Photo by Chris Jordan

NCBW Newsroom - The National & International Scene

The National & International Scene | Regional and Local Actions | The Research Beat | Resources | Jobs, Grants & RFPs

PROPOSALS ARE BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE 2019 NATIONAL BIKE SUMMIT
-> The League of American Bicyclists is accepting proposals until November 1 for the 20th National Bike Summit. Proposals can be for panels, workshops, roundtable discussions, mobile workshops or posters. Next year's summit will focus on four themes: Innovation, New audiences and Partners, Stronger Organizations, and What's Next? They will also entertain proposals that may not fall into any of those categories. For questions about the RFP contact summit@bikeleague.org. You can view the full RFP and start your proposal at https://bikesummit.secure-platform.com/a/page/RFP

WALKABLE CITIES, AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES & REGULATING ROW
-> Streetsblog USA published an excerpt focusing on the impact of autonomous vehicles (AVs) from the upcoming book "Walkable City Rules: 101 Steps to Making Better Places" by Jeff Speck. (https://amzn.to/2EoG1sn) While car ownership may decline with AVs, car use will not. Many thoughtful people predict a massive increase in car trips as a result of autonomy, due to the likelihood of lower driving costs. Since time wasted in traffic is currently the principal constraint to driving, any boost in roadway efficiency (through tighter vehicle spacing) will increase car use, as will the fact that time in traffic will become productive for work or play. In an AV future, each city street would ideally be allocated a limited number of driving lanes, no more than currently present. Only in this way will our downtowns remain welcoming to more than just cars. http://bit.ly/2EpDCO3

SYSTEMIC PEDESTRIAN SAFETY ANALYSIS TO ID RISKY SITES
-> The Transportation Research Board released a report that provides a safety analysis method to identify sites for potential safety improvements based on specific risk factors for pedestrians. A systemic approach, as opposed to a "hot-spot" approach, enables transportation agencies to identify, prioritize, and select appropriate countermeasures for locations with a high risk of pedestrian-related crashes, even when crash occurrence data are sparse. The guidebook also provides important insights for the improvement of data collection and data management to better support systemic safety analyses. "Systemic Pedestrian Safety Analysis" (http://bit.ly/2QI2vq9). Also see the contractor's technical report (http://bit.ly/2RSOuql) and download a PowerPoint presentation summarizing the project (https://bit.ly/2P29jRC).

MOBILE APP TO CALCULATE SAFEST PED ROUTES
-> Science Daily reports researchers at Cardiff University are developing a mobile app that guides pedestrians along the safest instead of quickest route to their destination. Math and computer science experts have devised a way of scoring the safety of any given area using sophisticated mathematical algorithms, which they believe could easily be implemented into a navigation mobile app to help reduce road traffic casualties. Apps, such as Google Maps, do not account for sidewalks and will only give people the quickest route to their destination. These apps do not take into account the characteristics of sidewalks and roads, and the dangers associated with them. The computer algorithm considers several factors, such as the types and number of crossings, the type of street, the possibility of jaywalking and the speed limits of each road in a given area. http://bit.ly/2RVQbU2. This study will be published in "Accident Analysis and Prevention in December: A Computational Model of Pedestrian Road Safety: The Long Way Round is the Safe Way Home" (http://bit.ly/2RTsD1X).

MADRID, SPAIN CUTS SPEED LIMIT TO 18 MPH ON 80% OF STREETS
-> El PaĆ­s reports the Madrid, Spain City Council is set to approve a new Sustainable Mobility Ordinance that will introduce a speed limit of 30km/h (18.6 mph) on all one-way streets and on single-lane two-way streets. The city will also slow traffic down to 20km/h (12.4 mph) on streets where the sidewalk is not elevated above road level. Motorcycles will not be allowed to park on sidewalks less than three meters (9.8 feet) wide or near pedestrian crossings. Bicyclists will be able to make right turns at red lights where indicated. And new traffic restrictions will go into effect in the downtown area on November 23. http://bit.ly/2RVgBFd

LONDON, ENGLAND TO CUT CAR TRAFFIC & SPEEDS IN FINANCIAL DISTRICT
-> Fast Company reports London, England introduced a plan to dramatically reduce car traffic and speeds in its financial district, colloquially known as the Square Mile. Cars would be banned from half of all roads in the city center, and vehicles passing through on access roads would be limited to 15 mph. The move is intended both to improve cyclist and pedestrian safety, and reduce emissions. The Transport Strategy for the district is finalizing plans that call for pedestrianizing streets around key local tube stations like Liverpool Street and Moorgate, and adding more two-way, protected bike lanes on major streets. http://bit.ly/2RX9EDA

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM: 80% DROP IN CARBON DURING CAR-FREE DAY
-> Eltis reports the Brussels, Belgium capital region went car free on September 16. The entire Brussels region closed to individual motorized transport between with 9:30 am to 7:00 pm, except for taxis, buses, police, emergency vehicles and persons with a special permit -- and these still had to respect a city-wide speed limit of 30 km/h (18.6 mph). While one of the main aims of the car-free day is to demonstrate to residents and visitors the quality of space a city holds when the largest part is not dedicated to cars and trucks, there was one other striking effect: measured values of black carbon decreased 80% during the time of the "car ban." http://bit.ly/2EpTaBj

