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RUMBLE STRIP IMPLEMENTATION ON NON-FREEWAY FACILITIES
-> FHWA released its rumble strip decision support guide to inform agencies on center lane rumble strips and shoulder rumble strips installation. It also documents the current state of the practice for their installation, conducts a gap analysis, and provides a framework for future research related to further implementation of rumble strips. "State of the Practice for Shoulder and Center Line Rumble Strip Implementation on Non-Freeway Facilities" http://bit.ly/2nH8jVT

[See Webinar section for a TRB webinar on rumble strips on March 28, 2017.]

PRACTICE OF RUMBLE STRIPS & RUMBLE STRIPES
-> A TRB synthesis captured current practices used by states installing rumble strips and stripes and explored variations in design, criteria and locations for installation, maintenance, perceived benefits, communication of benefits, and what are considered important issues (including impacts on bicyclists). In contrast to other standardized safety countermeasures, such as signs or pavement markings, there are no national standards of practice for rumble strips, so their lengths, widths, gaps, applicable locations, and general maintenance can vary widely among agencies. "Practice of Rumble Strips and Rumble Stripes" http://bit.ly/1P40UTz

FHWA METROPOLITAN PEDESTRIAN & BICYCLE PLANNING HANDBOOK
-> FHWA released its "Metropolitan Pedestrian and Bicycle Planning Handbook" to provide Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) with practical information and examples as they consider pedestrian and bicycle transportation in their regional planning activities. Based on research including interviews with seven MPOs and critical evaluations of plans and associated documents from 11 other MPOs, this handbook covers integration of pedestrian and bicycle information into the metropolitan transportation planning process. http://bit.ly/2nQH3AZ

FHWA REGIONAL COOPERATION & BIKE/PED & TRANSIT CONNECTIONS
-> FHWA released "Regional Cooperation and Bike/Ped and Transit Connections: A Regional Models of Cooperation Peer Exchange Summary Report" of a meeting held in October 2016. (http://bit.ly/2nIKU6f) Enhancing connections between bicycle and pedestrian and transit facilities can bring benefits to transportation systems including broadening the reach of transit systems; increasing access to different modes of transportation; promoting the health benefits of active transportation; and providing opportunities for transportation for communities with limited access to automobiles. Participants of this workshop identified 10 key strategies that agencies can employ to improve connections between bicycle, pedestrian, and transit infrastructure. These range from broad considerations, such as gaining support from agency leadership and other agencies; measuring needs and outcomes; prioritizing equity concerns; promoting the varied benefits of bicycle and pedestrian and transit modes; and redefining transit to include biking, walking, and on-demand services. The remaining strategies relate more closely to project level work.

IDENTIFYING AND MEASURING THE BENEFITS OF ACCESSIBILITY
-> The International Transport Forum released a report that explores the impacts of accessibility on economic and social life to move towards a framework for measuring the benefits of accessibility. (Towards a Framework for Identifying and Measuring the Benefits of Accessibility: ) When addressing the specific application of accessibility rights, governments, regulatory bodies and courts around the world deal comprehensively with costs but fail to value important categories of benefit, such as the reduction of stigmatic harms, "option" benefits and "existence" value, and capability value. The paper describes progress towards a comprehensive narrative and analytical framework for describing and measuring these benefits. http://bit.ly/2nQYgKJ

AARP WALK AUDIT TOOL KIT & LEADER GUIDE
-> Another article in the AARP Livable Communities Newsletter describes the AARP Walk Audit Tool Kit: A Step-by-Step Self-Service Guide for Assessing a Community's Walkability (http://bit.ly/2nR2thc) The walk audit download provides step-by-step instructions and checklists for examining intersections, sidewalks, driver behavior, public safety and more. Since the survey is user-directed, the walk audit can take as little or as much time as desired by, say, spending 15 minutes at one busy corner or devoting several hours to documenting several roadways in a neighborhood. The documented results can be shared with elected officials and other local leaders when advocating for such safe streets features as sidewalks, crosswalks and properly timed traffic lights. The AARP Walk Audit Tool Kit Leader Guide: How to Host a Walkability Workshop and Community Walk Audit (http://bit.ly/2nR667b) describes how to plan for and manage a larger-scale event. http://bit.ly/2nRcOtI

MO DOT GUIDE TO SEARCHING FOR EXTERNAL FUNDING
-> MO DOT developed a training methodology for identifying external funding, teambuilding and collaborative partners, and proposal element design. "Transportation Research Methods: A Guide to Searching for Funding Opportunities" http://on.mo.gov/2nGUSVQ

IMPORTANT THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN DESIGNING STREETS FOR PEOPLE
-> Arch Daily lists 4 important things to consider when designing streets for people, not just cars. The description of each one also describes new materials, technologies and thinking. The first involves streets as a linear system for both horizontally and vertically organizing the network of a variety of utilities. Second, the street is a drainage system... http://bit.ly/2nHiOse

11 WAYS TO MAKE STREETS SAFE FOR WALKING
-> An article in the AARP Livable Communities Newsletter describes 11 ways to make streets safe for walking. These include reduce the number of car lanes on wide streets; reduce the width of car lanes; reduce the length of crosswalks & make them more visible, and add medians or pedestrian islands in the middle of busy streets among others. http://bit.ly/2nR2emD