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US TRAFFIC DEATHS UP AGAIN IN 2016
-> A New York Times article reports US traffic deaths have increased for the second straight year and the sudden and sharp increase has alarmed safety advocates. According to National Safety Council estimates (http://bit.ly/2m6NZfC, http://bit.ly/2m701WB), 40,200 people died in crashes involving motor vehicles in 2016, a 6 percent rise from the year before. This comes after a 7 percent rise in 2015 and means the two-year increase — 14 percent — is the largest in more than a half a century. http://nyti.ms/2lTFxAx

HEALTH EQUITY VISION ZERO ROAD MAP
-> Next City reports a new brief from the Prevention Institute lays out a Vision Zero road map rooted in health equity, a framework that calls for identifying and eliminating the underlying causes of traffic fatality inequities. (Vision Zero: A Health Equity Road Map for Getting to Zero in Every Community: http://bit.ly/2m6Sh6Z) In low-income neighborhoods and communities of color inadequate public investment correlates with disproportionate rates of both traffic collisions and preventable diseases like diabetes.

The authors suggest starting a Vision Zero initiative with an honest assessment: How are resources currently distributed among neighborhoods? What land use patterns are contributing to traffic deaths? Who is most impacted by traffic violence? Who are the most valuable potential partners within neighborhoods to work on reduction? http://bit.ly/2kC850Z

LONDON, ENGLAND: HEALTHY STREETS PUT PED, BIKE & TRANSIT 1ST
-> Transport for London (England) released "Healthy Streets for London: Prioritising Walking, Cycling and Public Transport to Create a Healthy City" (http://bit.ly/2m6N2UG). This report introduces their new approach to get more Londoners physically active. It sets out how we will help everyone to use cars less and walk, cycle and use public transport more. Adopting the Healthy Streets Approach will help us to improve air quality, reduce congestion and make London's diverse communities become greener, healthier and more attractive places in which to live, play and do business. http://bit.ly/2kV7l3k

INCENTIVES, SUBSIDIES & THE FULL COST OF DRIVING
-> A CityLab article notes the problem is not that cars (or the people who drive them) are evil, but that we use them too much, and in dangerous ways. And that's because we've put in place incentives and infrastructure that encourage, or even require, us to do so. When we subsidize roads, socialize the costs of pollution, crashes and parking, and even legally require that our communities be built in ways that make it impossible to live without a car, we send people strong signals to buy and own cars and to drive—a lot. As a result, we drive too much, and frequently at unsafe speeds given the urban environment. http://bit.ly/2kS0iIJ

(See Resources section for infographic on the true personal cost of car commuting.)

STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN: KIDS MUCH HEALTHIER W/ CONGESTION PRICING
-> Inside Science reports Stockholm is one of several cities around the world to institute congestion pricing. The program uses automated technology to scan vehicles' license plates as they enter the "congestion pricing zone," then sends drivers a bill of up to the equivalent of US$2.60/trip. Researchers found that without congestion pricing, Stockholm's air would have been 5-10% more polluted between 2006 and 2010, and young children would have suffered 45% more asthma attacks. http://bit.ly/2k8pd9E

(See Resources section for an interactive air quality map, and an app that tracks pollution a user generates from each trip.)

SUPPORT GROWS FOR MORE WALKING & BIKING INFRASTRUCTURE
-> The League of American Bicyclists reports the majority of respondents to a recent survey supported increasing federal funding for biking and walking infrastructure (58%). This support has increased across all demographics since the previous survey was conducted in 2012. Princeton Survey Research Associates International asked respondents to estimate what percentage of federal transportation funding is currently spent on sidewalks, bike lanes and paths and then asked to say what percentage of transportation funds should be spent on biking and walking infrastructure. http://bit.ly/2lt0L4V

