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CHICAGO, IL: MOST BIKE TICKETS WRITTEN IN BLACK COMMUNITIES
-> The Chicago Tribune reports as Chicago police ramp up their ticketing of bicyclists, more than twice as many are being written in African-American communities than in white or Latino areas. The most common cyclist citation citywide was riding on the sidewalk. Protected bike lanes are missing from many African-American and Latino neighborhoods. http://trib.in/2mBruLz

[See Research section for 4-part series on the Silent Barriers to Bicycling for Blacks and Latinos.]

TEMPE, AZ: JAYWALKING CRACKDOWN SEEN AS "TAX ON POOR PEOPLE"
-> The New Phoenix Times reports a recent crackdown on jaywalking in Tempe, AZ is a "tax on poor people" and cites the experience of one pedestrian who received a $206 ticket, which is more than half what she pays in rent per month. The Tempe Police Department disagrees, saying it was part of a campaign designed to raise awareness about traffic safety in high-density areas in the city that bike, pedestrian and light rail commuters are using. This was an effort to bring awareness and ultimately reduce the number of pedestrian/bicycle collisions in these high-density areas." http://bit.ly/2nQw62h

CHICAGO, IL UPS TICKETS TO DRIVERS BLOCKING BIKE LANES
-> The Chicago Tribune reports this year, the City of Chicago is stepping up its enforcement efforts to deter motorists from blocking bike lanes by adding bike routes to the daily patrol maps for parking enforcement aides. The City is examining complaints to better send aides to where the issue persists. A city ordinance prohibits driving, standing or parking on bicycle paths or lanes and carries a ticket fine of $150. So far this year, the city has issued 440 tickets for violating the ordinance, according to the city's Department of Finance. In 2016, the city wrote 2,766 tickets, slightly lower than the 2,816 citations issued in 2015. http://trib.in/2nJ9tQs

PENNDOT: $70.1 M BIKING IMPROVEMENTS FOR 150 MI OF ROUTE 6
-> As part of its effort to improve bicycle safety, accessibility, and connectivity along Route 6, PennDOT released a report outlining enhancements for the route's 150 miles from the Ohio border to the McKean/Potter county line, as well as Route 6N in Erie County. (Pennsylvania Route 6 Bicycle Master Plan Design Guide, Section 1: Ohio/Pennsylvania Border to McKean/Potter County Line: http://bit.ly/2nQGoj4) The report estimates a $70.1 million cost, more than half of which is for bridge replacements, and an additional $5.9 million for enhancements to Route 6N. PennDOT plans two additional reports that will identify strategies and recommendations for the remaining sections of Route 6 in the state. http://bit.ly/2nQGGqa

MN: ECONOMIC IMPACT OF BIKE INDUSTRY & EVENTS
-> According to the CTS Catalyst, the University of Minnesota found the bicycling industry in Minnesota, including manufacturing, wholesaling, retail sales, and non-profits and advocacy groups, produced an estimated total of $780 million of economic activity in 2014. (Assessing the Economic Impact and Health Effects of Bicycling in Minnesota: http://bit.ly/2mkWTlQ) This includes 5,519 jobs and $209 million in annual labor income (wages, salaries, and benefits) paid to Minnesota workers. http://bit.ly/2n4FHW9

SOUTH MEMPHIS, TN: BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE TO RECONNECT CITY
-> Streetsblog reports South Memphis, TN is planning one of the country's first connected networks of all-ages bikeways. (http://memne.ws/2nQw6Q3) Part of the city's goal is to better connect South Memphis, the south side of downtown, and nearby amenities like Riverside Park and the new Big River Crossing to Arkansas with a series of bike-lane investments. When Memphis repaves a street there's often space to fit bike lanes simply by narrowing existing travel lanes. A conventional bike lane added this way costs just $2,000 per lane-mile, and a post-protected bike lane $6,000. http://bit.ly/2nQxW35

PHILADELPHIA, PA VISION ZERO DRAFT ACTION PLAN & MORE
-> The Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia reports that less than a week after its Vision Zero 2017 Conference on March 1, the City of Philadelphia released its Vision Zero Draft Action (http://bit.ly/2neXvxr), Mayor Jim Kenney also pushed to increase the city's paving budget beginning in Fiscal Year 2017, and a Councilman unveiled a new Safe Streets bill (http://bit.ly/2nf46YZ) to require changes to intersections where deadly crashes take place. At the conference Philadelphia's Bike/Ped Coordinator announced plans for a Chestnut Street protected bike lane (http://bit.ly/2nf1om2). http://bit.ly/2nf4MgR

BOSTON, MA PLANS TO BE AMERICA'S MOST WALKABLE CITY BY 2030
-> MassLive reports the City of Boston announced it plans to become the most walkable city in America by 2030. The city's Transportation Department unveiled its plans to improve transportation and housing in Boston. (Go Boston 2030 Vision Framework Draft for Public Review: http://bit.ly/2nQN9l0) About 14.5% of commuters walk to work currently, far less than the 40.6 percent who drive themselves. By 2030, the city would like to see the percentage of people walking to work up by almost 50 percent and the percent of those who drive down by half. One strategy is to provide a rail or bus stop within a 10-minute walk of every home in Boston. http://bit.ly/2n7zpSl

WICHITA, KS UPDATE: GUERRILLA PLUNGERS NET PERMANENT POSTS
-> Streetsblog provides an update: Two weeks after two rows of toilet plungers set up to temporarily protect a Wichita bike lane went viral (http://bit.ly/2lKuckV), the city of Wichita, KS decided that come to think of it, those plungers were making a pretty good point. Kansas's largest city spent about $1,000 to order and install permanent flexposts along 100 feet of the bike lane that had often been encroached on by people using the space as an illegal turn lane for their cars. http://bit.ly/2nQqvZY

PORTLAND, OR ANACHIST VIGILANTES MEND POTHOLES
-> CityLab reports a small circle of friends created Portland, OR Anarchist Road Care in February as a response to deteriorating road conditions, which they believe make driving and cycling less safe (as well as a financial burden to owners of damaged vehicles). Whereas the planet's other pothole vigilantes rely on mostly passive approaches to draw attention to holes—painting male genitalia around them in the U.K., making them tweet the government when run over in Panama—Portland's avengers take direct action, using a temporary but well-established mending technique called cold patching. They have patched holes on three city blocks and remain in a "constant state" of awareness to find other craters to fill. Needless to say, they have yet to consult the municipality for any of these activities. http://bit.ly/2nRcICc

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