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FL SUPREME COURT UPHOLDS RED-LIGHT CAMERA LEGISLATION
-> Streetsblog USA reports in a unanimous decision earlier this month, the Florida Supreme Court upheld legislation known as the "Mark Wandall Traffic Safety Act," allowing Florida municipalities to continue to use cameras to ticket motorists who run red lights. A 2016 Florida appeals court ruling in favor of a motorist who challenged a ticket led municipalities across the state to suspend their camera programs. But the Supreme Court's reversal should settle the matter. More than 5,000 pedestrians were killed in Florida between 2005 and 2014. An Insurance Institute for Highway Safety study of 117 cities, a number of them in Florida, found that those with camera programs have 21% fewer fatal red-light-running crashes. http://bit.ly/2rJdrcf

DETROIT, MI: TO CUT 2 OUT OF 7 LANES TO IMPROVE SAFETY
-> Smart Cities Dive reports Detroit is embarking on a $1 million project to cut 2 lanes of the 7-lane East Jefferson Avenue thoroughfare. The avenue was notoriously difficult for residents to cross; the redesign will shorten the distance across the lanes. The project will also prioritize safety and add better infrastructure for pedestrians and transit riders, including marked bus stops, pedestrian crossings, lower speed limit signs and bollards. Detroit has stepped up in recent years to expand beyond its car-centric culture and make things safer for non-drivers (the city had the highest annual pedestrian fatality rate). Last fall the Mayor announced plans to invest $125 million in bonds for road and sidewalk repair, making business districts more pedestrian friendly. Detroit is not one of the cities in the Vision Zero network. http://bit.ly/2rJRHNE

PORTLAND, OR $113M SIDEWALK RAMP SETTLEMENT
-> The Oregonian reports Portland, OR is preparing to settle a class action legal dispute with mobility-disabled residents by agreeing to upgrade more than 16,000 sidewalk ramps at a cost of $113 million over the next 12 years. City officials reached the tentative agreement after 3 wheelchair or scooter users complained the city wasn't complying with the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. As part of the settlement, the city will also survey every street corner for compliance, install proper sidewalk cutouts when constructing new roads and walkways and appoint a technical adviser to oversee the work. http://bit.ly/2L2VOfu

BAY AREA, CA BRIDGE TESTS 24-HR BIKE/PED PATH ACCESS
-> The San Francisco Chronicle reports for 10 days in May, bicyclists and pedestrians will be able to take a midnight ride or walk across the east span of the Bay Bridge. (A bike lane is yet be added to the west span of the Bay Bridge to allow bicyclists and pedestrians to travel all the way between San Francisco and the East Bay.) The span's 2.2-mile bike and pedestrian path travels from Oakland to Yerba Buena Island and is now closed between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. During the pilot, it is open for 24 hours until 9 p.m. on May 19. The all-night hours are intended to test what will be needed to make 24-hour operation permanent. While the bike path officially opened in September 2013, a few days after the first cars crossed the new east span, it has been available to bike riders and walkers only during limited hours. http://bit.ly/2GjBIKB

MACON, GA: POP UP PILOT LEADS TO PERMANENT PROTECTED LANES
-> A Tools of Change case study reports a temporary network of cycling lanes convinced the community of Macon GA to create permanent protected lanes. One-block sections of street that had previously been made more bike-friendly had not been used much and there was concern that not enough people would actually cycle. The pilot created the largest pop-up bike lane network in the world and tested five alternative kinds of bike infrastructure, from sharrows to more buffered lanes and protected cycle racks with bollards. http://bit.ly/2GnRPqq

DENVER, CO: SCHOOLPOOL HELPS PLAN POOLED SCHOOL COMMUTES
-> A Tools for Change case study describes Schoolpool, a dynamic program that gets students to and from school in a safer, more social and environmentally sustainable fashion, using carpools, transit and finding buddies for walking and cycling. Parents and guardians can locate nearby families or search for them along their child's route to school. The program serves 150 campuses in the Denver region, and more than 19,000 families. Schoolpool operates under the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) Way to Go program. http://bit.ly/2Gmfkjy

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE POSTS 5 MPH LIMIT ON DC SHARED USE PATH
-> In a recent message posted to the PRO-URB listserv, Brett Akkeren noted that while on his commute on a shared use path by the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC he noticed the NPS has posted a new 5 mph speed limit sign. In addition to being a trail that connects bike commuters from Virginia to downtown D.C., it also is a major running route for workers in the area.

BICYCLE FRIENDLY BUSINESSES NAMED
-> The League of American Bicyclists announced 114 new and renewing businesses from 30 states and Washington, DC, to its Bicycle Friendly Business (BFB) program. (http://bit.ly/2rK6sjf) Currently there are 1,199 businesses in all 50 states and the District of Columbia that hold a BFB designation. (http://bit.ly/2rK6sjf) http://bit.ly/2L1E3xg

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