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HOW MPOS BUILD MORE & BETTER BICYCLING & WALKING PROJECTS
-> Over the last 2 years, Transportation for America, in conjunction with the American Public Health Association, has worked with metropolitan planning organizations across the country to collect and document stories about how they are planning, funding and building more and better walking and bicycling projects in communities. They released a guide describing 8 strategies to allow more people to more easily walk, bicycle, or ride in a wheelchair. It includes examples from MPOs that have changed policies, developed plans, directed funding and designed projects. To register to download "Building Healthy and Prosperous Communities: How Metro Areas are Building More and Better Bicycling and Walking Projects" and for more details, watch the archived webinar that launched this new resource: http://bit.ly/2Axle3l

SMALL DECLINE IN CAR-FREE US HOUSEHOLDS, INCREASES IN SOME CITIES
-> Governing reports the latest Census Bureau estimates only 8.7% of US households reported not having any vehicles available last year, down slightly from a year ago and about the same as before the Great Recession. A stronger economy explains, in part, the small decline in car-free households. Demographics, fuel prices and where people live -- more Americans are migrating from cities to less dense suburbs -- also play a role in whether a household goes car-free. Still, many individual cities are seeing more of their residents forgo vehicle ownership. Several mid-sized cities recorded notable increases in shares of car-free households. See the opportunity to search by city the share of households without vehicles in 2009, 2010, 2015, and 2016 as well as by its 2015-16 average from American Community Survey data. http://bit.ly/2Bbtk1D

CALL FOR SUSPENDING PED TICKETS IN JACKSONVILLE, FL
-> ProPublica reports that local lawmakers and civil rights groups are calling for suspending all pedestrian ticket writing in Jacksonville, FL over concerns about targeted enforcement against African Americans. The calls from the civil rights organizations come two weeks after the Times-Union and ProPublica reported that a disproportionate number of the more than 2,200 pedestrian tickets issued from 2012 to 2017 had been given to blacks. Those tickets, issued for everything from jaywalking to walking on the wrong side of the road, can have an impact on people's driver's licenses and, if unpaid, their credit ratings. http://bit.ly/2ykLzvB

VISION ZERO CASE STUDIES: CHICAGO, IL & NEW YORK, NY
-> The Vision Zero Network reports when it comes to eliminating traffic fatalities and severe injuries, speed matters most. A recent article describes efforts in Chicago, IL and New York, NY to lower speeds using what they consider the trifecta of strategies: street design, lower speed limits, and automated speed enforcement. Traffic fatalities have declined for 3 consecutive years in New York since using these strategies, and are down 23% overall since the city committed to Vision Zero. http://bit.ly/2Axq9BA

VISION ZERO CHICAGO ACTION PLAN 2017-2019
-> Chicago released its Vision Zero Action Plan in June 2017, with speed management and speed prevention being key areas of focus. Included among the plan's many goals and strategies is the goal to reduce speed-related crashes 25% by 2020. According to city staff, speed was singled out among the dangerous driving behaviors because it causes the most deaths in Chicago. The city is working to achieve this goal by discouraging speeding and managing safe speeds through safe road design. "Vision Zero Chicago: Chicago's Initiative to Eliminated Traffic Fatalities and Serious Injuries by 2026: Action Plan 2017-2019" http://bit.ly/2AOZMnB

BIZ-LED DES MOINES, IA $33M STREET OVERHAUL
-> Streetsblog USA reports the City Council of Des Moines, IA recently unanimously approved one of the biggest downtown street transformations the US has seen in years, switching dozens of miles of downtown streets from one-way to two-way, improving hundreds of crosswalks, slowing auto traffic and creating a remarkably dense grid of protected, buffered, and conventional bike lanes. They are not proposing to rebuild streets, but will reallocate existing road space and take advantage of routine road, sewer and utility work already planned. The $33 million Connect Downtown plan is moving forward with the full-throated support of the Greater Des Moines Partnership, an eight-county business coalition that chipped in directly to help fund the planning process. The local business community sees the plan as good for attracting talent, boosting retail sales and improving public health and safety. The plan identifies short-, medium- and long-term projects between 2018 and 2023. http://bit.ly/2yUlHKJ

