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PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS TO PREDICT & PREVENT COLLISIONS
-> Govtech reports according to a new study, cities may be able to collect data on dangerous driving behaviors and focus on unsafe areas before collisions ever take place. (Predicting and Preventing Traffic Casualties: Preliminary Mapping Analysis of New York City Driver Behavior Data and Collision Data: http://bit.ly/2spMmNi) Zendrive, developer of software that measures unsafe driving through smartphone sensors, partnered with New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering to compare hard braking and rapid acceleration habits and found a 71% correlation between crash sites and the examples of risky driver behavior. http://bit.ly/2spGBzc

IRANIAN WOMEN DEFY CYCLING FATWA
-> According to The Guardian religious leaders in Iran consider women on bicycles a threat to morality. But as traffic chokes the capital, Tehran, a counter-movement is growing. The question has become a hotly debated point in Tehran in recent months, as the city grapples with two truly dire problems: air pollution and traffic congestion, both some of the world’s worst. With cars choking Iran’s cities, campaigns to encourage cycling are picking up speed. http://bit.ly/2srvZQt

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF LOWERING CONGESTION VIA CYCLING
-> In its recap of Day 1 of the Velo-city Conference in Arnhem-Nijmegen, The Netherlands, the European Cyclists’ Federation described the economic benefits of lowering traffic congestion through cycling. The European FLOW (Furthering Less Congestion by Creating Opportunities For More Walking and Cycling) project is currently studying these effects. The aim is to put walking and cycling on an equal footing with motorized modes to tackle urban congestion, by developing a user-friendly methodology, and involving traffic modeling, to assess the effectiveness of walking and cycling measures. The Netherlands, faced with an expected rise of 40% in traffic jams, has already started the “Beter benutten” (“Optimizing Use”) program to improve accessibility in the 12 busiest regions of the country by optimizing the use of existing infrastructure. Promoting cycling is a central part of program, for example through smartphone apps, cycle highways or incentives to use e-bikes. Besides reducing congestion, there are a lot of other co-benefits, for example through reduced costs in the public health system. Also, see recaps of these other sessions: What Gets People Cycling?; Social Inclusion; and Cycling For All- What Does it Really Mean? http://bit.ly/2sq457j

NACTO: GREEN LIGHT FOR GREAT STREETS
-> Streetsblog USA reports the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), representing more than 50 urban transportation departments across the United States, is launching an initiative called Green Light for Great Streets (http://bit.ly/2t067rV) to identify what’s holding back implementation of smarter street designs at a consistent pace in cities around the country, and identify strategies for overcoming those barriers. Green Light for Great Streets will encourage urban design excellence by helping cities make changes that allow them to move from individual project delivery to a comprehensive program with a pipeline of transformative projects. With this work, city goals—like building a city-wide high-capacity transit network or redesigning streets to support increased pedestrian activity—will be achievable on a broad scale, rather than implemented on what is often now a piecemeal basis.http://bit.ly/2t0cmfk

NEW STREET-LEVEL ANALYSIS OF BIKING NETWORKS IN 299 US CITIES
-> Streetsblog USA reports PeopleForBikes has just made the first attempt to measure and compare local bike networks on a nationwide scale. (PlacesForBikes Bike Network Analysis Score: http://bit.ly/2t0d502) Using OpenStreetMap (a sort of Wikipedia for online maps) and the widely respected “level of traffic stress” methodology developed by Northeastern University’s Peter Furth, they developed digital records of the biking networks in 299 U.S. cities and assigned a numerical score to how well each one connects people to places. One major shortcoming: It’s blind to destinations that haven’t been entered in OpenStreetMap. One interesting phenomenon turned up by the BNA: Many of the top-scoring cities have very small populations. Some of them hardly have any actual bike lanes. http://bit.ly/2t0s4Ht

