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NYCDOT: LEFT TURN PED & BIKE CRASHES STUDY
-> As part of NYC's Vision Zero initiative, the New York City of Department of Transportation recently published findings from its study of left turn pedestrian and bicycle crashes. In 2016, Mayor DeBlasio prioritized the reduction of failure to yield crashes—left turns account for more than twice as many pedestrian and bicyclist fatalities as right turns, and over three times as many serious injuries, and fatalities. "Don’t Cut Corners: Left Turn Pedestrian & Bicyclist Crash Study" http://on.nyc.gov/2bfT0ZT

ADDRESSING MA ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DISPARITIES
-> A new collaborative effort by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Boston University School of Public Health aims to address the health effects of exposure to multiple negative environmental and social factors—such as air pollution, excess noise, lack of green space, and crime—in communities across Massachusetts. Their goal is to understand how certain characteristics, such as race or income, neighborhood, and features of homes—such as the age or proximity to a busy road—can interact to affect health risk. http://bit.ly/2aQPhEE

E-BICYCLISTS’ VS REGULAR CYCLISTS’ BEHAVIOR
-> With normal speeds topping out around 20 mph, are electronic-bikes (e-bikes) more prone to crashes? Do e-bike riders behave any differently than regular ones? And do pedestrians, drivers, and other cyclists respond any differently to these motor-powered two-wheelers, which often look much the same as non-motorized ones? CityLab reports a Swedish study published in Transportation Research (Using Naturalistic Data to Assess E-Cyclist Behavior: http://bit.ly/2bDoID4) suggests that e-bikes carry a specific set of safety implications, and that transportation policy makers might do well to adapt. Vehicle safety researchers from Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology set up 12 Gothenburg cyclists with e-bikes decked out with special research instruments, including GPS units, video cameras at front and rear, and sensors measuring acceleration and brake force. Researchers found e-bikes riders take faster, shorter, more frequent trips than regular riders do, and run into crashes or near crashes more often... http://bit.ly/2aMMrgQ

CYCLIST BEHAVIOR AFFECTS ON CRASH CONFIGURATIONS
-> Transportation Research recently published "How Cyclist Behavior Affects Bicycle Accident Configurations?" (http://bit.ly/2blGslm). To better understand cycling crashes and how cyclist behavior interacts with other factors in causing them, researchers surveyed all injured cyclists between 2009–2011 in the Rhône, a French territorial "départment". They created a typology of 17 recurring configurations of cycling collisions and single-bicycle crashes. External factors contributing to cycling crashes, such as "bad weather" (13%) or "riding at night" (14%), roadway configuration such as "cycling infrastructure" (16%) or "intersections" (25%), and cyclist behavior such as "alcohol consumption" (5%) or "speed" (25%) are discriminatory variables that interact in many crash configurations. This study shows how road user behavior-influences each step in the chain of events leading to a crash.

MOST AMERICANS WANT MORE INFRASTRUCTURE SPENDING
-> According to a recent Association of Equipment Manufacturers national poll (http://bit.ly/2bh0MT5), 80 to 90 percent of Americans believe that the nation’s highways, bridges, water and energy grids are in "some" to "extreme" need of repair. Respondents from across the political spectrum agreed on the need for increased action on infrastructure from all tiers of government. Roughly three-quarters of individuals wanted more from their state governments, while 72 percent and 70 percent wish federal and local governments, respectively, could do more. About 68 percent said that more federal dollars going into roads, bridges, and pipes would have a positive impact on the economy. CityLab: http://bit.ly/2bm0jCW

HIGH-TRAFFIC ARTERIALS REDUCE QUALITY OF LIFE, EVEN BLOCKS AWAY
-> Streetsblog USA reports a new US DOT-sponsored study (Does the Livability of a Residential Street Depend on the Characteristics of the Neighboring Street Network?: http://bit.ly/2buMEJr) found that high traffic on your street isn’t the only type of traffic affecting what you think of where you live. Researchers found that living near, but not on, a wide, high-traffic arterial can also reduce residential satisfaction. The research is a repudiation of the suburban style of traffic calming that dominated the U.S. for decades, where cul-de-sacs and lack of through streets limits traffic on residential streets by diverting cars to major arterials. Pouring traffic onto inhospitable arterial roads is negatively impacting nearby residential areas, too. http://bit.ly/2brlOlo

HAZARD-PERCEPTION TEST FOR CYCLING CHILDREN
-> Transportation Research recently published "A Hazard-Perception Test for Cycling Children: An Exploratory Study" (http://bit.ly/2bfCoS2). Researchers developed a hazard perception test for bicyclists and tested it on adults and children eight years old or older. The test evaluated visual behavior, environmental awareness, and risk perception. Although they found only few differences in visual behavior and environmental awareness, researchers noted adults reacted earlier to hazards than children. These results suggest that children have difficulties to interpret the necessary information to react timely to hazardous traffic situations.

BARRIERS & FACILITATORS OF HELMET USE AMONG KIDS & PARENTS
-> A study recently published in Transportation Research investigated barriers and facilitators of helmet use among primary and secondary school pupils and their parents via surveys. Researchers found among children, age, gender, barriers and facilitators predicted helmet use while among adults only frequency of cycling and barriers were related to helmet use. Among children, the strongest correlates of not using a helmet were the belief of not needing a helmet and wish to use a cap or a hat instead. Having a helmet wearing as a habit and feeling safer were the strongest correlates of using helmet. Among adults, the strongest correlates of not using a helmet were "helmet looks ridiculous", "just going to short trip" and riding close to home while the strongest correlate of using a helmet was the habit of helmet use. "Barriers and Facilitators of Bicycle Helmet Use Among Children and Their Parents" http://bit.ly/2bftLtL