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TRB REPORT: TRAVEL TRAINING FOR OLDER ADULTS

-> According to a Sept. 16th Transportation Research Board blurb, "TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 168: Travel Training for Older Adults, Part I: A Handbook (http://bit.ly/1BKhLoT) presents a comprehensive roadmap for designing a travel training program to meet the mobility needs of older persons. The Handbook, Part I, addresses the primary components of an effective travel training program and provides an extensive set of guidelines for transit agencies and human services providers on how to build and implement training programs to help older adults who are able to use fixed-route public transit.

"The supplemental research report, Part II (Travel Training for Older Adults Travel Training for Older Adults, Part II: Research Report and Case Studies: http://bit.ly/1uG3czu), reviews the research plan that produced this report as well as the case studies used to formulate the overall strategic program. An Executive Summary (http://bit.ly/YQbPwG) brochure summarizes the highlights of TCRP Report 168, Parts I and II."

Source: http://bit.ly/1m8ZnCJ
Title & Author: "Travel Training for Older Adults Part I: A Handbook" by Staff

TRB REPORT: MULTI-MODAL APPROACH TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN MPO PLANNING

-> According to a Sept. 8th Transportation Research Board blurb, "The U.S. Federal Highway Administration has released a report that provides a review of research and current practices of integrating economic development goals in metropolitan area transportation planning. (A Multi-Modal Approach to Economic Development in the Metropolitan Area Transportation Planning Process: http://1.usa.gov/1qVTWH3"

Source: http://bit.ly/1tZvozu
Title & Author: "A Multi-Modal Approach to Economic Development in the Metropolitan Area Transportation Planning Process" by Staff

ACTIVE COMMUTES LEAD TO WELL-BEING

-> According to a Sept. 14th CityLab article, "New research concludes that an active commute may be as important to well-being as marriage or a pay raise.

"Our study shows that the longer people spend commuting in cars, the worse their psychological well-being," says Adam Martin from the University of East Anglia. The study (Does active commuting improve psychological wellbeing? Longitudinal evidence from eighteen waves of the British Household Panel Survey: http://bit.ly/1uS4B56), just published in the journal Preventative Medicine, concludes that commuters with 'active travel modes' are associated with higher rates of well-being than those who drive or use public transportation...

Source: http://bit.ly/1qdqAPF
Title & Author: "Want to Be Happier? Try Walking Even Part of the Way to Work" by Sam Sturgis

ADULT OBESITY REACHES NEW HIGH

-> According to a Sept. 5th The Columbus Dispatch article, "While U.S. childhood-obesity rates appear to be stabilizing, the rate among adults remains stubbornly high, reaching new peaks in several states during the past year. That's according to the latest annual report on obesity in America published yesterday by Trust for America's Health, a health-advocacy and research group, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a philanthropic group focused on public-health issues. The report stressed that geography and social factors, such as income and race, continue to play a significant role in obesity. The result is that more Americans face a higher risk for health problems, including heart disease, diabetes, some forms of cancers and premature death..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1lMfeXM
Title & Author: "Adult Obesity Reaches New High" by Daniel Salazar

STUDY: HISPANIC NEIGHBORHOODS MAY FACE THE MOST AIR POLLUTION

-> According to a Sept. 16th Public Health Newswire article, "Where you live has a lot to do with factors that influence your health, such as exposure to air pollution. According to new research (Race/Ethnicity, Residential Segregation, and Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis: http://bit.ly/1tb1O8C) from the American Journal of Public Health, Hispanic neighborhoods experience the most air pollution, while white neighborhoods face the least. The study, led by researcher Miranda Jones, PhD, of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, investigated household-level fine particulate matter and nitrogen oxides and compared it against neighborhood racial composition estimates for study participants. Jones and team reviewed the air pollution exposure levels among white, black, Hispanic and Chinese participants. Results revealed that the ethnic and racial make-up of a neighborhood is correlated with air pollution levels. Minority neighborhoods, on a whole, faced the largest exposures, with Hispanic communities experiencing the most..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1tZTRVv
Title & Author: "AJPH study: Hispanic neighborhoods may face the most air pollution" by Kim S.

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