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FLOW 15 QUICK FACTS FOR CITIES
-> FLOW was a European Commission research and innovation project focusing on the congestion reduction benefits of walking and cycling.(http://bit.ly/2bg5hml) It produced document that describes the results of 15 walking and cycling measures in Europe that not only improved conditions for pedestrians and cyclists, but also reduced congestion. For instance, analysis in London, England found one million daily journeys could be walked in less than 10 minutes; and 6.47 million daily journeys made by motorized modes could be cycled in less than 20 minutes. Walking, Cycling and Congestion: 15 Quick Facts for Cities: http://bit.ly/2L6cFy7

[See National & International Scene for more details on the FLOW project.]

FATAL PEDESTRIAN CRASHES INCREASINGLY INVOLVE SUVS
-> NPR reports pedestrian deaths in 2016 were the highest they've been since 1990. And SUVs were responsible for a growing number of those fatalities. A new study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety found that between 2009 and 2016, pedestrian fatalities increased in nearly every circumstance examined. (An Examination of the Increases in Pedestrian Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities During 2009–16: http://bit.ly/2L73rBU) But among all types of vehicles, SUVs had the biggest spike in single-vehicle fatal pedestrian crashes, and crashes were increasingly likely to involve high-horsepower vehicles. During that eight-year period, the number of such crashes involving SUVs increased by 81%. SUVs' front ends are higher and often more vertical, so they are more likely to hit a pedestrian in the head or chest, rather than the legs. https://n.pr/2rKcgt8

EFFECTS OF URBAN STRUCTURES SUPPORTING CYCLING IN DENMARK
-> A study published Journal of Transport Geography applies micro-level transport survey data to assess the significance of Bikeability variables on the probability of cycling in trips to or from residential and workplace locations in Denmark. The local scale, which includes the positive effects from population density and cycling infrastructures, is the most important in influencing cycling, but there are substantial additional contributions from access to retail and train stations within a range of 3–4km, as well as from the relative size of the city within the region. The effect of the regional scale most likely reflects the reliance upon motorized modes to connect to distant important nodes. "Bikeability -- Urban Structures Supporting Cycling. Effects of Local, Urban and Regional Scale Urban Form Factors on Cycling from Home and Workplace Locations in Denmark" http://bit.ly/2rKxIyh

CYCLING INJURY RISK IN LONDON
-> An article to be published in Accident Analysis & Prevention investigates cycling injury risk in relation to exposure, in London, England. Findings suggest that speed limits of 20mph may reduce cycling injury risk, as may motor traffic reduction. Further, building cycle routes that generate new cycle trips should generate 'safety in numbers' benefits. "Cycling Injury Risk in London: A Case-Control Study Exploring the Impact of Cycle Volumes, Motor Vehicle Volumes, and Road Characteristics including Speed Limits" http://bit.ly/2L6qNre

META-ANALYSES OF THE EFFECTS OF BIKE HELMETS ON INJURIES
-> An article to be published in Accident Analysis & Prevention reports on a meta-analysis conducted of the effects of bicycle helmets on serious head injury and other injuries among crash involved cyclists. The use of bicycle helmets was found to reduce head injury by 48%, serious head injury by 60%, traumatic brain injury by 53%, face injury by 23%, and the total number of killed or seriously injured cyclists by 34%. "Bicycle helmets -- To Wear or Not to Wear? A Meta-Analyses of the Effects of Bicycle Helmets on Injuries" http://bit.ly/2rMszpi

WHY DO PEOPLE LIKE BICYCLING? MODELING AFFECT TOWARD BICYCLING
-> Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour reports on a study that explored factors that may influence an individual's liking of bicycling, or more formally, their bicycling affect. Results showed that bicycling behavior has the strongest association with liking bicycling, with bicycling constraints following as the second most important factor. Individual cognitions, including perceptions and normative beliefs, also play important roles in predicting bicycling affect. Individual measures of the physical environment do not correlate with liking of bicycling, but the perception that biking to various destinations is safe does. "Why do People Like Bicycling? Modeling Affect Toward Bicycling" http://bit.ly/2L6Yqcu

CYCLING INTERVENTIONS W/ OVERWEIGHT ADULTS IN LOW-INCOME LATINO & BLACK COMMUNITIES
-> Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour reports on a pilot study that summarized perceived barriers to bicycling among overweight adults in two low-income communities of color and evaluates the impact of a bicycling intervention on these perceived barriers. The 12-week intervention consisted of group bicycle rides and bicycling instruction. Several barriers declined significantly among intervention group members soon after it was completed. In addition to decreasing barriers, qualitative analysis suggested that increasing support from family and friends as well as emphasizing personal health benefits could help motivate people to bicycle. "Can a Twelve-Week Intervention Reduce Barriers to Bicycling Among Overweight Adults in Low-Income Latino and Black Communities?" http://bit.ly/2rL3HhV

EFFECTIVE SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT OPTIONS FOR MINNESOTANS
-> Social media can be effective as a strategic and select part of public engagement plans, according to findings of a University of MN study published by MN DOT. The project investigated current knowledge about public engagement through social media nationwide and in MN. It also developed guidance about how social media may be used to reach and engage diverse populations in the state about transportation planning and projects. "Effective Social Media Engagement Options for Minnesota's Diversifying Population" http://bit.ly/2JiexTJ

JOB ACCESS BY AUTO & CONGESTION IMPACT BY CENSUS BLOCK
-> The Center for Transportation Studies at the University of MN released a report that estimates the accessibility to jobs by auto for each of the 11 million US census blocks. This report presents detailed accessibility and congestion impact values for the 50 largest (by population) metropolitan areas, and includes a census tract-level map that shows accessibility patterns at a national scale. "Access Across America: Auto 2016" http://bit.ly/2HIwOZa