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PARIS, FRANCE TO CUT CAR SPACE 50%
-> In autumn 2018, Paris will extend its 3.3 kilometer Right Bank of the Seine car-free zone westward by a kilometer, install a guided tram bus line along the 11 kilometer riverfront, and convert some space that's currently used by cars into a two-way protected bike path. The openly declared objective: first to cut Paris' car space by 50 percent, then ultimately rid central Paris of non-residents' cars altogether. http://bit.ly/2ib8PZG

REPORT: DANGEROUS BY DESIGN FOR PEOPLE WALKING
-> Smart Growth America released "Dangerous by Design 2016," the fourth edition of a report that examines areas in the US that are the most dangerous for people walking. The way we design streets is a factor in fatal collisions. Many people die on streets with fast-moving cars and poor pedestrian infrastructure. The report includes a racial and income-based examination of the people who are most at risk. People of color and older adults are overrepresented among pedestrian deaths. This year's report ranks states and the 104 largest metro areas in the country by a "Pedestrian Danger Index," or PDI. PDI is a calculation of the share of local commuters who walk to work and the most recent data on pedestrian deaths. The report also outlines how to protect people from being hit by motor vehicles and the first steps to making it happen. http://bit.ly/2iZ9lHv

TORONTO, CANADA: HIGHEST PED DEATHS IN 10 YRS, 9/10 OVER 55 YRS OLD
-> In Toronto Canada, 2016 was deadliest year for pedestrians in at least a decade—43 people were killed while walking. Almost 9 out of 10 of victims were over age 55. The city is taking action to specifically protect older pedestrians by creating "senior safety zones" that will feature measures like additional midblock crossings, lower speed limits, better lighting and signage, and longer pedestrian crossing times at signalized intersections. http://on.thestar.com/2ibciYf

VIDEO: SYSTEMATIC SAFETY: THE PRINCIPLES BEHIND VISION ZERO
-> Bicycle Dutch blogger Mark Wagenbuur reports he and Northeastern University professor Peter G. Furth created a succinct and clear 8-minute video to explain the concept of "Systematic Safety" based on Dutch transportation practices and outcomes. At its heart, systematically safety identifies and eliminates the opportunities that create high crash and injury risk. It recognizes human bodies are vulnerable and humans make mistakes. The video describes 5 systemic principles at the core of Vision Zero and provides examples of each in The Netherlands. Systematic Safety: The Principles Behind Vision Zero: http://bit.ly/2j0352l

PLANNERS: SPRAWL AS A HEALTH HAZARD
-> A recent Washington Post article notes planners in Maryland's Prince George's County are increasingly treating the county's low-density, auto-dependent design as more than a traffic problem: they're considering sprawl a health hazard. Nearly 70 percent of Prince George's adults are considered overweight or obese, and many areas of the county lack sidewalks or feel unsafe — whether from cars or crime — for walking, cycling or playing outside. A more health-oriented approach to urban planning is taking on new urgency across the United States as rates of child and adult obesity have soared, along with Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other weight-related illnesses. http://wapo.st/2hBijMa

SMALL TOWN AND RURAL MULTIMODAL NETWORKS GUIDE
-> Alta Planning + Design, the Federal Highway Administration, National Association of Counties, and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota released the guide to Small Town and Rural Multimodal Networks. This resource applies existing design standards in multiple, flexible ways to create roadway designs that support walking and biking in small and rural communities. It includes visualizations and flexible design guidance solutions and real world case studies for each treatment to demonstrate implementation and applicability. http://bit.ly/2ibeX47

NACTO RELEASES CITY DATA SHARING PRINCIPLES
-> The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) released a framework for data sharing by private mobility providers. Anonymized data including vehicle speed, volume, travel time, pick-up and drop-off information, among other crucial data points, will enable cities to make better data-driven planning and policy decisions, and redesign streets to meet modern needs. NACTO's data sharing standards set a path forward for better data for transportation planning, inclusion in mobility options and better tools for safety. http://bit.ly/2iaZXDz

PARIS, FRANCE: PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS - BIKE SHARE PART OF TRANSIT
-> A European Cyclists' Federation article reports on how predictive analytics make Velib', the Paris bike share, an integrated part of the public transport system. The integration of BikePredict API (Application Programmable Interface) makes Vélib' perform as public transport like the trains, Metro and buses. Travelers can use the STIF Vianavigo route calculator to choose a route that uses Vélib', and find a bike when going out on the street and a station to drop it near its destination. Read the description of how this system works: http://bit.ly/2ibXVDb

BELGIUM: MORE CYCLISTS GET PAID MORE FOR LONGER COMMUTES
-> Cycling Today reports more than 400,000 Belgians received €93 million (US$998.2 million) for using their bike to get to work. The incentive is a mileage allowance paid for by their companies, who can deduct it from their tax bill. Employees in turn can deduct the purchase and maintenance of their bicycles. In 2011 the annual average commute distance was 944 km (586.5 mi), last year it was 1,045 km (649 mi). Thus average mileage allowance has increased from €198 to €230 (US$209 to 243). http://bit.ly/2ic1UiY

UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS: NEW BIKE PED BRIDGE REMOVES BARRIER
-> Utrecht, The Netherlands opened a new piece of infrastructure for walking and cycling last month. The "Moreelsebrug" is a slender 295-metre-long bridge (968 feet) that allows people walking and cycling to cross the railroad. A bank headquartered next to the west landing was the driving force behind this bridge. In 2001, it donated 20 million Guilders (US$ 11.2 million) to the city to investigate and construct a bridge. The main objective for the bank was to give its employees a way to get to the historic Utrecht city centre east of the railway tracks 0n their lunch breaks. The total costs for the bridge were about 15 million euro (US$15.8 million). Bicycle Dutch provides a detailed history of the bridge design, photographs, videos, maps, and drawings. http://bit.ly/2j0Lszn

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