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BUS STOPS AS PLACES?!
by Mark Plotz

-> Waiting is one of the indignities visited upon those who get around on public transit. Waiting isnít so bad if you can pass the time by doing something productive like catching up on your reading or finishing your breakfast. The problem is that the bus stop usually isnít such a great place to wait. If your waiting room has a trashcan, a bench, and a route schedule then youíre practically a baller in the public transportation world. Now imagine a roof was added to that bus stop, along with some lighting, some brighter colors, a multimodal transportation map that was easy to understand, and one final ingredient: some art, a little music, or a history lesson. What would happen if we thought of transit stops as places where people wanted to spend time?

This summer, leading up to Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place in Pittsburgh, David Leyzerovsky and David Nelson of PPS began working with Pittsburgh City Planning and other stakeholders to identify transit stops for staging Placemaking interventions. The projectís goals were to improve the transit user experience and to encourage the community and public agencies to think of transit stops as potential community assets. Read the Davidsí report about what happened in Pittsburgh (http://bit.ly/1BRH6eN).

Our bus stop intervention in Pittsburgh follows a lighter, quicker, cheaper design philosophy; at the other end of the spectrum, but just as awesome and also in Pittsburgh, is a bus stop that Ikea and the Airport Corridor Transportation Association developed. Take a moment to make your some-assembly-required jokes, and then proceed to Streetsblog for pictures and the rest of the story (http://bit.ly/ZR1jWA0).

HAPPY WALK TO SCHOOL DAY (AND MONTH)!

-> According to an Oct. 6th National Center for Safe Routes to School release, "On Wednesday, Oct. 8, thousands of students, parents and communities representing more than 4,300 schools across the United States will walk and bicycle to school to celebrate International Walk to School Day (http://bit.ly/15PtJyo).

"This one-day event in the U.S. is a part of an international effort in more than 40 countries to celebrate the many benefits of safely walking and bicycling to school and to encourage more families to consider getting out of the car and onto their feet on the way to school in October. Walk to School events will be held nationwide on Wednesday and throughout the month of October. To view the names and locations of registered U.S. schools participating in Walk to School Day 2014, visit http://bit.ly/1vMa9Qb..."

Source: http://bit.ly/ZsyvTE
Title & Author: "Walk to School Day Celebrates National Effort to Promote More Walkable, Active Communities" by Staff

SURVEY: NATIONAL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PLAN PUBLIC COMMENT

-> According to recently opened survey, "Nearly five years ago, the National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP: http://bit.ly/1CTe7tl) was developed. This comprehensive strategic plan aims to increase physical activity in all segments of the U.S. population. To mark The Plan's 5 year anniversary, the NPAP will undergo revisions to update the existing document and prioritize strategies. During this revision process, public comment on the current version of the Plan will be solicited for 45 days (September 15 - October 31). The NPAP is comprised of 8 societal sectors, each with underlying strategies which are supported by tactics: Business and Industry; Education; Health Care; Mass Media; Parks, Recreation, Fitness, and Sports; Public Health; Transportation, Land use, and Community Design; and Volunteer and Non-Profit."

Source: http://conta.cc/1vR0mH6
Title & Author: "National Physical Activity Plan: Public Comment Survey" by Staff

U.S. CITIES WITH THE MOST BIKE COMMUTERS

-> According to a Sept. 26th Co.Exist article, "New census data released last week shows that more Americans are commuting by bike than ever before--but that the total numbers, even in the biggest biking cities, are still a paltry percentage of total commuters. According to the U.S. Census Bureauís American Community Survey, 0.62% of commutes were made by bicycle in 2013, a small increase from the year beforeó'Modes Less TraveledóBicycling and Walking to Work in the United States: 2008Ė2012í (http://1.usa.gov/1o4eyfP). This percentage equated to an estimated total 882,000 people who considered themselves bike commuters. In the city that had the highest percentage of bike commuters--Portland, Oregon--only 5.9% of people got to work by bike. The list of cities with the higher percentage of bike commuters, compiled by the League of American Bicyclists based on the census data, shows some surprises..."

Source: http://bit.ly/ZsnXUm
Title & Author: "The U.S. Cities With The Most Bike Commuters (It's Still Not A Lot)" by Jessica Leber

[New Census numbers show Pittsburgh has the nationís largest bike commuter jump since Y2K. Pittsburgh breaks 2 percent and sees a 408% jump: http://bit.ly/1pO8V1T]

ONE EASY THING ANY CITY CAN DO TO BE MORE PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY

-> According to an Oct. 7th Wired article, "There are many ways cities can make their public spaces safer and more inviting for pedestrians... But there is one easy, cost-effective, and quick thing just about any city can do to make themselves more pedestrian-friendly: Use building and landscape details to make people feel welcome and comfortable.

"The idea comes from a report by the non-profit SPUR (originally called the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association), which laid out seven ways to make any city more pedestrian-friendly. (See summary at http://wrd.cm/1vNpr6j) Most of the ideas required big changes to existing infrastructure, but this one is dead simple...."

Source: http://wrd.cm/1y1J8vh
Title & Author: "One Thing Every City Can Do to Be More Pedestrian-Friendly" by Jordon Golson

MAP INPUT SUGGESTS U OF MELBOURNE (AU) BIKE PARKING LOCATIONS

-> According to an Oct. 1st emailed CrowdSpot newsletter article, "The UniMelb (University of Melbourne, Australia) Bike Parking Map (http://bit.ly/1uzh1kx) launched last month and has so far received hundreds of contributions for new bike parking locations. The data collected will help plan for future bike parking locations at the Parkville Campus..."

WHAT HAPPENS TO YOUR BIKE AFTER ITíS STOLEN

-> According to an Oct. 1st Seattle Met article, "Last year 1,121 bicycles in Seattle were reported stolen. Thatís roughly three purloined bikes a day. But the moment a ride is pinched is only the beginning. To the prepared thief, every bike rack is a buffet... The components, meanwhileóthe lights, seats, handlebars, derailleurs, and brakes that turn a frame into a ridable bikeócan go for hundreds of dollars each on the black market. With no serial numbers, these parts, unlike frames, are untraceable... Locks deter, but so long as thereís profit to be made, they wonít prevent a theft. Addicts whose bottom line is a fix ally with websites whose bottom line is clicks, while legit secondhand stores struggle to cull their wares..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1vI1ixR
Title & Author: "This Is What Happens to Your Bike After Itís Stolen" by Casey Jaywork

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