billion in annual health benefits from walking.

STUDY OF BIKING & WALKING IMPACTS ON UT ECONOMY
-> The Salt Lake Tribune reports if government invests more to promote bicycling and walking, it would help both Utah's economy and the health of residents, according to a study conducted by the Utah Transit Authority in collaboration with 11 other transportation and health agencies. (Economic Impacts of Active Transportation: Utah Active Transportation Benefits Study: http://bit.ly/2vZWTwe) The review sought to put a dollar value on the benefits of such things as bicycle and walking trails, bike tourism and cost savings from improving health through active transportation.

Researchers found direct sales in cycling-related businesses in Utah amount to $132 million. The total economic impact, based on a multiplier effect, is $303.9 million, fueling nearly 2,000 jobs and more than $46 million in income. They also found more than $61 million is spent on bike tourism each year in Utah which translates into more than $121 million in economic output, 1,500 jobs and $46 million in income earned. http://bit.ly/2vZSxWh

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF ‘QUIET' RECREATION” IN SW UT
-> The Pew Charitable Trusts commissioned ECONorthwest to complete a first-ever study devoted to an exclusive analysis of "quiet recreational activities," on 2.1 million acres of Bureau of Land Management lands in southwest Utah. The report notes that out of 492,000 recreation visits logged in 2015 by the BLM, 74% were for quiet recreation that includes hiking, hunting, biking, fishing, camping or wildlife viewing. The report estimates the total expenditures from quiet recreation visits on lands managed by the BLM in the area to be $17.4 million annually. “Quiet Recreation on BLM-Managed Lands in Southwest Utah: Economic Contribution 2015” http://bit.ly/2vYvlYm

ANALYZING THE IMPACT OF PUBLIC TRANSIT USAGE ON OBESITY
-> VTPI News reports a study published in Preventive Medicine that provides empirical support for the effectiveness of encouraging public transit usage as an intervention strategy for obesity. Researchers used comprehensive demographic, travel and health survey data to evaluate factors that affect obesity. Their results indicate that each 1% increase in public transit use is associated with a 0.221% percent decrease in county’s obesity rates. “Analyzing the Impact of Public Transit Usage on Obesity” http://bit.ly/2vYUQIP

TRANSPORTATION & LAND USE AS SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH
-> The Upper Great Plains Institute released a report that examines residential exposure to traffic at regional and neighborhood level with race and socio-economic status as variables. The study focused on how transportation and land use may influence residents' exposure to traffic and adverse health outcomes. Between 4 and 19% of the US population lives close to high-traffic roads, depending on assumptions about distance and types of roadway. These proportions are higher for minority and low-income populations. Researchers found that minority and lower socio-economic status are systematically linked to higher exposure to traffic in Denver, CO at both regional- and neighborhood-level scales. “Transportation and Land Use as Social Determinants of Health: Analysis of Exposure to Traffic in the Denver Metropolitan Region” http://bit.ly/2v6mRBW

STUDIES FIND LATINOS & FAMILY BIKING LINKED
-> PeopleForBikes reports there's growing evidence that Latinos and Latinas are far more likely than other Americans to say that friends or family are a major factor in their choice to ride a bike. A recent study touching on this subject published in Preventive Medicine Reports also discovered the obvious: Americans of every background enjoy social biking. But the trend was stronger among Black Americans, and far stronger among Hispanic Americans. (Biking Practices and Preferences in a Lower Income, Primarily Minority Neighborhood: Learning What Residents Want: http://bit.ly/2sqL7xg). Check out the rest of the article for descriptions of older studies that came to complementary conclusions: http://bit.ly/2vZvQ4t

LARGE-SCALE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY DATA, WALKING & OBESITY RATES
-> Wired reports in a paper published in Nature, researchers at Stanford analyzed the minute-by-minute habits of 717,527 people from 111 countries to understand how things like activity levels, gender, and location impact their weight. (Large-Scale Physical Activity Data Reveal Worldwide Activity Inequality: http://go.nature.com/2vZ27bQ) By dissecting data from a physical activity-tracking app, the researchers found that in countries with low obesity rates, people walked a similar amount each day. The bigger the gap between those who took steps and those who didn’t, the fatter the country—a phenomenon they call "activity inequality."

