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NEW ORLEANS, LA TO CUT AUTO TRIPS BY 50% BY 2030
-> Think Progress reports in response to the dire threat posed by climate change, New Orleans, LA released a climate action strategy that includes more than two dozen actions aimed at cutting the city’s greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030, including cutting automobile trips by 50% by boosting walking, biking and transit. (Climate Action for a Resilient New Orleans: http://bit.ly/2wGb3TZ) To improve transportation choices, the city plans to design streets that are safe and useful for all; invest in safe, low-stress, and comprehensive bicycle infrastructure; promote walkable neighborhoods and transit-oriented development in priority areas; and incentivize public transit ridership, biking, and walking among other actions. http://bit.ly/2wGlh6M

NEW YORK, NY BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE TARGETS HIGH DEATHS & INJURIES AREAS
-> According to amNewYork, New York City will focus on building bike infrastructure in 10 newly identified districts with high rates of cycling deaths and injuries as part of a five-pronged action plan with actions ranging from new legislation to improved street engineering. (Safer Cycling: Bicycle Ridership and Safety in New York City: http://on.nyc.gov/2vNO90m) The plan’s objectives address the city’s nearly 150% increase in daily cycling between 2006 and 2015, from 66 million trips per year to 164 million. The de Blasio administration has set a goal to build at least 50 miles of bike lanes per year, and the new action plan will help guide that roll out through 2022 — with 75 of the those bike lane miles to be built in one of 10 priority districts. The districts encompass 14% of the city’s bike lane network and were home to nearly a quarter of all cycling deaths and serious injuries between 2010 and 2014. http://bit.ly/2vO7IFF

FL DOT LOWERS SPEED LIMITS TO IMPROVE SAFETY
-> The State Smart Transportation Initiative reports FL DOT plans to revise road designs to lower speed limits from 40-45 mph to 25 mph in an effort to improve roadway safety. The initiative puts FDOT ahead as one of the first states to tackle head-on the safety impacts of vehicle speeds; a pilot program will kick off in the Tampa Bay Region. Speed is one of the most significant factors in roadway crashes and fatalities in the U.S., and an especially serious problem for pedestrians and bicyclists. http://bit.ly/2vOyyxx

NASHVILLE, TN REQUIRES 3-FOOT PED PASSING DISTANCE
-> WKRN-TV reports the Nashville, TN Metro Council passed a bill last month that gives pedestrians the right-of-way on certain roads. The ordinance (http://bit.ly/2v7fRoB) says pedestrians must walk on a sidewalk or shoulder if there is one available. If not, they can use up to three feet of the roadway. If a driver wishes to pass the pedestrian, he must maintain a three-foot distance. If the driver cannot pass safely, the vehicle must yield to the pedestrian. http://bit.ly/2vNJlYY

DC PROPOSES 15 MPH SPEED LIMIT NEAR YOUTH FACILITIES
-> Safe Routes to School National Partnership reports that the District of Columbia, an early adopter of Vision Zero, proposed rulemaking (http://bit.ly/2wGiLxb) that would reduce speeds to 15mph between 7am and 11pm every day around schools, parks, playgrounds, and other facilities serving youth. (http://wapo.st/2wG3IUb) DC also proposed raising fines for speeding. SRTSNP suggested they consider fine mitigation options to not disproportionately affect low-income residents. http://bit.ly/2wGl9UO

NEW ORLEANS, LA LAFITTE GREENWAY: COMMUNITY LINK, NOT BARRIER
-> StreetsblogUSA reports New Orleans, LA is finding that the 2.6-mile Lafitte Greenway, an off-street path on a converted railway has become a common road for people of many backgrounds. It connects 6 diverse neighborhoods in the heart of New Orleans. This greenway is also an important spine in New Orleans’s developing central-city biking network. http://bit.ly/2vOsTHP

