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C-E-N-T-E-R-L-I-N-E-S

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#447 Wednesday, November 1, 2017

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CenterLines is the bi-weekly e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking, a program of Project for Public Spaces. CenterLines is our way of quickly delivering news and information you can use to create more walkable and bicycle-friendly communities.

T-H-E--N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L-&-I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-O-N-A-L--S-C-E-N-E
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----- Comment on USDOT Strategic Plan for FY 2018-2022
----- NACTO Blueprint for Autonomous Urbanism
----- Amsterdam Template for Bike-Dominated Transportation
----- Reducing Speeding-Related Crashes Through Design
----- Engaging Young Children & Families in Building Better Cities
----- Toronto, Canada: Proposed Zombie Law to Fine Cellphone Crossing Peds
----- Nissan Electric Car Sings to Alert Peds & Cyclists
----- 10 E-Bike Myths & Facts
----- Dockless Bike Share: Mobility, Infrastructure & Social Equity
----- Bus Stop Balancing: Bus Stops Too Close Together
----- Singapore to Cap Number of Cars Permitted on Streets
----- Connecting Neighborhoods with Low-Stress Bike Routes
----- Fed Program to Tackle Health Disparities Threatened to be Cut

R-E-G-I-O-N-A-L and L-O-C-A-L--A-C-T-I-O-N-S
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----- State DOTs Forfeit Unspent TAP Bike & Ped Millions
----- Bicycle Friendly Delaware Act Updates, Clarifies Law
----- CA Considers "Idaho Stop" Bill
----- TX Cyclists' App Data Helps Plan Future Bike Infrastructure
----- Montgomery County, MD: Low Stress Bike Coloring Book & Map
----- Sonoma County, CA Bicycle Coalition: Impacts of the Fires
----- 2017 Bicycle Friendly State Ranking
----- Sitka, AK Earns Bronze Walk Friendly Communities Designation
----- Cheap, Efficient Bike Lanes Added to Detroit-Superior Bridge
----- Crowd-Sourced Map of DC's Least Accessible Sidewalks
----- San Antonio, TX: Anonymous Group Makes Ped Safety Improvements

T-H-E--R-E-S-E-A-R-C-H--B-E-A-T
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----- Walking Disabilities Likely From More TV & Less Exercise Among Older Adults
----- Older Adults' Even Minimal Regular Walking: Lower Death Risk
----- Two New Studies Improve Walkability Measurement
----- Under-Reporting Bicycle Crashes to Police
----- Cyclist Injuries in Health Impact Economic Assessments
----- Neighborhood Characteristics & Built Environment Effects on Ped Injury Severity
----- TRB Annual Meeting Interactive Program Open

R-E-S-O-U-R-C-E-S
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----- FHWA Shared Streets Guide for Peds w/ Vision Disabilities
----- How to Develop a Ped & Bike Safety Action Plan
----- Manual on Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections to Transit
----- Complete Streets Implementation Challenges Infographic
----- Wayfinding System Principles
----- New Crowd-Sourced App to Help Cyclists Find Safest Routes
----- TRB Report: Method Selection for Travel Forecasting
----- Public Transportation Impact on Rural & Small Towns
----- Evaluation and Analysis of Liquid Deicers
----- Field Usage of Alternative Deicers for Snow and Ice Control
----- Exploring the Walking Tolerance of Transitway Users
----- What Is Policy? Introductory Fact Sheet

N-E-W-S--S-E-C-T-I-O-N-S
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- The National Scene
- Regional Actions
- The Research Beat
- Quotes R Us
- Webinars and Seminars
- Resources
- Share What You Know
- Conferences
- Jobs, Grants & RFPs
- Housekeeping
- Contact Us

THE NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL SCENE

COMMENT ON USDOT STRATEGIC PLAN FOR FY 2018-2022
-> USDOT invites public comment on its draft DOT Strategic Plan for FY 2018-2022. (http://bit.ly/2A2utEZ) Comments are due on or before November 13, 2017. The draft plan reflects the Secretary's priorities for achieving DOT's mission through four strategic goals:

  1. Safety: Reduce Transportation-Related Fatalities and Serious Injuries Across the Transportation System;
  2. Infrastructure: Invest in Infrastructure to Ensure Mobility and Accessibility and to Stimulate Economic Growth, Productivity and Competitiveness for American Workers and Businesses;
  3. Innovation: Lead in the Development and Deployment of Innovative Practices; and Technologies that Improve the Safety and Performance of the Nation's Transportation System
  4. Accountability: Serve the Nation with Reduced Regulatory Burden and Greater Efficiency, Effectiveness and Accountability.
http://bit.ly/2A4hyCl
Deadline: November 13, 2017

NACTO BLUEPRINT FOR AUTONOMOUS URBANISM
-> The National Association of City Transportation Officials released its "Blueprint for Autonomous Urbanism" (http://bit.ly/2z3pbsK), a first-of-its-kind street design vision to help cities worldwide prepare for the age of autonomous vehicles. The Blueprint envisions a future where cities benefit from new transportation technologies to improve the public realm and build streets that work for people, rather than merely redesigning streets to accommodate emerging technologies. It outlines the physical and policy steps that cities could take to ensure that their streets can be reimagined and redesigned to improve safety, prioritize people and public space, strengthen the role of mass transit and manage the contested curb as automated vehicles arrive on city streets. The "Blueprint for Autonomous Urbanism" is a series and will expand and adapt as transportation technologies emerge and evolve. http://bit.ly/2z4821O

AMSTERDAM TEMPLATE FOR BIKE-DOMINATED TRANSPORTATION
-> CityLab reports over the last 60 years, Amsterdam's leaders, planners and designers have by trial and error created a template for a city where bikes are the dominant force in transportation planning and design. That template has 5 essential characteristics; skip or short-change any one of them and your city of bikes won't work as well. Briefly these are: all streets are bike streets; separated cycle tracks, not bike lanes; when possible, go completely car free; two speeds, both slow; and stress-free intersections. See details on each characteristic: http://bit.ly/2z3AfGc

REDUCING SPEEDING-RELATED CRASHES THROUGH DESIGN
-> An Alta Planning + Design article describes the issue of speed-related crashes and their especially serious consequences for people walking and biking. Designing "self-enforcing" streets that force people driving to slow down and pay attention to their surroundings is critical to reducing speeding-related crashes. Better bicycle infrastructure, traffic calming, and lower speed limits have great potential for reducing bicycle and pedestrian injuries and fatalities. Better street design includes improved intersection crossings, reduced street crossing distances, making people walking more visible, and slowing turning vehicles. http://bit.ly/2zUCD1X

ENGAGING YOUNG CHILDREN & FAMILIES IN BUILDING BETTER CITIES
-> 8 80 Cities reports it partnered with the Bernard van Leer Foundation to compile pioneering examples of inclusive civic engagement processes with families and caregivers with young children. Their report looks at 21 case studies across 16 countries and provides some guiding principles for working with this underrepresented but important demographic to engage in city building. "Building Better Cities with Young Children and Families: How to Engage our Youngest Citizens and Families in City Building: A Global Scan of Best Practices" http://bit.ly/2yG3jWk

