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PREVIEW OF NACTO GUIDE FOR HIGH-COMFORT BIKE FACILITIES
-> Streetsblog USA provided a sneak peek at the contents of NACTO's new guide to analyzing any street to determine which need protected bike lanes or other facilities. NACTO's full digital rollout of its "Designing for All Ages & Abilities: Contextual Guidance for High-Comfort Bicycle Facilities" is coming out in a couple of weeks. A preview of a chart shows to use the basic traits of any street - auto speed, traffic volume, lane count - to create a recommendation of what sort of bike lane the street should have to create the sort of low-stress riding experience that gets people of "all ages and abilities" - eight-year-olds, 80-year-olds, bike-sharing tourists - on bikes. Got a two-lane, two-way 25 mph street that carries 4,000 autos per day? According to NACTO, a buffered bike lane will do. But if the traffic speed is 30 mph, it's time to protect the bike lane with a curb, posts or planters.

One of NACTO's key points: Traffic speed is something cities can and should control. There's no need to find more space on a street for bike lanes when you can achieve the same benefits by slowing down cars. Another chart hart shows, speed doesn't only affect the danger of people driving cars as they whoosh past someone biking: It also affects the number those driving cars that whoosh past someone biking. http://bit.ly/2jqdXdT

NHTSA: ANALYSIS OF STATE VISION ZERO COUNTERMEASURES
-> The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released a revised report outlining how engineering, technology, and behavior changes can aid in the progress toward vision zero. Vision Zero is a national transportation policy in several nations with a goal of zero deaths or serious injuries from crashes in road traffic. This vision shifts responsibility for traffic safety from individual road users to a roadway system designed to accommodate and protect against human error. This report describes 11 countermeasures that save lives; reports on each state's progress in implementing them; and provides fatalities data per 100,000 population and per 100 millions VMT (vehicle miles traveled). "A Comparative Analysis of State Traffic Safety Countermeasures and Implications for Progress Toward Zero Deaths in the United States" http://bit.ly/2jsSWPH

NEW VISION ZERO FOR YOUTH WEBSITE
-> The National Center for Safe Routes to School announced its new Vision Zero for Youth website to encourage communities to focus on safety improvements and slow traffic speeds starting where children and youth walk and bike, with the ultimate goal of benefiting all community members. The site invites Mayors and leaders to join the growing number of communities working toward a future with zero traffic deaths and a focus on youth. Most successful community efforts have committed city leaders and energized community support. Both are important. The Mayors' Statement on Safe Walking and Bicycling for Youth (http://bit.ly/2hA2rfC) describes the commitment to safe walking and biking for youth and the benefits this brings to communities. http://bit.ly/2hyiWsv

BASELINE REPORT CARD ON WALKING & WALKABLE COMMUNITIES
-> A new report card from the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance is the first comprehensive national assessment of walking and walkability in the US. (The 2017 United States Report Card on Walking and Walkable Communities: A Foundation for Assessing Future Progress: http://bit.ly/2hz0FLL) It measures the extent to which individuals and communities in the US meet selected standards related to walking. Grades reflect national-level performance, not that of states or local municipalities. For example, Adult Walking Behavior earned a C, the highest grade of the Report Card. The National Health Interview Survey 2015 data indicates that 63.9% of adults report walking for transportation or leisure in at least one bout of 10 minutes or more in the preceding 7 days. Less than 30% of children and youth walk to and from school on a regular basis. Children and Youth Walking Behavior earned an F. http://bit.ly/2hBWjTX

SAFE ROUTES TO HEALTHY FOOD
-> The Safe Routes to School National Partnership reports almost 20% of people in the United States experience significant transportation barriers to accessing healthy foods. The National Partnership's Safe Routes to Healthy Food task force has been working to figure out how local governments can make it easier and safer to walk, bike and take transit to grocery stores. Minor tweaks to existing policies and practices can make a big difference in real peoples' lives. Check out strategies cities can use to support safe walking and biking to healthy foods. (http://bit.ly/2hCIqF8) This fact sheet offers examples from cities, towns and counties across the country, and shares policy solutions that will support communities as they create or strengthen the transportation connections between neighborhoods and grocery stores. http://bit.ly/2hB3V9t

STRAVA APP USERS GENERATE DATA FOR 1B TRIPS
-> CityLab notes pedestrians and cyclists are notoriously difficult for transportation planners to count and map. This is beginning to change, because of fitness-themed social media network, Strava. This social network for athletes re-released its Global Heatmap (http://bit.ly/2hB1wLZ) with more data and better graphics. The interactive map depicts more than 1 billion journeys undertaken by Strava's millions of members, 80% of whom are from outside of the United States. All of that data makes for a detailed global map of trips made on foot, by bike, and by other alternative modes of transportation. http://bit.ly/2hCGE6W

EQUITICITY TO PUSH FOR MOBILITY JUSTICE NATIONWIDE
-> According to a Streestblog article, Oboi Reed, cofounder of Slow Roll Chicago, launched a new organization called Equiticity (pronounced "EquiTIcity," http://bit.ly/2jqaLyV), promising that the group "will operate at the intersection of equity, mobility and justice in communities of color across the U.S." Reed noted that the consequences of historic segregation and disinvestment "along with the stark lack of equity in the distribution of resources" have contributed to unsafe and inefficient conditions for walking, transit use, and biking in Black and Brown communities. He added that this represents a missed opportunity to improve health and economic outcomes and reduce violence. Equiticity's first goal is to establish dockless bike-share "libraries" in two low-to-moderate-income African-American communities on Chicago's South and West Sides. http://bit.ly/2juNmwB

DUTCH GOVERNMENT: 100 MILLION EURO FOR CYCLE PROJECTS
-> The European Cyclists' Federation reports after months of negotiating, the new Dutch coalition agreed to invest an additional 2 billion Euro into mobility, 5% of which (100 million Euro) will be allocated to cycling over the next 4 years. This is a one-off investment and will be used for bicycle parking facilities at railway stations and for fast cycle routes.

