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BAD AIR 2X IMPACT ON LUNG FUNCTION FOR POOR, INCREASES COPD RISK 3X
-> AirQualityNews.com reported air pollution has twice the impact on lung function for members of lower-income households and it increases their risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by three times. In research published in the European Respiratory Journal, scientists from universities in Canada, Switzerland, and the UK studied the data of more than 300,000 people aged 40-69 who enrolled in the UK Biobank study. (Air pollution, Lung Function and COPD: Results from the Population-Based UK Biobank Study: http://bit.ly/2JqaBSZ) Their aim was to examine whether exposure to PM10, PM2.5 and NO2 was linked to changes in lung function. They also wanted to find out whether it affected participants' risk of developing COPD. http://bit.ly/2JoZ7PG

TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH RECORD: JOURNAL OF THE TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD
-> Papers recently released through the Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board OnlineFirst portal include:

- CRASHES, SIGNAL TREATMENTS & PROTECTED BIKE LANE INTERSECTIONS
-> This study builds on the success of New York City's protected bicycle lanes (PBLs) through improving the understanding and impacts of two primary intersection design treatments for single-direction PBLs: the mixing zone and fully split phase signal. Researchers found that following the installation of PBLs, the rate of crashes per bicyclist decreased by an average of 30%. They also identified similar benefits between mixing zones and fully split phases at intersections with lower turn volumes while at higher turn volume locations the shorter mixing zones have the lowest crash rates. Bicyclist Crash Comparison of Mixing Zone and Fully Split Phase Signal Treatments at Intersections with Protected Bicycle Lanes in New York City: http://bit.ly/2XFWvWo

- BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE USER PREFERENCES IN EMERGING CYCLING CULTURES
-> This paper discusses the findings of a survey in six Alabama and Tennessee communities, where cycling is not (yet) widely adopted. The analysis includes linear regression models built on respondents' reactions to images of bicycling infrastructure and their perceptions of being comfortable, safe, and willing to try cycling on the displayed roadway type. Findings indicate a preference for more separated bicycle infrastructure types, along with options that exclude on-street parking. User Preferences for Bicycle Infrastructure in Communities with Emerging Cycling Cultures: http://bit.ly/2XBCJLt

- BUILT ENVIRONMENT FACTORS AFFECTING BIKE SHARING RIDERSHIP
-> This work used a data-driven method to correlate arrivals and departures of station-based bike sharing systems with built environment factors in six German cities, and three elsewhere in Europe and North America. The most influencing variables were related to the city population, distance to city center, leisure-related establishments, and transport-related infrastructure. This data-driven method can help as a support decision-making tool to implement or expand bike sharing systems. Built Environment Factors Affecting Bike Sharing Ridership: Data-Driven Approach for Multiple Cities: http://bit.ly/2XA2USX

- IDENTIFYING TRAINING FOR YOUNG DRIVERS WHO CRASHED W/ CYCLISTS
-> This study compared bicycle-motor-vehicle (BMV) crashes involving novice drivers (under 25 years) with those involving experienced drivers in three Australian states. Novice drivers were involved in only a small proportion of BMV crashes and were not over-represented on a per-license basis. For both driver groups, most crashes happened on lower-speed roads, at intersections, and during the day. In contrast to expectations, the distribution of types of BMV crashes differed little between experienced and novice drivers. Young Driver Crashes with Cyclists: Identifying Training Opportunities: http://bit.ly/2XDMWqT

LEGAL FRAMEWORK & ROLES IN MAAS ECOSYSTEMS
-> SmartCitiesWorld reported the released of a study by the Mobility-as-a-Service Alliance to help support development of mobility-as-a-service (MaaS) by improving the common understanding of the legal framework and roles of public and private partners in MaaS implementations. (Study on Market Access and Competition Issues Related to MaaS: http://bit.ly/2JomlFl) The study focuses on market access and competition issues related to MaaS in the context of European Union (EU) law. Different local interpretations and uncertainties in the legal framework have held up market access and provision of MaaS services in European cities. http://bit.ly/2JpwnpW