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REDUCING SPEED LIMIT NETS MARKEDLY LESS SPEEDING
-> Vision Zero e-News reports a new study from the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety affirms Vision Zero emphasis on speed management as a key strategy to improve safety for all road users. (Lowering the Speed Limit from 30 to 25 mph in Boston: Effects on Vehicle Speeds: http://bit.ly/2xxcSoa) Analyzing data following Boston's reduced speed limit from 30 mph to 25 mph as part of its Vision Zero initiative, researchers found a significant decrease in the percentage of vehicles traveling above the speed limit. Boston saw the greatest decline — a 29.3% reduction — in the odds of speeding for vehicles traveling faster than 35 mph. Vehicles moving at these higher speeds pose the deadliest threat on the road, especially those who are walking and biking. http://bit.ly/2xuuDVe

1.4 BILLION ADULTS RISK DISEASE FROM PHYSICAL INACTIVITY
-> The European Cyclists' Federation reports more than a quarter of the world's adults (1.4 billion) have greater risk of type 2 diabetes, cancer, dementia and cardiovascular disease, because they do too little physical activity according to data from the first study to estimate global physical activity trends over time. (Worldwide Trends in Insufficient Physical Activity from 2001 to 2016: A Pooled Analysis of 358 Population-Based Surveys with 1.9 Million Participants: http://bit.ly/2xwzFk5) The World Health Organization study was published in The Lancet Global Health journal. It found the regions with the highest increase in insufficient physical activity over time were high-income Western countries (from 31% in 2001 to 37% in 2016). Countries from these regions driving this trend include Germany, Italy Hungary, Portugal and UK, as well as the USA. http://bit.ly/2xvLlDr

AI PREDICTS CITY LEVEL OF OBESITY BASED ON INFRASTRUCTURE
-> Smart Cities Dive reports researchers at the University of Washington created an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm that estimates citizens' obesity levels within a city based on the city's infrastructure. (Use of Deep Learning to Examine the Association of the Built Environment With Prevalence of Neighborhood Adult Obesity: http://bit.ly/2xvp7l0) The study, published in JAMA Network Open, used AI on almost 150,000 Google Maps satellite and street view images from 6 cities and considered physical environment characteristics like types of housing, building spacing, crosswalks, highways and the presence of green space, and how those characteristics may link to weight. http://bit.ly/2xvBmhu

SUPPORTING ACTIVE LIVING THROUGH COMMUNITY PLANS
-> The American Journal of Health Promotion published a study that examined the association between the presence of supportive community planning documents in US municipalities with design standards and requirements supportive of active living. Researchers found the prevalence of design standards ranged from 19% (developer dedicated right-of-way for bicycle infrastructure development) to 50% (traffic-calming features in areas with high pedestrian and bicycle volume). Features required in policies for development ranged from 14% (short/medium pedestrian-scale block sizes) to 44% (minimum sidewalk widths of 5 feet) of municipalities. Supporting Active Living Through Community Plans: The Association of Planning Documents With Design Standards and Features: http://bit.ly/2QHnWHS

URBAN TRAILS AND DEMAND RESPONSE TO WEATHER VARIATIONS
-> The University of MN Catalyst reports on research that explored how weather variations affect urban trail use by bicyclists and pedestrians in cities throughout the country. (Urban Trails and Demand Response to Weather Variations: http://bit.ly/2xyjin3) In this study, published in Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, researchers monitored multi-use trail traffic in 13 cities located in 7 different climate zones across the US under varying weather conditions at different times of year. http://bit.ly/2xFHO5R

PED & CYCLISTS TREE LOCATION PREFERENCES ALONG FACILITIES
-> A study published in Cities describes a visual preference survey of the 5 existing cycle tracks in the Boston, MA area. Pedestrians and cyclists were asked their preferences about whether trees should be planted and, if yes, the preferred locations on the sidewalk/cycle track they were using. In all 5, they preferred trees. Trees with bushes between the cycle track and the street/parked cars were most preferred. Pedestrian and Cyclist Preferences for Tree Locations by Sidewalks and Cycle Tracks and Associated Benefits: Worldwide Implications from a Study in Boston, MA: http://bit.ly/2xwL1o6

WOMEN PREFER SEPARATED BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE
-> Streetsblog USA reports research presented at the British academic conference Cycling & Society Annual Symposium (Cycling Gender and Experience Survey: http://bit.ly/2xyV0co) helps confirm that nearly everyone — but women especially — prefer to bike in facilities that are separated from vehicle traffic. Both men and women said safety was their top concern when it came to cycling. But after that, opinions varied, with men placing more importance on directness of bike routes and women willing to accept bigger detours in the name of safety. http://bit.ly/2xuoVTh