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TRB 2016 BICYCLES AND MOTORCYCLES ISSUE
-> The Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board published its 2016 Bicycles and Motorcycles issue (http://bit.ly/2kCwP9j) containing 16 articles related to bicycling. We will highlight several in each of the next issues of CenterLines.

REVEALED BICYCLIST ROUTE PREFERENCES & STREET CONDITIONS
-> In this study, the route choices of cyclists in an urban Chinese environment were related to nine variables on street design and dynamics: tree shade, car parking, traffic speed, traffic volume, mixed or segregated traffic, dedicated bicycle facility, number of car lanes, number of restaurants, and number of retail stores. "Revealed Bicyclist Route Preferences and Street Conditions" http://bit.ly/2m7fohJ

EVALUATION OF CHILDREN'S BIKE ED PROGRAM IN MONTREAL, CANADA
-> "Bicycle Education for Children: Evaluation of a Program in Montreal, Quebec, Canada" (http://bit.ly/2m7cglM) evaluated an on- and off-bicycle education program for school-aged children to understand how education influences the cycling behavior and attitudes of children and parents. Results showed that children's confidence and knowledge of bicycle safety increased. The parents of the participants also reported improvements in their children's cycling abilities. Half of the parents included in the postprogram survey stated that their behavior, attitudes, or both, toward cycling had become more positive as a result of their child's involvement in the bicycle education program.

NETWORK CONNECTIVITY FOR LOW-STRESS BICYCLING
-> "Network Connectivity for Low-Stress Bicycling" describes the development of methods to visualize and to analyze the lack of connectivity in a low-stress bicycling network. (http://bit.ly/2m7t9Nt) Researchers classified levels of traffic stress on every street in San Jose , CA. In their analysis, they found a city divided into islands within which low-stress bicycling was possible, but these islands were separated from one another by barriers that could be crossed only with the use of high-stress links.

BICYCLING TO RAIL STATIONS IN NEW JERSEY
-> "Bicycling to Rail Stations in New Jersey" documented the conditions of the built environment and the characteristics of bicycle commuters to these locations. (http://bit.ly/2m7ue7Z) Researchers found bicycling to rail stations was an important yet underserved part of the commuter network in New Jersey. They also found improvements to bicycling infrastructure at and around stations were vital to increase the rate of bicycle-to-rail commuters. Those who bicycled to stations typically were male, white, and between the ages of 25 and 44 years. Most of these riders had earned college or postgraduate degrees and were members of a high-earning household.

SURVEY: MPOS' USE OF TRANSPORTATION PERFORMANCE MEASURES
-> Transportation for America conducted a national survey of 104 MPOs from 42 states in 2016. (Transportation Performance Measures: 2017 Survey: http://bit.ly/2lo8UaT) They discovered 75% of the MPOs surveyed are using performance measures in some fashion. However, only 30% of all MPOs use performance measures to evaluate specific projects for inclusion in the fiscally constrained five-year plans that govern all short-term spending. http://bit.ly/2locG3Z

NYS DOT: MEASURING IMPACT OF COMPLETE STREETS PROJECTS
-> New York State DOT released a report that describes a field study assessing the impact of Complete Streets projects in Buffalo, NY. The study team used multiple data collection tools to assess the impacts of the Complete Streets projects, including surveys, vehicle counts, and crash analyses. The authors suggest that ongoing Complete Streets data collection needs to become a shared priority among MPOs, Departments of Public Works, and Complete Streets groups. "Measuring the Impact of Complete Streets Projects: Preliminary Field Testing" http://on.ny.gov/2k8eGQL

ECONOMIC IMPACT & HEALTH EFFECTS OF BIKING IN MN
-> CTS Catalyst reports the results of a new MN DOT - University of MN study that found bicycle commuting in the (MN) Twin Cities metropolitan area reduces chronic illness and preventable deaths, saving millions of dollars annually in medical costs. (Assessing the Economic Impact and Health Effects of Bicycling in Minnesota: http://bit.ly/2mkWTlQ) The researchers measured the amount of bicycle commuting among Twin Cities adults. They then estimated the number of deaths prevented from that amount of bicycling using the Health Economic Assessment Tool developed by the World Health Organization (http://bit.ly/1HDgBfi). Their analysis found that bicycle commuting in the metro area prevents 12 to 61 deaths per year, saving $100 million to $500 million annually. "At current levels, roughly 1 death per year is prevented for every 10,000 cyclists. http://bit.ly/2kVc6K4

EQUITY OF BIKEWAY DISTRIBUTION IN MINNEAPOLIS, MN
-> The Transportation Research Board published a study that used two measures, the Gini coefficient and the loss of accessibility to jobs via bikeways, to assess both the horizontal and the vertical equity of the bicycling infrastructure's distribution in Minneapolis, MN. Determination of accessibility to jobs via lower-stress bikeway and street networks allows the levels of connectivity via bikeways to be compared for different groups. Systemwide analyses of the distribution of bikeways relative to the locations of the population and total employment revealed increases in equity from 2010 to 2014. "Equity of Bikeway Distribution in Minneapolis, Minnesota" http://bit.ly/2kQ5xuE

IMMEDIATE EFFECTS OF LUNCHTIME WALKING
-> Mother Nature Network reports a new study, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, finds that lunchtime strolls can immediately improve your mood, increase relaxation, and make you more enthusiastic about your work. (Changes in Work Affect in response to Lunchtime Walking in Previously Physically Inactive Employees: A Randomized Trial: http://bit.ly/2m7gnOK) While other fitness studies typically looked at the long-term effects of exercise plans, this study looks at changes that happen more quickly, from one day to the next or even hour to hour. http://bit.ly/2kCmuKB