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ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK TO RANK PEDESTRIAN AND CYCLIST PROJECTS
-> Next City reports new research takes a first step toward developing standard ways of measuring effectiveness of how well new or improved roads and other facilities safely accommodate people on foot and riding a bike. (Development of an Analytical Framework to Rank Pedestrian and Cyclist Projects: http://bit.ly/1XOWqah) Since the funds available for pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure are scarce, developing a uniform way to measure their effectiveness will help local governments determine how best to use those scarce funds. The researchers examined seven factors: safety, safety effectiveness, mobility, demand, equity, cost and qualitative factors. A value is calculated for each factor; the safety effectiveness value is scaled to ensure that crash reduction rates are measured proportionally to improvement costs. Then the values are weighted, with the safety and safety effectiveness values given the greatest weight, and all are summed to produce an overall score. http://bit.ly/1P4pGCM

NHTSA: 2014 TRAFFIC SAFETY FACTS: CHILDREN
-> The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released its 2014 Traffic Safety Facts: Children with details the number of motor vehicle traffic fatalities and injuries involving children 14 and younger. Of the 1,070 child fatalities in 2014, 20% had been walking, and 5% had been riding a bike. http://1.usa.gov/238oTss

CANADA: NEIGHBORHOOD WALKABILITY & BMI TRAJECTORIES
-> A new longitudinal study published in the American Journal of Public Health is the first to study changes in body mass index over a relatively long time period as a function of walkability. The study tracked body mass index for 12 years among 2,943 young and middle-aged adults (18-55 years old) across Canada who lived in urban areas (? 50,000 population). Neighborhoods were divided into walkable quartiles using Walk Score. They found that moving to a more or less walkable environment can affect the BMI of men. During the 12 years, the average BMI among the men increased, but the trajectories of the weight gain were different depending on the walkability of the area. "Neighborhood Walkability and Body Mass Index Trajectories: Longitudinal Study of Canadians" http://bit.ly/1UTrFvD

UK: PUBLIC HEALTH BENEFITS OF NEW WALKING AND CYCLING ROUTES
-> A new report by UK-based Sustrans highlights results from research to measure and evaluate the changes in travel, physical activity and carbon emissions related to new walking and cycling routes. (Fit for Life: Independent Research into the Public Health Benefits of New Walking and Cycling Routes: http://bit.ly/1Zi8HTv) Sustrans completed 84 new high quality walking and cycling routes in over 80 communities in the UK between 2009 and 2013. The project also created over 100 new or renovated bridges and 80 major new road crossings that over busy roads, rivers and railways. Leading experts from a number of top universities formed the iConnect consortium to provide evidence of the impact on people and their communities. The lessons learned from this research, including findings yet to emerge and from ongoing monitoring of the walking and cycling routes, are applicable at individual program level, at local area level, and at the national level. http://bit.ly/1VYnwvC

UK: IMPACT OF THE CYCLE TO WORK SCHEME EVIDENCE REPORT
-> A recent report by the Institute for Employment Studies in the UK for the Cycle to Work Alliance presents an assessment of data around the efficacy of cycle to work programs and the health and economic benefits of cycling to work. It provides an overview of research in this area and identifies key themes and issues in research surrounding cycling. The assessment analyzed responses to a Cycle to Work Alliance survey completed by employers and employees who have taken advantage of the scheme.

Around 180,000 people a year participate in the cycle to work program operated by employers, through which employees can save up to 40 per cent of the cost of a new bicycle to cycle to work from reduced income tax and National Insurance. Using modest assumptions the authors estimate that if the program generates an additional 9,200 cyclists a year, then the social benefit would be £72 million (US$102 million) a year and the cost benefit ratio would be more than 2:1. "Impact of the Cycle to Work Scheme Evidence Report" http://bit.ly/261ElIJ

ESTIMATING DAILY BIKE COUNTS FROM SEASONAL & WEATHER FACTORS
-> A recently published Transportation Research Record article examines the relationship between several seasonal and weather factors and bicycle ridership from 2 years of automated bicycle counts at a location in Seattle, WA. This paper improves on prior work by demonstrating the use of the negative binomial instead of a Poisson model, which is appropriate given the potential for over dispersion, as observed in these data. In addition to validating the significance of factors identified from the literature, this paper contributes methodologically through its intuitive visualization of effect sizes to nonstatistical audiences. The authors believe that the combination of model type and counterfactual simulation and visualization reflects a reasonable compromise between model complexity and interpretability. "Estimating Daily Bicycle Counts in Seattle, Washington, from Seasonal and Weather Factors" http://bit.ly/1PtdrA4

ACCURACY OF BICYCLE COUNTING WITH PNEUMATIC TUBES IN OR
-> A recently published Transportation Research Record article describes findings and recommendations for how to minimize error for bicycle counting from tests with OR DOT. This research studied three types of off-the-shelf pneumatic tube counters for counting bicycles, including equipment from five manufacturers: two bicycle-specific counters, three varieties of motor vehicle classification counters, and one volume-only motor vehicle counter. Accuracy of Bicycle Counting with Pneumatic Tubes in Oregon: http://bit.ly/1tq5x5C

METHODS FOR CALCULATING BIKE TRAFFIC DAILY ADJUSTMENT FACTORS
-> There are several methods to calculate and apply adjustment factors for bicycle traffic. The reported accuracy of these factors differs from one study to another. The objective of a study recently published in the Transportation Research Record was to compare the estimation accuracy of methods used to calculate daily adjustment factors and to quantify the performance of these methods relative to their mathematical intensity. Researchers studied three methods of calculating daily adjustment factors: the AASHTO method, the monthly and weather-specific method, and the day-of-year method. The paper provides insights on the advantages and disadvantages of each calculation method. "Toward a Better Estimation of Annual Average Daily Bicycle Traffic: Comparison of Methods for Calculating Daily Adjustment Factors" http://bit.ly/1tvyQnZ

TRB RELEASES UPDATED PAPER SUBMISSION GUIDE
-> TRB released its updated Preparing Papers for Peer Review and Presentation (http://bit.ly/10kGI6i) for authors planning to submit papers for presentation at the 2017 TRB Annual Meeting and publication in the Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board. This guide includes changes in the process since the publication of the last guide, critical dates in the paper submission process, general guidelines, manuscript specifications, manuscript submission rules, TRBís peer review process, the submission of discussions for papers, and other general information. Deadline to submit papers is August 1, 2016.