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BALTIMORE, MD: COMPLETE STREETS POLICY PROMOTES RACIAL EQUITY
-> Streetsblog USA reports Baltimore, MD's new complete streets policy promotes racial equity by making streets are safer for all users with design elements such as bike lanes, intersection bulb-outs, and narrower lanes. (Complete Streets Ordinance 17-0102: http://bit.ly/2DDQJd8) The new policy calls for the planning process to be more equitable. An accompanying guide recommended hiring community groups to lead the DOT planning process, making sure all meetings are at ADA-accessible locations, and ensuring sufficient translation services. The document also recommended using the "Jemez Principles for Democratic Organizing (http://bit.ly/2RQRVwR)," which seek to make sure marginalized voices are heard. The Complete Streets policy will require the city to evaluate the equity impacts of how projects are prioritized through a formal process called an equity gap analysis. http://bit.ly/2RUYLSc

NEW YORK, NY & OTHERS: DESIGNS UP LEFT TURN SAFETY
-> StreetsblogUSA reports cities are using design to improve safety at dangerous left turns, which account for about a quarter of pedestrian crashes. "Slow turn wedges," "hardened centerline," and other left-turn traffic calming treatments force drivers to slow down and follow the proper path while making left turns. New York City installed left-turn traffic calming infrastructure in more than 200 locations in 2016 and 2017. (See article for photos) NYC DOT reports median left turn speeds have decreased 19% at these intersections, and the number of vehicles crossing the double yellow lines while turning left has decreased 79%. http://bit.ly/2DyOic3

CHICAGO, IL METRO PLAN FOR WALKABLE COMMUNITIES
-> CMAP (Chicago, IL Metropolitan Agency for Planning) reports its ON TO 2050 recommendation to support development of compact, walkable communities builds on the idea that, in the future, more people will want to live in vibrant areas that offer easy access to amenities. The plan provides strategies about street and sidewalk adaptations, parking, safety, transit-supportive land use, and placemaking that can help communities in their region increase walkability for their residents. http://bit.ly/2RRY63E

BOULDER COUNTY, CO APPROVES E-BIKES ON TRAILS
-> The Daily Camera reports the Boulder County, CO commissioners approved a one-year pilot program to study the use of e-bikes on trails throughout Boulder County Open Space. There were plenty of people at Thursday night's meeting who were concerned that allowing e-bikes on county trails would compromise safety and overcrowd the already well-used trails, but after nearly 40 public comments, commissioners ultimately determined that the ability of e-bikes to reduce the number of vehicles on the roads and to allow the elderly or disabled to use the trails more efficiently was of larger consequence -- especially considering the low number of conflicts already and the fact that class 1 and 2 e-bikes top out at 20 mph, a rate of speed many traditional cyclists can hit under their own power. http://bit.ly/2DCUb7X

NJ DOT AVERTS LAPSE IN TAP FUNDS, OBLIGATES BIKE & PED PROJECTS
-> The League of American Bicyclists reports the New Jersey DOT recently announced the authorization of a record $23 million in federal Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funds to 31 bicycle and pedestrian projects across the state. This obligation of TAP funds enabled the agency to avoid a lapse of these federal dollars back to FHWA in federal fiscal year 2018. The state lost $6.2 million in TAP funds in the fall of 2017, one of only four states to lose these funds, and the highest among the four. The New Jersey Bike & Walk Coalition (NJBWC) advocated heavily for the state to take action to avoid an even bigger lapse in 2018, one that was projected to be $11.8 million. http://bit.ly/2RR4DMc

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY $9M PROJECT TO CUT SOV USE
-> Vanderbilt News reported MoveVU, Vanderbilt University's developing mobility strategy for faculty, staff and students, received a $4.5 million, three-year federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program grant, which the university will match. The $9 million total will fund an integrated approach to getting people out of single-occupant vehicles, including transportation demand management, shuttle operations, shuttle shelters, and establishing bike and scooter share stations, shelters and repair sheds. http://bit.ly/2DDmMd9

KANSAS CITY, MO: FREE ACCESS TO BIKE SHARE ADDED TO BUS PASS
-> WalkBikeKC reports transit users can now enjoy free access to Bike Share. A partnership of the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (RideKC) and BikeWalkKC's Bike Share KC program, the Bike + Bus Pass allows users to access both bike share and bus from a single pass card. Users who maintain a 31-day bus pass for $50/month can upgrade their membership to the Bike + Bus Pass for no additional cost, adding unlimited 60-minute bike share trips to their transit options. http://bit.ly/2RTm2nj

FOR MORE WALKABLE COMMUNITIES, ENLIST THE FIRE CHIEF
-> A Streetsblog USA excerpt from Jeff Speck's new book, "Walkable City Rules" (https://amzn.to/2DDbDJl), advises communities wanting to become more walkable to rewrite their fire chief's mandate to optimize public safety, not response times. Replace the 20-foot clear and minimum curb radii with more precise measures. Do not add or keep unwarranted signals in the name of preemption. Size new fire trucks to the community and not vice versa. Most cities have found themselves under the protection of fire chiefs who, when introduced to the planning conversation, advocate for three things that make their cities more dangerous: wider streets, broader intersections, and the introduction of unwarranted traffic signals. http://bit.ly/2DDIzSb

BOSTON, MA: BIKE LANE-WIDTH STREET SWEEPER
-> In a Tweet @jkwessel provides photographs showing a bike lane-width street sweeper clearing leaves off protected bike lanes. http://bit.ly/2DDQm2e

CHICAGO, IL DOT CREATES PARKLET PROTOTYPE
-> Next City reports parklets have had a "rocky history" in Chicago, IL, as the city has previously required local business improvement districts to pay for the spots, which can run in the tens of thousands of dollars. A new parklet, which Chicago is calling a "people spot," was designed by Chicago DOT and the agency promises to make the plans available for free to any community groups that want to build their own parklets. The modular and moveable "people spot" takes up two parking spaces and consists of seating, potted plants and a wooden fence. Community groups can disassemble a parklet for storage during Chicago's harsh winters or simply move it to a new space. http://bit.ly/2RNxm4k

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