TORONTO, CANADA: PROPOSED ZOMBIE LAW TO FINE CELLPHONE CROSSING PEDS
-> A Toronto Star editorial says it is tempting to support any legislation that would impose fines on those people who habitually bury their faces in a smartphone and walk the city streets oblivious to the crowds and cars around them. But while the eponymous phone-crazed "zombies" of a proposed new provincial "zombie law" are no doubt irritating, study after study has shown they don't pose a significant threat to themselves or others. As such, the newly tabled private member's bill at Queen's Park aimed at curbing so-called "distracted walking" amounts to evidence-blind legislative overreach. The proposed law, which would impose fines of up to $125 for crossing the street while using a cellphone, is itself a distraction from the real causes and solutions to Ontario's - and, in particular, Toronto's - growing pedestrian safety problem. http://bit.ly/2z2OevO

NISSAN ELECTRIC CAR SINGS TO ALERT PEDS & CYCLISTS
-> Wired reports at the Tokyo Motor Show Nissan unveiled the IMx, its newest electric (and autonomous) concept. It emits a noise like a demonic string quartet tuning its instruments. Nissan calls the feature Canto-literally, "I sing" in Italian-and it's built to alert pedestrians that the very quiet electric vehicle is coming, even at low speeds. The little high-pitched whine created by electric motors doesn't travel nearly as far as the ripping barrrrp of a gas-powered car. But that can be bad news for your standard walker or cyclist, especially those who are vision impaired. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has found that hybrid vehicles are 35% more likely to get into a pedestrian-involved crash, and 57% more likely to get into a cyclist-involved one. (Incidence Rates of Pedestrian And Bicyclist Crashes by Hybrid Electric Passenger Vehicles: An Update (2011): http://bit.ly/2z3ObjA) In 2015, NHTSA announced a new safety standard that would require electric vehicles to make an audible noise while traveling below 19 mph. (Cars moving faster than that will create enough tire and wind noise to be heard.) http://bit.ly/2zW5OSs

10 E-BIKE MYTHS & FACTS
-> As the popularity of e-bikes skyrockets around the world, it's only a matter of time before they really take off in the U.S. Fact. PeopleForBikes provides 10 e-bike myths and the truth behind them. Here's a sample:

  1. They're too fast. FACT: Most e-bikes travel at bike-like speeds. Class 1 e-bikes have a motor that cuts off after the rider reaches 20 mph. This is the top assisted speed, not the average speed. On flat and uphill surfaces, class 1 e-bikes travel on average 2-3 mi/hr faster than traditional bicycles.
  2. E-bike access is a slippery slope and will lead to full motorized access on all non-motorized trails. FACT: Pedal-assist e-bikes are fundamentally different from ATVs, off-road motorcycles and internal-combustion off-road vehicles. Motorized vehicle regulations were written before the invention of e-bikes and shouldn't be used to regulate e-bike use. E-bikes are emissions- and noise-free. PeopleForBikes works to distinguish e-bikes from motorcycles and bicycles so that e-bikes are understood and non-motorized trail access is preserved... http://bit.ly/2A3j

DOCKLESS BIKE SHARE: MOBILITY, INFRASTRUCTURE & SOCIAL EQUITY
-> The PlacesForBikes and Better Bike Share blogs teamed up to help more cities understand how deckles bike share is working so far. For a 3-part series they spoke with smart Seattleites about what they see going on and how things might play out for mobility, infrastructure and social equity. In the first the series, check out what Mafara Hobson, a spokeswoman for the Seattle DOT has to say. http://bit.ly/2yFeSNS

BUS STOP BALANCING: BUS STOPS TOO CLOSE TOGETHER
-> Streetsblog USA reports bus ridership is falling in American cities, and the only way to turn around the trend is to provide better service. One thing nearly every US transit agency should consider to win back riders is "Bus stop balancing," which TransitCenter explains in a new video. (http://bit.ly/2z3HBcV) In most cities, bus stops are spaced too closely together. On a local bus route, stops should be within a convenient walking distance of each other - about a quarter mile. If stops are spaced much more tightly than that, buses spend an excessive amount of time stopped for boarding and at red lights. http://bit.ly/2z67edb

SINGAPORE TO CAP NUMBER OF CARS PERMITTED ON STREETS
-> Streetsblog USA reports the island city-state of Singapore is capping the number of cars on its streets. To own a car in Singapore, you need a permit. And beginning in February, the Singapore government will cease to issue additional permits. Currently, permit growth is capped at about 0.25 percent annually. (http://bit.ly/2z2VqYP) Space is just too limited to accommodate more motor vehicles. The country has expanded the length of its rail network 30% in the past six years, and is planning to invest US$14 billion on rail expansion and $3 billion on additional bus service over the next five years. They plan to reevaluate the hard cap on cars in 2020. http://bit.ly/2z2ICBZ

CONNECTING NEIGHBORHOODS WITH LOW-STRESS BIKE ROUTES
-> Common Dreams reports New York City has created a well-connected grid of safe and comfortable bike routes featuring protected bike lanes on busy avenues and painted lanes on quieter streets. Built over the last decade as part of a methodical plan to improve biking, this network explains Brooklyn's doubling of bike commuters over just five years, 2009-2014. Those 10,000 new bike-commuting Brooklynites, not to mention the tens of thousands of others in the borough who now bike for shorter errands and social trips, are more than a trend. They're a model. "The next big idea for biking in the US is building complete, connected networks of comfortable places to ride," says Martha Roskowski, vice president of local innovation for the national bicycling advocacy coalition PeopleForBikes. http://bit.ly/2z3Zqs9

FED PROGRAM TO TACKLE HEALTH DISPARITIES THREATENED TO BE CUT
-> TransportationForAmerica reports scores of communities are eager to find ways to improve the health of their most vulnerable residents - the people most likely to suffer from poor health outcomes - and those less likely to have access to safe streets for walking or biking. They want to know how to steer more of their transportation dollars into projects that will bring significant health benefits and reduce these disparities. The Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health program (REACH), a small program within the CDC, has helped these communities meet the demand for more active transportation projects, address the wide disparities in health from zip code to zip code, increase access to opportunities, and create a foundation of shared and sustainable prosperity. REACH is an evidence-based program that directly tackles these health disparities and is the only community health program currently funded at the CDC. Both the House and Senate Appropriations bills for next year (FY 2018) eliminate funding for this critical program. http://bit.ly/2iTQCB1


REGIONAL AND LOCAL ACTIONS

STATE DOTS FORFEIT UNSPENT TAP BIKE & PED MILLIONS
-> Streetsblog USA reports millions of dollars that should have gone toward building safer sidewalks or bike lanes near schools were instead forfeited by state DOTs that couldn't get their acts together. That's according to data compiled by the Safe Routes to School National Partnership. (http://bit.ly/2z3HnCo) The 2012 federal transportation bill gave states four years to spend funds from the "Transportation Alternatives" program - the name for small pot of money for walking and biking infrastructure. The hard deadline was October 1. Four states returned bike/ped money to the feds: Georgia: $4.4 million; Maryland: $2.5 million; New Jersey: $6.2 million; and North Carolina: $4 million. (See how your state did. Transportation Alternatives Program and Safe Routes to School program - State of the States As of September 30, 2017: http://bit.ly/2z3UDa9) In addition, many states choose to transfer Transportation Alternatives funds to road and bridge projects. In total, states shifted about 18% of the funding in the program to projects that are not primarily for walking and biking. http://bit.ly/2z3GsC0

