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CALTRANS: TRIPLE BIKING, DOUBLE WALKING & TRANSIT BY 2020
-> Caltrans released its new Strategic Management Plan (http://bit.ly/1FcTc7V), and it includes priorities and performance targets that show the department is serious about reforming itself. The new plan includes active transportation and Vision Zero, within its priority number one, “Safety and Health.” It also cites a goal of tripling bicycle mode share and doubling walking and transit mode share by 2020–that means not just the number of trips, but the percentage of total trips in California. [http://bit.ly/1DAaWoh]

NEW YORK CITY PED INJURIES DOWN 61% AFTER ROAD DIET
-> As in Sunset Park, the Fourth Avenue road diet has yielded impressive street safety dividends for Park Slope, including a 61 percent drop in pedestrian injuries. Now, DOT is moving forward with plans to cast its changes in concrete. Between Atlantic Avenue and 15th Street, the road diet widened medians, shortened crossing distances, and trimmed the number of car lanes from three in each direction to two along most of the street (the northernmost blocks retained the same number of lanes). The changes were implemented using paint and flexible bollards.

After the redesign, pedestrian injuries on this stretch of Fourth Avenue fell 61 percent, total crashes dropped 20 percent, and crashes with injuries were reduced by 16 percent, according to DOT, which compared one year of post-implementation crash data to the prior three-year average (See PowerPoint project report with before and after photos, cross-sections, outcomes: http://on.nyc.gov/1DgRJZD). The improvements were especially dramatic at 3rd Street, where crashes fell 41 percent, and at 9th Street, where they fell 59 percent. [http://bit.ly/1QfyLvp]

CA: CHANGING ANALYSIS OF NEW DEVELOPMENT TRANSPORTATION IMPACTS
-> In California, changes are coming to the way cities and developers analyze transportation impacts for new development under the California Environmental Quality Act. This is great news. It will help cities get a more accurate picture of development’s real effects on roads, transit systems, and bicycle and pedestrian conditions and puts an end to level of service (LOS), a metric requiring costly and misleading analysis. The California Office of Planning and Research is recommending per capita vehicle miles traveled (VMT), which is simpler to calculate and measures regional impacts instead of just local impacts. (http://bit.ly/1Qi9bWH) Using VMT as your metric will lead to decisions that are good for all forms of transportation and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. [http://bit.ly/1yRf6gd]

TAMPA, FL POLICE ISSUE 79% OF TICKETS TO BLACK CYCLISTS
-> For the past decade, Tampa police have enforced a “stop and frisk”-style policy that aggressively and disproportionately targets the city’s poor, black residents who ride bicycles, according to a Tampa Bay Times investigation. Cyclists can be stopped and ticketed for having a missing tail light, baggy clothing, pedaling through a high-crime neighborhood or not having their hands on the handlebars, which is no longer illegal, according to the Tampa newspaper. Of the 10,000 bicycle tickets issued by Tampa police in the past dozen years, the newspaper found that black cyclists received 79 percent of those citations, despite making up less than a quarter of the city’s population. [http://wapo.st/1yJ9VOX]

ST. LOUIS, MO RESPONSE TO PED DEATHS & INJURIES SURGE
-> The recent surge of pedestrian deaths and injuries in St. Louis deserved the front-page placement on the April 10 issue (“City’s Walk of Peril”: http://bit.ly/1Eak9by). We can no longer wait to improve conditions for people walking. The high rate of pedestrian deaths and serious injuries in St. Louis led the Federal Highway Administration to designate the city of St. Louis a “focus city” in 2011; the designation remains today. The good news is there are changes afoot.

Trailnet is the leading pedestrian and bicycling advocacy organization in the St. Louis region. Through informal meetings, policy change and educational workshops, Trailnet has been working with city, county and state elected officials, transportation engineers and planners to improve pedestrian safety. The strategy is to implement Complete Streets policies and designs, and employ the 5 E’s...on Sept. 28, Trailnet will host a Walk Summit to bring all of these ideas together to catalyze further action. The summit is happening in conjunction with the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals conference in St. Louis, Sept. 28 to Oct. 1. These two events will bring hundreds of advocates, planners, engineers and elected officials together who are passionate about creating safe streets for people walking. [http://bit.ly/1OCt5rT]

OHIO HEALTH & TRANSPORTATION COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS
-> Ohio's efforts to integrate health and transportation are well underway. The Ohio Departments of Health (ODH) and Transportation (ODOT) and the Safe Routes to School National Partnership (SRTSNP) have been working together to integrate health and transportation by helping communities develop strategies and implement projects and policies that improve Ohioans' access to bicycling, walking, and public transportation...One strategy is to increase the number of communities involved with Safe Routes to School. Each of the nearly 200 school travel plans developed in Ohio since 2013 included input from a health representative... In another strategy Columbus Public Health conducted a Health Impact Assessment to determine which of the 90 schools in Columbus would benefit most from improved infrastructure and targeted programming such as safer crossings, education, and "road diets" to make room for pedestrian and bicycle facilities, while improving safety for all... [ http://1.usa.gov/1DLPMH0]

[Ed. Note: Columbus will host the Safe Routes to School National Conference, April 5-7, 2016 http://bit.ly/YE6ocN. For more about what is happening in Columbus, OH see their presentation from Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place 2014 http://bit.ly/1buaKkB.]

