Photo by John Williams

NCBW Newsroom - The Research Beat

The National & International Scene | Regional and Local Actions | The Research Beat | Resources | Jobs, Grants & RFPs

-> The Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board OnlineFirst portal recently released several papers. (http://bit.ly/2GihN0I)

PED NETWORK ANALYSIS: FORMAL PED FACILITIES VS STREET NETWORKS
-> This paper examines the difference between street networks (SN) and formal pedestrian facilities networks (FPFN e.g., sidewalks and crosswalks) and how the differences affect the outcomes of network measures. Researchers concluded (i) using FPFNs yields greatly different outcomes from using SNs, (ii) an SN can broadly describe the morphological features of a network, especially for a gridiron pattern with narrow streets and small blocks full of sidewalks and crosswalks; however, an FPFN performs much better in describing features which are invisible when using SNs; and (iii) using FPFNs can provide opportunities to develop new measures of performance, such as safety or convenience. Pedestrian Network Analysis using a Network Consisting of Formal Pedestrian Facilities: Sidewalks and Crosswalks: http://bit.ly/2VYULWv

TRAVEL TIME: CARGO CYCLES & CARS IN COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
-> This study explored cargo cycles' travel time performance by quantifying the travel time differences between them and conventional vehicles for commercial trips using real-life trip data from cargo cycles with Google's routed data for cars. Results indicate cycling trip distance to be the most significant variable. The study shows that expected travel time difference for trips with distances between 0 and 20 km (12.4 mi) ranges from -5 min (cargo cycle 5 min faster) to 40 min with a median of 6 min. This value can decrease if users take the optimal cycling route and the traffic conditions are worse for cars. "Travel Time Differences between Cargo Cycles and Cars in Commercial Transport Operations" http://bit.ly/2W3wezu

CALGARY, CANADA: PED COLLISIONS AS EQUITY ISSUES
-> Co-designing the Active City reported that pedestrian collisions are an issue of equity as streets in lower income areas are more dangerous for pedestrians. Over the course of Active Neighbourhoods Canada (ANC) co-design projects in 12 communities across Alberta, Ontario and Quebec, they noticed some lower income neighborhoods have inadequate pedestrian infrastructure. The ANC team investigated if lower-income areas in Calgary, Canada were at a greater risk for motor vehicle/pedestrian collisions. They found that, apart from the downtown core of the city, most of these collisions happened in the North-Eastern part of the city--some of Calgary's lowest income communities that also have a higher proportion of new Canadians. To create equitable access to healthy built environments for all Canadian communities, there is an urgent need to prioritize creating walkable neighborhoods, especially in low-income or otherwise marginalized areas. http://bit.ly/2YaSuoC

CYCLISTS BREAK FAR FEWER ROAD RULES THAN MOTORISTS
-> Forbes reported a new video study from the Danish Road Directorate shows that less than 5% of cyclists break traffic laws while riding yet 66% of motorists do so when driving. (http://bit.ly/2LJF95i, in Danish, requires logon to read) The Danish Cycling Embassy, a privately funded NGO, puts this down to visibility: law breaking by cyclists is "easy to notice for everyone" but transgressions by motorists, such as speeding, are harder to spot. The video cameras counted 28,579 cyclists crossing at intersections. The most frequently recorded transgression was bicycling on the sidewalk. Rule breaking by cyclists was twice as numerous in smaller cities, which, in Denmark, have fewer cycleways. http://bit.ly/2W01Aqx