BICYCLE FRIENDLY DELAWARE ACT UPDATES, CLARIFIES LAW
-> Bicycling magazine reports the Bicycle Friendly Delaware Act, which passed the state legislature with bipartisan support and was recently signed by the Governor, established several new and modified traffic rules. (House Bill 185: http://bit.ly/2z2XakN) The bill's synopsis states that "without changing the legal meaning of existing law, these updates would clarify sections of the Delaware Rules of the Road that are frequently misunderstood by the police, by bicycle operators and by vehicle drivers... would enable the Department of Transportation to deploy bicycle traffic signals as a safety countermeasure at intersections where most fatal bicycle crashes occur; require vehicles to change lanes when passing bicycles (and farm equipment and animal-drawn vehicles) when lanes are too narrow..." The law also adopts a policy known as the "Idaho stop." Named after the first state to pass a similar law, the rule allows cyclists to treat stop signs like yield signs. http://bit.ly/2x7FjYj

CA CONSIDERS "IDAHO STOP" BILL
-> Bicycle Retailer reports Idaho and Delaware have passed legislation allowing bicyclists to treat stop signs as yield signs after determining it is safe to do so. An unusual bipartisan bike bill (AB 1103: http://bit.ly/2z59QIg) would permit the "Idaho stop" in California. A change in California would create a powerful precedent for reform across the country. Other states (OR, AZ, CO, MN AR, UT, OK & MT) have tried, but failed, to enact similar legislation. That's an indication that rolling through stop signs is not confined to ID, DE or CA nor is it rare behavior. A DePaul University study found that 96% of Chicago bike riders didn't come to a stop. (Policies fro Pedaling: Managing the Tradeoff between Speed & Safety for Biking in Chicago: http://bit.ly/2z2negb) Millions of times a day across the U.S., riders treat stop signs as yield signs-without catastrophic results. In Idaho, injury collisions actually decreased after it changed the law and have remained at low levels since. http://bit.ly/2x8UQXG

TX CYCLISTS' APP DATA HELPS PLAN FUTURE BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE
-> KSTX - San Antonio reports that data from more than 84,000 Texas users of the smartphone cycling app, Strava, could help Texas plan where future additional bike lanes and signs will go. For the past few years Strava has been aggregating and anonymizing cyclist data then selling it to cities and states. Texas DOT bought 2 years worth of data a couple months ago for an undisclosed amount. Unlike cars, where cyclists are going is largely anecdotal. Strava provides demographic profiles, start and end points, and time stopped at intersections from its users who represent between 3 and 20% of the entire cycling community. TxDOT says it will take around 6 months to fully integrate the data and learn how to use it. Under the TxDOT purchase, MPOs, cities and other planners get the data for free. http://bit.ly/2yFc572

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD: LOW STRESS BIKE COLORING BOOK & MAP
-> CityLab reports Montgomery County, MD, chose the ultimate stress-busting medium of the coloring book to share concepts from its "low stress" bicycle master plan. (Enjoy the Ride: http://bit.ly/2z3mEP6) Each black and white page depicts different types of bikeways, such as neighborhood greenways, separated bike lanes and trails. Since 2015, county planners have been working on a bicycle master plan to increase local cycling rates. Reducing the stress experienced by cyclists and would-be cyclists on busy, high-speed suburban arterial roads is a particular focus of their efforts. Last year they launched an online bicycle stress map (http://bit.ly/2z5M3YJ) that rates streets according to Level of Traffic Stress (LTS) based on a Mineta Transportation Institute study. (Low-Stress Bicycling and Network Connectivity: http://bit.ly/2z4UMub) LTS quantifies the amount of stress that cyclists feel based on traffic speed, traffic volume, number of lanes, ease of intersection crossings, and other variables. http://bit.ly/2yyR9My

SONOMA COUNTY, CA BICYCLE COALITION: IMPACTS OF THE FIRES
-> The Sonoma County, CA Bicycle Coalition reports their staff and board are all physically safe, but have experienced losses from the devastating fires as have so many other individuals and organizations within their cycling community. The Santa Rosa Cycling Club, one of their staunchest supporters, lost their entire warehouse and over $100,000 worth of equipment - everything they need to host rides like the Wine Country Century. They did not have insurance. (http://bit.ly/2z2PiQn) This will have a huge impact on the community groups, including SCBC, to which they donate the proceeds from these cycling events. Fire-related school closures and air quality issues have and will continue to affect the Safe Routes to School program, impacting its funding stream, staff jobs, and ultimately the organization's bottom line. http://bit.ly/2z4it5w

2017 BICYCLE FRIENDLY STATE RANKING
-> The League of American Bicyclists released its 2017 Bicycle Friendly State Ranking. Find out where your state placed. (http://bit.ly/1no5Bet) You can also see Report Cards for all states. (http://bit.ly/2z3KMkI) You can also review the visuals of the rankings with charts and maps of the data used to arrive at the rankings. (http://bit.ly/2z3FaXM) The top 5 states are WA, MN, CA, MA and OR. The states with the most opportunity for improvement are OK, KS, ND, HI and NE.

[See Webinar section for a November 7, 2017 webinar on this topic.]

SITKA, AK EARNS BRONZE WALK FRIENDLY COMMUNITIES DESIGNATION
-> Walk Sitka reports the City and Borough of Sitka, AK earned renewal of its bronze-level Walk Friendly Communities designation (http://bit.ly/2z2I66P), joining seven other communities who also recently learned that they earned their first or renewed designations. (http://bit.ly/2z2BjtN) In 2013, Sitka became the first, and so far only, town in Alaska to earn a bronze-level or higher designation from the Walk Friendly Communities program. (Juneau has honorable mention status). Sitka is the only community in Alaska with both Walk Friendly Communities and Bicycle Friendly Community designations.

The other communities earning Walk Friendly Communities designations are:
- Gold: Washington, DC
- Silver: Columbus, OH; Long Beach, CA & Redwood City, CA
- Bronze: Essex Junction, VT; Gainesville, FL & Northampton, MA.
The next Walk Friendly Communities application deadline is December 15, 2017. For details, go to http://bit.ly/2qPEjsn

CHEAP, EFFICIENT BIKE LANES ADDED TO DETROIT-SUPERIOR BRIDGE
-> Cleveland.com reports new cheap, efficient bike lane additions to Detroit-Superior Bridge show a sea change in city policy. It was 16 years ago that the nonprofits Cleveland Public Art (now LAND Studio) and EcoCity Cleveland proposed turning the two outer lanes of the five-lane Detroit-Superior Bridge into dedicated bike and pedestrian routes. Last week the city began work on $81,000 in modifications that will finally bring up-to-date bike lanes to both sides of the bridge, improving safety for cyclists, pedestrians and motorists. Check out details and photos: http://bit.ly/2xoIjzB

CROWD-SOURCED MAP OF DC'S LEAST ACCESSIBLE SIDEWALKS
-> Curbed reports Project Sidewalk, the crowd-sourced map of D.C.'s least accessible sidewalks, is nearly complete. In February, the University of Maryland introduced a brand new Walk Score-inspired map, called Project Sidewalk. (http://bit.ly/2iU4tr1) This map allows the public to catalog and rate the accessibility of sidewalks and curb ramps and any obstacles like fire hydrants or crumbling pavement. Recently Project Sidewalk confirmed that there are now over 100,000 accessibility labels across 763 miles of the city, which is over 70% of DC. You can still help map the least accessible sidewalks in DC to make a difference through Project Sidewalk: http://bit.ly/2iU4tr1. http://bit.ly/2yFh5sE

SAN ANTONIO, TX: ANONYMOUS GROUP MAKES PED SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS
-> Streetsblog USA reports without permission an anonymous group calling themselves the San Antonio Department of Transformation painted a zebra crosswalk and extended the curb, using toilet plungers and polka dot paint to make the intersection at St. Mary's and Mistletoe safer. In removing the demonstration, San Antonio officials acted with the kind of swiftness that they've never displayed in response to the city's staggering pedestrian death rate. http://bit.ly/2z3jLO9


