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COURT: BAD STREET DESIGN LIABLE IN NYC CRASH
-> Curbed reports transportation experts agree that poor street design—and the driver behavior it enables—is responsible for many of the U.S.'s astronomically high number of traffic deaths. Now, in a landmark case, the New York State Court of Appeals has found New York City's street design liable for a 2004 crash that left a 12-year old boy riding a bike with multiple skull fractures and reduced mental and physical capacities. The city's leaders had been advised multiple times before the crash that the stretch of street was particularly dangerous. The court ruled, "an unjustifiable delay in implementing a remedial plan constitutes a breach of the municipality's duty to the public." The city was found 40 percent liable, and ordered to pay $19 million of the $20 million settlement to the boy. The city narrowed the street from four lanes to three by repainting the medians. However, from 2007 to 2016, the same street saw a shocking four fatalities, including the death of a 17-year-old cyclist. Late last year—almost 12 years after the 12-year old boy's crash—New York City's Department of Transportation finally announced major design changes to the street. http://bit.ly/2j03bXP

JUMP IN STATES TRANSFERRING TAP FUNDS TO ROADS & BRIDGES
-> The Safe Routes to School National Partnership released their most recent quarterly "State of the States" report tracking Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funding transfers through September 2016 (http://bit.ly/2j0HeYo). It shows a jump in the amount and number of states that transferred TAP funding away from biking, walking, and Safe Routes to School and into roads and bridges. Plus, 12 states transferred funds for the first time. Congress allows state DOTs to transfer up to half of their TAP funds to other transportation priorities. SRTSNP urges advocates to ask their DOT to reverse these transfers. Check out details of the $109 million state DOTs transferred out of TAP between July and September 2016. http://bit.ly/2j0HeaQ

SAN ANTONIO, TX - 40% INCREASE IN PED DEATHS
-> According to KSAT-TV, 65 people died while walking in San Antonio, TX in 2016—a 40% increase over 2015. This spike is hitting as the city's new Vision Zero program (http://bit.ly/2j0wqcJ) finishes initial projects to lower pedestrian deaths. To people who live near "pedestrian problem spots," it makes sense why some people take risks: missing sidewalks, a lack of crosswalks. The city installed several "Z" crossings, which allow pedestrians to cross mid-street. They give drivers heavy warning with signs and lights. With millions of dollars expected from the 2017 bond, every district in the city has been allocated money for pedestrian mobility projects. http://bit.ly/2j0CphS

SMART CITY CHALLENGE RESOURCES & TOOLS
-> A little over one year ago, USDOT launched their Smart City Challenge, asking mid-sized cities across America to share their ideas for the creation of an integrated, first-of-its-kind smart transportation system using data, applications, and technology to help people and goods move faster, cheaper, and more efficiently. Over 75 cities competed for the resources to connect and deploy new technologies, and now those applications and a wealth of data is available to the public in a new comprehensive report, "Smart City Challenge: Lessons for Building Cities of the Future" (http://bit.ly/2ibyDVx). New Smart City web tools (http://bit.ly/2ibuHEw), including an interactive map that links to information in the cities' applications.

NASHVILLE, TN: TEENS MAP ROUTES, IDENTIFY MOBILITY OPTIONS
-> To make the case for better neighborhood mobility, a class of middle and high school students in Nashville, TN mapped their movements around North Nashville, tracking the spaces they visited most and the barriers that kept them from getting around, such as the lack of crosswalks and paths. They developed suggestions for connecting North Nashville to the rest of the city, eventually sharing their findings with urban planners. After meeting with the class, city planners incorporated a new bicycle lane along Rosa L. Parks Boulevard. Although the lane stretched only 2 miles, it created a bicycle route across the interstate, connecting North Nashville to downtown. http://bit.ly/2j0DBBT

NASHVILLE, TN: HISTORY OF SIDEWALKS & CONTINUED GAPS
-> As Nashville, TN, like countless other cities across the US, has huge gaps in its sidewalk system and not enough money allocated to fill them. CityLab reports on the history of sidewalk purpose, policy, perception, and levels of political will to pay for them in Nashville beginning in the mid-19th century. http://bit.ly/2j0zzJG

MD DOT: INCREASING CYCLIST SAFETY ON HIGH-SPEED ROADWAYS
-> A Maryland DOT study investigated bicycle infrastructure design options and treatments to facilitate safe accommodation of bicyclists on high-speed roadways. They studied a design called "rumble-buffered" bike lane as a means to help mitigate the inherent hazards to bicyclists associated with limited separation from motor vehicles where separated facilities are not feasible. http://bit.ly/2iZ02HC

BUFFALO, NY: DROPS PARKING MINIMUMS
-> As part of a six-year-long initiative called the Buffalo Green Code (http://bit.ly/2ib7emZ), or the Unified Development Ordinance, Buffalo, New York, has become the first major city to completely remove outdated minimum parking requirements. Projects above 5,000 square feet will require parking analysis that factors in alternative transportation options in the area. The new code also follows form-based zoning, emphasizing the relationship between public space and buildings. http://bit.ly/2ib7hiF

SRTS: PESTICIDE SPRAYING & NOTICE NEAR CA SCHOOLS & DAY CARES
-> In California Safe Routes to School National Partnership reports they partnered with the Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability to ask that the Department of Pesticide Regulation amend their policy around notifying schools and day care centers about pesticide spraying (http://bit.ly/2j0xVaR). The current policy would only require notification for spraying within a quarter-mile buffer zone during school hours; we asked that it be expanded to a mile and for additional hours to better protect children walking and biking to and from school and after-school events. http://bit.ly/2j0DYwg

EVERY BODY WALK! AWARDS MICRO GRANTS
-> America Walks and the Every Body Walk! Collaborative announced the second round of 22 Every Body Walk! Micro Grant awardees. The micro grant program provides funds that support grassroots efforts aimed at getting communities walking and creating more safe, accessible and enjoyable places to walk and be physically active. Read the descriptions of these projects that employ art, signage, social support, environmental design and other innovative means to encourage all people to walk more and engage in creating safe, accessible delightful walkable places. http://bit.ly/2iMvw38

TRANSFORMING UGLY URBAN UNDERPASSES TO PUBLIC PARKS
-> Curbed reports many cities are turning transit underpasses into public parks, replacing trash, overgrown weeds, and dark passageways with art installations, funky lights, and pedestrian thoroughfares. Check out 7 creative examples that have been transformed, are still under construction or in the process of becoming public parks. http://bit.ly/2j05jyN

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