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CHARLOTTE, NC FULLY FUNDS $4M BIKE LANE EXPANSION PLAN
-> Next City reports the citywide bike plan that the Charlotte, NC City Council approved last year represented a careful balance between what advocates expected was a realistic investment and what they wanted to accomplish in terms of impact on the street level. (Charlotte BIKES: http://bit.ly/2NI9cHA) The $4 million allocation is part of the city's 2018 Transportation Bond, which goes before voters in November. Despite the work that went into it, getting the plan through the budget process unharmed was never a sure thing. In June the city council approved an annual budget with the full $4 million. The $4 million allocation is part of the city's 2018 Transportation Bond, which goes before voters in November. http://bit.ly/2Lb3Cvi

DETROIT (MI) GREENWAYS COALITION RESPONDS TO ANTI-CYCLING OP-ED
-> The Detroit (MI) Greenways Coalition noted that recently there have been prominent editorials and comments about the loss of "our culture" because of changes in road safety and accessibility, including an Op-Ed piece by Keith Crain of the Crain media family. (http://bit.ly/2L9A69k) Their thoughtful response describes efforts in Detroit to balance the needs of everyone who uses and pays for public roads. In brief they refute common refrains and misconceptions, along with clarifications to educate those unwilling to recognize the importance of these changes or even to have the patience to accept the improvements that come over time. http://bit.ly/1WyRSkv

CO DOT & GOLDEN, CO LIDS US 6 SEPARATES TRAFFIC & RECONNECTS NEIGHBORHOODS
-> FHWA reported the CO DOT and the city of Golden partnered on the Linking Lookout project (http://bit.ly/2NFVBAl), an example of using community connections approaches to improve safety and connectivity. The project replaced a signalized intersection with an interchange at US 6 and 19th Street. It also constructed Colorado's first highway "lid" over US 6 to separate pedestrian and bicycle traffic from vehicle traffic. The lid includes landscaping, trails, and park amenities to connect neighborhoods west of US 6 with the city on the east side. The new lower alignment of US 6 and low-speed design of 19th Street minimize traffic noise in nearby neighborhoods.

HI ENACTS 3-FOOT SEPARATION LAW
-> In signing Act 47 (HB 2215: http://bit.ly/2m9NWgY) to require drivers to allow at least 3 feet of separation when overtaking cyclists, Hawaii Governor David Ige said, "The passage of this bill highlights our commitment to ensuring that cyclists are safe on our roads, and that Hawai'i becomes a more bicycle friendly community. I am happy to sign this bill and make Hawai'i the 37th state in the nation to make this commitment." http://bit.ly/2zuPGLy

SW VA TRAILS & ECONOMIC GROWTH
-> A Daily Yonder article reports in SW VA, trails are key infrastructural components of the nearly $1 billion annual tourist economy. They link unincorporated communities, small towns and cities, and natural wonders into networks of local economic growth organized around outdoor tourism. The regional trail economy has played an integral role in the process of economic recovery. The town of Damascus generates $450,000-500,000 annually from the 34-mile long Virginia Creeper Trail. A Virginia Tech study estimated that the 57-mile New River Trail accounted for 2% ($238,279) of the 2010 total tax revenue in the town of Galax. (Building Connectivity through Recreation Trails: A Closer Look at New River Trail State Park and the Virginia Creeper Trail: http://bit.ly/2u7bism) In 2017, nearly 1.2 million riders used the trail. And, according to another Virginia Tech report, New River Trail visitors spent over $31 million last year. (Virginia State Parks Economic Impact Report 2017: http://bit.ly/2u8GyH9) http://bit.ly/2u87sPy

NEW YORK CITY: CENTRAL PARK PERMANENTLY CAR-FREE
-> Smart Cities Dive reports New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio led officials from his administration on a bike ride Tuesday through Central Park to commemorate the last car driving through. The park went permanently car-free at 7 p.m. on June 26. The move is intended to reduce air pollution and improve safety in the park, where more than 42 million people visit each year for exercise or leisure. The transverse roadways at 65th, 79th, 86th and 97th Streets will not be affected, as they were built into the park's original design. http://bit.ly/2NHs49j

BLIND PEDESTRIANS SUE NEW YORK CITY TO IMPROVE CROSSING SAFETY
-> The New York Times reports pedestrian have filed a lawsuit alleging that the City of New York is violating the rights of the visually impaired by failing to update most of the city's crosswalks with accessible pedestrian signals that use vibrating surfaces, noises and other vocal cues as a safety guide. New York City maintains thousands of traffic signals, but only 317 are equipped with accessible pedestrian signals, and the city has been adding only about 75 each year. Since 2000, the city has replaced most of its traffic signals at least once, according to the plaintiffs' complaint. Unlike New York, some large cities like San Antonio, Seattle and Los Angeles have policies that require accessible pedestrian signals to be installed when new signals are put up and when old signals are replaced. https://nyti.ms/2L3zpyj

20 THINGS CITIES CAN DO TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE
-> Curbed reports a new set of recommendations for the public realm has been published by the Center for Active Design (CfAD)—a nonprofit that promotes design solutions for improving public health—and the Knight Foundation. (Assembly Civic Design Guidelines: http://bit.ly/2uhS5TU) These recommendations might seem like old hat: plant trees, improve public transit, build more bike lanes. However, the report positions them as means to a robust public life, which the organization defines as inspiring greater trust, participation, stewardship, and informed local voting. Plus, it has years of original research to back up the suggestions. See the full article for 20 things cities can do to improve quality of life and help strengthen the bonds between residents. http://bit.ly/2zvivHE

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