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INTEGRATING HUMAN HEALTH INTO URBAN AND TRANSPORT PLANNING
-> A new book edited by Mark Nieuwenhuijsen and Haneen Khreis brings together the world's leading experts on urban and transport planning, environmental exposures, physical activity, health and health impact assessment to discuss challenges and solutions in cities. The book provides a conceptual framework and work program for actions and outlines future research needs. It presents the current evidence-base, the benefits of and numerous case studies on integrating health and the environment into urban development and transport planning. Integrating Human Health into Urban and Transport Planning: A Framework: http://bit.ly/2QIKIPY

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COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN TRANSPORTATION & PUBLIC HEALTH
-> Ann Steedly of Planning Communities reports via the H+T Friends listserve that their team is working on NCHRP 25-25 Task 105: A Guidebook for Communications between Transportation and Public Health Communities. They will develop a practitioner-friendly guide that provides tools and techniques that can be put into ready use by transportation practitioners and agencies to effectively integrate health considerations from transportation planning through implementation. (http://bit.ly/2xstCwA) The team will incorporate input from transportation and health stakeholders. The guidebook include transportation and health processes and points of intersection; stakeholders to involve; communications and language differences; communication and coordination techniques; existing organizations, forums and program resources available to support collaboration; and resources and data sources for practitioners to learn more about transportation and health issues. The project is slated to conclude next winter.

ONLINE TOOL TO INTEGRATE HEALTH INTO ENGINEERING PRACTICE
-> Earlier this year, the Institute of Transportation Engineers signed a memorandum of understanding to collaborate with Streetsmart, a nonprofit organization who is developing an evidence-based transportation tool to better integrate health into engineering practice. Currently in prototype form, this online tool will help better integrate a wide range of environmental and livability concerns, including health, into engineering and planning practice. ITE will assist with the review and translation of research results, form and support one or more potential user focus groups, recruit pilot agencies and manage pilot projects, support applications for funding, and connect ITE member transportation professionals to the availability and usefulness of the tool. http://bit.ly/2xwsPL7

FRANCE TO TRIPLE BIKE USE BY 2024
-> Reuters reports France plans to more than triple the share of cycling in transport to 9% by 2024 when they host the Olympics. A multi-year plan calls for building better bike lanes, financial incentives for bicycle commuters and measures against bike theft. The government will launch a fund to invest 350 million euros ($410 million) in cycling infrastructure over the next 7 years. https://reut.rs/2xv6ei1

GLOBAL CLIMATE AND HEALTH FORUM CALL TO ACTION
-> As a part of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, the first-ever Global Climate and Health Forum brought together health leaders from around the world and unveiled a global Call to Action. It outlines 10 priority actions that will significantly protect lives and improve people's health in the era of climate change, including "Transition to zero-carbon transportation systems with an emphasis on active transportation." Available in English or en Espanol: http://bit.ly/2D5uHRa.

UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS: RECONSTRUCTED SHOPPING STREET
-> The Bicycle Dutch blog reports retailers in the Utrecht, The Netherlands shopping street Oudkerkhof are very pleased with how their street was reconstructed. Some seem to think it was done at their request. But this transformation was part of a much larger program that runs for years. It is meant to upgrade the city centre of Utrecht by making it less accessible for motor traffic and much more attractive for people walking and cycling. Check out before and after photos, cyclist's view video, cross-sections and other graphics. http://bit.ly/2xwrMet

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