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LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CA TO TAKE 100K CARS OFF STREETS IN 5 YRS
-> According to a 89.3 KPCC radio story, transportation officials announced an aggressive plan last week to take 100,000 cars off the streets of Los Angeles County in five years. Metro and the city's Department of Transportation, along with representatives from Uber and Lyft, have joined the Shared-Use Mobility Center to back the goal. The Shared Mobility Action Plan for Los Angeles County (http://bit.ly/2daDJzN) urges the county to leverage bike-sharing, rideshare apps and better public transit to lure drivers away from congested roads. The goal is to expand sustainable, cost-effective modes of transportation for the city. http://bit.ly/2cc3fhO

SAN DIEGO, CA AUDIT: USE MORE PED DATA TO ID PROJECTS
-> San Diego's traffic department should make use of data on pedestrian safety when choosing where to spend money on modernizing intersections and crosswalks, according to a report released Thursday by the City Auditor's Office. (Performance Audit of The City’s Programs Responsible For Improving Pedestrian Safety: http://bit.ly/2co3fQX) The report found the city was updating certain intersections with things like flashing beacons and countdown timers when those intersections hadn't seen any accidents in at least 15 years. At the same time, some of the most dangerous intersections had not seen any of the same safety improvements. The report made 18 recommendations to address the issues it identified. The City Administration agreed to all 18. The city is already implementing many of the recommendations and the mayor allocated $23 million in his latest budget to Vision Zero projects. KPBS Radio News: http://bit.ly/2cQBXQq

UT DOT: ADD EXTRA WALK TIME TO SIGNAL DURING PEAK PERIODS
-> The Utah DOT announced its new technology that allows school crossing guards to add an extra 10-15 seconds of "walk" time on a crosswalk signal for students walking and biking to school. This increases safety and allows traffic to continue moving smoothly and efficiently throughout the day. Installation costs about $20 per crosswalk, plus 30 minutes of an electrician’s time. http://bit.ly/2cizX4p

SEATTLE, WA & BOSTON, MA: REDUCING CITY SPEED LIMITS
-> The Seattle Times reports that the city may drop speed limits to 25 mph on arterials, 20 mph in neighborhoods to reduce traffic injuries. Assuming the City Council approves this month, road crews would begin putting up 500 new signs in November. SDOT retimed downtown traffic lights for 25 mph last New Year without fanfare. Studies in 2016 confirmed the retiming didn’t reduce traffic flow. http://bit.ly/2diCcq2 Boston lowered its default speed limit from 30 mph to 25 mph, effective January 1. http://bit.ly/2d1dIzw

LOS ANGELES, CA: SCRAMBLE INTERSECTION SLASHES CRASHES & INJURIES
-> In November, Los Angeles DOT redesigned the high volume intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue with a new pedestrian scramble crosswalk (aka Barnes Dance). It had been one of the most dangerous intersections for pedestrians in LA. From 2009 to 2013, the average number of crashes per year at Hollywood and Highland was 13. In the first 11 months of 2015 there were 19 crashes, resulting in 13 injuries. But since the crosswalk was redesigned in November, there has only been one non-injury car versus car crash. LADOT estimates the cost for the conversion is about $100,000 per crosswalk. Check out the brief before and after video. http://bit.ly/2clsFK0

[See the National & International section for a video of a Tokyo scrambled crosswalk.]

EL PASO, TX MPO DESIGNATES 7 ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION CORRIDORS
-> The El Paso, TX Metropolitan Planning Organization passed a new rule that designates seven key corridors as the "active transportation system." Next, the MPO will identify gaps in the walking and biking network and issue calls for projects that complete the missing links. The rule is part of the MPO’s efforts to increase walking and bicycling rates and improve air quality." The rule also requires Texas DOT to implement walking and biking upgrades whenever the agency conducts road work on the active transportation network. StreetsBlog: http://bit.ly/2cinpab

PENNSYLVANIA WALKWORKS: WALKING WITH FRIENDS PROGRAMS
-> Partnerships of governmental agencies, businesses and organizations aim to get more people walking. Walking with friends is one of the suggestions for people to become more physically active in the Live Well Allegheny campaign in the Pittsburgh, PA area. WalkWorks (http://bit.ly/2cPKhle), a collaboration between the University of Pittsburgh and the Penn state Department of Health is funded through a CDC grant to work in 7 regions. It works with communities to develop walking routes of 1 to 2 miles and form walking groups. In Blairsville, 52 people walked at the kickoff. One of its walking groups has been established for a year and meets five days a week at 7 a.m., and there’s also a group in the evening which often has dinner together. The Blairsville path — as with all the WalkWorks routes — leads walkers past notable points of interest, such as several historical buildings. There are no restrictions in age or walking speed. The research shows that there’s a group cohesiveness, an interpersonal bonding. A leader is important to keep a walking group going and announce times and locations of walks. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: http://bit.ly/2co5VhB

WICHITA, KS ORDINANCES: BIKING UNDER THE INFLUENCE & BIKES NO LONGER VEHICLES
-> The Wichita, KS Bicycling and Walking Update reports the Wichita City Council recently approved ordinances pertaining to bicycling under the influence. One ordinance made bicycling under the influence an illegal activity separate from driving under the influence (http://bit.ly/2ddYh6w). A second ordinance revised the City Municipal Code to remove devices moved by human power from the definition of a vehicle (http://bit.ly/2d8zWTt).

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