THE RESEARCH BEAT

WALKING DISABILITIES LIKELY FROM MORE TV & LESS EXERCISE AMONG OLDER ADULTS
-> The Nation's Health reports older Americans who watch more TV and exercise less are more likely to have walking disabilities, according to a new study in The Journals of Gerontology. (The Joint Associations of Sedentary Time and Physical Activity With Mobility Disability in Older People: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study: http://bit.ly/2z4vmNb) The study is based on prospective data of self-reported diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviors for over 300,000 people ages 50-71. Participants were determined to have a mobility disability if they reported an inability to walk or maintain a normal walking pace of less than two miles per hour. Researchers found participants who reported the lowest level of physical activity and sat the most - seven hours of daily sitting time or more - were twice as likely to have a mobility disability compared with participants who sat fewer than three hours and reported the highest level of physical activity. http://bit.ly/2z5V7wJ

OLDER ADULTS' EVEN MINIMAL REGULAR WALKING: LOWER DEATH RISK
-> According to an eMedicineHealth article regular walking, even when it's below the minimum recommended levels for physical fitness, is associated with lower all-cause mortality compared with inactivity, according to new data from a large, ongoing US cancer prevention cohort study among older Americans. (Walking in Relation to Mortality in a Large Prospective Cohort of Older U.S. Adults: http://bit.ly/2A2yo4y) This recently published study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine showed that 120 minutes or less of weekly moderate-intensity walking (about 20 minutes per mile) is also a boon to one's life span. This is the first study to examine walking only in relation to mortality in older men and women. http://bit.ly/2A483D0

TWO NEW STUDIES IMPROVE WALKABILITY MEASUREMENT
-> A State Smart Transportation Institute article considers two recent studies published by the Transportation Research Board that focus on the quality of the walking network connecting to pedestrians' destinations. (http://bit.ly/2iTdPnf) While Walk Score is a useful metric for beginning to understand if places are walkable, it doesn't capture some important factors affecting people's walking experience, such as surface parking and street trees according to one new study in Montreal. (The Missing Middle: Filling the Gap Between Walkability and Observed Walking Behavior: http://bit.ly/2A3kqPL) Extending this concept further, researchers in Singapore developed a Pedestrian Accessibility Tool that accounts for how features and conditions like roadway characteristics, greenery, building frontage, crossings, and weather affect people's perceived travel time while walking. (Introducing the Pedestrian Accessibility Tool: Walkability Analysis for a Geographic Information System: http://bit.ly/2ghn8Zi previously included in a past CenterLines issue)

UNDER-REPORTING BICYCLE CRASHES TO POLICE
-> A recent study published in Accident Analysis & Prevention reviewed responses to 7,015 online surveys from adult cyclists in 17 countries. Across all countries, an average of only 10% of all crashes were reported to the police, with a wide range among countries: from a minimum of 0.0% (Israel) and 2.6% (Croatia) to a maximum of a 35.0% (Germany). Police crash reports are often the main source for official data in many countries. However, with the exception of fatal crashes, crashes are often underreported in a biased manner. Consequently, the countermeasures adopted according to them may be inefficient. "Under-Reporting Bicycle Accidents to Police in the COST TU1101 International Survey: Cross-Country Comparisons and Associated Factors" http://bit.ly/2z5ULGb

CYCLIST INJURIES IN HEALTH IMPACT ECONOMIC ASSESSMENTS
-> The Journal of Transport & Health published a paper that discusses how injuries sustained while cycling can be included as a component of a health impact economic assessment of increased cycling. To include injuries as a component of a health impact assessment, their expected frequency of occurrence and impacts on health must well known. Incomplete reporting of cyclist injuries in official accident statistics is an obstacle for good health impact assessment. The paper compares 2 approaches. One relies on the relationship between distance cycled per year and risk of injury. The other approach is based on the concept of safety-in-numbers. The number of injuries is modeled as a function of the number of cyclists and motor vehicles." How can Cyclist Injuries be Included in Health Impact Economic Assessments?" http://bit.ly/2z3Pfnr

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTERISTICS & BUILT ENVIRONMENT EFFECTS ON PED INJURY SEVERITY
-> A study to be published later this year in Analytic Methods in Accident Research investigated and quantified the effects of neighborhood characteristics and built environment on pedestrian injury severity using FL DOT District 7 pedestrian-vehicle crash data. Based on the estimation results, three factors (African American community, school zone, and bus stop area) related to neighborhood characteristics and the built environment were identified to have significant influence on pedestrian injury severity. "The Effects of Neighborhood Characteristics and the Built Environment on Pedestrian Injury Severity: A Random Parameters Generalized Ordered Probability Model with Heterogeneity in Means and Variances" http://bit.ly/2z3cduS

TRB ANNUAL MEETING INTERACTIVE PROGRAM OPEN
-> The Interactive Program for the 97th TRB Annual Meeting, January 7-11, 2018, in Washington, DC is now available online. (http://bit.ly/2A3qAiU) You can use it to navigate through the full schedule 5,000 presentations in more than 800 transportation-related sessions. The Interactive Program allows you to filter the results for specific subjects, days of the week, and event types. You do not need to be registered for the Annual Meeting to browse the entire program.


QUOTES R US

"If you look at the history of our profession [transportation engineering], we have not fully embraced our number one ethical mandate: to protect the safety, well-being and health of the public. In the context of what's out on the ground, it's quite obvious that we cared more about prioritizing automobile travel. We didn't think about other people on the road and we didn't design for them. It's still part of the profession, that mindset. We spend billions of dollars every year and we're not addressing the historical legacy of these bad decisions."
-Bill Schultheiss, a transportation engineer with Toole Design Group on challenging his profession to uphold its ethical standards during an interview with Streetsblog USA. http://bit.ly/2gEpjdu

AND NOW, FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...

DUBAI HOVERBIKE POLICE PATROLS & FIRE FIGHTER JET PACKS
Dubai police are going to start using electric hoverbikes capable of speeds of up to 70 km/hr for patrols. The Dubai fire department uses "jet packs" to launch fire fighters into the sky to fight fires. Check out videos of both these amazing innovations: http://bit.ly/2z35DV7

THE HISTORY OF THE AMPERSAND
The history of the ampersand begins with the Ancient Romans. Roman scribes would write in cursive so as to increase the speed of their transcription, often combining letters into one form to save time while also increasing legibility, where certain characters overlap in a visually discordant manner-this was the birth of the ligature. The ampersand is simply a ligature of the letters E and T (et being the Latin word for and). Read on for the origin of the word "ampersand." http://bit.ly/2ghmjzV


WEBINARS, WEBCASTS AND SEMINARS
To better help you plan your continuing education activities, we list Webinars scheduled in the next month. Check our searchable master calendar at http://bit.ly/centerlines for opportunities farther in the future. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical.