MEXICO CITY, MEXICO: VISION ZERO FOR YOUTH REPORT RELEASED
-> The FiA Foundation reports Mexico City's upcoming change in administration provides an opportunity for Child Health Initiative partner ITDP's Vision Zero for Youth pilot project to be scaled up. ITDP recently released its report detailing the successful pilot Vision Zero for Youth project at a public school known for its active community and committed teachers. (Vision Zero for Youth: Making Streets Safer One School at a Time: http://bit.ly/2EpWlci in English) The report outlines successes and challenges, and can be used as a model to replicate and scale the project elsewhere. They also launched a report evaluating Vision Zero in the city to provide guidance to the new administration on continuing and improving the initiative. http://bit.ly/2Ep3tFJ

LONDON, ENGLAND ACCESSIBILITY INDICATORS
-> The Human Environment Digest reports the International Transport Forum released a report that provides an overview of connectivity indicators, which describe the extent to which people can utilize the transportation system to access jobs and services. It concludes with a set of challenges and opportunities for improving connectivity in London's transportation system. "London's Accessibility Indicators: Strengths, Weaknesses, Challenges" http://bit.ly/2RTudAV

UK INSURANCE COMPANY ANALYSIS: CYCLISTS MAKE SAFER DRIVERS
-> Forbes reports cyclists who drive are better behind the steering wheel than motorists, a new analysis has found. The link between cycling and safer motoring was revealed by a UK insurance firm, which offers specialist motor insurance policies for cyclists. The analysis of their firm's crash data showed that cyclists make less than half the number of insurance claims as non-cyclists. Their cyclist-driver policy offers lower premiums than policies aimed at the wider market. http://bit.ly/2RTj9Us

DOCKLESS PEDAL BIKE SHARE GIVES WAY TO E-BIKES & E-SCOOTERS
-> A Streetsblog USA article provides a brief review of dockless pedal bike share expansion over the last year and describes the shift many cities are making to pedal-assist e-bikes and e-scooters. Electric vehicles such as e-bikes and scooters are just more popular than traditional bikes, micro-mobility firms say. E-bikes are twice as popular as pedal bikes, Lime told the Seattle Times. And e-scooters are even more popular, having been checked out five times more than pedal bikes in their same markets. http://bit.ly/2EzMi4i

DOCKLESS BIKE USE DATA INFORMS INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING
-> MIT Technology Review reports data generated by dockless bikes is helping cities map your movement that some cities, like South Bend, IN, are leveraging to decide where to place new bike paths and protected bike lanes. Earlier this year, South Bend used this data to determine the most popular bike drop-off areas on its sidewalks. It then marked them with paint and began encouraging people to leave their bikes there. Eventually, hundreds of these "preferred parking locations" could dot the city. http://bit.ly/2EqrKex

RENO-SPARKS (NV) INDIAN COLONY: FIRST RESERVATION W/ BIKE SHARE
-> The Fostering Multimodal Connectivity Newsletter reports this spring, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC) became the first Reservation with bike share. The RSIC partnered with the Cities of Reno and Sparks, the University of Nevada, Reno, and Washoe County to launch a regional pilot program to test dockless bike share throughout the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. The Regional Transportation Commission of Washoe County was also an essential partner, bringing the entities together to explore bike share as a mobility solution to better serve citizens and visitors. RSIC received Federal Lands Highway Tribal Transportation Program funds to support its transportation planning program, which aided in the coordination and implementation of this project. The first several months of the pilot program have been successful, with significant ridership in the RSIC and metro region. http://bit.ly/2Eutjbt

UNIVERSAL BASIC MOBILITY IS A HUMAN RIGHT
-> CityLab reports Universal Basic Mobility is a long overdue human right. People need easy access to work and to essential services to live decent, independent lives. In areas where commutes are long, it's hard for children to escape poverty, and in many cities, areas with poor mobility have high unemployment and low incomes. The right to freedom of movement precedes the U.S. Constitution and is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: It's not merely a human right, it's the foundation of a healthy economy. Universal Basic Mobility would be a system of partnerships and/or policies that provide a minimum level of mobility to all members of society. http://bit.ly/2ErGslN

STRATEGIES FOR HOW CITIES & DEVELOPERS CAN REDUCE TRAFFIC
-> Smart Growth America reports a new approach to addressing the potential transportation impacts of new development in urban areas is outlined in a new report by our State Smart Transportation Initiative. (Modernizing Mitigation: A Demand-Centered Approach: http://bit.ly/2RV1ZWA) This could be a powerful recipe for reducing the demand for driving, while helping create more prosperous transit- and pedestrian-friendly cities. Rather than requiring developers to add more street/road capacity, a more productive approach seeks to minimize traffic from development before resorting to just building expensive, bigger and wider roads. Actions developers can take include improving the infrastructure for walking, biking, or transit; providing complementary land uses that minimize the need for new trips; subsidizing other forms of mobility like bike sharing or car sharing; or providing first- and last-mile connections to high-capacity transit (like a regular shuttle). http://bit.ly/2RV8NDt

[See Webinar section for an October 29 webinar: "Modern traffic mitigation for development in cities: Moving beyond LOS."]

TORONTO, CANADA CYCLISTS' POOL NOODLES CLAIM SAFE PASSING SPACE
-> BlogTO reports increasing numbers of Toronto, Canada cyclists are mounting colorful pool noodles perpendicular to the backs of their bikes to increase the space between them and drivers passing them on the left. The law requires drivers to give bicyclists 1 meter (3.3 feet) of passing distance. http://bit.ly/2Eowz87 (Photos)

Get a jump start on this news by subscribing to CenterLines.