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WORLD DAY OF REMEMBRANCE NOVEMBER 18, TAKE #CRASHNOTACCIDENT PLEDGE
-> The Vision Zero Network reported on Sunday November 18, 2018 people around the world will unite in remembrance of those who have been killed or injured by vehicles on our roadways. In communities from Austin, Texas to those in Thailand, family members and friends, advocates, government and elected officials and NGO partners will rally, hold vigils, walk or ride a bike calling attention to the millions of lives lost and the urgency of reducing these preventable traffic tragedies. In its 23rd year, World Day of Remembrance 2018 (#WDoR2018: http://bit.ly/2NJTpro) harnesses the collective grief, anger and frustration into a collective day of action that highlights the emotional and economic cost of traffic fatalities and injuries.

This year, the Vision Zero Network encourages those participating in #WDoR2018 to also take the #CrashNotAccident Pledge: http://bit.ly/2DB3aq8. As we tell our stories, let's shift away from using "accident" when discussing traffic tragedies towards calling them "crashes." As stated by the Associated Press Stylebook in its guidance to reporters--using accident "can be read as exonerating the person responsible." Changing culture also happens when we change our language. http://bit.ly/2DBWkAJ

UPDATED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY GUIDELINES FOR AMERICANS
-> Health.gov released the second edition of its "Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans." (http://bit.ly/2RO6iSD) It is based on the latest scientific evidence that shows that physical activity conveys even more health benefits than previously known. New aspects include:

  • Additional health benefits related to brain health, additional cancer sites, and fall-related injuries;
  • Immediate and longer term benefits for how people feel, function, and sleep;
  • Further benefits among older adults and people with additional chronic conditions;
  • Risks of sedentary behavior and their relationship with physical activity;
  • Guidance for preschool children (ages 3 through 5 years);
  • Elimination of the requirement for physical activity of adults to occur in bouts of at least 10 minutes; and
  • Tested strategies that can be used to get the population more active.
http://bit.ly/2RNlpf6

MOST UK DRIVERS IN FATAL CYCLIST CRASHES AVOID JAIL TIME
-> The United Kingdom-based Independent reported less than one-fifth of drivers involved in fatal collisions with cyclists in the UK receive jail time and just a third of drivers lose their licenses following a deadly crash involving a bicycle. Cycling UK obtained this 2007-20017 data from 10 police forces. The figures do not include the majority of the country's 43 police forces, with many stating they did not hold the information. Among those not to provide the data was the UK's largest force, the Metropolitan Police. https://ind.pn/2DCAywK

85TH PERCENTILE SPEED LIMITS: "FAST, FURIOUS & FATAL"
-> A State Smart Transportation Initiative article notes the 85th percentile, as a means of setting speed limits, is not a good standard of safety and cites research done as part of a Master in Urban and Regional Planning degree. (Fast, Furious & Fatal: An Assessment of Speed-Setting Methodology in California: http://bit.ly/2RTOW6W) A proposed "injury minimization" scheme recommends local governments use safer limits. For instance, in conditions where there is a mix of motorized and unprotected users, the recommended speed limit would be 20 mph; and roads with access where side-impact crashes can result he recommended speed limit would be 30 mph. http://bit.ly/2RU51JF

PARIS, FRANCE TO BUILD WORLD’S LARGEST E- BIKE FLEET
-> Quartz reports Paris plans to build the world's largest fleet of electric bicycles. Île-de-France Mobilités, Paris's regional transport agency, plans to offer long-term rentals of 10,000 electric bicycles starting September 2019. The agency would aim to expand the program, called Veligo, to 20,000 e-bikes, making it the largest rental fleet in the world. In Paris, the Veligo program will complement the existing system, Velib, for rentals of traditional pedal bicycles. The Veligo program would cost €40 a month (US$45.20), half of which could be subsidized by employers. http://bit.ly/2DDgU3K

UBER E-BIKE MOBILITY DASHBOARD FOR CITIES
-> Smart Cities Dive reports Uber launched its Jump e-bike mobility dashboard for cities (https://ubr.to/2RQcRUP) Users can use the platform to view Jump data including total number of bike trips and miles traveled. Uber says the tool includes features to protect bike riders' privacy while still providing valuable data to cities. http://bit.ly/2RYVQIj

AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS: PROPOSED PARKING FEE HIKE
-> SmartCitiesWorld reports the Amsterdam City Council in the Netherlands is proposing to increase city parking rates in a bid to deter motorists from driving to the city centre. Once the increase comes into effect in April 2019, it will cost €7.50 per hour (US$ 8.44) to park in the centre (currently €5 = US$5.63). Additional revenue will improve the livability and accessibility of the city. Restricting the space for motorized traffic in the city can create more room for greenery and play areas. The proposal will substantially increase parking fees in the historic city centre and the 19th-century neighbor hoods. The differences in the street parking fees between adjacent areas have been kept to a minimum in order to prevent a waterbed effect (shifting the traffic volume). http://bit.ly/2RKpsc2

