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MONTRÉAL, CANADA TO REDUCE SPEED LIMITS TO 30-40 KM/HR (19-25 MPH)
-> CBC News reports as part of a new Vision Zero plan Montréal, Canada wants to impose stricter speed limits across the city as part of an effort to make the roads safer for cyclists and pedestrians. Under the changes, which would go into effect next spring, vehicles would be limited to 30 or 40 km per hour (19 or 25 mph) on most city streets — includes sections on major arteries near school zones and playgrounds. On some streets in Old Montréal the speed limit would be 20 km per hour (12 mph). http://bit.ly/2vNtQ38

TRB SUMMARY: UTC PED & BIKE SAFETY CONFERENCE
-> The Transportation Research Board hosted a Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety conference of university transportation centers in December 2016. The conference focused on the role of policy and guidance, emerging and future technologies, behavior change, equity, children, infrastructure, data, and areas for further research. "Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety: Summary of the 10th University Transportation Centers Spotlight Conference" http://bit.ly/2srs3yV

APPS MODIFY SIGNAL TIME FOR SLOWER PEDS, SLOWER CYCLISTS
-> Springwise reports Crosswalk is a new app that gives pedestrians with restricted mobility more time to cross the road. Currently the system is being trialed with 10 subjects in the Dutch city of Tilburg. The adapted traffic lights house a sensor that scans the pavements on both sides of the road. If it locates someone using the Crosswalk app then it automatically adjusts the time that the lights remain green. The app has four varied time settings, and the light’s sensor will pick the one suitable for the pedestrian’s level of mobility to ensure that they have more than enough time to cross the road, but also that it doesn’t overly delay the traffic. In the Dutch city of Utrecht, CityLab reports cyclists are testing Flo (http://bit.ly/2vNTLrt), a new system that detects their speeds and recommends adjustments to make the green lights. http://bit.ly/2vO8h2g

CALGARY, ALBERTA DOWNTOWN BIKE TRAFFIC UP BY 40% IN 2 YEARS
-> Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates The Squeaky Wheel reports that Calgary's success is a model for downtown Sacramento. Calgary, Alberta increased bicycle traffic into its downtown by 40% in just two years, thanks to a bold vision and a willingness to experiment. As Sacramento develops its Downtown Specific Plan, which will provide high-level environmental review for projects expected to add at least 10,000 housing units to the Central City grid over the next 10 years, Calgary's example offers some valuable lessons. In the summer of 2015, Calgary – which already had one 7-block-long downtown cycle track (also known as a protected bike lane or separated bikeway) — took the unprecedented step of adding an entire network of cycle tracks in a single big project. Three months after the network opened, bike traffic had increased by 95% on the streets with cycle tracks compared to year earlier. Overall, the project increased bicycle traffic into downtown Calgary by 40% in just about a year, including a larger share of women traveling by bike. Better still, the project came in more than $1 million under budget. http://bit.ly/2vOvTnG

WHO PAYS FOR ROADS? A STATE-BY-STATE LOOK
-> State Smart Transportation Initiative reports all roads are subsidized, but to wildly varying degrees in each state. A new state-by-state study from the Tax Foundation found that user fees only cover a fraction of total road costs, ranging from 12% in Alaska to 76% in Hawaii. (How Are Your State’s Roads Funded?: http://bit.ly/2vNU2L9) While the report does not give a national figure, a previous version estimated user fees cover just 50% of road costs. http://bit.ly/2wGpd7l

THE HIDDEN COSTS OF PARKING
-> State Smart Transportation Initiative reports on top of the monetary fees, the cost of finding a parking spot also includes time, wasted fuel, and congestion. A new study by INRIX estimates that Americans spend an average of 17 hours a year searching for parking, costing the U.S. economy more than $72 billion annually. (The Impact of Parking Pain in the US, UK and Germany: http://bit.ly/2wGmtqr) Much as roadway congestion can cost money in the form of fuel and lost time, trying to find a parking spot is among the perils of urban driving. In a famous study, parking guru Donald Shoup tried to estimate how much traffic in a downtown area was caused by people cruising for parking. (Cruising for Parking: http://bit.ly/2wGj8rq) The INRIX study updates this by assigning numbers to the time wasted looking for parking and the additional meter-plugging drivers do to make sure they don’t run out of time and get a ticket. http://bit.ly/2wGpvLz