Wired also notes the challenges of using smartphone-based data to build public health research and guidance as step-tracking data is actually pretty unreliable and inaccurate. http://bit.ly/2vZbAzF


QUOTES R US

“Speeding is ingrained in life all around us… What it boils down to is the old expression, speed kills. This study tells us how it kills, and how we can stop some of the killing. In short, this study’s about finding and enforcing speeds that we all can live with. This study’s recommendations, if acted on, will be about adding years to all those lives that might otherwise be cut short in speeding-related crashes.”
—NTSB Acting Chairman Robert L. Sumwalt commenting on the release of “Safety Study: Reducing Speeding-Related Crashes Involving Passenger Vehicles” http://bit.ly/2v6cyOz

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

CHINESE AERONAUTS WHO BUILD GYROCOPTERS FROM GAMING JOYSTICKS AND SPARE PARTS
A new book, “Aeronautics in the Backyard” (http://bit.ly/2v6KV7T), provides photographs and the stories of eight men with little to no formal training in aeronautics who have built flying machines from gaming joysticks and spare parts. They are farmers, barbers, and carpenters with nothing more than a deep love of flight and a knack for cobbling together airplanes and gyrocopters. Most learned what they know from books and magazines, and happily pour time and money into contraptions that may not actually fly. http://bit.ly/2v6Tmjp

MAGICAL, STRIKING SCENES FROM ... GOOGLE STREET VIEW
Check out screen grabs from Google Street View that capture sweeping scenes so striking you'd never guess they were created on a website most people use for directions. http://bit.ly/2v7KiuT.


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
To better help you plan your continuing education activities, we list Webinars scheduled in the next month. Check our searchable master calendar at http://bit.ly/centerlines for opportunities farther in the future. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical.

NEXT UP

Webinar “Collaborating with Law Enforcement to Reach Zero”
Date: August 1, 2017, 11:00 am to 12:30 pm ET
Presenters: Bill Beans (MBO Engineering), Joseph Weiss (Rutgers Univ.) & Craig Allred (FHWA Resource Center)
Hosts: National Center for Rural Road Safety
Details: http://conta.cc/2v7dmlU, free

Webinar “Outdoor Recreation: Partnering for Relevancy and Inclusion”
Date: August 1, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Briget Eastep (Southern Utah Univ.)
Hosts: Society of Outdoor Recreation Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/2v7igzJ, Free for SORP members, $45 for non-members

Webinar "Bike Share Equity"
Date: August 1, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET **Date may change**
Presenters: Nathan McNeil (Portland State University)
Hosts: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/2sZazHw, free

Webinar “Sustainability in the City of Nashville, Tenn.”
Date: August 3, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Erin Hafkenschiel (City of Nashville)
Host: Sustainable City Network
Details: http://bit.ly/2vZNsgz, free

Webinar "Surface Roughness and Rollability Research"
Date: August 3, 2017, 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Jon Perlman (Human Engineering Research Laboratories, Univ. of Pittsburgh) & Scott Windley (U.S. Access Board)
Host: U.S. Access Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2ueh8JN, free

Webinar "2017 National Walking Summit Preview"
Date: August 9, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0oJmY, free

Webinar "Innovative Statewide Partnerships for Active Transportation Planning"
Date: August 15, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Leesa Freasier (AR Dept .of Health), Jessie Jones, AR State Highway & Transportation Dept.), Ashley Tracy (Whitman, Requardt & Associates), Caitlin Harley (OH Dept. of Health) & Jordan Whisler (Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Comm.)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2ugswVx, Some registrants will need to pay a fee to attend this webinar. Sign into MyTRB.org to view registration information.

