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SAN FRANCISCO, CA DATA UPDATES MAP OF HIGH-INJURY NETWORK
-> The Vision Zero Network reports the San Francisco Department of Public Health released an updated map of its high-injury network. (Vision Zero High Injury Network: 2017 Update: http://bit.ly/2vO3VYZ) The data capture is significant because it acknowledges that police data often under reports traffic crashes, including among people walking and bicycling. Getting the discrepancies right is critical in Vision Zero, and San Francisco's multi-departmental data check provides a new model for other Vision Zero cities. This report describes the methodology developed in 2017 by the Department of Public Health to identify corridors with high concentrations of severe traffic injuries and fatalities. San Francisco is the first city in the country to use mapped hospital data along with police injury data to analyze spatial patterns of severe and fatal injuries in support of Vision Zero.

EFFECTIVENESS OF PEDESTRIAN DETECTION SYSTEMS
-> The Volpe Center conducted a study to determine how effective pedestrian detection systems in cars are. (Estimation of Potential Safety Benefits for Pedestrian Crash Avoidance/Mitigation Systems: http://bit.ly/2vPa3Av) One out of three vehicle-pedestrian crashes involves a vehicle going straight as a pedestrian crosses the road. To prevent these crashes, automakers now offer a "pedestrian detection" system in some models. If the system detects that a pedestrian could be in the vehicle’s travel path, it alerts the driver or employs automatic emergency braking, preventing what could be a fatal crash. Researchers found that PCAM systems can potentially reduce up to 5,000 vehicle-pedestrian crashes and 810 fatal vehicle-pedestrian crashes per year. http://bit.ly/2vOPRPc

CONNECTING SACRAMENTO STUDY: TRIP-MAKING & ACCESSIBILITY
-> State Smart Transportation Initiative reports they have worked to advance best practices in the use of accessibility metrics and trip-making data from mobile devices. Their recently completed study, Connecting Sacramento, brings together these technologies and tests their application in identifying and prioritizing first- and last-mile-connections to transit, among other uses. http://bit.ly/2vNcDqJ They have released several related reports:

  1. Accessibility and Trip-Making: An Introduction for Practitioners, a broad overview of the technologies for high-level practitioners and policymakers: http://bit.ly/2vNANkI
  2. Connecting Sacramento: A Trip-Making and Accessibility Study, a brief overview and highlights from the study: http://bit.ly/2vNqttc
  3. Accessibility Analysis and Connections to Transit, an introduction to accessibility metrics: http://bit.ly/2vNA1nH
  4. Understanding Trip-Making with Big Data (http://bit.ly/2vNqtcG). This brief provides an overview of trip-making data from cell phones, mobile apps, and in-vehicle GPS devices. It shows example applications and offers lessons learned from our recent Connecting Sacramento study and from past studies in Colorado and Virginia. http://bit.ly/2vOryAK

WALKING FOR TRANSPORTATION OR LEISURE 2005-2015
-> The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data from 2005 (26,551 respondents), 2010 (23,313), and 2015 (28,877) to evaluate trends in the age-adjusted prevalence of self-reported walking among adults aged ?18 years. The prevalence of walking increased steadily among women, from 57.3% in 2005, to 62.5% in 2010, and to 65.1% in 2015. Among men, a significant linear increase in reported walking was observed, from 54.3% in 2005, to 61.8% in 2010, and to 62.8% in 2015, although the increase stalled between 2010 and 2015. By implementing community and street scale design strategies that encourage pedestrian activity and by supporting walking programs where persons spend their time, communities can improve walkability and make walking a safer and easier option for increasing physical activity. "Walking for Transportation or Leisure Among U.S. Women and Men — National Health Interview Survey, 2005–2015" http://bit.ly/2wGIFB6

WALKING & RISK OF PEDESTRIAN-MOTOR VEHICLE COLLISION
-> The American Journal of Epidemiology published "The Relationship Between Objectively Measured Walking and Risk of Pedestrian-Motor Vehicle Collision" (http://bit.ly/2vNWpgJ) Safe urban walking environments may improve health by encouraging physical activity, but the relationship between an individual's location and walking pattern and the risk of pedestrian–motor vehicle collision is unknown. Researchers examined associations between individuals’ walking bouts and walking risk, measured as mean exposure to the risk of pedestrian-vehicle collision. Males walked in areas with higher collision risk compared with females, while vehicle owners, residents of single-family homes, and parents of young children walked in areas with lower collision risk.

ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA SENIOR CITIZENS TRANSPORTATION STUDY
-> Mobility Lab reports seniors in Arlington County, VA, have many similar traits to Millennials when it comes to using public transportation: they are active, strategic and use many different transportation options. Though driving is certainly a part of their transportation mix, they also are significant users of Metrorail. This is one of several findings from recent focus groups. (Arlington County Senior Citizens Transportation Study: http://bit.ly/2vOawTm) Seniors are also strategic travelers. Before leaving their homes, they consider a number of factors prior to selecting a transportation mode. These factors include time of day, parking options and availability, destination, mood, time constraints, and planned activities. http://bit.ly/2vOugq7

TRAFFIC IMPACTS OF BICYCLE FACILITIES
-> FHWA’s Human Environment Digest reports the MN DOT published a new report that explores interactions between vehicles and bicyclists to facilitate the safe, efficient design of transportation systems. (Traffic Impacts of Bicycle Facilities: http://bit.ly/2vNmnkN) This study involved a review of design guidelines for bicycle facilities, observation of bicycle-vehicle interactions at 9 roadways with different types of bicycle facilities, analysis of results, and description of design implications. Given an objective of increasing predictability of driver behavior, buffered or striped bicycle lanes offer advantages over other facilities. http://bit.ly/2vOI8Ra

CRASHES OVER FIRST FOUR YEARS OF DRIVING & GRADUATED LICENSING
-> The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety released a report that examines how crashes over the initial four years of licensure differ for novice drivers licensed at different ages. This research was conducted to determine whether there is epidemiologic evidence to support adoption of extended-age graduated driver licensing policies, particularly passenger and nighttime restrictions. "Older Novice Driver Crashes in New Jersey: Informing the Need for Extending Graduated Driver Licensing Restrictions" http://bit.ly/2wGnlLM