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PWPBPP 2016 – EARLY SUMMER REG ENDS FRIDAY!
-> On Friday, July 15 at 8pm Eastern, Early Summer registration closes for Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place 2016. If you haven’t already registered, what are you waiting for? Go to http://bit.ly/walkbikeplaces2016.

The conference program is now online (http://bit.ly/29XJJdd) and we are beginning to announce our keynote speakers (Charles Montgomery, author of Happy City). Another reason not to delay registering: Mobile Workshop registration opens on Tuesday, July 19. For the complete list of Mobile Workshops see our conference blog (http://bit.ly/2a9xA1c). We will see you in Vancouver this September 12-15!

GOOGLE SELF DRIVING CARS: CYCLIST ROAD SHARING PROVISIONS
-> Google’s self-driving car may be able to share the road with cyclists better than you could. With a 360-degree view of its surroundings, the vehicle can recognize cyclists’ hand signals, provide them with the perfect amount of buffer room when driving alongside them or passing them, and can even identify bikes of all different shapes and sizes, Google said in its June report on its self-driving car project (http://bit.ly/29VY7mq). The Christian Science Monitor: http://bit.ly/29PUJq9

NEW ZEALAND: 9 URBAN CYCLEWAYS COMPLETED IN 1 YEAR
-> Nine of the New Zealand’s Government’s Urban Cycleways are complete one year on since the program was launched. Through the Urban Cycleways Programme, central and local government are working together to deliver NZ$333 million (US$242 million) of new cycleway projects throughout the country over the next three years - the single biggest investment in cycling in New Zealand’s history. Scoop Independent News http://bit.ly/29CkQiw

PARIS: 28-MI BIKE HIGHWAY SYSTEM PLANNED
-> Paris inaugurated its first bike highway last May. The 0.5-mile stretch of freshly paved road alongside the Bassin de l’Arsenal is part of the Réseau express vélo ("REVe"), an initiative to build fast-track bike lanes free of motorized vehicles. It’s only the first section of the soon-to-be 28-mile network of bike highways that will cross the city by 2020. In 2015, the city voted unanimously to spend €150 million (US$164.5 million) on expanding and improving its biking infrastructure, including REVe (which translates to "dream" in French). Cyclists will benefit from more bike-friendly rules—including the freedom to turn without waiting for a green light at every intersection—as well as new bike stands and two-way bike lanes on one-way streets. With these new bike lanes, the city hopes to see daily bike trips increase from 5 to 15 percent by 2020. CityLab: http://bit.ly/29vXE6a

BERLIN, GERMANY: BICYCLE BILL REFERENDUM
-> The Volksentscheid Fahrrad (Bicycle Referendum) is an example of how regular citizens can take responsibility and respond to the inactivity of the city administration by offering concrete, best practices alternatives for cycling infrastructure. In November, 30 people participated in a workshop meant to find the 10 most important objectives to improve cycling conditions in Berlin—see article for the list. Since they presented their project to the media in December of last year, the issue was at the center of the public debate, and it will likely be one of the hot topics of the agenda of the Berlin state election of this September. In January, a team of 30 lawyers and cycling experts collaborated to draft the points of what is now Berlin’s and Germany’s first draft of a cycling strategy bill. In less than a month, they collected 105,425 signatures supporting the bicycle referendum, and presented them to Berlin’s Parliament, well exceeding the 20,000 needed to have the Senate examine the admissibility of the request for a referendum. European Cyclists’ Federation: http://bit.ly/29D9Pin

NEW ZEALAND: SPEED MANAGEMENT GUIDE IN FINAL STAGE
-> The New Zealand Transport Agency’s Speed Management Guide, which is currently being finalized, will contain a new framework for speed management using technology and national data sets to enable best-practice speed management across the network. It shows New Zealand is moving to a new approach to speed management which is based around the road and risk. It is not all about making wholesale changes to speed limits. http://bit.ly/29HnAhs

NHTSA BICYCLIST TRAFFIC SAFETY FACT SHEET 2014
-> NHTSA released a fact sheet that details the 50,000 bicyclists injured in crashes involving motor vehicles and the 726 killed in 2014—a 3% decrease from 2013. Over the past 10 years there has been a steady increase in the average age of pedalcyclists* both killed and injured in incidents involving motor vehicles. The average age in 2014 was 45. (*pedalcyclists = bicyclists and other riders of two wheel, nonmotorized vehicles; tricycles; and unicycles powered solely by pedals) "Bicyclists and Other Cyclists Traffic Safety Fact Sheet 2014" http://bit.ly/29NySQx

GREAT BRITAIN: 2015 ROAD CASUALTIES
-> The Great Britain Department for Transport released a report that provides the number of personal-injury road traffic accidents in Great Britain that were reported to the police in 2015, and includes the number of people killed or injured in these accidents (409 pedestrians killed and 24,073 injured; 100 pedal cyclists killed and 18,845 injured). There is no obligation for people to report all personal injury accidents to the police, therefore, figures do not represent the full range of all accidents or casualties in the country. (Casualty = A person killed or injured in an accident.)

The Department for Transport has two key ways of looking at casualty numbers. The first is in terms of absolute counts. The second approach is to look at casualty rates in terms of the number of casualties per mile travelled. Vulnerable road users (pedestrians, pedal cyclists, and motorcyclists) have much higher casualty rates per mile travelled in comparison with the other road user groups. Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain: Main Results 2015: http://bit.ly/29wNaCG

CDC: VEHICLE CRASH DEATHS & PRIORITIZING INTERVENTIONS & COSTS
-> The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention presents motor vehicle crash death risk factors, data, comparisons to other high-income countries, and strategies different individuals, organizations and levels of government can follow to reduce crashes and deaths: http://bit.ly/29s5l23. For instance, states can consult the CDC’s "Motor Vehicle Prioritizing Interventions and Cost Calculator for States" (MV PICCS) to find out the cost of implementing up to 14 interventions and the number of injuries prevented and lives saved: http://bit.ly/29DmyS1

BOOK: AMERICA’S WALKING RENAISSANCE
-> America Walks and the Every Body Walk! Collaborative recently released a new book, "America’s Walking Renaissance: How Cities, Suburbs & Towns are Getting Back on Their Feet" (free download: http://bit.ly/29PbYIn). It examines how nine cities, suburbs and towns across the US of all shapes and sizes are getting back on their feet to embrace walking and become more walkable. It also provides resources and information on the growing walking movement. America Walks: http://bit.ly/29DXPOT. Check out an Utne Reader article with a more detailed description of this book and its context. http://bit.ly/29WTLvl

3 WAYS TO MAKE STREETS SAFER FOR PEOPLE WALKING
-> In a Strong Town article Adam Porr suggests 3 strategies to help bridge the dangerous gap between the current culture and one in which people while walking feel safe to be in the street and people while driving are attentive and courteous enough to allow this to happen: encourage pedestrian strength in numbers, force drivers to wake up, and preserve and expand pedestrian protections. http://bit.ly/29CMbGM

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