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PAYING FOR INNOVATIVE ONSTREET BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE

-> According to a July 7th Advocacy Advance post, "Advocacy Advance recently released its latest report, 'How Communities are Paying for Innovative OnStreet Bicycle Infrastructure.' (http://bit.ly/1rpH6jh) The report provides examples of how communities across the country are paying for separated bicycle infrastructure. Just like how communities are paying for other important civic infrastructure, communities are using a combination of federal, state, local/regional, and private sources of funds...

"In conjunction with the report's release, Advocacy Advance held a webinar with the report's author, Darren Flusche, Policy Director at the League of American Bicyclists? Randy Neufeld, Director at SRAM Cycling Fund? and Kyle Wagenschutz, Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator at the City of Memphis, TN. Watch the webinar recording (http://bit.ly/1rfCIFQ - just over 1 hour) and download the combined slides from all panelists (http://bit.ly/1rfCNJB - PDF)..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1mg3mXl
Title & Author: "Getting it done: How communities are paying for innovative infrastructure" by Staff

AARP RESOURCES FOR LIVABLE AND AGE-FRIENDLY COMMUNITIES

-> According to a July Fostering Livable Communities Newsletter article, "Central to the creation of livable communities is the possibility for everyone, regardless of age or ability, to travel safely. Yet, many of our nation's roads do little to meet the needs of the growing population of older Americans."

-Excerpted from the Complete Streets in the Southeast Tool Kit (http://1.usa.gov/1nvgDf2) released in 2014 by Smart Growth for America, the National Complete Streets Coalition, and AARP...

"According to AARP, two complementary approaches can overcome these transportation challenges. First, communities can ensure that residents of all ages and abilities have access to a range of transportation options (including public and specialized transit services) and that streets are safe for walking and bicycling as well as for driving. Second, policy makers can coordinate housing, transportation, and land-use policies to promote the development of walkable, transit-oriented communities that allow older adults to live near essential services."

Source: http://1.usa.gov/1tQ2p1z
Title & Author: "AARP Provides Resources for Livable and Age-Friendly Communities" by Amy Levner

COLLABORATIONS BETWEEN SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL & SCHOOL BUSING

-> According to a July Safe Routes to School National Partnership eNews article, "Student transportation departments usually focus on busing children to school, but there is great potential for collaboration with Safe Routes to School advocates. Buses, Boots, and Bicycles: Exploring Collaboration Between Safe Routes to School and School Busing Professionals to Get Children to School Safely and Healthily, a new report released by the National Partnership (http://bit.ly/1yqJae2), presents a comprehensive look at student transportation in the United States and proposes ways that Safe Routes to School professionals and transportation directors could collaborate more effectively to ensure that all children safely access their local schools. (50% of vehicle trips to school are at a distance easily covered on foot or by bike.)"

Source: http://bit.ly/1mKXfiP
Title & Author: "Buses, Boots, and Bicycles: Exploring Collaboration Between Safe Routes to School and School Busing Professionals" by Staff

[See related July 17 webinar in Webinar section above.]

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MODELING & DATA COLLECTION TO IMPROVE ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION 

-> According to a July Safe Routes to School National Partnership eNews article, "To better understand the current state of active transportation data collection and modeling in California, the National Partnership regional network project staff conducted a series of structured interviews with modeling professionals across California in the fall of 2013. The National Partnership has compiled the results from these interviews into a report titled Improving Modeling and Data Collection to Improve Active Transportation (http://bit.ly/WhdeuZ) to provide policy makers a series of recommendations they can implement to improve data collection and modeling for active transportation. While this report specifically focused on efforts in California, many of the recommendations will apply to states across the nation."

Source: http://bit.ly/1mKXfiP
Title & Author: "New Report Aims to Catalyze Improvements to Modeling and Data Collection" by Staff

UNCONTROLLED PED CROSSINGS ASSESSMENT & DESIGN GUIDE

-> According to a July CTS Catalyst article, "...To help Minnesota transportation agencies evaluate pedestrian crossings and determine where improvements are warranted, the Minnesota Local Road Research Board funded the development of a new guidebook for practitioners. (Pedestrian Crossings: Uncontrolled Locations: http://bit.ly/1rpFztj) The guidebook focuses specifically on uncontrolled pedestrian crossings, which aren't controlled by a stop sign, yield sign, or traffic signal.

"The new guidebook recommends when to install marked crosswalks and other enhancements based on a number of factors, including the average daily vehicle count, number of pedestrians, number of lanes, and average vehicle speed. It helps agencies rate a crossing for pedestrian service, and includes a flow chart and several worksheets to assist in data collection and decision making... The guidebook is designed around an 11-step evaluation process that engineers can use to evaluate an uncontrolled pedestrian crossing location in a systematic way. Based on the results of the evaluation, users can identify what level of treatment is appropriate for their location, ranging from in-street crossing signs to overhead flashing beacons to traffic calming devices such as curb bump-outs. For each potential treatment option, the guidebook includes information on advantages, disadvantages, recommended locations, and cost..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1wtjb2L
Title & Author: "New guidebook aims to make pedestrian crossings safer" by Staff

2 RURAL SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL RESOURCES + WELLNESS POLICY & GENERAL PLAN LANGUAGE

-> According to a July 15th email message, "Even though the Safe Routes to School movement has gained momentum nationwide, many communities still face challenges implementing these programs. Four new publications from ChangeLab Solutions are now available to help districts, parents, and active transportation advocates develop policies for walking or bicycling to school.

"On the Move (http://bit.ly/1mg54rG) and Get Out & Get Moving (http://bit.ly/1oXRGgo) are geared toward rural areas that face unique challenges around implementing Safe Routes to School programs. On the Move breaks down approaches and tools of particular interest to rural school districts, including highlights of the online Safe Routes to School Policy Workbook (http://bit.ly/1l24kGZ) tool. Get Out & Get Moving explores the legal implications of remote drop-off programs, and includes a cost-benefit worksheet for assessing risk...

"Incorporating Safe Routes to School into Local School Wellness Policies (http://bit.ly/1tPMZKT) and Model General Plan Language Supporting Safe Routes to Schools (http://bit.ly/1wtpbs8) provide model language that communities can adapt to their specific needs..."

Source: http://bit.ly/1l25cLD
Title & Author: "Healthy Resources for Walking & Biking to School" by Staff

GUIDELINES FOR ROAD DIET CONVERSIONS

-> According to a July 9th CMAP article, "The Kentucky Transportation Center at the University of Kentucky released Guidelines for Road Diet Conversions (http://bit.ly/1oY1F5o). The guidelines consider operational and safety aspects of the conversions to assist in the preliminary determination of whether a road diet conversion is appropriate for a given roadway segment. The guidelines provide suggested cross section designs, transition to and from the road diet section, and a flow chart for determining the appropriate actions.

"Road diets typically involve restriping of a four-lane, undivided roadway as a three-lane road with two through lanes and a two-way left-turn lane.  The resulting 'extra' roadway width can be converted to create bicycle lanes, supply on-street parking, widen sidewalks, or provide opportunities for landscaped median islands.  Road diets seek to develop multimodal corridors within the original right-of-way and are an innovative solution to address mobility and safety concerns in an environment with budgetary constraints."

Source: http://1.usa.gov/W9CFyl
Title & Author: "Guidelines for road diet conversions" by Staff

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