BRISBANE (AUSTRALIA) ACTIVE SCHOOLS TRAVEL PROGRAM
-> The Tools of Change Transportation Peer-Selection Panel chose a new Landmark case study: Brisbane (Australia) Active Schools Travel Program. (http://bit.ly/2RPuUdL) This program offers weekly active travel days, special events, maps, bike and scooter skills training and public transport orientation classes for students. There are competitions and rewards to incentivize individuals, classes and whole school populations, and opportunities to identify necessary infrastructure improvements. On average, the program has achieved a 23% increase in active travel (mostly walking trips), corresponding to a 23% reduction in car trips. http://bit.ly/2RT38x7

TORONTO, CANADA: CLOSING MAJOR TRANSIT CORRIDOR TO CARS
-> Streetsblog USA reports one year after Toronto, Canada turned King Street in a transit- and walking-priority street, streetcar ridership, biking and walking are way up. (King Street Transit Pilot: July & August Update: http://bit.ly/2DD7fKG) The project, which cost just $1.5 million, has produced an 11% increase in average daily ridership, and as much as 34% at peak hours. Once the street was closed to cars, about 20,000 additional streetcar riders materialized practically overnight. Biking, meanwhile, is up by as much as an astounding 440%, according to city estimates. Toronto will decide before the end of the year whether to make it permanent. There remains, however, a certain amount of discontent among some business owners. Toronto reports business receipts are up along the corridor as well, albeit a tiny 0.3%. The rest of the city was up 3.8% over the same period. http://bit.ly/2DEKTbH

NUDGE SCIENCE ENCOURAGES TRANSIT USE
-> The State Smart Transportation Initiative reports in England, the Nudge Unit--officially called the Behavioural Insights Team--encourages positive social behaviors via behavioral economics and psychology. Now cities in North America are using the lessons of the Nudge Unit to encourage people to use transit and reduce vehicle miles traveled. Nudge Theory uses practices like social norming and positive reinforcement to get people to change their behavior or repeat actions that governments want to encourage, in this case using transit instead of driving. There are psychological tricks to get individuals to try something new or maintain behaviors. One is social norming--getting people to think a behavior is something everyone--or at least their peers--are doing. Asking people to make a plan for a new behavior makes it more concrete; so people who intend to do the right thing, but might be held back by habit, will follow through. http://bit.ly/2DDs6gU

AGING WITH GRACE NEXT BIG CHALLENGE FOR URBANISTS
-> Public Square reported 'aging with grace' is the next big challenge for urbanists. Designing and establishing systems for walkable communities that support aging residents are important planning and development tasks for the coming decades. A recent Aging with Grace symposium brought together more than a dozen speakers with extensive backgrounds in public health, architecture, planning, "wellness," and other fields. Participants considered the needs of "old age," which in its initial years, when people still possess considerable energy, "has its comforts" and "old old age," a later period often marked by substantial decline and fragility. http://bit.ly/2RTWgzh

[See Quotes R Us section for more detail.]

10-MINUTE WALK TO PARKS: MULTIPLE COMMUNITY VALUES
-> Spaces to Places reported the National Recreation and Park Association, Urban Land Institute and The Trust for Public Land, launched a nationwide movement to work with mayors, park and recreation professionals, private developers, and others to ensure there's a great park within a 10-minute walk of every person, in every neighborhood, in every city across America. Over 220 Mayors have signed-on to support this vision in the first year of the campaign.

The Urban Land Institute released case studies outlining several topics, the concept that by investing in equitable access to parks and open space, developers can help improve community health and wellness, boost economic development, and enhance a project's financial success.

(The Case for Open Space: Why the Real Estate Industry Should Invest in Parks and Open Spaces: http://bit.ly/2RNGeXG)

DEMONSTRATIONS TURN FOOTSTEPS INTO ENERGY
-> SmartCitiesWorld reports Interactive installations demonstrated the possibilities of energy transition with technology that harvests energy from pedestrian footsteps. A partnership between Bank of the West and sustainable an energy company, Pavegen, staged demonstrations in San Francisco and Los Angeles, CA; Sacramento, CA; and Portland, OR. As individuals walked across the installations, large-screen monitors tracked steps towards each city's total goal, which ranged from 50,000- to 150,000 steps. When these goals were met, Bank of the West made $10,000 donations to clean energy organizations. "Hosting these smart tile installations was an interactive way for us to demonstrate energy transition and give people in the Bank's local footprint a first-hand look at what the future of energy could look like." http://bit.ly/2DyUHUx

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