NEXT UP

Webinar "Using Health Impact Assessment to Improve Our Communities"
Date: November 1, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): Anna Ricklin, Jackie Forbes(Kane County, IL)
Host: Smart Growth Online
Details: http://bit.ly/2x4WYjj, free

Webinar "Designing Bicycle Facilities"
Date: November 3, 2017, 12:00 pm to 1:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): Nazir Lalani (Traffex Engineers Inc.)
Host: American Society of Civil Engineers
Details: http://bit.ly/2xAtaLG, $99 members, $159 non-members. For groups: http://bit.ly/2z2cNcj, $249.00 members, $349 non-members

Webinar "Right-Sizing Roundabout Intersections for State Highways"
Date: November 7, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): Brian Walsh (WA DOT)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2ghEZQ1, fee varies up to $105

Webinar "State of Place Virtual (Makeup) Placemaking Workshop"
Date: November 7, 2017, 1:30 pm to 2:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: State of Place
Details: http://bit.ly/2iQvGLm, free

Webinar "The 2017 Bicycle Friendly State Ranking"
Date: November 7, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: League of American Bicyclists
Details: http://bit.ly/2z5UcfG, free

Webinar "Putting it all together: the policy context of applying the FLOW tools"
Date: November 8, 2017, 9:00 am to 10:30 am ET (European-based webinar)
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: FLOW
Details: http://bit.ly/2z3Res5, free

Webinar "Addressing Speed-Related Crashes with a Focus on Protecting Children"
Date: November 8, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): Nancy Pullen-Seufert (National Center for Safe Routes to School), Leah Walton (National Transportation Safety Board), Margot Ocañas (Los Angeles DOT) & Nina Haiman (New York City DOT)
Host: Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
Details: http://bit.ly/2A4DGg2, free

Webinar "Creating Vibrant Communities with the Community in Mind: Development and Gentrification"
Date: November 8, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0s0Tn, free

Webinar "Policy and Planning Actions to Address Connected and Automated Vehicles"
Date: November 8, 2017, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): Ray Derr (Transportation Research Board), Johanna Zmud & Ginger Goodin (TX A&M Transportation Institute) & Anita Kim (Volpe)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2gjet8Y, $95

Webinar "Electric Bicycles: A Primer on the Technology & Land Manager Tools"
Date: November 9, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): Morgan Lommele (People for Bikes) & Chris Bernhardt (Sentieros Consulting)
Host: American Trails
Details: http://bit.ly/2yp90YX, free for members, $55 nonmembers

Webinar "What Do We Know About Location Affordability in U.S. Shrinking Cities?"
Date: November 9, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): Joanna Ganning (Cleveland State University)
Host: National Institute for Transportation and Communities
Details: http://bit.ly/2ghmOtL, free

Webinar "Practical Techniques for Successfully Communicating Technical Topics"
Date: November 9, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): Shelley Row (Shelley Row Assoc.)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2giupIE, $55

Workshop or Call-in "Achieving Access for People with Disabilities in the Built Environment: An International Comparison"
Date: November 13, 2017, 9:30 am - 12:00 pm ET (after lunch: informal guided discussion with invited panelists, other participants & members of the public); Access Board Conference Center, 1331 F Street, NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. or call in
Presenter(s): Michael Small (former Australian government official) & panelists from disability rights organizations, building codes groups, government, the design profession, and industry
Host: US Access Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2gjmzhU, free

Webinar "U.S. Federal Policy Briefing"
Date: November 14, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): Caron Whitaker (League of American Bicyclists)
Host: League of American Bicyclists, the Alliance for Biking & Walking, and the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals
Details: http://bit.ly/2wAh9rB, free

Webinar "Creating Healthy Places For Healthy People"
Date: November 14, 2017, 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): Stephanie Bertaina (US EPA)
Host: Smart Growth Information Clearinghouse
Details: http://bit.ly/2z2FS7F, free

Webinar "eMTB 101 - Who's Riding, Current Policies, and Resources"
Date: November 15, 2017, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: PeopleForBikes
Details: http://bit.ly/2wwGvby, free

Webinar "Street lighting - Best Practices and Innovations in Illumination Technology"
Date: November 15, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0uReU, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members

Webinar "Tackling Gentrification and Displacement in Creating Vibrant Communities"
Date: November 15, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): Rachel Bennett (Prevention Institute), Maria Sipin (Multicultural Communities for Mobility), Nate Storring (Project for Public Spaces) & Jennifer S. Vey (Metropolitan Policy Program & Brookings Institution)
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/2x8LECE, free

Webinar "Who's Leading the Leading Health Indicators? Webinar: Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity"
Date: November 16, 2017, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: Centers for Disease Control
Details: http://bit.ly/2iP5Ffv, free

Webinar "Vision Zero and Safe Routes to School: Partners in Safety"
Date: November 16, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): Leah Shahum (Vision Zero Network), Margo Pedroso (Safe Routes to School National Partnership) & Jonathan Rogers (DC DOT)
Host: Safe Routes to School National Partnership & Vision Zero Network
Details: http://bit.ly/2iP61CR, free

Webinar "Regulations and Policies Impacting AV/CV Introduction in Transit"
Date: November 16, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): Douglas Gettman (Kimley-Horn) & Sam Lott (TX Southern Univ.)
Host: Transportation Research Board
Details: http://bit.ly/2giuA6M, free

Webinar "Fitting the road to the context: Florida's Context Classification and Complete Streets implementation"
Date: November 28, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): DeWayne Carver (FL DOT) & Billy Hattaway (City of Orlando)
Host: State Smart Transportation Initiative
Details: http://bit.ly/2yyxY5x, free

Webinar "New Complete Streets Policy Framework"
Date: December 1, 2017, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: National Complete Streets Coalition
Details: http://bit.ly/2xziSvn, free

Webinar "Case Studies in the FTA 'Manual on Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections to Transit'"
Date: December 4, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): Nathan MCNeil (Portland State Univ.)
Host: TREC
Details: http://bit.ly/2z3aeXy, free

Webinar "eMTB Land Manager Handbook"
Date: December 6, 2017, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: PeopleForBikes
Details: http://bit.ly/2wwYO0o, free

Webinar "Travel Training Assessments: Determining Student Competency"
Date: December 6, 2017, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): Julie Dupree (ESPA Consulting)
Host: Easter Seals Project Action
Details: http://bit.ly/2ggw1SQ, $45

Webinar "Build a Sustainable Trail that Lasts 100 Years"
Date: December 7, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Presenter(s): Michael Osborne (Five Rivers MetroParks)
Host: American Trails
Details: http://bit.ly/2yoHSct, free for members, $55 nonmembers

Webinar "Designing and Implementing Separated Bikeways"
Date: December 12, 2017, 11:30 1m to 1:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): Kyle Cook (Fehr & Peers) & Rick Plenge (HDR)
Host: American Society of Civil Engineers
Details: http://bit.ly/2z2Blln, $99 members, $159 non-members. For groups: http://bit.ly/2z2XRL6, $249.00 members, $349 non-members

Webinar "Turning Data into Action"
Date: December 13, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: America Walks
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0qNva, free

Webinar "The Modes They are a-Changing - Changing Landscape of Transportation and Implications for Bicycling"
Date: December 13, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: APBP
Details: http://bit.ly/2j0top8, site license $50 for members, $85 for non-members

Webinar "eMTBs: Current Issues and Partnership Opportunities"
Date: January 24, 2018, 11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Presenter(s): TBA
Host: People for Bikes
Details: http://bit.ly/2wuF65r, free


RESOURCES

FHWA SHARED STREETS GUIDE FOR PEDS W/ VISION DISABILITIES
-> FHWA released its guide to shared streets related to the needs of pedestrians with vision disabilities where they and other pedestrians, bicyclists, and motor vehicles are intended to mix in the same space. It reviews notable practices and considerations for accommodating pedestrians with vision disabilities on shared streets. The guide is based on an extensive stakeholder engagement process that involved pedestrians with vision disabilities, including people who were both deaf and blind, orientation and mobility specialists, shared street designers, and Federal, State, and local government officials. "Accessible Shared Streets: Notable Practices and Considerations for Accommodating Pedestrians with Vision Disabilities" http://bit.ly/2A2onV0

HOW TO DEVELOP A PED & BIKE SAFETY ACTION PLAN
-> FHWA released a revised guide to assist agencies in developing and implementing safety action plans to improve conditions for bicycling and walking. (How to Develop a Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Action Plan: http://bit.ly/2yzTOWq) This version builds on the original guide released in 2009. The plan lays out a vision for examining existing conditions and using a data-driven approach to match safety programs and improvements with demonstrated safety concerns.

