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STUDY: $10M SRTS SPENDING NETS $230M IN SOCIETAL BENEFITS
-> Fast Company reports a new study from researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health shows per dollar spent, constructing bike lanes is a cheap way to improve public health. (The Cost-Effectiveness of Bike Lanes in New York City: http://bit.ly/2ghe6Nh) For instance back in 2005, New York City spent $10 million on curbing traffic as part of the federally-funded Safe Routes to School program. Sidewalks were widened, bike lanes constructed, and traffic lights re-phased to suit pedestrians. The "net societal benefit" of these changes? The study's authors estimate it to be $230 million. http://bit.ly/2fQzPZi

ULI: HEALTHY CORRIDORS PROJECT
-> At a recent Urban Lands Institute meeting, a moderator noted "Auto-centric commercial corridors make it challenging to walk or bike or access healthy food. The majority of pedestrian deaths in the U.S. occur along corridors such as this. Every community has them." Many of these communities, she noted, are in low-income areas with minority populations. The Healthy Corridors project (http://bit.ly/2gwRcyY) is working to inspire action to improve such corridors across the country. ULI leaders from three of the four cities with demonstration corridors in the Healthy Corridors project—Los Angeles, Nashville, and Denver—as well as from a model healthy corridor in Shoreline, Washington, reported on their progress and their direction for the future. http://bit.ly/2fPH57V

SMALL MPO PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PRACTICES
-> As part of its research into effective public involvement and environmental strategies for rural and small metropolitan areas, the Community Transportation Association of America (CTAA) conducted a scan of the 274 MPOs with planning responsibilities for urbanized areas under 200,000 population. In this scan, which took place during January 2016, CTAA asked these MPOs about the successful and potentially replicable strategies that were used to engage with low-income and minority communities as part of these MPOs’ planning activities. Check out the highlights of their results: http://bit.ly/2gvPU7m

BIKE SCORE, URBAN BIKEABILITY & BICYCLING BEHAVIOR
-> In a study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, researchers sought to determine if Bike Score was associated with between and within-city variability in cycling behavior. Bike Score® is a metric capturing environmental characteristics associated with cycling that is now available for over 160 US and Canadian cities. They found the Bike Score metric was associated bicycle mode share between and within cities, suggesting its utility for planning bicycle infrastructure. Bike Score®: Associations between Urban Bikeability and Bicycling Behavior in 24 Cities: http://bit.ly/2fPZBiT

IN PROGRESS: MEASURING MULTIMODAL NETWORK CONNECTIVITY
-> This research project will synthesize and present options available for measuring multimodal network connectivity and tracking change over time. It will be a comprehensive resource that documents existing network connectivity performance metrics. The research will evaluate how various metrics, approaches, and methodologies can be used to support planning decisions and identify best practices. The project will apply a subset of methodologies in five case study communities, and the results will be incorporated into the final report. Contact Dan Goodman, Transportation Specialist in FHWA’s Office of Human Environment for details: daniel.goodman@dot.gov.

GPS-ENABLED HOUSEHOLD TRAVEL SURVEYS SAMPLE SIZE
-> The Transportation Research Board report, "Sample Size Implications of Multi-Day GPS-Enabled Household Travel Surveys," summarizes a project that studied the design of household travel surveys. Multi-day travel surveys are now more feasible, given global positioning system (GPS) technology. This project explores if surveys using a GPS device provides less drop-off in response compared to travel diaries. This project also investigates the effects of using multi-day data for developing travel demand models and explores the impact of sample size on multi-day versus single-day surveys. http://bit.ly/2fPYEHk