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SILENT BARRIERS TO BICYCLING FOR BLACKS AND LATINOS 4-PART SERIES
-> In a four-part series, Better Bike Share Partnership reports on a landmark study, "Removing Barriers to Bicycle Use in Black and Hispanic Communities" (http://bit.ly/2nQkI6z, fee to access). The underlying issue to address is the lack of access to political power that many marginalized communities sense.

- 1. EXPLORING BLACK AND LATINO BICYCLING EXPERIENCES
-> The first in the series provides an overview of this survey and focus group research about the factors that could encourage Blacks and Latinos to bike, and obstacles to more of them doing so. While commonly understood fears of traffic collisions rank first in terms of obstacles to bicycling, personal safety factors such as crime and racial profiling are highly underexamined issues that influence Blacks and Latinos when deciding whether to bike or not. In addition, over half of respondents were not aware of bike share, though 85% would be interested in using it. http://bit.ly/2nQDv1x

- 2. FEAR OF CRIME WHILE CYCLING AMONG BLACKS AND LATINOS
-> The second in the series considers perceptions of crime and how the fear of being robbed, assaulted, or stranded while using a bicycle deters participants from riding. In the Black focus group, crime fears seemed to center on the worry of having one's bicycle stolen, whereas the Latino group maintained more fear of being a physical target of crime while bicycling through perceived high-crime neighborhoods. Researchers found the majority of respondents lived in major urban centers that collectively were the source of 39% of all of New Jersey's violent crime. Nearly one out of every three respondents reported being victims of bike theft, with many having been victimized multiple times. The personal safety of Black and Latino cyclists may require transportation professionals to create deeper and more meaningful engagement of communities of color rather than ramping up policing in urban neighborhoods. http://bit.ly/2nQsflS

- 3. RACIAL PROFILING OF THE BLACK AND LATINO COMMUNITY
-> Researchers found that 1 in 5 Black and Latino males they surveyed felt police had at some point unfairly stopped them. They found the male rate of perceived profiling was 7 times higher than that of female participants. Researchers posit that the perception among Black and Latino males of being a police target in the past likely increases fear of future profiling, and thereby reluctance to bike. In the focus groups, many felt bicycling simply makes one too vulnerable to be worth it. Participants said that they routinely avoided certain towns and certain routes due to fear of police profiling. It is important for transportation professionals to be aware of these community dynamics when planning infrastructure changes. More community bicycling events might bring residents and the police together, and give residents a way to talk about their concerns in a non-hostile interaction. http://bit.ly/2nQl9Op

- 4. INFRASTRUCTURE IN BLACK AND LATINO NEIGHBORHOODS
-> The fear of traffic collisions and poor pavement conditions are also types of mobility and access barriers in Black and Latino neighborhoods. There is also a dearth of bike lanes and bike parking in some Black and Latino neighborhoods. For instance, a majority of Chicago's 200 miles of bike lanes are concentrated in neighborhoods with the fewest Black and Latino residents. When respondents were asked to rate the quality and accessibility of bicycle paths, bicycle lanes, and bicycle racks, Blacks, Latinos, and mixed race individuals had less positive results to report. http://bit.ly/2nQtbXq

[See the Regional section for Chicago, IL: Most Bike Tickets Written in Black Communities.]

EFFECT OF NETWORKS OF CYCLE-TRACKS ON THE RISK OF CYCLING
-> Accident Analysis & Prevention recently published a study that analyzed the evolution of the risk of cycling in Seville, Spain before and after the implementation of a network of cycle tracks. (On the Effect of Networks of Cycle-Tracks on the Risk of Cycling. The Case of Seville: http://bit.ly/2nQC0R1) Researchers studied the evolution of the risk for cyclists of being involved in a collision with a motor vehicle seven years before and after the network was built. A sudden drop in risk was observed after the implementation of the network of bikeways. The authors discuss the mutual causal relationships between the increase in safety, the increase in the number of cyclists and the presence of the network of bikeways.

BUSTING THE MYTH OF THE "SCOFFLAW CYCLIST"
-> Streetsblog notes according to a certain perspective, bicyclists are reckless daredevils who flout the road rules that everyone else faithfully upholds. But the results of a massive survey published in the Journal of Transport and Land Use point to a different conclusion everyone breaks traffic laws, and there's nothing extraordinary about how people behave on bikes. (Scofflaw Bicycling: Illegal but Rational: http://bit.ly/2nQtaTd)

Nearly 18,000 respondents completed an online, scenario-based survey about their compliance with traffic laws when they are driving, biking, or walking. Researchers found that people admit to breaking the rules of the road at roughly the same (very high) rate, regardless of how they're getting around. "Bicyclists, perhaps despite popular conception, really don't break the rules at any greater rate than any other modes: pedestrians or drivers," said Aaron Johnson, one of the authors. "When there's a disregard for the rules it tends to come from efforts to negotiate infrastructure that really wasn't built for them." http://bit.ly/2nQu8Pm

[On a related note: The Helena Independent Record reports a bill to establish a safe distance between cars and bicycles sharing the road was voted down by the Montana Senate after comments by Republican Senate President Scott Sales about bicyclists. "They're some of the most self-centered, rude people navigating on the highways and county roads I've seen. They won't move over. You can honk at them. They think they own the highway."