HONOLULU, HI BANS CROSSING THE STREET WHILE VIEWING MOBILE DEVICES
-> The Verge reports Honolulu pedestrians will need to start putting their phones away when they’re crossing the street later this year. The city passed Bill 6 (http://bit.ly/2vNYCsA), an ordinance that enacts fines against anyone crossing "a street or highway while viewing a mobile electronic device." The city becomes the largest in the US to adopt such a measure, which bans pedestrians from crossing a road while looking at a cell phone, text messaging device, pager, PDA, laptop computer, video game, or camera, although audio devices are exempt. The bill also provides exemptions for first responders on the job and anyone making an emergency call to 911. Hawaii already bans the use of hand-held electronic devices while driving. http://bit.ly/2vOn7pI

MORE NEW YORKERS OPTING FOR LIFE IN THE BIKE LANE
-> The New York Times reports that more New Yorkers are opting for life in the bike lane. Biking has become part of New York’s commuting infrastructure as bike routes have been expanded and a fleet of 10,000 Citi Bikes has been deployed to more than 600 locations. Today there are more than 450,000 daily bike trips in the city, up from 170,000 in 2005, an increase that has outpaced population and employment growth, according to city officials. About one in five bike trips is by a commuter. http://nyti.ms/2vOwEgi

MT VEHICLE REGISTRATION OPT-IN FEE FOR SHARED USE PATHS
-> Bike Walk Montana reports the State of Montana now has a $5 opt-in contribution Shared Use Path contribution line on vehicle registration forms. The funds generated will be used for trails and shared use path maintenance and bicycle/pedestrian education in the contributor’s region. http://bit.ly/2wFDod4

MI DOT: COURSES HELP CITY STAFF EXPERIENCE STREETS BY BIKE
-> Alta Planning + Design reports MI DOT sponsors "Training Wheels" courses (http://bit.ly/2wGWFL8) around the state to help communities integrate bike facilities into existing infrastructure. The courses include both classroom and outdoor instruction. The latest training was in Kalamazoo, MI, where City engineers and planners got a firsthand look at bicycling conditions. http://bit.ly/2wGSAq9

KANSAS CITY, MO STOPS POTHOLES BEFORE THEY START
-> Future Structure (from the publishers of GOVERNING) reports Kansas City, MO, has developed "pothole prediction" technology. Using various data streams, work crews are able focus on stopping the pothole before it starts rather than a full-scale street repair after a pothole has occurred. The project uses existing traffic cameras to provide data related to traffic volume and other metrics, such as the age of the pavement, while also considering weather and other anomalies like traffic accidents or department maintenance to anticipate when a section of street will fail. http://bit.ly/2wG6Yie

SAN FRANCISCO, CA CONSIDERS CAR-FREE STREET
-> Next City reports San Francisco, CA officials who skew car-free have been dreaming of transforming Market Street into a bike-and-public transit-only thoroughfare for years. Now, it looks like those dreams may be a step closer to coming true. As part of a $604 million initiative, the city is planning to bring pedestrian, bike and public transportation improvements to 2.2 miles of city street between Octavia Boulevard and the Embarcadero. One part of the proposal — sure to be controversial — involves banning private vehicles, including ride-sharing vehicles, from certain parts of Market Street. Under the initiative, emergency vehicles, public transit, taxis and delivery trucks would still be allowed through, but all other vehicles would have to go around. http://bit.ly/2vOmSuL

DETROIT, MI TO BUY ROW FOR INNER CIRCLE GREENWAY
-> The Detroit, MI Greenways Coalition reports the Inner Circle Greenway, a 26-mile trail around the city, continues to move forward. After many years of discussion and negotiation, the city of Detroit has agreed to terms for the purchase of 7.5 miles of abandoned Conrail railroad property. They will be able to use $4.3 million in grant funding that they helped them get. The city also got a $2 million dollar grant from the Ralph C. Wilson Foundation which will be used to develop a framework plan and construction documents. The city announced that the trail would be completed by 2019. http://bit.ly/2sriJep

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