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NATIONAL VISION & GAMEPLAN TO ELIMINATE TRAFFIC DEATHS BY 2050
-> The Vision Zero Network reports the goal of zero traffic deaths was boosted in April with the release of a groundbreaking report setting a goal to eliminate traffic fatalities in the U.S. by 2050. The (Road to Zero: A Vision for Achieving Zero Roadway Deaths by 2050: http://bit.ly/2jnPx1C) The report is the first of its kind in the US and was developed by the RAND Corporation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research institution, in partnership with the Road to Zero Coalition. It recommends Vision Zero and the Safe Systems approach as the right strategies to reach zero deaths, giving credence to local Vision Zero efforts across the country. The Road to Zero report identifies proven, life-saving actions for the short-, mid-, and long-terms that should be taken by federal, state, and local government officials; automakers; technology manufacturers; business leaders; insurance agencies; law enforcement; and safety advocates. http://bit.ly/2rKQqG5

EUROPEAN COMMISSION PROJECT REDEFINES CONGESTION
-> The European Cyclists' Federation reports the FLOW H2020 project developed a new tool to demonstrate that measures that promote walking and cycling, far from causing more congestion in cities, are a great way to reduce it. (FLOW Impact Assessment Tool – Guideline: http://bit.ly/2L4DTVL) FLOW was a European Commission research and innovation project focusing on the congestion reduction benefits of walking and cycling. (http://bit.ly/2bg5hml) It expanded the prevailing understanding of congestion, which used to focus on motor vehicle traffic, to a perspective where all traffic participants (including those using non-motorized modes) are equally considered as a potential source and remedy of congestion.

FLOW developed a strong methodology to evaluate the impact of walking and cycling on the performance of urban transport networks. (Walking, Cycling and Congestion: Implementer's Guide to Using the FLOW Tools for Multimodal Assessments: http://bit.ly/2L4E1EJ) Since people on foot, on bicycles or in public transport require less space than people in cars, any shift in demand from motorized to non-motorized modes or public transport has the potential to increase the effective transport network capacity. Its 20 case studies to prove that more walking and cycling actually reduce congestion. http://bit.ly/2rJk5PJ

[See The Research Beat for results of 15 walking and cycling measures in Europe as part of the FLOW project.]

IMPERIAL COUNTY, CA: 10X MORE AIR POLLUTION EVENTS THAN DETECTED BY GOVERNMENT
-> Public Health Institute reports when community members installed their own air monitors in Imperial County, CA near the Mexican border they found government air monitors were missing 9 out of 10 PM2.5 pollution episodes (1426 vs 116), according to preliminary findings from Comite Civico del Valle, PHI's California Environmental Health Tracking Program and researchers from the University of Washington. Children in Imperial County have the highest rates of ER hospitalization for asthma in the state. Part of a 4-year, $2 million study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the air monitor project is an innovative approach to engaging local residents in scientific data collection. A community steering committee of local residents played a key role, from project design to implementation. The committee and other community members determined the sites where half of the monitors were placed. http://bit.ly/2GkxD8N

PEOPLE WHO BIKE TO WORK LIVE LONGER THAN PEOPLE WHO DRIVE
-> Streetsblog USA reports overall mortality among bike commuters is significantly lower than among people who don't bike or walk to work, according to a robust study recently published in the British Medical Journal. Controlling for a range of other factors, researchers found that bike commuters were 41% less likely to die during the 5-year study period than people who drove or took transit. (Association Between Active Commuting and Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, and Mortality: Prospective Cohort Study: http://bit.ly/2HHyiDL) The connection between bike commuting and lower mortality is "independent of sex, age, deprivation, ethnicity, smoking status, recreational and occupational physical activity, sedentary behaviour, dietary patterns, and other confounding factors." Similar but weaker correlations were observed for people who walked to work or biked for part of their commute. Walking does not require enough physical activity to affect health outcomes, except for those who had long walking commutes -- at least six miles per week. http://bit.ly/2GmS7Ou

PEOPLE OVERESTIMATE TIME IT TAKES TO WALK OR BIKE SOMEWHERE
-> MinnPost reports most people incorrectly estimate how long it would take them to walk or bike from their home to a location they frequently go to by car -- and usually by overestimating the amount of time, according to a new study. (Predicting Discordance Between Perceived and Estimated Walk and Bike Times Among University Faculty, Staff, and Students: http://bit.ly/2Go3SUJ) These findings, published in the journal Transportmetrica A: Transport Science, underscore one of the biggest barriers to getting people to use more active forms of transportation: the perceived time commitment. http://bit.ly/2GnezHe

HOW RELIABLE BIKE PARKING ENCOURAGES NEW RIDERS
-> Mobility Lab reports on thoughtful bike parking is one inexpensive way to encourage cycling. Studies of European cities with a high rate of bicycling for errands or commuting show plentiful, secure bike parking is important to a strong bike culture. Knowing there's support for bicycles can convert trips that would otherwise be taken in the car. Normalizing bike culture allows people to see themselves in the rider's seat by putting bikes in the places they already go. Having a bike locker or other secure indoor parking spaces for long term parking, like at an office or transit hub, can reassure the most nervous new rider that their security is important. Bike parking--accessible, public, and plentiful--helps create a positive riding experience. http://bit.ly/2rM2MgZ

RESISTANCE GROWING TO STREET REDESIGN FOR BIKES & PEDS
-> CityLab observes nationwide, proposals to shed car lanes in the name of improving traffic safety or adding bike and pedestrian access are often met by fierce resistance. Such redesigns may be popular with traffic safety advocates--lane reductions or road diets have been shown to reduce the total number of crashes by up to 47%, according to FHWA. But even though traffic experts and city planners are well aware of the benefits, the process to remake America's streets from car-dominated to more multimodal "complete" streets is getting backed-up. Participants in the public process often support adding bike lanes or sidewalks, as long as no car lanes get touched. http://bit.ly/2GlyiXz

CONVERSATIONS CITIES & BIKE SHARE COMPANIES NEED TO HAVE
-> An opinion piece published by Smart Cities Dive outlines 5 topical areas of consideration for those looking to implement a bike-share program: map out numbers, factor in related costs, plan responsibly, consider the political implications, and look at other, non-financial benefits. http://bit.ly/2GnYaSN

BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA: TRANSIT SMART CARD UPS RIDERSHIP 4-6%/YR
-> British Columbia, Canada based TransLink introduced Compass, a travel pass payment system that replaced 150 different tickets and passes. To ensure positive adoption, TransLink brought customers through a series of messages that generated awareness, created broad comprehension around Compass benefits and features, and educated customers on proper card use behavior. It achieved a 95% adoption rate within months, and transit ridership increased 4-6% per year following introduction. http://bit.ly/2GnkoUN

FARE WELL, HANK DITTMAR
-> Hank Dittmar, a leading international urbanist and former Executive Director of the Surface Transportation Policy Project (STPP), passed away last month at the age of 62. Dittmar's long-held tenets in urban design are neatly summed up in this quote: "If we surrender our towns, countryside, and cities to the car, we will also be surrendering many other values that we hold dear: neighborhood life, a sense of history and place, a feeling of belonging somewhere." http://bit.ly/2GmNdAT

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