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CHICAGO, IL: ADDING 175 BIKE SHARE STATIONS, 16,500 E-BIKES
-> The FHWA Fostering Multimodal Connectivity Newsletter reported that the Chicago, IL City Council approved $127 million to modernize and expand Divvy, its bike share system, with an additional 10,500 bikes and 175 stations for a total of approximately 16,500 bikes and 800 stations. (http://bit.ly/2BX5zIM) All of the new bikes will be electric pedal-assist bikes and have hybrid locking capabilities. Lyft will invest $50 million in this new capital and service area expansion and will pay the city an additional $77 million in direct revenue. The city will use the direct revenue to support the Vision Zero Chicago traffic safety program and related transportation improvements, including new bike lanes, pedestrian safety enhancements, and other traffic safety projects. http://bit.ly/34gnXJ8

BAY AREA, CA ADAPTIVE BIKE SHARE PILOT
-> Next City reported on a 6-month pilot for adaptive bike-share this summer, beginning in Oakland and expanding to Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, CA. The Bay Area is one of a handful of US cities testing or fine-tuning adaptive bike-share considering how best to integrate it into the traditional one-way bike-share model. The Metropolitan Transportation Commission, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, Oakland Department of Transportation, Lyft (who operates Bay Area Bike Share) and nonprofit accessible sports and recreation provider Bay Area Outreach and Recreation Program partnered for the summer pilot. The nonprofit runs an adaptive cycling center out of Berkeley. Its staff assists users, identifies which bike model is appropriate, can transfer users from their mobility device, and care for their belongings. http://bit.ly/34o5xGr

CHICAGO, IL: CONDUCTING E-SCOOTER VIABILITY STUDY
-> The FHWA Fostering Multimodal Connectivity Newsletter also reported that Chicago, IL issued permits to 10 e-scooter companies and has been conducting a 4-month test of the viability of e-scooters as a new mobility option. (http://bit.ly/2MWNj8Z) Permits were limited to specific areas to provide more options for people to get around in an area that is less-served by transit, and to test e-scooters in communities with differing densities, different types and numbers of destinations, and other variables. The permits included rigorous requirements to promote safety and to keep the public right of way clear of obstructions. Vendors are providing the city with real-time data on operations, ridership, and safety using both the Mobility Data Specification (MDS) and General Bikeshare Feed Specification (GBFS). http://bit.ly/34gnXJ8

NEW YORK CITY GREEN WAVE OF LIGHTS FOR CYCLISTS
-> The New York Times reported the death toll in New York City has continued to rise even as city officials have sought to make streets safer by redesigning intersections and building more protected bike lanes to separate cyclists from vehicles. Twenty-five cyclists have been killed so far this year--15 more than in all of 2018, and the highest toll in two decades. Now New York is going even further to re-engineer streets that were once dominated by cars and for the first time adjusting traffic signals to give bikes the priority for green lights. Cyclists who travel, on average, 10 to 15 miles per hour on streets where the speed limit is typically up to 25 mph will catch a wave of green lights and glide through intersections without having to stop. Drivers who go faster than 15 mph will hit red lights. https://nyti.ms/2pfPlYS

MEMPHIS, TN DEADLIEST PLACE FOR PEOPLE WALKING
-> StreetsblogUSA reported Memphis, TN is the deadliest place for pedestrians, thanks to its high-speed roads, lack of walkable infrastructure, and preponderance of distracted drivers. Its pedestrian fatality rate of 4 deaths per 100,000 people was the highest among the nation's largest metropolitan regions, according to data from NHTSA. The number of pedestrians killed in the Memphis metropolitan area, which includes Shelby county and parts of Mississippi and Arkansas, rose 64% between 2014 and 2018. City officials said its deadly crashes are concentrated in neighborhoods where people can't afford a car and rely on walking, cycling, and transit to get around. http://bit.ly/2pnXIBq

SANTA CLARA, CA AREA INCREASES EQUITY IN BIKE/PED FUNDING
-> The Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition e-Bulletin reported the VTA (Santa Clara, CA Valley Transportation Authority) board voted 8-4 to increase the importance of serving oppressed communities when it allocates 2016 Measure B bike/ped capital program funding. This is a big win for equity in Silicon Valley! The exact vote the VTA board took "increased Criterion #9 to 10 points and increased the total program points to 125." Criterion #9 gives points to projects, which served oppressed communities. This increased the potential points that bike/ped projects could earn by servicing oppressed areas in the county from 4% to 8% of the total points available. Originally, this criterion was proposed for only 5 points and then it was in danger of being eliminated altogether. The 2 main reasons they wanted this outcome are there has been less infrastructure investment in these areas in the past; and it is more important to have improved infrastructure in poorer areas because more people there rely on walking and biking to get around. http://bit.ly/2PBkOQ1

BOULDER, CO APPROVES SENIOR HOUSING W/O NO TENANT PARKING
-> The Daily Camera reported that the Boulder, CO Planning Board unanimously approved a senior care project where tenant-owned cars will be prohibited from parking. The redevelopment will include 106 permanently affordable units. Residents will be able to use a facility shuttle van service for transportation, and can use one of 9 electric vehicles that will be parked on site as part of its car-sharing program. There will be parking spots dedicated to the on-site restaurant, a portion of which will be open to the public, 10 for restaurant employees and 25 for visitors; 10 spaces for family visitors of residents; and 15 spaces for employees of the residential care component development. http://bit.ly/2N1vTH7