Photo by John Williams

NCBW Newsroom - The Research Beat

The National & International Scene | Regional and Local Actions | The Research Beat | Resources | Jobs, Grants & RFPs

CITIES SAFER BY DESIGN REPORT
-> A new report (Cities Safer by Design: http://bit.ly/1JupNIJ) examines cities around the world to discover why some have safer streets than others. The report documents design elements that make streets safer for all users. Traffic safety has become a public health concern in many countries, and the fatalities can have a significant economic development impact. In less developed countries, the majority of deaths are among pedestrians and bicyclists hit by motor vehicles. The authors provide real-world examples and evidence-based techniques to improve safety through neighborhood and street design that emphasizes pedestrians, bicycling, and mass transport, and reduces speeds and unnecessary use of vehicles. http://bit.ly/1U5RxX8

STREETSCAPE FEATURES RELATED TO PEDESTRIAN ACTIVITY
-> Researchers measured 20 streetscape features and numerous other variables for 588 blocks in New York City, to identify variables that explain pedestrian traffic volumes. (Streetscape Features Related to Pedestrian Activity: http://bit.ly/1LQUSq9 free download through 8/31/15) Three streetscape features had significant positive correlations with pedestrian counts: the number of pieces of street furniture, the proportion of windows on the street, and the proportion of active street frontage. http://bit.ly/1IIoSpg

INSTITUTIONALIZING SAFETY IN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING PROCESSES
-> TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) "Report 811: Institutionalizing Safety in Transportation Planning Processes: Techniques, Tactics, and Strategies" provides field-tested guidance on institutionalizing the integration of safety into transportation planning and programming processes. The guidebook also provides ways to measure the effectiveness and success of integration efforts. Seven principles lead to a coordinated and comprehensive approach to safety, including "Incorporate transportation safety issues, such as pedestrian and bicycle safety, safe mobility for older citizens, and transit safety, in planning programs and documents"... http://bit.ly/1I8TieD

COMMUTING TO WORK IN THE 30 LARGEST U.S. CITIES
-> The aim of the "Commuting to Work in the 30 Largest U.S. Cities" study was to provide a broad overview of commuting by workers 16 years of age and older in the 30 largest U.S. cities, by highlighting the following aspects of commuting: who, how, how time consuming, and when. The study used the 2013 data from the American Community Survey—an ongoing annual survey by the U.S. Census Bureau. Among the aspects examined: 1) No vehicle available: 1.8% in Fort Worth and San Jose, 46.0% in New York; 2) Using public transportation to work: 0.7% in Oklahoma City, 56.7% in New York; 3) Walking to work: 1.2% in Fort Worth, 14.5% in Boston; and 4) Bicycling to work: 0.1% in El Paso, 5.9% in Portland. http://bit.ly/1eyIfCR

SCHOOL-TRANSPORTATION-RELATED CRASHES
-> A school-transportation-related crash is a crash that involves, either directly or indirectly, a school bus, or a non-school bus functioning as a school bus, transporting children to or from school or school-related activities. In this fact sheet "school-age" children are defined as children 18 or younger. From 2004 to 2013, there were 116 school-age pedestrians (18 or younger) who died in school transportation-related crashes. Sixty-two percent were struck by school buses, 5 percent by vehicles functioning as school buses, and 33 percent by other vehicles (passenger cars, light trucks and vans, large trucks, and motorcycles, etc.) involved in the crashes. http://1.usa.gov/1SfyLyV

Get a jump start on this news by subscribing to CenterLines.