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BIKE LANES CAN PROVIDE POSITIVE ECONOMIC IMPACT IN CITIES
-> A new study released by the Portland State University Transportation Research and Education Center found bicycle lanes and infrastructure can produce tangible economic benefits for cities. (Pedestrian Mobility - A Multi-City Multi-Approach Exploration: https://bit.ly/3eVZZZJ) The National Street Improvements Study researched the economic effects of bicycle infrastructure on 14 corridors across six cities -- Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Memphis, Minneapolis and Indianapolis. The study found that improvements such as bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure had either positive or non-significant impacts on the local economy as measured through sales and employment.

BIKE FACILITY PREFERENCES & EFFECTS ON INCREASING BIKE TRIPS
-> The Transportation Research Board released a report that presents an analysis of perceptions and preferences of cyclists for different types of bicycling facilities. (Bicyclist Facility Preferences and Effects on Increasing Bicycle Trips: https://bit.ly/35eK6cb) The study presents information on how cyclists and noncyclists perceive a range of on-street bicycling facility designs--including sharrows, bike lanes, and buffered bike lanes--along a variety of roadway types, with and without curbside automobile parking. Researchers analyzed the effect of newly constructed bicycling facilities on perceptions of bikeability and changes in the frequency of bicycling. The results provide insights into how the design and presence of new bicycling facilities can affect attitudes, preferences, and willingness to try cycling. The report includes a poster presentation (https://bit.ly/35caoMr) and a set of presentation slides (https://bit.ly/2Yhc9pV).

ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE & CYCLIST INJURY CRASHES
-> Accident Analysis & Prevention published a report of an in-depth study of 100 Western Australian cyclists who were injured due to involvement in a crash that occurred on road and resulted in an admission to a hospital. (Characteristics of the Road Infrastructure and Injurious Cyclist Crashes Resulting in a Hospitalisation (sic): https://bit.ly/2KHID51) Overall, 42% of crashes involved a motor vehicle and 58% did not. Bicycle crashes were severely under-reported with only 40% reported to the Police. Approximately half of crashes occurred at intersections (51%) and half at midblock (non-intersection) sites (49%). Fifty-seven percent of crashes that occurred at intersections involved a motor vehicle, whereas only 27% of crashes that occurred at midblocks involved a motor vehicle.

PEDS TRUST IN TRAFFIC LIGHTS & TRUST IN SELF-DRIVING CARS
-> The Conversation reported research published in Frontiers in Robotics and AI on pedestrians' perceptions of safety shows their trust of traffic lights tends to override their fear of self-driving cars. (Pedestrian Trust in Automated Vehicles: Role of Traffic Signal and AV Driving Behavior: https://bit.ly/3cUHzXt) This suggests one way to help pedestrians trust and safely interact with autonomous vehicles may be to link the cars' driving behavior to traffic lights. A recent University of MI study focused on communication via a vehicle's driving behavior to study how people might react to self-driving cars in different situations. When there was a light, pedestrians focused on the traffic light and usually crossed the street regardless whether the car was driving aggressively. https://bit.ly/3awk9pM

TRB BICYCLE TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE CENTENNIAL PAPER
-> The Transportation Research Board Centennial Celebration invited all standing committees to submit a Centennial Paper to showcase their past accomplishments and contributions, demonstrate their current relevancy and activities, and consider their role in meeting future challenges and opportunities. The Bicycle Transportation Committee (ANF20) https://bit.ly/2KH6JN7