The Senate president also criticized cyclists by saying they use the road without paying a gas tax to support maintenance, and suggested cyclists over the age of 16 should pay a $25 tax. "They have this entitlement mentality, many of them, that we should just wait for them, and quite frankly I think that's wrong. ... Quite frankly I don't want more of them in the state because there's already too many of them as it is." http://bit.ly/2nQCkiR]

BIKE PGH SURVEYS CYCLISTS & PEDS RE AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES
-> Bike Pittsburgh surveyed their neighbors who bike and walk to find out how they felt about sharing the road with autonomous vehicles (AV) as a bicyclist and/or as a pedestrian, and collect stories about people's experiences interacting with AVs. The results of the survey were surprising and will influence how BikePGH will approach its work as it relates to AVs and keeping bicycle riders and pedestrians safe. Bike PGH released the raw data to the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center so that others can explore, process, and conduct new and different analyses. http://bit.ly/2nQ9Fu8

[See National section for Driverless Future: A Policy Roadmap for City Leaders, and Autonomous Cars Impact on Sustainable Cities items.]

IMPROVING TRIP GENERATION METHODS FOR LIVABLE COMMUNITIES
-> The Transportation Research and Education Center for Portland, OR State University published a new report that examines multimodal trip generation and identifies site-level attributes of the built environment that help explain multimodal trip generation. (Improving Trip Generation Methods for Livable Communities: http://bit.ly/2nRiGTO) The objectives of this study are to examine establishing multimodal trip generation more closely, identify site-level attributes of the built environment that help explain multimodal trip generation, and develop a framework for trip generation analysis that takes findings from this study into consideration. Findings highlight the influence of people living nearby and using the site; the nature of the land use on the site; the development along arterial roadways; site permeability and access; and the local culture around walking and cycling.

ANALYSIS CONFIRMS CLOSE-IN LAND DEVELOPMENT REDUCES DRIVING
-> The Huffington Post reports the recent publication in the Journal of the American Planning Association of an analysis that confirms close-in land development reduces driving. (Does Compact Development Make People Drive Less?: http://bit.ly/2nIYTZL) This thorough, meticulous new "meta-regression analysis" of empirical data from some 37 academic studies found that halving the distance between a particular development and downtown is likely to reduce per capita driving associated with that development by as much as 32%. http://huff.to/2nIYnLj

APTA REPORT: WHO RIDES PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
-> An American Public Transport Association report summarizes passenger characteristics of US public transit users based on regional surveys conducted between 2008 and 2015. Its top line results report key demographics, such as age, ethnicity, income, vehicle availability, and driver's license status among others. It also reports key travel characteristics such as trip purpose, reasons of taking transit, mode used to access and egress transit (69% walk to transit, 76% walk after getting off transit), and preferred alternative mode if transit weren't available. "Who Rides Public Transportation: The Backbone of a Multimodal Lifestyle" http://bit.ly/2nH6Izk

FHWA RELEASES TRAFFIC VOLUME TRENDS REPORT
-> FHWA released its January monthly Traffic Volume Trends report in PDF and Excel formats. Its data is based on hourly traffic count data reported by the States which is collected at approximately 4,000 continuous traffic counting locations nationwide. These data estimate the percent change in traffic for the current month compared with the same month in the previous year. Estimates are re-adjusted annually to match the vehicle miles of travel from the Highway Performance Monitoring System (http://bit.ly/2nwVmdT) and are continually updated with additional data. http://1.usa.gov/Yrm7Lt

FHWA RELEASES 2015 STATE STATISTICAL ABSTRACT
-> FHWA released the 2015 edition of the State Statistical Abstract with tabular information by State specific data on: Population; Land Area; Motor Fuel Use; Motor Fuel Tax; Public Road Length; Functional System Lane Length; Vehicle Miles of Travel; Driver Licenses; Vehicle Registrations; Fatally Injured in Vehicle Crashes; State Highway Finance and Attributed Federal Trust Fund Receipts. http://bit.ly/2neTOYL

TAKE TRB URBAN TRANSPO DATA & INFO SYSTEMS CMTE SURVEY BY 3/31
-> Ted Mansfield of USDOT on behalf of one of the TRB Health and Transportation Subcommittees co-sponsoring committees, the Urban Transportation Data and Information Systems Committee (ABJ30), is developing an Urban Data Inventory cataloging data resources and tools commonly used by transportation practitioners and researchers. One focus of this inventory will be health and transportation. Please consider supporting this effort by filling out a brief Health and Transportation Data Survey by Friday, March 31, 2017. (http://bit.ly/2nRlAIi) This is a great opportunity to share our important work a bit more broadly within the transportation community. Contact Ted (theodore.mansfield@dot.gov) if you have any questions about the survey or the data inventory.

2017 TRB ANNUAL MEETING SLIDES & POSTERS ONLINE
-> The Transportation Research Board's TRB Annual Meeting Online portal (AMOnline: http://bit.ly/1RjRPXs) includes papers, presentation slides, and posters of more than 5,000 program presentations at the 2017 TRB Annual Meeting as well as materials from the 2011-2016 TRB Annual Meetings. Access is free for Annual Meeting registrants and employees of year-round TRB sponsors. See pricing chart for other user categories. http://bit.ly/2nGZ2wU