MANUAL ON PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE CONNECTIONS TO TRANSIT
-> The Federal Transit Authority released its Manual on Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections to Transit. (http://bit.ly/2ylbVlu) TREC reports the manual can help planners and engineers boost their city's bicycle and pedestrian transit access. It defines "access sheds," linking transit and bike share, and provides 3 case study regions that take an innovative approach to integrating pedestrians and bicycles with transit: Atlanta, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis-St. Paul. http://bit.ly/2z3aeXy

[See Webinar section for a December 4, 2017 webinar on the case studies highlighted in this manual.]

COMPLETE STREETS IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES INFOGRAPHIC
-> Smart Growth America reports that applications to its Safe Streets Academy offered an up close and informative look into the challenges jurisdictions currently face when implementing Complete Streets. The National Complete Streets Coalition, in partnership with Voices for Healthy Kids, put that valuable information to use by creating an infographic that summarizes some of the most pressing issues. These challenges include auto-oriented culture; limited staff time and resources; integration of Complete Streets design elements; public engagement; performance measures; and resistance to traffic calming. http://bit.ly/2z2KNVY

WAYFINDING SYSTEM PRINCIPLES
-> An Alta Planning + Design blog notes well-crafted wayfinding systems encourage people walking and bicycling to go that extra mile, explore new areas, and foster a sense of place. Wayfinding systems can also encourage increased rates of active transportation by creating a clear and attractive network that is easy to understand and navigate. The blog describes 6 core principles that guide the placement and design of a wayfinding system to create a clear experience and create a more navigable bicycle network. These include connecting places; promoting active travel; maintaining motion; being predictable; simplifying information; and being accessible. http://bit.ly/2zWMVyy

NEW CROWD-SOURCED APP TO HELP CYCLISTS FIND SAFEST ROUTES
-> Next City reports LaneSpotter (http://apple.co/2z2Z1WT), a new app promises to help cyclists find the safest ways to get around, and it's being tested in eight pilot cities. (St. Louis, Mo; New York, NY; San Francisco, CA; Washington, DC; Philadelphia, PA; Atlanta, GA; Minneapolis, MN; and Portland, OR.) The app aims to be "like Waze for cycling." Waze is a real-time navigation app that relies on its users to provide it with data. The bike-centered LaneSpotter promises to help users find bike lanes and trails nearby, filter maps based on road preference and use input to create ratings. http://bit.ly/2z2fqe9

TRB REPORT: METHOD SELECTION FOR TRAVEL FORECASTING
-> A Transportation Research Board National Cooperative Highway Research Program report presents guidelines for travel-forecasting practitioners to assess the suitability and limitations of travel-forecasting methods and techniques to address specific policy and planning questions. (Method Selection for Travel Forecasting: http://bit.ly/2A4G7PB) The report also provides practitioners with the ability to scope model development or improvements to attain the desired policy sensitivity within constraints such as institutional, budget, model development time, and resources. It is accompanied by a software tool, TFGuide, which illustratively and systematically "guides" the practitioner through the selection of travel-forecasting methods and techniques based on application needs, resource constraints, available data, and existing model structure. TRB's Developing a Method Selection Tool for Travel Forecasting documents research efforts and methodology used to produce the report and tool. http://bit.ly/2A2tAMF

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION IMPACT ON RURAL & SMALL TOWNS
-> An American Public Transportation Association report investigates how public transportation can play a role in rural areas and small towns. The report examines rural public transit cost efficiency, and describes successful examples of smaller community public transit programs. "Public Transportation's Impact on Rural and Small Towns: A Vital Mobility Link" http://bit.ly/2A2yJUZ

EVALUATION AND ANALYSIS OF LIQUID DEICERS
-> An Ohio DOT report identifies the effectiveness of multiple liquid deicers available on the market, including the time it takes the deicer to work as well as the how long the deicers will continue to work after applied to the roadways. The research provides a potentially cost-effective and environmentally friendly option instead of salt, the most commonly used deicer. "Evaluation and Analysis of Liquid Deicers for Winter Maintenance" http://bit.ly/2A5TVcz

FIELD USAGE OF ALTERNATIVE DEICERS FOR SNOW AND ICE CONTROL
-> A Minnesota DOT report summarizes non-chloride based deicers available on the market, including acetate, formate, glycol, and succinate based deicing products. The report explores the deicers' feasibility for use as alternatives to chloride based deicers, and identifies next steps to determine if a non-chloride based deicer is a viable option for implementation in winter maintenance operations by MnDOT and local snow and ice removal providers. "Field Usage of Alternative Deicers for Snow and Ice Control" http://bit.ly/2A4slMQ

EXPLORING THE WALKING TOLERANCE OF TRANSITWAY USERS
-> A Minnesota DOT report examines the distance transit park-and-ride (P&R) users are willing to walk to stations. The research investigates P&R users' walking tolerance and identifies built environment attributes that influence the walking distance. "Exploring the Walking Tolerance of Transitway Users" http://bit.ly/2A5acOT

WHAT IS POLICY? INTRODUCTORY FACT SHEET
-> Have you ever been asked, "What exactly do you mean by policy?" ChangeLab Solutions answer this question with a simple fact sheet that defines policy, makes a case for the effectiveness of policy as a tool for change, and provides examples of how communities have used policies to improve health. (What is Policy?: http://bit.ly/2z2xZin) It's a useful training tool for discussing the concept of policy change with community leaders, government staff, or other stakeholders in healthy communities. http://bit.ly/2yzP7fg


SHARE WHAT YOU KNOW

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - 2018 National Bike Summit, March 5-7, 2018, Washington, DC
Deadline Extended: November 5, 2017 by 11:59 pm HAST, http://bit.ly/2fO6G6g

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 16th National Tools of the Trade Transportation Planning Conference (regarding planning, development, and implementation of multimodal transportation for small and medium sized communities), August 22-24, 2018, Kansas City, MO
Deadline: November 5, 2017 (new deadline), http://bit.ly/2wBR8Is

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - I-TED 2018: International Transportation Economic Development Conference, June 6-8, 2018, Washington, DC
Deadline: November 15, 2017, http://bit.ly/2wCthZd

-> CALL FOR RESEARCH BRIEFS AND ABSTRACTS - 7th International Conference on Innovations in Travel Modeling, June 24-27, 2018, Atlanta, GA
Deadline: November 30, 2017, http://bit.ly/2ypGOSW

-> CALL FOR PROPOSALS - 5th New England Bike-Walk Summit, April 26-27, 2018, Boston, MA
Deadline: December 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2z4JdmK

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - Joint ITE International and Midwestern/Great Lakes Districts Annual Meeting and Exhibit, August 20-23, 2018, Minneapolis, MN
Deadline: December 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2x8JSSn

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 14th National Light Rail & Streetcar Conference, October 21-23, 2018, Jersey City, NJ
Deadline: December 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2A3rTOQ

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 2018 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program, April 25-27, 2018, Washington, DC
Deadline: December 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2gZLYMg

-> CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - 6th National Bus Rapid Transit Conference (BRT), June 18-19, 2018, Los Angeles, CA
Deadline: December 15, 2017, http://bit.ly/2fOttPA

-> CALL FOR PAPERS - Physical Activity, Cognitive and Motor Performance and the Aging Brain series, European Review of Aging and Physical Activity
Deadline: December 31, 2017, http://bit.ly/2xRWT3f

CONFERENCES, TRAINING, & EVENTS
For a searchable calendar of conferences, training and events in the bicycle, pedestrian, or livable community fields, go to: http://bit.ly/centerlines. To subscribe, look for the + Google Calendar button in the lower right corner. iCal users can subscribe automatically here: http://bit.ly/centerlines_ical. We will continue to list the new items here since the last issue.

