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3 JOURNAL OF PLANNING EDUCATION AND RESEARCH STUDIES:
• POLICY IMPLICATIONS OF WALKING TO SCHOOL IN INNER CITY LOS ANGELES
• BUILT ENVIRONMENT & PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN DETROIT
• REGIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH & TRANSPORTATION POLICIES: IMPACTS ON LOCAL HEALTH

-> According to a Sept. 5th Planetizen article, "[W]e need to start talking about how schools can promote Green Health. Green Health is the practice of place-making at a variety of scales that integrates environmental sustainability with health promotion. The Summer 2014 issue of the Journal of Planning Education and Research (bit.ly/XHrZXJ) is a compilation of conversations and research on this topic.

"Banerjee, Uhm, and Bahl examine student safety and travel as it relates to the built environment and social milieu environmental risks of walking to school. Their piece, Walking to School: The Experience of Children in Inner City Los Angeles and Implications for Policy,' (bit.ly/1B68MMH) provides crucial information about student travel for safe walking trips. Based on their analyses of student and parent perceptions, they present some very useful suggestions for researchers, planners and policymakers to consider in making similar evaluations in other regions. For example, walking to school policies and interventions need to address children’s concerns about crime, aesthetics and destinations, in addition to traffic and infrastructure. Also, policies impacting the trips to and from school need to be considered individually as the impetus behind each differs; time demands dominate the morning commute versus parental perception of youth competence, preference and social support in the afternoon.

"Wineman et al. further the conversation on walkability and physical activity in general in Designing Healthy Neighborhoods: Contributions of the Built Environment to Physical Activity in Detroit' (bit.ly/Y0Zk08). This piece extends the discussion to the perspective of the low-income resident in studying the interrelationships between the built environment, physical activity, and health outcomes. Their findings demonstrate that in neighborhoods with well-connected street networks, residents report higher levels of walking than in less well-connected neighborhoods.

"Several pieces in the Green Health Symposium focus on the policy perspective as it pertains to environmental sustainability and health promotion across various community design sectors including transportation. McAndrews and Marcus consider the integration of public health in transportation policy in Community-Based Advocacy at the Intersection of Public Health and Transportation: The Challenges of Addressing Local Health Impacts within a Regional Policy Process (bit.ly/1uYwv1d). A significant policy implication from their research is that action is required from multiple scales in order to effectively integrate health and transportation issues at the local level. They demonstrate that the issues that pose regional-local conflict require complex solutions, and should include forums, institutions, and advocacy tools for the implementation of health in all policies..."

Source: bit.ly/1qXCOC1
Title & Author: "Green Health Tools for 'Back to School'" by JPER

OR DOT: PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR OUTCOME BASED SYSTEM MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING

-> According to a Sept. 19th Transportation Research Board blurb, "The Oregon Department of Transportation has released a report (Transportation Performance Measures for Outcome Based System Management and Monitoring) (1.usa.gov/1xckHuH) that inventories its high-level transportation performance measures; compares them to federal, state, and agency goals; and identifies a framework to determine the suitability of the measures."

Source: bit.ly/1Dx3n5j
Title & Author: "Transportation Performance Measures for Outcome Based System Management and Monitoring" by Staff

CRASH EXPERIENCE WARRANT FOR TRAFFIC SIGNALS

-> According to a Sept. 22nd Transportation Research Board blurb, "TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 204: 'Crash Experience Warrant for Traffic Signals’ (bit.ly/1oheeqa) develops a procedure for evaluating and quantifying the safety of stop-controlled and signal-controlled intersections. The findings from this evaluation were used to develop a proposed crash experience warrant. 

"The main products of the research are the proposed crash experience warrant contained in this report, a spreadsheet tool (bit.ly/1uXs5YH) that implements the safety evaluation procedure, and a safety evaluation guidebook (bit.ly/1qsjRkV) and spreadsheet user manual."

Source: bit.ly/1oheeqa
Title & Author: "Crash Experience Warrant for Traffic Signals" by Staff

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