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NEW YORK, NY CONSIDERS PRIORITIZING PEDS, CYCLISTS & TRANSIT USERS
-> Gotham Gazette reported New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson has spoken out about "breaking car culture," or prioritizing pedestrians, cyclists, and mass transit in public policy rather than private automobiles. Breaking the car culture is at the center of Johnson's proposed "master plan for city streets" (http://bit.ly/2XzugDR), new legislation that would require the city Department of Transportation (DOT) to improve pedestrian and cyclist access and safety by establishing benchmarks. The plan would also, in five-year increments, aggressively build out a network of bike lanes, bus lanes, and pedestrian plazas that would almost certainly transform the city. By 2024, the master plan would institute a connected bike network across the city, install many miles of protected bus lanes, install accessible pedestrian signals at all intersections with a pedestrian signal, redesign all intersections with a pedestrian signal according to a checklist of street design elements designed to enhance safety, and complete all these improvements within the standards for accessible design held by the Americans with Disabilities Act. http://bit.ly/2XwnHSh

NEW YORK, NY RESPONSE TO 15 CYCLISTS' DEATHS: THREE WEEKS OF ENFORCEMENT
-> Jalopnik reported a shocking rise in the number of pedestrians and cyclists dying on New York City streets. Lax traffic enforcement has helped contribute to a wave of cyclists being hit by cars-15 people have been killed while riding bikes so far this year. In response, the New York City Police Department has announced it will more strongly enforce some traffic laws, for three weeks. This is not a plan to stop cyclists from dying. It is, in fact, an explanation for why it keeps happening. This enforcement blitz begs the question: what happens when the three weeks are up? This response is a grand experiment in what happens when traffic laws aren't adhered to, least of all respected. http://bit.ly/2XFohgL

OP-ED: COMMUNITIES OF COLOR NEED PROTECTED LANES, TOO!
-> An op-ed published by Streetsblog NYC noted that the installation of protected bike lanes in New York City has been heavily skewed towards certain (wealthier) neighborhoods in Manhattan. The bike-infrastructure inequities among neighborhoods are hard to square with Mayor de Blasio's stated goal of knitting together the "two cities" of New York. Some may argue that it's impossible to upgrade the city's many bike lanes to protected ones. Not true: While it does take designers and funds, it is political will above all that is needed. A side-by-side comparison of the 2009 and 2019 bike maps show that the city has constructed many protected lanes in Manhattan, but not many in the outer boroughs-and especially not in poorer neighborhoods. http://bit.ly/2JlpA0e

WI GOVERNOR SIGNS SCOOTER LAW
-> Urban Milwaukee reported Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers signed legislation legalizing scooters. (Senate Bill 152: http://bit.ly/2Jnb5Jg) The bill, which goes into effect today, clears up ambiguity about the legal status of electric scooters, reduces the need for single-occupancy automobiles, and grants municipalities the ability to regulate safety and access. Municipalities can now regulate the size of dockless scooter fleets, areas in which they may operate, and whether users can ride on the sidewalk. The law authorizes scooters to go up to 15 miles per hour on city streets. See the article for details about this law and its impact on Milwaukee. As many as six scooter companies could soon be deploying hundreds of scooters each on their streets. http://bit.ly/2JmR3yO

LORAIN, OH PUBLIC LIBRARY LAUNCHES FREE BIKE SHARE
-> The Lorain, OH Public Library System launched its bike share program in May in collaboration with Lorain County Public Health (LCPH), the Lorain County Metro Parks, and the Lorain County Community Action Agency. People can use a library card to check out one of the adult bikes available, courtesy of the Lorain Police Department. Helmets and locks are also free and can be checked out without a bike. The bikes are available for checkout when the library opens and must be returned before closing. The National Safety Council's Road to Zero initiative awarded LCPH a one-year $69,976 Safe Systems Innovation Grant, a portion of which funds the Go Lorain Bike Share, bike racks throughout town, bike maintenance supplies, educational materials, baskets, bike lights, locks, advertising, and bike maps. http://bit.ly/2JnyMS4

Bicycling magazine reported Go Lorain is part of a growing trend in which libraries are getting involved in bike share programs. See links to: Georgetown Public Library, TX; Bethlehem Public Library, PA; Kent District Library, MI and U Mass Library. http://bit.ly/2Jo6mr5

MADISON, WI LAUNCHES ALL E-BIKE BIKE SHARE
-> Wisconsin Bike Fed reported Madison BCycle (http://bit.ly/32g2Y8T) launched the first all-electric citywide bikeshare program in the country June 18. Trek Bicycle and the City of Madison partnered in creating the bikeshare program. In her remarks at the official launch, the Mayor of Madison also called on all involved to ensure that the benefits of bike share systems, bike infrastructure, and other transportation investments benefit everyone in the community, including those without smartphones, bank accounts, or drivers licenses. In Wisconsin, current state law doesn't recognize modern electric bicycles, leaving them in a regulatory gray area. The Wisconsin Bike Fed is leading the stakeholder organizations working with state government to pass an "e-bike bill," (Senate Bill 129 / Assembly 132: http://bit.ly/2NHQOlV), which defines e-bikes as a new type of vehicle and regulates them like other bicycles. http://bit.ly/32fryH5

PITTSBURGH, PA: DENSITY, POPULATION & HILLS AFFECT CYCLING RATES
-> BikePGH reported when it comes to biking, there are a lot of factors that impact where people in Pittsburgh ride and why. The Green Building Alliance's Make My Trip Count survey found bicycling is on the increase in Pittsburgh, though different neighborhoods experience this growth in different ways. BikePGH took a deeper look into the data, considering neighborhood population, density, and elevation. http://bit.ly/2JsgjSQ

CHICAGO, IL CALLS FOR CONGESTION PRICING, MORE ACTIVE TRANSPO $
-> Smart Cities Dive reported a group of transportation companies and advocates sent a letter to Chicago's new mayor suggesting the adoption of transportation policies that could reduce congestion and pollution while increasing locals' economic and social mobility. Two points they requested the mayor consider are congestion pricing and dedicated funding to improve sustainable modes of transportation including walking, biking, and public transit, while embracing innovations such as micro-transit. http://bit.ly/2XC9JhU

NAPLES, FL: 70 MI + PARADISE COAST TRAIL
-> Naples, FL Pathways Coalition announced the Paradise Coast Trail it envisions to be a premier, 70+ mile trail built exclusively for safe and enjoyable walking, running, and biking. Connecting Naples, Ave Maria, Immokalee and many other areas within and beyond Collier County, it will expand transportation options, improve health and wellness, reduce carbon footprints, and provide a destination to experience the Paradise Coast's unique beauty. They have partnered with Rails to Trails Conservancy and hired a consulting firm to help bring this vision to reality. Recently the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization voted in support of a resolution endorsing the project. They are now seeking donations to fund the feasibility study to fast-track the trail's development and not wait on the typical five-year improvement project time frame. http://bit.ly/2XvIWUo