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INEQUITIES IN ALLOCATION OF BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS
-> The State Smart Transportation Initiative reported equity advocates claim that increases in active transportation investments are mostly improving conditions for whiter and wealthier areas of communities. A recent study published in the Journal of Transport Geography looked at the intersection of bicycle infrastructure and socioeconomic status of residents in 22 U.S. cities strengthens this claim. (Social (In)Equity in Access to Cycling Infrastructure: Cross-Sectional Associations Between Bike Lanes and Area-Level Sociodemographic Characteristics in 22 Large U.S. Cities: http://bit.ly/2MYz4Ra) Researchers found the investments to be serving areas with higher socioeconomic status, higher education attainment, and lower proportions of Hispanic residents. http://bit.ly/2q5dHEq

EXPERTS, PARENTS DON'T ALWAYS AGREE ABOUT SAFE CYCLING ROUTES FOR KIDS
-> The State Smart Transportation Initiative reported a recent study led by Rutgers University indicates parents' perspectives about "low-" and "high-stress" environments don't always align with transportation practitioners when it comes to the safety of their children. (Traffic Experts, Parents Don't Always See Eye to Eye on Safe Cycling Routes for Children: http://bit.ly/2NnbvQS) The study found that parents preferred separation from traffic to a greater degree than the Level of Traffic Stress framework suggests: 88% would allow their children to bike on separated multi-use trails, but only 44% would allow children to bike on wide residential streets, and just 32% would be comfortable letting their kids bike on narrow residential streets. More parents were comfortable allowing their children to bike on busy streets with buffered lanes than in traffic on narrow residential streets. As the study authors note, these findings do not invalidate the Level of Traffic Stress framework, but rather point to opportunities to refine it. http://bit.ly/2qRBesV

STUDY: PROPERTY VALUES INCREASE NEAR TRANSIT
-> Smart Cities Dive reported residential and commercial building property values increase dramatically when located close to transit, according to a joint study from the American Public Transportation Association and the National Association of Realtors. (Locations Close To Public Transit Boost Residential, Commercial Real Estate Values: http://bit.ly/2N1JXSd) The associations found that residential properties within a half-mile of public transit options had a 4%-24% higher median sale price. Meanwhile, in 4 of the 7 regions analyzed, commercial property values saw a median sales price per square foot increase by between 5%-42%. They also found that people who live near transit have dramatically lower transportation costs--each household on average saves between $2,500 and $4,400, with 1 in 4 households who live close to transit not owning a car. http://bit.ly/2pZ7oSZ

INTEGRATING TRANSIT & BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE AT TRANSIT STOPS
-> The Transportation Research and Education Center (TREC) at Portland State University described the first US study to look at bus, bicycle, and car interactions and conflicts. (Improving Integration of Transit Operations and Bicycle Infrastructure at the Stop Level: http://bit.ly/2po1Pxt) Researchers observed interactions between buses, bikes and cars and analyzed the number of bus-bicycle conflicts (as a proxy for safety), and bus delay as a result of these interactions. At current bus and bicycle volumes, over 11,000 annual conflicts can be expected. These quantitative findings can be used to justify funding for intersection upgrades or for an education/enforcement campaign. Researchers also found that the bike box onsite does not significantly contribute to bus delay, nor do bicycles that stop in the bicycle lane.

ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA E-SCOOTERS & DOCKLESS E-BIKES EVALUATION
-> Mobility Lab Express reported it conducted an evaluation of data from an Arlington County, VA pilot program of dockless e-bikes and e-scooters—also known as shared mobility devices (SMDs). Its report includes a detailed analysis and summary of how the devices related to each of the County's 5 main Master Transportation Plan goals. (Arlington County Shared Mobility Devices (SMD) Pilot Evaluation Report: http://bit.ly/36bpQIN) Researchers found SMDs are popular and used mostly for short trips; users choose SMDs mainly "to get around faster" and because they are "convenient;" and SMDs provide a viable complement to the County's transportation ecosystem that increases mobility options and provides potential sustainability benefits; among other findings. http://bit.ly/2PwL79M

AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND: INFRASTRUCTURE CHANGES TO SUPPORT AVS
-> Austroads RoadWatch: Roundup reported the release of a series of 5 reports on a project that examined the readiness of Australian and New Zealand highways and freeways to support automated vehicles. (Infrastructure Changes to Support Automated Vehicles on Rural and Metropolitan Highways and Freeways, 5 modules: http://bit.ly/34bP0VH) The project involved an extensive road audit that assessed how well vehicle machine vision systems could interpret more than 8 million line segments and 8,000 signs on a 25,000 km (15,534 mi) sample of the Australasian road network. The audit found that most freeways and highways of Australia and New Zealand can support Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) such as lane-keeping assistance, particularly when there are high quality lines. http://bit.ly/34bP0VH

[See the Webinar section for a November 6 (in the US, November 7 in Australia) webinar on this research.]