RESPOND TO PEOPLEFORBIKES SURVEY & CITY SNAPSHOT
-> CityLab reports on two PeopleForBikes initiatives (http://bit.ly/2lTytna) PeopleForBikes has launched an 8-week community survey asking Americans to sound-off on the cycling infrastructure and culture in their cities. The survey will generate a city ranking called PlacesForBikes. The survey asks questions about the safety, convenience, and civic support cyclists enjoy in their towns. It is available in English or Español. Respondents have a chance to win a $1,500 bike from Trek Bikes. Deadline: April 15, 2017,

City Snapshot is PeopleForBikes' corollary initiative. It asks city staffers or professionals with detailed knowledge of local biking conditions to submit information about existing and planned bike infrastructure, events that get people out on bikes, and safety. If a city submits a GIS shaped file of the city boundaries, the project offers to use their network connectivity tool to generate a map of a city's low-stress bike network, checking in this summer to evaluate the accuracy of the new map. Deadline: April 15, 2017, http://bit.ly/2ltUzK0

GARCIA & LYDON ON TACTICAL URBANISM
-> Temporary bicycle lanes and public spaces, traffic calming for a day or a month, colorful crosswalks, turning parking lots into pop-up parks—such testing ideas in the real world activities are formalized by techniques and strategies called tactical urbanism. Public Square interviewed Anthony Garcia and Mike Lydon, co-authors of the book "Tactical Urbanism: Short-Term Action for Long-Term Change" (http://bit.ly/2m6TLOr). http://bit.ly/2kSfm9d

PLATER-ZYBERK & SPECK ON THE 5-MINUTE WALK
-> A "pedestrian shed" is a distance that can be covered in five minutes at a normal walking pace—typically shown on a plan as a circle with a quarter-mile radius. If the built environment is appealing and human scale, the theory is that most people will walk at least five minutes rather than get in a car. Public Square interviewed urban planner and architect Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and urban planner Jeff Speck on the subject of the 5-minute walk and what that means to cities and towns across America. http://bit.ly/2kCjSwt

BRITISH GREY GRAFFITI ARTISTS SPRAY PAINT HAZARDS TO PROMPT FIXES
-> The Manchester (England) Evening News reports an army of ‘grey graffiti' artists between 50 and 80 years old have hit local streets to spray paint wonky pavements and potholes pensioners could hurt themselves on. Using special biodegradable paint, the group has been spotted marking slanted and cracked pavements and roads they hope the town hall will fix. http://bit.ly/2kCz4JV

DUTCH SIDEWALK-EMBEDDED LEDS FOR DISTRACTED PEDS
-> Popular Mechanics reports the town of Bodegraven, Netherlands is embedding LEDs in the sidewalk at intersections. When a green light is about to change, a line of LEDs flashes to warn distracted pedestrians of the change, and then turns red. Someone with their head buried in a smartphone will be more likely see the lights in their peripheral vision. Check out the brief video. http://bit.ly/2kCAyUg

PED BEG BUTTON FRUSTRATION IN EDMONTON, CANADA
-> An Edmonton (Canada) Journal article reports on the disconnect between the walkable culture Edmonton says it celebrates and "beg buttons" — the pedestrian signal lights that never give a walk sign until a person hits the button and waits. They are especially frustrating on popular bus routes where people may wait up to two minutes for the walk signal while watching their bus pull up, stop and drive off.

Edmonton now has official guidelines calling for these beg buttons to be eliminated in high-pedestrian locations. The first was The Way We Move Complete Streets Guidelines (http://bit.ly/2m6WgA7). The more recently adopted Winter Design Guidelines (http://bit.ly/2m6WwPS) echoed the call. A third set of guidelines, the Edmonton Main Streets Guideline (http://bit.ly/2m6MMVB), says lights on walkable shopping strips should put pedestrians first. http://bit.ly/2m6V5AH

EMERGENCY BIKE MEDIC TEAMS MORE NIMBLE
-> The Washington Post reports at least 500 agencies across the country have emergency bicycle medic teams who patrol airports, sports arenas, downtown entertainment areas and special events such as festivals, concerts and marathons. They deliver quick emergency care by darting in and out of heavy traffic, maneuvering through large crowds or cutting across parkland more nimbly than a crew in an ambulance. http://wapo.st/2k8NnAZ

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