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EVALUATING THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS AND BENEFITS OF TRANSIT
-> A new report from the Transportation Research Board identifies ways to most effectively incorporate transit economic impacts and benefits into public discussion and decision making, and appropriately convey the business case for transit. It describes the methods used for assessing transit economic impacts and benefits, the types of effects that are covered by these methods, and the ways that agencies are using the information obtained for planning, prioritizing, funding, and stakeholder support. "Practices for Evaluating the Economic Impacts and Benefits of Transit" http://bit.ly/2oLBZyS

IMPROVING TRIP GENERATION METHODS
-> The National Institute for Transportation and Communities reports on a recent study to help planners accurately forecast travel demand for pedestrians, cyclists and transit riders. The most important outcome of this research is a framework for sustainable multimodal planning. The flexible, transparent approach to data collection and analysis is helping to create a system where land use planning and transportation impact analysis are inextricably linked -- thus giving agencies more autonomy to decide what the character of a place should be based on the needs of the people who live there. "Improving Trip Generation Methods for Livable Communities" http://bit.ly/2jZnxzc

TRB 2016 BICYCLES AND MOTORCYCLES ISSUE
-> The Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board published its 2016 Bicycles and Motorcycles issue (http://bit.ly/2kCwP9j) containing 16 articles related to bicycling. We have highlighted several in each of the past several issues of CenterLines. Here are two more:

1. GPS MODELING OF BIKESHARE USER ROUTE CHOICE
-> This study used GPS data obtained from 9,101 trips made by 1,866 users of Grid Bikeshare, Phoenix, Arizona. Bikeshare, with instrumented bikes, allows for better assessment of revealed route preference of a large subpopulation of cyclists. The trips studied included only direct utilitarian trips. The results were compared between registered bikeshare users and casual users. Registered users made shorter trips on roads with low volume and preferred bike-specific infrastructure. "Modeling Route Choice of Utilitarian Bikeshare Users with GPS Data" http://bit.ly/2pyV4qP

2. NIGHTTIME VISIBILITY OF CYCLISTS APPROACHING LEFT-TURNING MOTORISTS
-> This study evaluated the visibility of bicyclists encountered by left-turning motorists at urban intersections under nighttime conditions, and compared them with other hazards. A low-fidelity simulator presented a series of videos from a motorist’s perspective, while a passenger vehicle was positioned in the permitted left-turn lane at a signalized intersection. The observed response times to a bicyclist were not different from the response times to a passenger vehicle with two headlights. However, the response times were significantly shorter than the times to recognize no hazard or a bicyclist with no headlight. "Visibility of Two-Wheelers Approaching Left-Turning Vehicles Compared with Other Hazards Under Nighttime Conditions at Urban Signalized Intersections" http://bit.ly/2pz08LI

PERSPECTIVES IN DEPLOYING AUTOMATED SPEED ENFORCEMENT
-> A Roadway Safety Institute article observes in the US, speeding is by far the leading factor in fatal crashes—equivalent to the use of drugs, alcohol, medication, and distracted driving combined. Although automated speed enforcement (ASE) is a promising countermeasure shown to reduce speeding and crashes, several states have enacted restrictions or even banned its use. A new study published by the University of MN charts a possible path to ASE use. (Identifying and Reconciling Stakeholder Perspectives in Deploying Automated Speed Enforcement: http://bit.ly/2oMqKGj) Researchers’ interviews with influential Minnesota stakeholders more clearly defined the arguments for and against ASE. Researchers also compared the rates of motor vehicle fatalities in states using ASE to Minnesota’s rates. Finally, they evaluated public concerns about ASE to better understand the causes for continued conflict regarding ASE deployment among the general Minnesota population and to potentially identify avenues for reconciling this conflict. http://bit.ly/2oMqvLp