Photo by John Williams

NCBW Newsroom - The Research Beat

The National & International Scene | Regional and Local Actions | The Research Beat | Resources | Jobs, Grants & RFPs

EVALUATION OF GREEN LANES/PROTECTED BIKE LANES

-> According to a July 7th State Smart Transportation Initiative article, "This report (Lessons from the Green Lanes: Evaluating Protected Bike Lanes in the U.S.: http://bit.ly/1snPJxr) presents findings from research evaluating U.S. protected bicycle lanes (cycle tracks) in terms of their use, perception, benefits, and impacts. The data was analyzed to assess actual behavior of bicyclists and motor vehicle drivers to determine how well each user type understood the design of the facility and to identify potential conflicts between bicyclists, motor vehicles and pedestrians.

"The study found that protected bike lanes encouraged substantial numbers of new bikers to take to the road, largely because they feel safer about doing so. More than half of automobile drivers felt the protected lanes made cyclists more predictable and safer. Residents saw the physically-separated bike lanes as improvements for their neighborhoods as a whole, even if they made it harder to park. And almost 60 percent of residents said the separated bike lanes made their streets work better for everyone."

Source: http://bit.ly/1wuxzYv
Title & Author: "Lessons from the Green Lanes: Evaluating Protected Bike Lanes in the U.S. (National Institute for Transportation and Communities, 2014)" by Staff

SMART GROWTH POLICIES' EFFECT ON TRAVEL DEMAND

-> According to a July 10th Transportation Research Board posting, "TRB's second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2) has released a project brief that provides transportation planning agencies with improved tools and methods to accurately and comprehensively integrate transportation investment decision making with land development and growth management. (Evaluating the Effect of Smart Growth Policies on Travel Demand: http://bit.ly/1mTyOPy)

"The project produced a decision support software tool and online resources to improve communication, interactions, and partnerships between decision makers and planners in both the transportation and land use arenas."

Source: http://bit.ly/1nH9VHn
Title & Author: "Evaluating the Effect of Smart Growth Policies on Travel Demand" by Staff

RECOMMENDED BICYCLE LANE WIDTHS FOR VARIOUS ROADWAY CHARACTERISTICS

-> According to a July 10th Transportation Research Board posting, "TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 766: Recommended Bicycle Lane Widths for Various Roadway Characteristics (http://bit.ly/1mTxQmc) presents an analysis of the research and design guidance for bicycle lane widths on existing travel lane widths and parking lane widths. The conclusions are most applicable to urban and suburban roadways with level grade and a posted speed limit of 30 mph and should be used cautiously for the design of roadways with motor vehicle speeds outside of the range of 25 to 35 mph, and in particular for higher-speed roadways."

Source: http://bit.ly/1mgclYt
Title & Author: "Recommended Bicycle Lane Widths for Various Roadway Characteristics" by Staff

PED & BIKE DATA COLLECTION METHODS IN OREGON

-> According to the abstract of the Design and Implementation of Pedestrian and Bicycle-Specific Data Collection Methods in Oregon published in June, "Although there is a growing need to access accurate and reliable pedestrian and bicycle data, there is no statewide system to collect data or plan future data collection efforts in the state of Oregon. To address these issues this research conducted a comprehensive review of pedestrian and bicycle data collection methods and counting technologies. Oregon data sources were also compiled and AADT estimation techniques were reviewed and applied to Oregon data. A pilot study was conducted to test bicycle and pedestrian counting methods at signalized intersections with 2070 controllers. The report also provides a summary of recommendations regarding factoring methods and the implementation of a statewide non-motorized data collection system."

Source: http://1.usa.gov/1zHKJ8O
Title & Author: "Design and Implementation of Pedestrian and Bicycle-Specific Data Collection Methods in Oregon" by Miguel Figliozzi, Chris Monsere, Krista Nordback, et al.

AIR TOXINS FROM MOTOR VEHICLES & DISTANCE FROM HIGHWAYS

-> According to a June Air Quality and Transportation Conformity Highlights article, "The FHWA and EPA National Near-Road Study Detroit, MI (http://1.usa.gov/1yq3Fr2), provides a summary of a monitoring study conducted in Detroit in 2010 - 2011. The objective of this study was to determine Mobile Source Air Toxic (MSAT) concentrations and variations in concentrations as a function of distance from the highway and to establish relationships between MSAT concentrations as related to highway traffic, meteorological conditions; and other pollutants primarily emitted from motor vehicles." 

Source: http://1.usa.gov/1t2baSf
Title & Author: "FHWA Posted New Report" by Staff

LACK OF EXERCISE, NOT DIET, LINKED TO RISE IN OBESITY

-> According to a July 7th Stanford Medicine News article, "An examination of national health survey results suggests that inactivity, rather than higher calorie intake, could be driving the surge in obesity. Inactivity rather than overeating could be driving the surge in Americans' obesity, according to a study by a team of Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. (Obesity, Abdominal Obesity, Physical Activity, and Caloric Intake in U.S. Adults: 1988-2010: http://bit.ly/1mTR4rW) Examining national health survey results from 1988 through 2010, the researchers found huge increases in both obesity and inactivity, but not in the overall number of calories consumed.

"'What struck us the most was just how dramatic the change in leisure-time physical activity was,' said Uri Ladabaum, MD, associate professor of gastroenterology and lead author of the study. 'Although we cannot draw conclusions about cause and effect from our study, our findings support the notion that exercise and physical activity are important determinants of the trends in obesity.'..."

Source: http://stanford.io/1l2DOxa
Title & Author: "Lack of exercise, not diet, linked to rise in obesity, Stanford research shows" by Becky Bach

Get a jump start on this news by subscribing to CenterLines.