VIDEO: THE HIGH COST OF FREE PARKING
-> Mobility Lab reports it’s estimated that, in America, there are eight parking spots for every car, covering up to 30 percent of our cities. The more parking we have, the more encouraged we are to drive and to shape our urban landscapes based on that parking. This story and stats are part of a new 6:42-minute video on the price of parking and how we have historically done it all wrong in this country. UCLA professor and parking guru Donald Shoup is interviewed in the film, detailing the two big parking inventions that came to dominate how we think about and manage parking: parking meters and off-street parking requirements/mandatory parking minimums. http://bit.ly/2vOcqDD

CARLESS RENTERS SHOULDER $440M IN ANNUAL PARKING COSTS
-> The State Smart Transportation Initiative reports carless renters shoulder $440 million annually in parking costs. Unused garage parking costs the average carless renter an extra $621 per year, or 13% of a housing unit’s rent, according to a new study from researchers at UCLA. (Hidden Costs and Deadweight Losses: Bundled Parking and Residential Rents in the Metropolitan United States: http://bit.ly/2vOHLFZ) The heaviest burdens often fall on the lowest-income households, who may be paying for parking they do not need or want. SSTI offers useful resources to help developers and cities build and manage parking more efficiently. http://bit.ly/2vOIg2P

MEXICO CITY TO LIMIT NEW PARKING SPACES
-> Wired reports Mexico City, Mexico is either the most, or the 12th most, congested city in the world. However, it just made it easier for real estate developers to avoid building parking. Mayor Miguel Ángel Mancera Espinosa this month announced a new policy that limits how many parking spaces builders can build. He hopes to spur development. Sprawling parking lots and looming garages can actually create more traffic and make housing less affordable and city streets more difficult to navigate. http://bit.ly/2wGk6UQ

MANY BOSTON, MA (& ELSEWHERE) PED WALK BUTTONS DO NOTHING
-> The Boston Globe reports the vast majority of walk buttons that dot downtown neighborhoods, don’t actually do anything. Officials say the city’s core is just too congested — with cars and pedestrians — to allow any one person to manipulate the cycle. Other major cities around the world, including New York, Seattle, and London, follow similar protocols. While pedestrians may be irked to learn they have been pressing what amount to placebo buttons, Boston officials say the setting is actually aimed at making life easier for walkers by eliminating the need to push a button at all. There was a time when pedestrians needed to press the device to ensure they got their turn. Now, traffic lights at many busy intersections are programmed to assume that pedestrians are constantly looking to cross. http://bit.ly/2vNQjgD

FIRST MILE-LAST MILE, INTERMODALISM & TRANSIT
-> Planetizen reports as planners seek to leverage public transit investments with enhanced first mile-last mile connections, it is critical that market analysis guides those initiatives and that impacts and cost effectiveness are part of the performance assessment. Experimentation and a learning curve are to be expected as new technologies, business models, and deployment strategies are deployed and experience accumulates. But it will be important to glean a well-informed sense of the public and user costs, travel impacts, and environmental, safety, and other impacts. http://bit.ly/2vNZkpS

ALL-AGES TRANSIT ACCESS
-> StreetsblogUSA reports a new TransitCenter briefing paper based on extensive surveys, shares recommendations to better serve America’s aging population. (All-Ages Access: Making Transit Work For Everyone in America’s Rapidly Aging Cities http://bit.ly/2vOU0lV) Here are five takeaways for transit agencies and cities to help people age in place by providing transit service that meets their needs: 1) The basics of good service still matter; 2) Comfortable waiting areas and vehicles; 3) Walkability and accessibility; 4) Make paratransit efficient and convenient; and 5) Increase nighttime and weekend service. http://bit.ly/2vOAWV4

SWITZERLAND LONGEST PED SUSPENSION BRIDGE
-> Switzerland opened the world's longest suspension bridge after only 10 weeks of construction. It measures 1,620 feet long (or about a third of a mile), hangs 278 feet in the air, and only measures 25.6 inches wide — just enough for one person, single file. The bridge over the Grabengufer ravine connects Zermatt with nearby Grächen, which is also a popular two-day hike in Switzerland. http://tandl.me/2wfzxDe

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY – WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THE BIKE SHARE WORLD?
-> The European Cyclists’ Federation reports bike share surely is summer 2017’s hot topic – and not only within cycling media. Because dockless fleets can be set up in a matter of hours and – virtually – without any permission from local authorities, many have been sprouting across Europe, filling newspapers and social media with contradictory opinions. This Executive Summary will create order out of the chaos: http://bit.ly/2vOS3pO

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