ON THE HORIZON

-> November 1 - December 12, 2017 - The Location Advantage free online esri training course
http://arcg.is/2gheRoh
-> November 2, 2017 - CTS 28th Annual Transportation Research Conference, Minneapolis, MN.
http://bit.ly/1o0DfWn
-> November 2-5, 2017 - NARP Passenger Rail EXPO And 50th Anniversary Celebration, Chicago, IL
http://bit.ly/2wAMbji
-> November 3-4, 2017 - 2017 Massachusetts Trails Conference, Leominster, MA
http://bit.ly/2wEctB6
-> November 3-4, 2017 - North Carolina Bike Summit, Wilmington, NC.
http://bit.ly/1fgGco2
-> November 4-8, 2017 - American Public Health Association, Atlanta, GA
http://bit.ly/2w0SHw7
-> November 6-10, 2017 - Next City's Vanguard Conference, Newcastle, Australia. Applications due August 1, 2017
http://bit.ly/2sl9qZ6
-> November 8-10, 2017 - Trafinz 2017, Nelson City, New Zealand
http://bit.ly/2xbtsIs
-> November 13-14, 2017 - Nevada Bicycle and Pedestrian Summit, Las Vegas, NV.
http://bit.ly/2w4d9fB
-> November 13-15, 2017 - 10th International Urban Design Conference, Queensland, Australia
http://bit.ly/2p7sGbQ
-> November 14-16, 2017 - 5th Annual AARP Livable Communities National Conference, Addison, TX
http://bit.ly/2vZ0lY3
-> November 14-16, 2017 - Using Census Data for Transportation Applications Conference, Kansas City, MO.
http://bit.ly/2kJRvf2
-> November 15-19, 2017 - LA CoMotion, Los Angeles, CA
http://bit.ly/2tmfORr
-> November 19, 2017 - World Day of Remembrance 2017 to honor those who have been injured or killed by a road traffic crash.
http://bit.ly/2x7pOzF
-> December 5-7, 2017 - Brownfields 2017: Sustainable Communities Start Here, Pittsburgh, PA.
http://bit.ly/2kkICs9
-> January 6, 2018 - TransportationCamp DC, Arlington, VA
http://bit.ly/2iRkNcm
-> January 7-11, 2018 - 97th TRB Annual Meeting, Washington, DC.
http://bit.ly/1OxTYxD
-> January 23-25, 2018 - Geodesign Summit, Redlands, CA
http://arcg.is/2xp29Ll
-> February 1-3, 2018 - New Partners for Smart Growth Conference, San Francisco, CA.
http://bit.ly/2vNPh4f
-> February 8-10, 2018 - Winter Cycling Congress, Moscow, Russia
http://bit.ly/2iQ0w6M (Use Google to translate from Russian.)
-> February 11-14, 2018 - Active Living Research Conference, Banff, Alberta, Canada
http://bit.ly/2oZcysp
-> February 20-23, 2018 - 2018 International Winter Road Congress, Gdansk, Poland.
http://bit.ly/2fPI7Dp
-> February 22-26, 2018 - World Bicycle Forum/El Foro Mundial de la Bicicleta, Lima, Peru
http://bit.ly/2iOnACS (Use Google to translate from Spanish.)
-> February 28 - March 2, 2018 - Second Annual Vision Zero Advocate Conference, Toronto, Canada
http://bit.ly/2fNY4fW
-> March 5-7, 2018, 2018 National Bike Summit, Washington, DC
http://bit.ly/1shH4b1
-> March 12-14, 2018 - National Shared Mobility Summit, Chicago, IL
http://bit.ly/1VBld28
-> March 13, 2018 - Utah Bike Summit, West Valley City, UT
http://bit.ly/2gwJEPV
-> March 20-21, 2018 - 2018 Esri Federal GIS Conference, Washington, DC
http://arcg.is/2fPwDm9
-> March 21-23, 2018 - 2018 Montana Bike Walk Summit - Bozeman, MT
http://bit.ly/2v7t94b -> April 3-4, 2018 - Intersections: Creating Culturally Complete Streets, Nashville, TN
http://bit.ly/2w1ky0P
-> April 4-5, 2018 - Esri Public Sector CIO Summit, Redlands, CA
http://arcg.is/2xpU7BP
-> April 5-6, 2018 - US Cargo Bike Summit, Bethesda, MD
http://bit.ly/2iSNG7J
-> April 22-24, 2018 - Lifesavers Conference, San Antonio, TX
http://bit.ly/2iQsnno
-> April 23-26, 2018 - 2018 National Outdoor Recreation Conference, Burlington, VT
http://bit.ly/2iReky3
-> April 25-27, 2018 - 2018 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program, Washington, DC
http://bit.ly/2wsqEe4
-> April 26-27, 2018 - 5th New England Bike-Walk Summit, Boston, MA
http://bit.ly/2z2n5ZZ
-> May 1-3, 2018 - PlacesForBikes Conference, Indianapolis, IN
http://bit.ly/2yE4mpP
-> May 2-4, 2018 - 8th Symposium on Pavement Surface Characteristics: SURF 2018, South Brisbane, Australia
http://bit.ly/2w0g4Y7
-> May 6-9, 2018 - APWA North American Snow Conference, Indianapolis, IN
http://bit.ly/2fNymbl
-> May 9, 2018 - National Bike to School Day
http://bit.ly/2iRdmBV
-> May 14-18, 2018 - International Making Cities Livable Conference, Ottawa, Canada
http://bit.ly/2xAelIV
-> May 16-18, 2018 - Road Safety on Five Continents, Jeju Island, South Korea
http://bit.ly/2oLhBxE
-> May 16-19, 2018 - CNU 26.Savannah, Savannah, GA
http://bit.ly/2vO92Zq

NEW & FURTHER OUT: See http://bit.ly/centerlines for other events more than six months from now.
-> July 9-13, 2018 - 2018 Esri User Conference, San Diego, CA
http://arcg.is/2z3aRk1
-> July 15-18, 2018 - 57th Annual Workshop on Transportation Law, Cambridge, MA
http://bit.ly/2A4VuY6
-> August 20-23, 2018 - Joint ITE International and Midwestern/Great Lakes Districts Annual Meeting and Exhibit, Minneapolis, MN
http://bit.ly/2A4CQ2A
-> September 16-19, 2018 - Walk/Bike/Places Conference (formerly Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place), New Orleans, LA
http://bit.ly/1mpbcFN
-> September 23-26, 2018 - APTA Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN
http://bit.ly/1LMVNnl
-> October 8-12, 2018 - Walk21 Bogotá, Bogotá, Colombia
http://bit.ly/2z6cVb3
-> October 21-23, 2018 - 14th National Light Rail & Streetcar Conference, Jersey City, NJ
http://bit.ly/2A3J7vs


JOBS, GRANTS, AND RFPS
Please limit job announcements to about 150-250 words and include a web link for the full description. This will reduce the editor's workload! Thanks! See previous issues of CenterLines for Jobs, Grants and RFPs that may still be current at http://bit.ly/ZHi0NE.