CLEVELAND, OH $14.4M IN BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE
-> Cleveland.com reports the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA) announced it would allocate federal transportation dollars to two that would create the first major protected bike lanes in the Cleveland, OH. NOACA allocated $8.3 million for construction planned in 2020 of the first leg of the Midway, which would eventually constitute a system of "bicycle highways" running down the center lanes of more than 50 miles of wide, underused streets that once carried streetcars. NOACA also allocated $6.1 million for the city's planned construction in 2022 of the proposed Lorain Avenue Cycle Track. http://bit.ly/2yimbXz

ELLENSBURG, WA: SMALL TOWN BUILDS BIKE BLVD
-> Streetsblog USA reports the college town of Ellensburg, WA, population 20,000, became one of the smallest cities in the country ever to construct a neighborhood bikeway, complete with five traffic diverters on larger streets to ease pedestrian crossings and reduce cut-through auto traffic. The new 1.7 mile route cost just $150,000 to plan, design, and install — one-tenth as much as the city was simultaneously spending to widen a single intersection for more auto traffic. Of that total, $120,000 came from a state grant earmarked for walking and biking. http://bit.ly/2AtDlat

NORMAN, OK: FIREFIGHTER BIKE EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM
-> News9 reports Norman, OK Firefighters are rolling out a faster way to respond to emergencies—especially in crowds. Recently the department deployed a new bicycle response team to monitor crowded events. The bicycle response team is a mini ambulance that can get there before an ambulance, and start pretreatment. The department bought eight new bikes to add to their response arsenal. The firefighters who ride them are EMT certified. Paired in two-person teams, they ride together to bring medical care straight to the patient. Each bicycle is equipped with medical supplies to treat everything from a scratch to a heart attack. http://bit.ly/2Az2lgm

NEW YORK, NY REDISTRIBUTES VEHICLE SPACE TO PEDS & BIKES
-> Car and Driver reports New York City recently conducted a months-long experiment on a single block along Broadway. NYC DOT redistributed pavement that was used exclusively for cars, allotting more space to bicyclists and pedestrians. They slashed the speed limit to 5 mph, added dedicated, protected bike lanes, and narrowed pedestrian crossing distances. The experiment was so successful that the changes are now permanent. The "shared street," near the iconic Flatiron Building, occupies a sliver of Broadway where it intersects Fifth Avenue, just west of Madison Square Park. http://bit.ly/2AlU7Z6

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK PROPOSES PEDS & BIKES SHARE DOWNTOWN SIDEWALK
-> NewsOK reports the release of a new rendering of a key section of proposed changes to Oklahoma City Boulevard in Oklahoma City, OK does not include a median or a clearly marked bike lane. Instead it shows bicyclists and pedestrians sharing wide sidewalks. Throughout the planning process, this section of the boulevard was promoted as a grand entrance into downtown that would be friendly for pedestrians and bicyclists, and would acknowledge its relationship to the new Scissortail Park, the new convention center, the Omni Hotel and as a corridor linking Bricktown, the Oklahoma River, downtown and Core to Shore. http://bit.ly/2AjvE6y

DAVIS-SACRAMENTO, CA AREA TO LAUNCH LARGEST E-BIKE BIKE SHARE
-> Next City reports Davis, Sacramento and the city of West Sacramento are launching an all electric bike bike-share system on May 15, 2018. The Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG), and cities of Davis, Sacramento and West Sacramento have been working with private bike-share company Social Bicycles (SoBi) to plan the system. SoBi will finance, own and operate the system when it launches. By the summer, its 900 electric, pedal-assist bikes will make this multi-city system the largest e-bike bike-share scheme in the country. http://bit.ly/2At7KWi

CA CONSIDERS PER MILE FEE IN LIEU OF GAS TAX
-> The Sacramento Bee reports weeks into a new gas tax hike, California transportation officials said they are studying ways to charge drivers based on how many miles they drove since their last fill-up rather than the amount of fuel they use. California drivers are choosing such fuel-efficient cars that the state fears it will be deprived of enough road construction revenues in the long run. A Caltrans study – the "California Road Charge Pilot Program 2017 Summary Report" (http://bit.ly/2AvgLOP) – describes a way for the state to move from its longstanding but outmoded pump tax to a system where drivers pay based on their odometer readings. http://bit.ly/2AuEnTF

65 NEW & RENEWING BICYCLE FRIENDLY COMMUNITIES
-> The League of American Bicyclists welcomed 65 new and renewing Bicycle Friendly Communities (BFC). There are now 430 BFCs in all 50 states. http://bit.ly/2AxCTYK The next BFC deadline is February 13, 2018 by 11:59pm PT. http://bit.ly/1uGVzL1

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