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LIVING NEAR HEAVY TRAFFIC INCREASES RISK OF DEMENTIA
-> A study recently published in The Lancet found those who live closest to major traffic arteries were up to 12% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia a small but significant increase in risk. Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer's in urban areas could be associated with living amid heavy traffic, the study estimated although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to exhaust fumes causes neurodegeneration. (Living Near Major Roads and the Incidence of Dementia, Parkinson's Disease, and Multiple Sclerosis: A Population-Based Cohort Study: http://bit.ly/2iZWl4w) An article in The Guardian provides more details and comments about the study and its implications. http://bit.ly/2iZTYi1

EUROPEAN SURVEY: BARRIERS TO CYCLE COMMUTING
-> A survey conducted in several European countries revealed the main barriers faced by commuters while cycling to work (http://bit.ly/2ic7xh2). Most respondents claimed that non-segregation of traffic is the biggest problem, while a smaller group of surveyed people has identified weather as the biggest problem. The respondents of the survey were divided in three different categories: those who always walk or cycle to work, those who sometimes walk or cycle to work and those who never walk or cycle to work. In one city 80% of the people that never cycle to work say that they don't cycle to work because it rains too often. The people that are already cycling to work every day tend to disagree: only 29% of them thinks it rains too often. The survey is part of the CHIPS project (Cycle Highways Innovation for Smarter People Transport and Spatial Planning), a collaboration with the Netherlands and Belgium, Germany and the Republic of Ireland. http://bit.ly/2ic3Ckt

FHWA: TRAFFIC MONITORING FOR NONMOTORIZED TRAFFIC
-> FHWA released its Coding Nonmotorized Station Location Information in the 2016 Traffic Monitoring Guide Format (http://bit.ly/2j0okkt). The Traffic Monitoring Guide (TMG) includes a section on traffic monitoring for nonmotorized traffic, along with a format for nonmotorized data collection. The format was introduced in the 2013 TMG and updated in the 2016 TMG with new fields to code helmet use, gender and age and refinements to existing fields to add more clarity and options for describing a wide range of counting scenarios. The data format is flexible and detailed, but also complex. This document offers detailed guidance and examples showing how to code counts and count locations in the TMG data format.

ACCESS TO JOBS VIA TRANSIT
-> A new report from the University of Minnesota lays out how many jobs are accessible via transit in major American cities. (Access Across America: Transit 2015: http://bit.ly/2icAGZH) New York, San Francisco, Chicago, and D.C. offer the best transit access to jobs. Seattle and Denver have devoted significant resources to transit expansions recently and also rank high.

BUS ACTIVE SAFETY-COLLISION WARNING PILOT
-> A Federal Transit Administration grant and insurance company contributions funded a pilot project to install collision avoidance warning systems (CAWS) on 38 buses in Washington State. The project included a comprehensive examination of the total costs of the most severe and costly types of collisions, frontal collisions and collisions with pedestrians and cyclists, the potential for collision avoidance technology to reduce the frequency and severity of these types of collisions, and reduce the associated casualty and liability expenses. See Active Safety-Collision Warning Pilot in Washington State, pages 143-144 in IDEA: Innovations Deserving Exploratory Analysis Programs: http://bit.ly/2hS3Lte

PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT STRATEGIES FOR RURAL & SMALL COMMUNITIES
-> FHWA research recently published sought to help people in rural areas and smaller communities develop effective, locally appropriate, replicable strategies for public involvement in transportation planning and programming, especially to engage environmental justice communities in working with transportation planners to co-create strategies that will mitigate or avoid prospective environmental justice issues. Working initially with six competitively selected planning organizations in rural and urban areas of less than 200,000 population, the research found that effective practices for public involvement in transportation planning required as diverse a set of strategies in smaller metropolitan areas as in those with much larger populations, but smaller areas' planning agencies have correspondingly smaller staffs, and must be selective in their use of various public involvement strategies. "Developing and Advancing Effective Public Involvement and Environmental Justice Strategies for Rural and Small Communities" http://bit.ly/2icCIZB

2011 - 2017 TRB ANNUAL MEETING PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE ONLINE
-> The Transportation Research Board has now included the compendium of papers 5,000+ program presentations at the 96th TRB Annual Meeting, January 8-12, 2017 and its final program on its Annual Meeting Online (AMOnline) portal. This portal also includes papers, visual aid slides, and poster presentations from the 2011-2016 Annual Meetings. There is no charge to access this material those more closely associated with TRB or registered for the Annual Meeting. http://bit.ly/1RjRPXs