Webinar "Incorporating Public Art into Transportation Corridors"
Date: August 16, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0qIaL, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members

Webinar “Geometric Highway Design Process for the 21st Century”
Date: August 22, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Timothy Neuman (Bednar Consulting, Inc.) & Richard Coakley (CH2M)
Hosts: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2vYlcL4, fee for some participants

Webinar “Learning About and Using the Research in Progress (RiP) Database”
Date: August 24, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenters: Janet Daly (Transportation Research Board)
Hosts: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2vYrQB4, fee for some participants

Webinar "National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for communities: Implementation" Part 3 of 3 (Part 2 on July 20)
Date: August 30, 2017, 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: U.S. Environmental Protection agency
Details: http://bit.ly/2sPOCMJ, free

Webinar “Understanding Changes in Youth Mobility”
Date: September 6, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm ET
Presenters: Matthew Coogan (Consultant) & Mark Bradley (RSG)
Hosts: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2vZzyLo, fee for some participants

Webinar “U.S. Federal Policy Briefing”
Date: September 12, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenters: Caron Whitaker (League of American Bicyclists)
Hosts: League of American Bicyclists, the Alliance for Biking & Walking, and the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/2v7uuZ0, free

Webinar "Advancements in measuring bicycle and pedestrian accessibility"
Date: September 12, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: Jennifer Boldry (People For Bikes), Spencer Gardner (Toole Design Group) & Chris McCahill (SSTI)
Hosts: State Smart Transportation Initiative
Details: http://bit.ly/2sPFecb, free

Webinar “Green Design: Minimizing Environmental Impact in Public Rights of Way”
Date: September 20, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenters: TBA
Hosts: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/Y9w4kF, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members


RESOURCES

FHWA INTERIM APPROVAL FOR TWO-STAGE BICYCLE TURN BOXES
-> FHWA has released Interim Approval 20 under the MUTCD for Two-Stage Bicycle Turn Boxes. Interim Approval allows interim use, pending official rulemaking. The two-stage bicycle turn box is an area set aside for bicyclists to queue to turn at a signalized intersection outside of the traveled path of motor vehicles and other bicycles. When using a two-stage bicycle turn box to make a left turn, a bicyclist would proceed on a green signal indication to the turn box on the right-hand side of the travel lanes, and then turn left within the turn box and wait for the appropriate signal indication on the cross street to proceed. Two-stage bicycle turn boxes can also be used with a left-side bicycle facility to facilitate bicyclists turning right. In addition to mitigating conflicts inherent in merging across traffic to turn, two-stage bicycle turn boxes reduce conflicts between bicycles and pedestrians and separate queued bicyclists waiting to turn from through bicyclists moving on the green signal. http://bit.ly/2vYMXDm

ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION FOR CANADA. NOW! WEBSITE
-> Canada Walks reports a new website urges support for a Canadian active transportation strategy that will boost everyday walking, cycling, and active school travel. (Active Transportation for Canada. Now!: http://bit.ly/2vZudDE) The site and accompanying campaign are the work a six-month-old alliance comprising Canada Bikes, the National Active & Safe Routes to School Working Group, and Green Communities Canada (Canada Walks). Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, has repeatedly voiced her support for a national strategy, and her office invited a proposal from the alliance to undertake strategy development. http://bit.ly/2vZpJgA

BUILDING VISION ZERO CAPACITY THROUGH EMPOWERMENT & FUNDING
-> A recent Vision Zero Network article highlights encouraging examples from Washington, DC; Los Angles and San Francisco, CA that recognized the importance of community input and providing funding to respected, on-the-ground organizations to assist with meaningful engagement. It describes how cities can build trust and meaningfully engage with residents in neighborhoods that may not have experience with or faith in being heard in planning processes. Part of the answer includes collaborating with community groups that are genuinely engaged in the neighborhoods, who have strong connections with and respect of locals, and who can help share the hopes and fears of long-time residents. And, it is important to understand that this is work, and work comes with a price tag. We should be ready to compensate the efforts of hard-working community groups sharing their time and expertise to help advance Vision Zero. http://bit.ly/2vZhwZs

EUROPEAN BIKE SHARING POSITION PAPERS
-> The European Cyclists’ Federation reports the Platform for European Bike Sharing and Systems (PEBSS), in collaboration with the International Association of Public Transport (UITP), released two position papers related to bike sharing. http://bit.ly/2vZWpGu

1. POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR SMART PUBLIC-USE BIKE SHARING
-> The first position paper provides recommendations for cities looking for strategic guidance for the implementation or upgrade of a bike sharing system as part of their public transport network. http://bit.ly/2vZE2RZ

2. COMMON POSITION PAPER ON UNLICENSED DOCKLESS BIKE SHARE
-> The second position paper aims to ensure dockless bike sharing schemes contribute to the objectives of a wider sustainable urban mobility policy and efficiently complement public transport. http://bit.ly/2vZVMg6

VIDEO: THE HIGH COST OF FREE PARKING
-> Mobility Lab reports the more parking we have, the more encouraged we are to drive and to shape our urban landscapes based on that parking. This story and stats are part of a new video produced by Mobility Lab, the Chilton Media Group, and Vox on the price of parking and how we have historically done it all wrong in this country. UCLA professor and parking guru Donald Shoup is interviewed in the film, detailing the two big parking inventions that came to dominate how we think about and manage parking: the parking meter and off-street parking requirements. See a list of other parking resources at the end of the article. http://bit.ly/2v7leUE


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 10th International Urban Design Conference, November 13-15, 2017, Queensland, Australia
Deadline: July 31, 2017, http://bit.ly/2p7vs0B

-> CALL FOR PAPERS -The History of Bicycle Transportation and Planning for lectern or poster presentation at the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting January 7-11, 2018, Washington DC.
Deadline: August 1, 2017 (Call opens June 1), http://bit.ly/2r8k7AZ

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - Applying Census Data for Transportation, November 14-16, 2017, Kansas City, MO
Deadline: August 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2oWI6Ui

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - 5th Annual AARP Livable Communities National Conference, November 14-16, 2017, Addison, TX
Deadline: August 14, 2017 by 11:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/2vZ0lY3

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 2018 Active Living Research Annual Conference, February 11-14, 2018, Banff, Canada
Deadline: August 24, 2017, http://bit.ly/1FSW3BQ

-> INVITATION FOR CONSULTANT LETTERS OF INTEREST - The Transportation Research Board Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP)
Deadline: August 25, 2017, http://bit.ly/2sYQgdf

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 12th Access Management Conference, July 17-19, 2018, Madison, WI.
Deadline: September 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2p7sNUC