-> CALL FOR APPLICATIONS TO PARTICIPATE - 4TH ANNUAL WALKABILITY ACTION INSTITUTE, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHRONIC DISEASE DIRECTORS
The National Association of Chronic Disease Directors (NACDD), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control Division of Nutrition Physical Activity and Obesity plans, implements, and evaluates a Walkability Action Institute (WAI) as a multi-day "course" for interdisciplinary teams. Each year, interdisciplinary four-to-six-member teams, comprised of public health, transportation, planning, elected officials, and other disciplines apply to receive travel assistance to attend the course, develop team action plans, and implement PSE outcomes to make their communities, regions, and states more walkable over the long term. The course combines traditional learning methods with robust activities and outdoor learning. NACDD tracks the outcomes achieved by alumni teams semi-annually and convenes ongoing Walkability Community of Practice groups bi-monthly.
Deadline: December 8, 2017 by 11:59 pm ET, http://bit.ly/2A4crSO

-> RFP - BIKE SHARE EQUITY RESEARCH 2018-19, BETTER BIKE SHARE PARTNERSHIP
The PeopleForBikes Foundation, as part of the Better Bike Share Partnership, seeks proposals for academic research projects that increase the understanding of the links between bike share and equity, particularly focused on bike share use by people with low incomes. We will award a total of $100,000 via one to three grants, ranging from $25,000 to $75,000 each. Applicants must be U.S. based organizations.
Deadline: December 1, 2017, http://bit.ly/2xIpA2g

-> CALL FOR NOMINATIONS - 2017 BEST COMPLETE STREETS INITIATIVES, NATIONAL COMPLETE STREETS COALITION
The National Complete Streets Coalition is now accepting nominations for the Best Complete Streets initiatives. Nominate a project, initiative, event, person, task force, etc. that exemplifies Complete Streets. The selected winners of the best Complete Streets initiatives will be featured in the Best Complete Streets Policies of 2017 report. Their new policy-grading rubric will take effect beginning with all policies adopted in 2018. The new framework requires greater accountability from jurisdictions for implementation and provisions to include the needs of the most vulnerable users.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2xA3BKJ

-> JOB - TRANSPORTATION SPECIALIST-BIKE & PED PROGRAM, CITY OF SAN JOSE, CA
The City of San Jose seeks a Transportation Specialist to focus on bicycle and pedestrian facility planning. Under the general direction of the Associate Transportation Specialist, this position will work directly with a team of two existing Transportation Specialists in the Bicycle & Pedestrian Program on a variety of projects including annual bikeway work plans, bike parking implementation, bike share expansion, and a variety of pedestrian projects.
Deadline: November 2, 2017 at 11:59 pm PT, http://bit.ly/2A3SKu8

-> JOB - PRESIDENT AND CEO, SMART GROWTH AMERICA, WASHINGTON, DC
The Board of Directors of Smart Growth America (SGA) is seeking a qualified President and CEO to provide national leadership for the smart growth movement and overall direction to the organization and its staff, ensure the organization's fiscal health and administrative functions, and oversee the delivery of SGA programs and policies. Established in 2002, SGA is a national non-profit organization dedicated to improving Americans' lives by building better neighborhoods, towns, cities and communities.
Deadline: November 15, 2017, http://bit.ly/2xAOdOa

-> JOB - MAPPING SPECIALIST, PEOPLEFORBIKES, BOULDER, CO
PeopleForBikes (PFB) seeks a creative, organized, and proactive network and mapping specialist to help get more people on bikes more often. The ideal candidate will demonstrate expertise in geographic information systems, outstanding analytic skills, and enthusiasm for using data in innovative ways.
Deadline: Open until filled, http://bit.ly/2yF6my1

-> JOB - SENIOR DIRECTOR, TRAIL DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS, RAILS-TO-TRAILS CONSERVANCY, WASHINGTON, DC
The Senior Director of Projects is a new position that will support the Vice President of Trail Development in growing and managing the Trail Development team, as well as collaborating as part of a multidisciplinary team to implement RTC's TrailNationT projects, which span cities and regions nationwide. This position will be responsible for overseeing up to three projects in RTC's TrailNation portfolio. This is an amazing opportunity for a strategic, creative and results-oriented professional with exceptional management, program development and implementation skills to join a successful organization in a leadership position.
Deadline: Open until filled, http://bit.ly/2xHt84C

-> 2 JOBS - NELSON/NYGAARD CONSULTING ASSOCIATES, BOSTON, MA
Nelson\Nygaard Consulting Associates is seeking two highly organized, independent, and motivated staff for their multimodal, smart parking, and transportation demand management practice in their Boston office.

1. PRINCIPAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNER
They are seeking a Principal Transportation Planner with at least 15 years of experience and a strong interest in integrated, multimodal transportation, parking and TDM planning as well as some background in developing sustainable strategies to improve community accessibility and mobility. Experience working on projects in the Northeast and Boston region are a plus. The successful candidate will be expected to manage entire projects, often with the involvement and guidance of other principals. Work will include responsibility for client communication, overall task and project management, determining and managing analytical tasks, client communication, public presentation, and other skills as necessary. The successful candidate is expected to lead proposals, be responsible for overall business development targets, and provide guidance and oversight to junior staff is a must. Projects may be located anywhere throughout the United States.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2zW8rn2

2. SENIOR TRANSPORTATION PLANNER
They are seeking an individual with at least six (6) years of experience and a strong interest in the multimodal, smart parking, and transportation demand management. Experience working on projects in the Northeast and Boston region are a plus. In this position, the successful candidate will be expected to serve as Deputy Project Manager and Task Leader for larger projects and Project Manager for small to mid-sized projects, often with the involvement and guidance of other principals. The successful candidate is expected to contribute to and eventually lead proposals, be responsible for overall business development targets, and provide guidance and oversight to junior staff.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2A48A8i

-> JOB - T4AMERICA POLICY ASSOCIATE, WASHINGTON, DC
Transportation for America - a program of Smart Growth America - is seeking a skilled and motivated individual with knowledge, experience and interest in transportation policy development and implementation at the federal, state or local level. This position reports to the Policy Director of T4America. Candidates must demonstrate an ability to work successfully with limited supervision, independently and within a team. The policy associate will support T4America's development of policies furthering local decision-making and multi-modalism in close cooperation with our national and local civic, elected, business and non-profit partners, backing them up with research, and mobilizing diverse and compelling voices.
Deadline: None provided, http://bit.ly/2xAuSgi

-> TRB CAREERS IN MOTION JOB CENTER
The Transportation Research Board launched its online Careers in Motion Job Center to support the broader transportation industry's impending challenges around attracting and retaining its professional workforce. Create an account to view professional transportation jobs from multiple employers and disciplines around the world or post a resume. http://bit.ly/2A5sQWQ

See also:
-> Alliance for Biking and Walking Job Board, http://bit.ly/1IQlOaf
-> American Planning Association Jobs Online, http://bit.ly/1FUbQ3U
-> Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Career Center: http://bit.ly/1DhwE41
-> Alta Planning + Design, http://bit.ly/1jbgjF9
-> Burgess & Niple, http://bit.ly/1DWNrf3
-> NACTO Careers, http://bit.ly/13VnUBl
-> Sam Schwartz Engineering, http://bit.ly/PsktvP
-> Toole Design Group, http://bit.ly/1k7DPRg

[Let us know if your firm or organization has a job or RFP to announce or typically has job openings: news@bikewalk.org.]


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