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CDC: ONLINE COUNTY COMMUNITY HEALTH STATUS INDICATORS
-> Centers for Disease Control released the updated Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI: http://1.usa.gov/1LUYPMA) online tool that produces public health profiles for all 3,143 counties in the United States. Each profile includes key indicators of health outcomes, which describes the population health status of a county and factors that have the potential to influence health outcomes, such as health care access and quality, health behaviors, social factors, and the physical environment.

The re-designed online application includes updated peer county groups, health status indicators, a summary comparison page, and U.S. Census tract data and indicators for sub-populations (age groups, sex, and race/ethnicity) to identify potential health disparities. In this new version of CHSI, all indicators are benchmarked against those of peer counties, the median of all U.S. counties, and Healthy People 2020 targets. Organizations conducting community health assessments can use CHSI data to:

  • Assess community health status and identify disparities;
  • Promote a shared understanding of the wide range of factors that can influence health; and
  • Mobilize multi-sector partnerships to work together to improve population health. [Source: http://1.usa.gov/1EFdN00]

COMMUNICATING TO ADVANCE THE PUBLIC'S HEALTH: WORKSHOP SUMMARY (2015)
-> The Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Population Health Improvement brings together individuals and organizations that represent different sectors in a dialogue about what is needed to improve population health. On September 22, 2014, the roundtable held a workshop to discuss some of the science of health communication, audiences, and messaging, and to explore what it will take to generate widespread awareness, acceptance, and action to improve health, including through the entertainment media, the news media, and social media. This report summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop. [Source: http://bit.ly/19jz72]

TRAINING FRAMEWORK FOR PUBLIC HEALTH & PLANNING PROFESSIONALS
-> As public health professionals and urban planners begin to work more closely, they need the ability to speak each otherís languages in order to work together effectively. This toolkit will help both professions get basic training in concepts that will foster this collaboration. [Source: http://1.usa.gov/1LV0fqB]

TOOLS TO SUPPORT HEALTH AND TRANSPORTATION PLANNING
-> The Transportation Research Board's (TRB) Health & Transportation Subcommittee hosted a workshop that focused on a variety of tools that practitioners, researchers, and analysts could find useful when exploring the intersection of health and transportation. The meeting participants discussed 12 tools, which are summarized in this workshop working plan document (Tools to Support Health and Transportation Planning and Analysis: http://bit.ly/1EXANMJ). [Source: http://1.usa.gov/1CXrFYE]

ACTIVITY-BASED TRAVEL DEMAND MODELS: A PRIMER
-> TRBís second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2) Report S2-C46-RR-1: Activity-Based Travel Demand Models: A Primer (http://bit.ly/1FECAHc) explores ways to inform policymakersí decisions about developing and using activity-based travel demand models to better understand how people plan and schedule their daily travel.

The document is composed of two parts. The first part provides an overview of activity-based model development and application. The second part discusses issues in linking activity-based models to dynamic network assignment models. [Source: http://bit.ly/1o6sG4u]

REPORT: MEASURING WHAT WE VALUE
-> How do we justify transportation expenditures? To many people, the perception is that project decisions are made in a mysterious process, or through a political process where only the projects with the most connections get funded. Further, it is not clear to the average person what all the spending gets them.

Transitioning to a more performance-based system of transportation investment was a key reform of MAP-21 and could represent a sea change in how funding decisions are made and our transportation system performs. This report and recommended framework (Measuring What We Value: Setting Priorities and Evaluating Success in Transportation) looks at innovative DOTs and MPOs experiencing early successes in measuring transportation system performance and getting the best value from their investments. It also outlines T4America's recommended goals and measures for system performance, safety, economic health and resilience, access to destinations and public health and environment. [Source: http://bit.ly/1xfW81q]

BUILDING HEALTHY PLACES TOOLKIT
-> Urban Land Instituteís Building Healthy Places Toolkit: Strategies for Enhancing Health in the Built Environment (http://on.uli.org/1EFtnZN) outlines evidence-supported opportunities for enhancing health outcomes in real estate developments. Developers, owners, property managers, designers, investors, and others involved in real estate decision making can use the reportís recommendations and strategies to create places that contribute to healthier people and communities, and to enhance and preserve value by meeting growing desires for health-promoting places. [Source: http://on.uli.org/1Cp7XTE]

REPORT: THE WALKUP WAKE-UP CALL: BOSTON
-> In the Boston metropolitan area, walkable urbanism adds value. On average, office, retail, hotel, rental apartments, and for-sale housing have higher values per square foot in walkable urban places than in low-density drivable locations. These price premiums of 20 to 134 percent per square foot are strong indicators of pent-up demand for walkable urbanism.

Walkable urban places are now gaining market share over drivable locations for the first time in at least half a century in hotel, office and rental apartment development. Households in walkable urban places spent less on housing and transportation (43 percent of total household budget) than households in drivable locations (48 percent), primarily due to lower transportation costs. In addition, property tax revenues generated in walkable urban places are substantially higher than in drivable locations on a per acre basis. [Report: The WalkUP Wake-Up Call: Boston: http://bit.ly/18VYA1S. Source: http://bit.ly/1GhdPjf]

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