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

ON THE HORIZON

-> July 27-28, 2017 - 8th International Visualization in Transportation Symposium: Visualization in Action, Washington, D.C.
http://bit.ly/2dlh6Io
-> July 29 - August 2, 2017 - Greater, Greener 2017: Parks Connecting Cities, Cultures and Generations, Minneapolis & St. Paul, MN.
http://bit.ly/2nQO44G
-> July 30, 2017 - TransportationCamp Toronto, Toronto, Canada
http://bit.ly/2vZEnUY
-> July 31 - August 4, 2017 - Comprehensive Bikeway Design 2.0, Initiative for Bicycle & Pedestrian Innovation, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2k1qyPj
-> August 6-9, 2017 - APTA Sustainability & Multimodal Planning Workshop, Minneapolis, MN
http://bit.ly/2v6CjxV
-> August 8, 2017 - 7th Annual Silicon Valley Bike Summit, Mountain View, CA
http://bit.ly/2qEIO4r
-> August 20-24, 2017 (NOTE NEW DATE) - 1.0 Workshop: Fundamentals of Bikeway Planning & Design, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2k1fPoj
-> August 22-30, 2017 - Making the Metropolis, Summer School 2017 Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands & workshops and fieldwork in Amsterdam, The Netherlands
http://bit.ly/2ttJ3BT
-> August 31 - September 1, 2017 - Smart Cities Expo World Forum, Sydney, Australia
http://bit.ly/2u8h4v5
-> September 11-12, 2017 - TREC Transportation & Communities Summit, Portland, OR State University
http://bit.ly/2oZTk5V
-> September 11-13, 2017 - 2nd Transportation Research Board Conference on Transportation Needs of National Parks and Public Lands: Partnerships for Enhancing Stewardship and Mobility, Washington, D.C.
http://bit.ly/2fb3YUg
-> September 13, 2017 - KC Regional Safe Routes to School Summit, Kansas City, KS
http://bit.ly/2srnMeT
-> September 13-15, 2017 - National Walking Summit, St. Paul. MN.
http://bit.ly/2a7hk08
-> September 14-15, 2017 - NACTO Sister Cities Roadshow—New Haven, CT
http://bit.ly/2t0qsgF
-> September 15, 2017 - New York State Bike Summit, Albany, NY.
http://bit.ly/2ltfj4K
-> September 16-20, 2017 - Governors Highway Safety Association Annual Meeting, Louisville, KY
http://bit.ly/2mu32MO
-> September 16-22, 2017 - European Mobility Week
http://bit.ly/2sYgX5l
-> September 17-20, 2017 - Rail~Volution 2017, Denver, CO.
http://bit.ly/S0xyxe
-> September 19-21, 2017 - International Cycling Conference 2017, Mannheim, Germany
http://bit.ly/2oYZ00b
-> September 19-22, 2017 - Walk21 Calagry 2017, Calgary, Canada
http://bit.ly/2gwJJ6c
-> September 21-22, 2017 - 6th International Cycling Safety Conference (ICSC), Davis, CA.
http://bit.ly/2jUmGQa
-> September 24–25, 2017 - West Virginia Bike Summit, Morgantown, WV.
http://bit.ly/2lt6w2s
-> September 26-27, 2017 - 11th University Transportation Center (UTC) Spotlight Conference: Rebuilding and Retrofitting the Transportation Infrastructure, Washington, DC
http://bit.ly/2sYSDwq
-> September 26-28, 2017 - National Recreation and Park Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA
http://bit.ly/2sqO54R
-> September 26-29, 2017 - 8th International Symposium on Travel Demand Management, Taipei, Taiwan
http://bit.ly/2vZ6lA9
-> September 26-29, 2017 - 14th International Conference on Urban Health, Health Equity: The New Urban Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals, Coimbra, Portugal
http://bit.ly/2jyEdAu
-> October 1-3, 2017 - Southeast Greenways and Trails Summit, Durham, NC.
http://bit.ly/2nQH2x5
-> October 2, 2017 - Colorado Bicycle Summit, Denver, CO.
http://bit.ly/2kHfGdZ
-> October 2-3, 2017 - SOPHIA’s 2017 Practitioner Workshop, Washington, DC
http://bit.ly/2t0Bd2G
-> October 2-4, 2017, EcoMobility World Congress, Kaohsiung, Chinese Taipei
http://bit.ly/2srk1Gh
-> October 2-6, 2017 - 54th International Making Cities Livable Conference on Public Places for Community, Democracy, Health & Equity, Santa Fe, NM
http://bit.ly/2ugMJuH
-> October 3-4, 2017- 10th Annual Growing Sustainable Communities Conference, Dubuque, IA.
http://bit.ly/2ltAOSZ
-> October 3–6, 2017 - California Bicycle Summit, Sacramento, CA.
http://bit.ly/2p0dcG1
-> October 4, 2017 - International Walk to School Day
http://bit.ly/1HFSofq
-> October 4-5, 2017 - Cycle Highway Academy, London, England
http://bit.ly/2sYgcsS
-> October 5–7, 2017 - CityWorks (X)po 2017, Roanoke, VA
http://bit.ly/1YqD0J4
-> October 6-8, 2017 - Youth Bike Summit, Arlington, VA & Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/2jyEG3b
-> October 11-12, 2017 - Sustainable Trails for All Workshop, Greenfield, NH
http://bit.ly/2vZNogN
-> October 11-14, 2017 - Placemaking Week 2017, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
http://bit.ly/2lVa6ly
-> October 14-16, 2017 - I AM Traffic 2, St. Louis, MO
http://bit.ly/2r5YL7h
-> October 17-20, 2017 - Asia Pacific Cycling Congress, Christchurch, New Zealand
http://bit.ly/2oM5lgp
-> October 20-23, 2017 - American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA.
http://bit.ly/1OrYqwK
-> October 24-27, 2017 - National Charrette Institute, Chicago, IL
http://bit.ly/2vZHlcd
-> October 29 - November 2, 2017 - ITS World Congress: Integrated Mobility Driving Smart Cities, Montréal, Canada
http://bit.ly/2k1c563
-> October 30-November 2, 2017 - NACTO Designing Cities 2017, Chicago, IL.
http://bit.ly/2fwJOG1
-> November 2, 2017 - CTS 28th Annual Transportation Research Conference, Minneapolis, MN.
http://bit.ly/1o0DfWn
-> November 3–4, 2017 - North Carolina Bike Summit, Wilmington, NC.
http://bit.ly/1fgGco2
-> November 6-10, 2017 - Next City’s Vanguard Conference, Newcastle, Australia. Applications due August 1, 2017
http://bit.ly/2sl9qZ6
-> November 14-16, 2017 - 5th Annual AARP Livable Communities National Conference, Addison, TX
http://bit.ly/2vZ0lY3
-> November 14-16, 2017 - Using Census Data for Transportation Applications Conference, Kansas City, MO.
http://bit.ly/2kJRvf2
-> November 15-19, 2017 - LA CoMotion, Los Angeles, CA
http://bit.ly/2tmfORr
-> December 5-7, 2017 - Brownfields 2017: Sustainable Communities Start Here, Pittsburgh, PA.
http://bit.ly/2kkICs9

