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NEW FROM FHWA: SEPARATED BIKE LANE PLANNING AND DESIGN GUIDE
-> Yesterday FHWA guidance released its Separated Bike Lane Planning and Design Guide (http://1.usa.gov/1PVn0Y2). It is the result of two years of research into numerous modern protected bike lanes around the country, in consultation with a team of national experts. Among the many useful images and ideas in the 148-page document is a spectrum of comfortable bike lanes, starting with bike infrastructure that will be useful to the smallest number of people and continuing into the more broadly appealing categories. [http://bit.ly/1rW2snN]

RURAL ROAD LIGHT SURFACE TREATMENT
-> Because of limited funding, some agencies are considering reverting some rural roads with lower volumes of traffic to gravel. But doing so creates a surface with a much lower ride quality, and vehicles driving over gravel roads stir up substantial amounts of dust. Fortunately, a method is available that serves as a middle ground between the costs of repaving and the drawbacks of reverting to gravel. Called a light surface treatment, this method applies a light asphalt emulsion to a thicker than usual base.

A new report from the LRRB synthesizes LST state-of-the-practice in the United States (Lightly Surfaced Roads: Stabilized Aggregate Applications: http://bit.ly/1EWxyQx, and Light Surface Treatments: A Cost-Effective Middle Ground for Maintaining Low-Volume Roads Technical Summary: http://bit.ly/1HrEAB5)

SYLLABUS FOR RACE, JUSTICE & DESIGN COURSE
-> Members of the African American Student Union (AASU) of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design notes their instruction has been based in the work of architects whose worldviews don’t give heavy weight to social problems. AASU president Dana McKinney told Al Jazeera that issues of race and justice are not only not discussed among designers, but neither does Harvard’s Design School offer courses that consider these things together. Here’s a syllabus for course suggested by urban architects and designers... [http://bit.ly/1IP31Kh]

DESIGNING ACCESSIBLE PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES
-> The NJ Division of the Federal Highway Administration created a slide presentation on pedestrian accessibility on transportation-related facilities and rights-of-way. [Designing Pedestrian Facilities for Accessibility: http://bit.ly/1FqbcLR] Curb cuts and street crossings are covered in detail, with extensive photos marked up with dimensions and critical points. The appropriate laws and guidance are cited and explained for various facilities. [http://bit.ly/1LfO6s5]

[See also APBP’s Designing Pedestrian Facilities for Accessibility Course: http://bit.ly/1FlgcAd]

VIDEO: PATH AS PLACE PRESENTATION
-> In this 9:42 minute video in Spanish with English subtitles, Julio Carrillo makes a presentation based on the concept of “Path as Place” by Ian Lockwood of Toole Design that Ian presented at CNU 23 in Dallas. The video touches on the integration between transportation and urbanism. With a powerful and simple idea as this, it is simple to understand how wrong it is to support automobile infrastructure in a growing city. [http://bit.ly/1R250xw]

SURVEY: VIEWS ON HOUSING, TRANSPORTATION & COMMUNITY
-> Many Americans face significant community design-related barriers to living a healthy life, according to a new Urban Land Institute report (America in 2015: A ULI Survey of Views on Housing, Transportation and Community: http://on.uli.org/1AkK9kW). The report is based on a nationwide survey of 1,201 adults. A large number of people, particularly minorities and Millennials, report living in areas that lack easy access to safe places for outdoor physical activity, active transportation systems such as bike lanes, and healthy food options. [http://bit.ly/1c3YSVU]

PARKLET IMPACT ON SIDEWALK VITALITY & LOCAL BUSINESSES
-> The University City District (Philadelphia, PA) published a briefing on "The Case for Parklets: Measuring the Impact on Sidewalk Vitality and Neighborhood Businesses" (http://bit.ly/1HPTzEb). This publication examines the economic benefits of converting parking spaces into temporary inviting public spaces with seating and bicycle racks. [http://1.usa.gov/1L8Te0p]

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