ASSESSING JOB ACCESSIBILITY FOR CYCLISTS
-> The University of MN Accessibility Observatory reports evaluating real-world bicycle access to destinations is a significantly more challenging problem than for other modes, since route planning by bicycle is significantly more sensitive to things like road type, speed limit, hills, and the presence (or lack) of dedicated infrastructure like bike lanes than route planning for cars or transit. They created a map showing bicycle accessibility to jobs within 30 minutes in the Twin Cities area, without accounting for where people actually would prefer to ride or avoid; the reality is likely significantly less geographically uniform. To account for this sensitivity among people interested in bicycling, the Observatory is working to adapt the bicycle level of traffic stress (LTS) framework to our research. (Low-Stress Bicycling and Network Connectivity: Low-Stress Bicycling and Network Connectivity) LTS assigns a “stress level” ranking to roadways based on data such as street width, number of lanes, speed limit, the presence of bike lane facilities, and other factors. The higher the stress level, the less likely people are to use the street for biking and the less likely people will be able to reach businesses and other destinations on that roadway by bike. http://bit.ly/2t08WZS

CYCLING ASPECTS OF AUSTROADS GUIDES (2017 EDITION)
-> “Cycling Aspects of Austroads Guides” contains planning, design and traffic management of cycling facilities information from Australia’s Austroads Guides, primarily the “Guide to Road Design” (http://bit.ly/2spt0YC), the “Guide to Traffic Management” (http://bit.ly/2spODb8) and the “Guide to Road Safety” (http://bit.ly/2spwqKQ). It provides an overview of planning and traffic management considerations and cross?references to other Austroads Guides and texts; a summary of design guidance and criteria relating to on?road and off?road bicycle facilities with cross?referencing to the relevant Austroads Guides; and information and cross-references on the provision for cyclists at structures, traffic control devices, construction and maintenance considerations and end-of-trip facilities. http://bit.ly/2spTDg1

THE NETHERLANDS BUSIEST CYCLE ROUTE: AVE 32K PEOPLE/DAY
-> According to Bicycle Dutch Vredenburg (the main east-west route in Utrecht) is part of The Netherlands’ busiest cycle route. On an average working day, some 32,000 people pass here on a bicycle. On one single occasion the city counted 37,000. On a very cold, wet day in April, a single hour count with the CounterPoint App (http://bit.ly/2t0grQs) tallied almost 4,000 people passing on their bicycles. Check out photos from the 1960s and now plus video and more detail at http://bit.ly/2t0DavS

VIDEO ANALYTICS TOWARDS VISION ZERO CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS
-> In a collaboration with organizations across North America, the City of Bellevue (WA), the University of WA and Microsoft are asking for the public's help in a cutting-edge effort to help prevent deaths and serious injuries from traffic crashes. Called "Video Analytics Towards Vision Zero," the project will tap new technologies to analyze traffic camera video footage available in many cities, and use near-miss collisions to predict where future crashes are likely to occur. Traffic engineers could then take corrective action to prevent them.

Project organizers are encouraging as many people as possible to help by watching traffic camera video and using tracking tools to identify objects and movements. The crowd-sourcing effort is critical to the project's success. http://bit.ly/2t0vFoC

RESPOND TO SRTS SURVEY NATIONAL PARTNERSHIP SURVEY
-> The Safe Routes to School National Partnership is conducting a national survey about and for Safe Routes to School program champions and volunteers. The goal is to explore what motivates and sustains those who volunteer their time for a Safe Routes to School Program, and to understand how Safe Routes to School coordinators manage and recruit volunteers. We hope this information will assist practitioners and advocates on various ways to develop, support, and sustain a Safe Routes to School program. The survey should take about 15-20 minutes.
Deadline: June 30, 2017, http://bit.ly/2t01spN

OPED: THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF BICYCLE HELMETS
-> “The Unintended Consequences of Bicycle Helmets” is the focus of a recent OpEd in Medpage Today. Its author notes it is almost impossible, in the US at least, to have an intelligent conversation about bicycle helmets. The universal view is that you have to be crazy not to wear one. He opines, “...the issue is far more complex than most people believe. It's a great example of unintended consequences, and that what seems obvious may not always be so...I am opposed to public health campaigns that focus on helmets, thereby implanting in people's minds the dangers of cycling. Instead, in my view, the public health agenda regarding cycling should be to promote the far greater health benefits of cycling. The overarching goal of any public health campaign should be to dramatically increase cycling in the US, thereby increasing physical activity and helping to reduce obesity and diabetes.” http://bit.ly/2sqW2aq

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