While Dutch ECF member Fietsersbond welcomes this investment as a recognition for cycling to be part of the national mobility agenda, it criticizes that such a recognition would require not only structural funding but also higher investments to realize the high ambitions as formulated in the ‘Tour de Force.' A coalition of 23 stakeholders involved in the formulation of this agenda, including the previous national government, had set the objective of growing cycle use by 20% (measured in km cycled) between 2017 and 2027. The average Dutch person cycles about 1,000 km per year. http://bit.ly/2hzhHtb

NEW MONTREAL, CANADA MAYOR RAN ON TRANSIT & CYCLING PLATFORM
-> Streetsblog USA reports Montreal, Canada's newly elected Mayor Valérie Plante ran on a platform, which focused heavily on better transit and safer bicycling. Her platform called for of adding 300 buses to the city's fleet, reducing fares 40% for low-income residents, free service for children and seniors, and universal accessibility at all metro stations by 2030. For bicycling, Plante's platform was also ambitious, but not so expensive. She wants to build out a 140-kilometer Réseau Express Vélo ("Bike Express Network") of two-way protected bike lanes, at a projected cost of $25 million annually for 10 years. She also promised to improve safety at the 20 most-dangerous intersections in the city, extend sidewalks, and reduce wait times for pedestrians at signalized intersections. http://bit.ly/2jrp1Yq

CANADIAN EDITORIAL PED DEATHS. WHO YOU GOING TO BLAME?
-> An editorial in The Globe and Mail in Toronto, Canada reacts to a proposed bill that would slap fines on people caught staring at their electronic devices while crossing the street. Often when people vaguely feel that there oughtta be a law, there ought not. As a rule, we shouldn't legislate against the merely annoying or off-putting. And that's what zombie walking is. Rather, they note our car-centric cities and suburbs too easily become killing fields for those navigating them on foot, especially the elderly. The problem is cars, not people negligently walking into them. If you want to save pedestrian lives, slow down the [people driving the] vehicles. Install more crosswalks. Add speed bumps. Lower speed limits. Widen sidewalks. Narrow roads. https://tgam.ca/2jvph8U

LONDON, ENGLAND: PLANS TO PEDESTRIANIZE OXFORD STREET
-> Dezeen reports the western section of London's main shopping street is to be transformed into a pedestrian zone filled with public art. The Mayor of London has revealed plans to start imposing traffic restrictions along Oxford Street by the end of 2018, allowing the congested street to become a pedestrian-priority area. Visualizations show the pedestrianized zone stretching all the way from Oxford Circus to Selfridges, with colorful shapes painted over the pavement and public art suspended over the road. http://bit.ly/2hCDfoG

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND OPENS FAST WALKING LANES
-> The Independent reports Britain's first ever fast pedestrian lane has opened in Liverpool city center - following research that claims 47% of the nation finds slow walking the most annoying aspect of high-street shopping. Opening on the city's St John Street, the fast lanes will allow users to speed through the crowds while perusing the three-story Liverpool One shopping centre. https://ind.pn/2hB3IDg

PARIS, FRANCE VELIB BIKE SHARE TO ADD E-BIKES
-> Radio France International reports ten years after Paris launched the wildly popular Velib bicycle-sharing scheme, the 20,000 grey two-wheelers that have spawned imitators worldwide are being replaced by two new, colorful models in January, 30% of which will be electric. The frames of the bicycles are still grey but the manual model comes with an apple-green basket and chain guard. On the electric versions, which have a maximum speed of 25 km/hour (15.5 MPH) and a range of 50 kilometers (31 miles), those parts are turquoise blue. http://bit.ly/2hBynjM

SATELLITE PICS OF EVERY PART OF EARTH'S LANDMASS EVERY DAY
-> Quartz reports Planet, the American satellite company, is now snapping a picture of every part of earth's landmass every single day. Analyzing the imagery over time promises to unlock critical information about the economy and the environment for Planet's customers, which range from investors to activists. It's also a milestone in humanity's ongoing efforts to understand the planet it calls home. Most of the images they take are at a resolution of three meters (10 feet) per pixel. By taking images daily, the company can track changes in the physical world, like how quickly the temporary city of Burning Man rises out of the desert. http://bit.ly/2hzjfn3

THE END OF THE AUTOMOTIVE ERA
-> In an Automotive News article, Bob Lutz is a former vice chairman and head of product development at General Motors, says we are approaching the end of the automotive era because travel will be in standardized modules. The vehicles, however, will no longer be driven by humans because in 15 to 20 years - at the latest - human-driven vehicles will be legislated off the highways. The tipping point will come when 20 to 30% of vehicles are fully autonomous. Countries will look at the accident statistics and figure out that human drivers are causing 99.9% of the accidents. Of course, there will be a transition period. Everyone will have five years to get their car off the road or sell it for scrap or trade it on a module. http://bit.ly/2jtdo3a

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