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DENVER, CO & PHILADELPHIA, PA: CROWDSOURCED VISION ZERO MAPS
-> NextCity reports Vision Zero planning in Denver and Philadelphia is using crowdsourcing to capture community concerns about dangerous streets and intersections that their traditional data sources might miss. http://bit.ly/2pzH67T

Denver’s online Vision Zero Map (http://bit.ly/2pznQYi) asks people through the end of April to highlight a section of street they like or dangerous problem areas. For good areas, respondents are asked to explain why they like it. For bad, they’re asked for further details about why it makes them feel unsafe — accessibility problems, blocked crosswalks, unsafe speeds, failures to yield, etc. They must also say whether they were walking, biking, using a wheelchair or driving. Finally, they can add time of day and type of trip regarding a specific incident, and there’s an open-ended box for more comments.

Philadelphia’s crowdsourcing Vision Zero Safety Map (http://arcg.is/2pzozbY) only lets users report problems, instead of allowing highlights of both good and bad streets. Respondents must pick a spot on the map, select a problem such as red light running or speeding and say what transportation mode they were using. They also have the option to elaborate in a comments area. Unlike Denver, the Philly tool allows you to submit photos of the problem area. It also displays all the data points from other users on the map, allowing anyone to see the kind of problems being reported and where they’re happening.

ITHACA, NY: SMARTTRIPS PERSONALIZED SUSTAINABLE TRANSPO CAMPAIGN
-> The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority has released its final report of SmartTrips Ithaca, a neighborhood-based personalized educational campaign that encouraged downtown residents to try sustainable modes of transportation such as walking, biking, transit, and carsharing. The report offers a case study in how the SmartTrips model was adjusted to the unique context of a small college town, and summarizes the positive results in trip reduction and mode shift that occurred in a before-and-after survey of program participants. "SmartTrips Ithaca: Encouraging Sustainable Transportation Options through a Personalized Educational Campaign" http://bit.ly/2oLHTzU

SACRAMENTO, CA DISTRICT 5X MORE JAYWALKING TICKETS TO BLACKS
-> According to the The Sacramento Bee Sacramento police issued 233 tickets for jaywalking last year in the police district that includes North Sacramento and Del Paso Heights – nearly triple the number handed out in the entire rest of the city. Black people received 111 of those citations, nearly 50 percent, but account for about 15 percent of the area’s residents. The equivalent of 12 citations were issued to every 1,000 black residents in District 2 last year, more than 5 times the issuance rate for non-blacks, city and census figures show. http://bit.ly/2oMGTeW

SAN FRANCISCO, CA: FAIR VALUE COMMUTING
-> Fair Value Commuting (FVC) is a five-part plan that combines technology, policy and will to eventually reduce the share of San Francisco Bay Area commutes made by single-occupancy vehicles (SOV) from around 75% to 50% (around 1 million trips). To do so, it’ll have to get local transportation providers, companies like Google and Facebook, and politicians on board. To implement the strategy, FVC’s creators have authored a bill that could be introduced by local city councils with a simple-majority vote. The bill would enact a city-wide "trip cap" to limit the number of car trips through the region; companies within the city would be permitted a certain number of commuter vehicles depending on their size, and companies that exceed that number would have to adopt the commute-reducing strategies outlined in the FVC plan. The way FVC works is by encouraging companies to increase the penalty on SOV commuting for employees, while offering a streamlined alternative. http://bit.ly/2pbUfnD

PROVIDENCE, RI: $4.3M INFRASTRUCTURE FOR LATINO NEIGHBORHOOD
-> PeopleForBikes reports a main corridor through southern Providence, RI is getting recognition for its local Latino culture, and $4.3 million investment in creative placemaking, and walking and biking infrastructure to improve life for the existing community and enhance its draw for people from elsewhere. This investment on Broad Street is part of south Providence's participation in the Big Jump Project, and City Walk, a larger multi-year initiative to link parks and neighborhoods with continuous biking and walking routes. The planned investment in high-quality bike infrastructure is notable for Providence, which has almost no existing bike lanes. http://bit.ly/2prmqMt

THE WALKUP WAKE UP CALL: METRO NEW YORK CITY
-> Smart Growth America reports New York City is the most pedestrian-friendly city in the country. Yet for all its reputation as a walker’s paradise, just 2.4 percent of the total regional land mass in New York is considered "walkable urban." Despite the demand for walkable urban places in New York, most real estate investment has been in the region’s core rather than in creating new walkable urban places or growing the region’s rail-served town centers. This represents a lost economic opportunity, and presents a real danger of a substantial affordable housing crisis if efforts to balance the region are not taken. This is according to "The WalkUP Wake-Up Call: New York" (http://bit.ly/2p0gtoY), released today by the George Washington University School of Business’s Center for Real Estate & Urban Analysis. http://bit.ly/2pz3qid

MEMPHIS, TN BIKE SHARE: PRIVATE, NONPROFIT & COMMUNITY-LED
-> The bike share model in Memphis is a new one for the United States: It’s driven by an advertising firm and a cadre of multi-sector stakeholders, rather than the government itself. When local companies, organizations, and community-members in Memphis found out that getting a publicly-driven bike share system would be a no-go, they didn’t give up. In fact, they decided to take matters into their own hands. The result of the collaboration is Explore Bike Share, which is setting up for its big launch later this year with 60 stations and 600 bikes. http://bit.ly/2pzEqah

SEATTLE, WA BIKESHARE POST-MORTEM
-> The Guardian reports fundamentally, low ridership killed Seattle’s Pronto bikeshare system. The system had 500 bikes at 54 stations. In its first year of operations, there were 142,832 trips or an average of just 0.78 rides per bike per day. According to the National Association of City Transportation Officials, the national average for US bike share systems is 1.8 rides per bike per day. New York City’s CitiBike system gets nearly 3.8. Some say Seattle’s helmet law discouraged use. Others say the system was too spread out and never got the expansion it needed. Some say it lost its political support both inside and out of city hall. More still think would-be riders were discouraged by the lack of bike infrastructure in downtown Seattle or the city’s notorious rain and hills. http://bit.ly/2oMuozZ

CA APPROVES $84M IN TRAILS PROJECTS
-> Rails-to-Trails Conservancy eNews reports California transportation officials recently announced more than $84 million in funding for trail projects (http://bit.ly/2pA9lTS) as part of the state's Active Transportation Program (ATP). And this month, the state Legislature approved an additional investment of $1 billion over the next decade in ATP for walking and biking programs across the state. http://bit.ly/2pzVoW1

BOULDER COUNTY, CO OFFERS FREE BIKE RACKS
-> Community Cycles reports Boulder County, CO is providing free bike racks and installation assistance to businesses and organizations throughout Boulder County. The goal: employees and customers have safe places to lock their bicycles, so that it’s easier to bike to work and support healthy, active lifestyles. http://bit.ly/2oMsgYR

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