NEW & FURTHER OUT: See http://bit.ly/centerlines for other events more than six months from now.
> March 21-23, 2018 - 2018 Montana Bike Walk Summit - Bozeman, MT
http://bit.ly/2v7t94b
-> September 16-19, 2018 - Walk/Bike/Places Conference (formerly Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place), New Orleans, LA
http://bit.ly/2oWTtf2


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - OPPORTUNITY FOR HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS IN 14 STATES
The Health Impact Project will award at least four 2-year grants of up to $100,000 to organizations in select counties in the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia. The grants will support the design and completion of a health impact assessment (HIA).
Deadline: September 15, 2017 by 8:00 pm ET, http://bit.ly/2v6Wiwr

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM SPECIALIST, PORTLAND, OR BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION
The City of Portland is seeking a Program Specialist to assist in the implementation of the Bureau's Vision Zero work and Safe Routes to School program. The position will be responsible for coordination, management and public outreach for small capital projects and operational improvements. This position will help implement the Transportation Bureau's safety efforts, with a focus on the High Crash Corridors, school routes, access to transit and Neighborhood Greenways.
Deadline: July 28, 2017 by 4:30 pm PT, http://bit.ly/2uAfnX7

-> JOB - MEMBERSHIP, EVENTS, AND DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR, BOSTON, MA CYCLISTS UNION
The Coordinator manages the Boston Cyclists Union's rapidly growing membership and volunteer programs. They develop and execute communication strategies, assist in planning events, and collaborate with staff and partners to explore other fundraising and development opportunities. Through this work they fulfill the Bike Union's goals of growing and supporting our membership, and building the bike community and the network of bike-friendly businesses in the Boston area. They strongly encourage people of color and women to apply.
Deadline: Applications considered on a rolling basis until position is filled, preference for applications received by July 30, 2017, http://bit.ly/2v7fHgG

-> JOB - PROGRAM MANAGER: BIKE SHARE & CITIES FOR CYCLING, NACTO, NEW YORK, NY
NACTO (National Association of City Transportation Officials) seeks a Program Manager who will manage their participation in the Better Bike Share Partnership and coordinate NACTO’s Cities for Cycling Network. The Program Manager will work directly with city staff around the country on bike share, equity, cycling, and other issues in sustainable transportation, urban planning, design, and policy. They will also support other ongoing NACTO initiatives focused on the creation of safer, better conditions for people biking, walking, and taking transit.
Deadline: August 18, 2017, though applications considered on a rolling basis, interviews or an offer could be extended before deadline, http://bit.ly/2uAo6IS

-> 5 JOBS - TOOLE DESIGN GROUP
Toole Design Group has a staff of over 130 professionals whose work includes a wide variety of projects at the local, state and national level – including supporting the National Center for Safe Routes to Schools and the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center. In addition to multimodal planning and engineering work, they advise and support state and local agencies across the country on their SRTS and bicycle and pedestrian transportation programs.