OVERLAND PARK, KS APPROVES $27M BIKE PLAN
-> An extensive bike network has been approved for Overland Park. The city council approved a much-anticipated bike plan, which would likely create 165 miles of bicycle lanes throughout the city. It also calls for buffered bicycle lanes, shared use paths, shared lane markings and signed bike routes. The $27 million project will be implemented gradually and will take several years to complete, spreading out the cost. New lanes and signage will be constructed simultaneously with street resurfacing and reconstruction projects already in the works. [http://bit.ly/1DgI717]

BILLINGS, MT: CONNECTING BIKE & PED NETWORKS
-> Over the past several decades, the City of Billings, MT, has used a range of funding sources to develop an extensive bicycling network. By 2011, the city had built 35 miles of multi-use trails, 8 miles of narrower "Connector" trails, and 11.5 miles of on-street bicycle lanes, and hosted a variety of events and programs to encourage bicycling and walking, including bicycle education courses and Safe Routes to School programs. The public started asking for bicycle facilities to fill gaps between neighborhoods, schools, and other destinations. To reflect this need, the 2011 Billings Trails and Bikeway Master Plan adopted the vision that "Billings will have one of the most comprehensive bicycle and trail networks in the State of Montana, and will be rated a 'Gold Bicycle Friendly Community' by the League of American Bicyclists by the year 2020." To meet this goal, the city set out to eliminate gaps in the existing network through data tracking, stakeholder engagement, and efficient funding mechanisms. [http://1.usa.gov/1Od6F5z]

HOT SPRINGS, AR REVAMPS, ADOPTS COMPLETE STREETS POLICY
-> The City of Hot Springs hosted a Complete Streets workshop and public education meeting to discuss their draft Complete Streets Policy with a diverse group of citizens and community leaders, including representatives from the National Complete Streets Coalition, Smart Growth America, EPA, FHWA Arkansas Division, and Metroplan, central Arkansas' metropolitan planning organization (MPO). The workshop focused on both policy development and implementation. Participants critiqued the draft Complete Streets policy and suggested several solution-oriented revisions to strengthen its language. They focused on the connectivity, design, context, and implementation components of the proposed policy. The resulting Technical Assistance Report and Suggested Next Steps presented several policy recommendations...The City Board unanimously adopted the proposed Complete Streets Policy on February 17, 2015. This policy dedicates 20 percent of the street department's paving budget to Complete Streets projects and elements. [http://1.usa.gov/1DLPMH0]

BIRMINGHAM, AL TO OPEN ELECTRIC-ASSIST BIKE SHARE THIS FALL
-> A new transportation option coming to Birmingham features added technology that planners say puts it among few of its kind worldwide and will make Alabama a base for similar programs in the future. This fall, the city's first public bike sharing program will go into operation using vendor Bewegen Technologies, Inc., officials with REV Birmingham, the Regional Planning Commission of Greater Birmingham, the city and the Community Foundation of Greater Birmingham announced Monday afternoon at Railroad Park. Birmingham's program will make it the first city in the Western Hemisphere to use "electric-assist" bikes, or those that use electricity to help with pedaling in hilly terrain, according to REV Birmingham. [http://bit.ly/1aPfGzk]

CHICAGO, IL SHARED STREET—NO CURBS, LANE MARKINGS, SIGNAGE
-> To create a safer, more inviting environment for walkers and bicyclists, Chicago is constructing its first “shared street” project. Shared streets, also known as woonerfs or living streets, erase boundaries between uses and question the hard and fast rules that govern driver behavior. The goal is to create a pedestrian and bike-friendly environment by forcing drivers to slow down and pay closer attention to other road users. Rather than using curbs to separate pedestrians from cars, shared streets may use planters, trees, benches, or bollards to reserve portions of the street for pedestrian use. [http://bit.ly/1K3wAGT]

ANNUAL STATE OF BICYCLING IN BOULDER, CO—RIDERS’ PERSPECTIVE
-> The Community Cycles’ Advocacy Committee just released its Annual Report “The State of Bicycling in Boulder” (http://bit.ly/1HU3Hha). The report reviews bicycle infrastructure and policy within the city of Boulder from the viewpoint of everyday bike riders. [http://bit.ly/1aRpbxR]

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