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T4A: INFRASTRUCTURE REPAIR PRIORITIES REPORT
-> Transportation for America released a new state-by-state report of how states are spending their transportation money. It concludes our infrastructure issues are more of a policy problem than a money problem. Despite more transportation spending over the last decade, the percentage of the roads nationwide in "poor condition" increased from 14 to 20%. Two thirds of states actually saw the percentage of their roads in poor condition increase from 2009-2017. This report, Repair Priorities 2019 (http://bit.ly/2VqRgUq), finds that states are neglecting repair and routine maintenance in favor of costly expansions and widenings. Even when given more flexibility by Congress to spend money as they see fit, states, on average, spent as much money expanding their road networks ($21.3 billion) as they did repairing their existing roads ($21.4 billion) each year. http://bit.ly/2VoaCcS

BUILDING A MULTIMODAL FUTURE CONNECTING LAND USE & TDM
-> The Urban Land Institute released a new book that shows how planning land uses and transportation together with transportation demand management (TDM) policies creates safer, more walkable environments. (Building a Multimodal Future: Connecting Real Estate Development and Transportation Demand Management to Ease Gridlock: http://bit.ly/2VYTDCc) Its authors explore the origin, implementation, best practices, and results of TDM policies from 10 distinctive communities across the US. Uniquely, it includes the perspectives of those who implement these policies and those who are affected by them, including property owners, developers, managers, and other professionals who work with TDM policies.

E-BIKES COULD TRANSFORM HOW WE AGE
-> Fast Company reported there's growing interest among older Americans in cycling: Between 1995 and 2009, the number of people aged 60 to 79 who bike increased by 320%, and the recent boom in electric bicycle technology is creating more opportunities for older Americans to consider biking as a mode of transportation. E-bike sales are growing across demographics, and bike-share companies like Motivate and Jump have rolled out e-assist versions of their bikes in the last year. E-bikes are especially capturing the older market, many of whom have found that e-bikes enable them to ride much later in life than they previously imagined. http://bit.ly/2W3gkoS

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF ACTIVE TRAVEL TO SCHOOL EXCEED COSTS
-> The Safe Routes Partnership (formerly the Safe Routes to School National Partnership) reported that the Community Preventive Services Task Force found economic benefits exceed the cost for active travel to school interventions. (Physical Activity: Interventions to Increase Active Travel to School: http://bit.ly/2JrrPxI) This finding is based on a systematic review of economic evidence. Included studies of US. Safe Routes to School programs reported economic benefits of averted injuries that were a result of street-level engineering improvements. http://bit.ly/2LLieq7

MICROMOBILITY IN CITIES: A HISTORY & POLICY OVERVIEW
-> Smart Cities Dive reported that the National League of Cities released a report that details the history and policy background of micromobility (such as dockless bikes, e-bikes and e-scooters), analyzing the different modes and their evolution. (Micromobility in Cities: A History and Policy Overview: http://bit.ly/2LJU3sl) The guide describes micromobility challenges and factors that cities should take into consideration such as public space overcrowding and users strewing dockless devices in public spaces. It also provides seven recommendations, including focusing on equity, developing a plan and agreement for trip data and learning from other cities' experiences.http://bit.ly/2LM7qYS

GREATER MANCHESTER, UK TO SPEND $177M ON BIKING & WALKING
-> AirQualityNews.com reported Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) in the United Kingdom is set to spend £137m (US$177 million) on its walking and cycling 'Bee Network' as the city region aims to become a world leader for active travel. If approved, the 18 new walking and cycling schemes would be the GMCA's biggest investment in walking and cycling yet, bringing the total value of projects to over £200m (US$258.2 million). This means that the GMCA has now endorsed 42 such schemes, which will feature a total of 319 new and upgraded crossings and 70 miles of new cycling and walking routes. http://bit.ly/2W5AK0u

DRAFT 10-YR PLAN REARRANGES MELBOURNE, AUS. TRANSPORT PRIORITIES
-> The Conversation reported more shared spaces, more pedestrian, cycling and tram access, safer streets, and fewer cars in the city are all part of a newly released ten-year plan by the City of Melbourne, Australia. (City media release: http://bit.ly/2LWNbYL, Draft Transport Strategy 2030: http://bit.ly/2LJcdua) A significant amount of on-street parking and road space would be reallocated to walking, cycling and greenery. Some "little" streets would be converted to shared zones that give priority to pedestrians, with reduced speed limits. Variable parking pricing would be trialled and congestion charging not be ruled out. The draft strategy represents a call for action to overcome unsustainable transport practices. For Melbourne to thrive, the transport priorities need to be rearranged to meet travel demand, emissions targets and citizens' changing needs. http://bit.ly/2LWNrqH

AUSTRALIA: MOBILITY AS A SERVICE (MAAS) UPDATE
-> Austroads reported the concept of Mobility as a Service (MaaS) will allow a person to plan, book and pay for their travel using a single app that would then guide them on their journey. MaaS will allow users to choose between all transport modes and prioritize options for their journey such as cost, directness, ease, time and other factors deemed important by the individual. Austroads is investigating MaaS as part of its congestion management project. The MaaS module report, which examines the risks and opportunities for Australia and New Zealand's public sector, is expected to be published by mid-year. The South Australian Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure library has also recently produced a collection of MaaS information resources distributed via Tranzinfo: http://bit.ly/2LK1K1F.

RTC PROPOSES GREAT AMERICAN RAIL-TRAIL ROUTE
-> CityLab reported once the Great American Rail-Trail is finished the preferred route will link Washington, DC to Seattle -- traversing 12 states and about 3,700 miles. (Great American Rail-Trail Preferred Route: http://bit.ly/2LLhP75) The Rails-to-Trails Conservancy identified about 90 gaps in that trail route, with the most substantial links missing in MT, WY, and NE. It could take another decade or two to complete the trail. As local and state governments complete their parts of the route, they could see whole towns become an attraction, generating tourism along the way. The gentle grade of these former railroad corridors could make the trails an amenity for people of all ages and abilities. http://bit.ly/2LL7wzV

WHAT IT TAKES FOR CITY PARENTS TO LIVE CAR-FREE
-> CityLab reported they surveyed parents who are carless about how they make it work. They heard from readers around the world, and shared some of the wisdom and challenges. These parents talk about selecting the right neighborhood, kid-carrying equipment, transit issues, accessibility challenges, being dependent on the kindness of strangers, and how to take the suburban babysitter home, among other factors. http://bit.ly/2W7Jses

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