- PROJECT PLANNER/SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOLS PROGRAMS COORDINATOR, BERKELEY, CA
Toole Design Group is looking for a person with a strong commitment to sustainable transportation and who enjoys working with a skilled team of co-workers on projects in northern California and throughout North America. This person will be responsible for managing multiple projects and/or technical tasks simultaneously, including managing subconsultants; managing SRTS programs and projects; and managing and leading community or stakeholder engagement efforts, among several other responsibilities.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2r7WMzc

- 3 CIVIL ENGINEER POSITIONS, SILVER SPRING, MD OR DENVER, CO
As a Civil Engineer, you’ll use state of the art tools and practices to help create sustainable multimodal transportation infrastructure. You’ll work with your colleagues to engage communities, develop concepts, and produce construction documents for multi-modal projects that range from small improvements to full-scale street reconstructions. In an industry that is constantly changing you’ll be at the forefront of designing and implementing real solutions.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2vYVDJT (Silver Spring); http://bit.ly/2vYTZrL (Denver); and http://bit.ly/2vYUuC9 (Senior Civil Engineer-Denver)

- CIVIL ENGINEER, BERKELEY, CA
Toole Design Group is looking for a Civil Engineer to work in their Berkeley, CA office to participate in all stages of project development, to make presentations and conduct client meetings, do fieldwork, conduct engineering analyses, and prepare construction documents and technical reports.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2vYEtMz

-> JOB - BETTER BIKE SHARE GRANT MANAGER, CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, PA
The Philadelphia the Office of Transportation and Infrastructure Systems (oTIS) offers an opportunity for an experienced grant manager to lead the work of the Better Bike Share Partnership and create strategies to sustain the partnership in a dynamic industry. Along with management of Indego, oTIS leads the Better Bike Share Partnership (BBSP), a national initiative that seeks to challenge assumptions on race, income and equity in the realm of bike share. BBSP work is centered in Philadelphia with Indego bike share is serving as a living laboratory for best practices in creating an equitable and replicable model for bike share. Partnership and works closely with People for Bikes, the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) and the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia (BCGP) as well as the Center for Social Inclusion.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2uADqWe

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


HOUSEKEEPING

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Founding Editor: In Memoriam John Williams.

Editor: Linda Tracy
Executive Editor and Program Manager: Mark Plotz, AICP
Web/Systems Administrator: Jimmy Johnston

Contributors: AARP Livable Communities Newsletter; AASHTO Daily Transportation Update; AASHTO Journal; American Trails; Michael Andersen; Apple News; Association of Bicycle & Pedestrian Professionals Listserve; Osman Bari; Canada Walks; Froso Christofides; CityLab; Lee Davidson; Christopher B Douwes; Brooke DuBose; Deseret News: Phil Diehl; ECF General Newsletter; Shane Farthing; Kathleen Ferrier; FHWA; Human Environment Digest; KIRO-TV; Dave Kirschner; Michael Kissinger; Luz Lazo; Michael Lewyn; Todd Litman; Lyndsey; Mobility Lab; Megan Molteni; Montana Associated Technology Roundtables; Ryan Morgan; Holly Moskerintz; NACTO News; National Transportation Safety Board; New Atlas; Next City; Amy Joi O’Donoghue; The Overhead Wire; PeopleForBikes; Niccolò Panozzo; The Pew Charitable Trusts; Public Square; Rail-Trail eNews; Paul Ridden; The Salt Lake Tribune; The San Diego Union-Tribune; Angie Schmitt; Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition e-Bulletin; Smart Growth America; Smart Growth Information Clearinghouse; Smart Growth Online; Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition Newsletter; Spaces to Places; Robert Steuteville; Streetsblog USA; Streets MN; TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter; University of Illinois Law Review; US DOT; Stephan Vance; Vancouver Courier; Vision Zero Network; VTPI News; Walk Bike Nashville Advocacy Update; Jay Walljasper; Wired; Janet Zeller.


CONTACT US

©2017 - NCBW | The National Center for Bicycling & Walking is a program of Project for Public Spaces, Inc. http://www.bikewalk.org/contact.php