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TACTICAL URBANISM: SHORT-TERM ACTION FOR LONG-TERM CHANGE
-> Check out Next City’s excerpt from the new book, “Tactical Urbanism: Short-Term Action for Long-Term Change” by Mike Lydon and Anthony Garcia (http://bit.ly/1bhEoJ0). “Vacant lots. Empty storefronts. Run down buildings, and scantly used parking lots. Overly wide streets for driving... in Dallas, a group of artists and activists have shown us that you don’t need to wait for an angel investor or benevolent government agency to play the role of savior. Instead, the people that live in a neighborhood can jumpstart its revitalization in a single weekend, armed with nothing more than their energy, ideas and donated materials...” [Source: http://bit.ly/1QhxPXq]

(See related article: Former NYC DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan says a nimble, tactical-urbanism-style approach was key to her success: http://bit.ly/1yNTYXU)

TECH HACKERS PLOT RADIUS RIDE DATA TO ID ACTUAL RIDE TIMES
-> Radius Rides are organized events in which a group of cyclists starting from the same location, like a high-school parking lot, library, or shopping center take routes away from there. This actual ride data is then valuable for showing the local public how far one can get on a bike in five, 10, or 15-minute intervals from the selected starting point. The rides are relaxed-speed group rides – not races – for the purpose of recording data to plot on maps.

In Alexandria, Virginia, we chose the high school’s main campus as the start of our first Radius Ride because it is central to the city and generates a lot of car and school bus traffic. Starting from the high-school parking lot, we traced out routes along the roads and paths that led to the edge of the school’s boundaries. Next, we recruited experienced riders who could face our inconsistently bike-friendly roads. We asked them to bring a cell phone loaded with an app, like Strava, that could collect and export the route data in the commonly-used GPX file format. When all the rides were completed, we sent the GPX files to Mobility Lab’s tech guru Michael Schade. He spent several long nights compiling the data and creating a way to display the information in a very informative full-motion graphic of the entire event. [http://bit.ly/1HjmdAz]

INVISIBLE SPRAY PAINT MAKES CYCLISTS GLOW IN THE DARK
-> Volvo LifePaint is a highly reflective temporary spray which is invisible in the daytime but becomes illuminous at night, by reflecting the light from headlights. Volvo LifePaint can be sprayed onto bikes, clothing and bags to help make cyclists much more visible in the dark. The particles in the paint cannot be seen in the daytime but glow brightly under headlights, illuminating the bike and rider. The paint lasts for about a week, can be washed off anytime and will not have any lasting effect on the surface material. It is currently available in bike shops around London. [http://bit.ly/1Oka79d]

ACTIVETRANS PRIORITY TOOL RANKS PED & BIKE IMPROVEMENTS
-> TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 803: Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation Along Existing Roads—ActiveTrans Priority Tool Guidebook (http://bit.ly/1HsqlNb) presents a tool and guidance to help prioritize improvements to pedestrian and bicycle facilities, either separately or together as part of a “complete streets” evaluation approach. Download a CD-ROM with a programmed spreadsheet to use the ActiveTrans Priority Tool, and a final report documenting the research approach, findings, and conclusions. [http://bit.ly/1aQrd1o]

COMPLETE STREETS TOOLKIT
-> CMAP (Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning), in collaboration with the National Complete Streets Coalition and Active Transportation Alliance, has produced a Complete Streets Toolkit. (http://1.usa.gov/1DgbK2B) Complete Streets is a transportation policy and design approach that requires streets to be planned, designed, operated, and maintained to enable safe, convenient, and comfortable travel and access for all anticipated roadway users, regardless of their age, abilities, or mode of travel. The Toolkit is intended to serve as a guide for incorporating a Complete Streets approach into local planning, design, and construction processes and documents. [http://1.usa.gov/1GgUrle]

HEALTH IN TRANSPORTATION WORKING GROUP: 2014 ANNUAL REPORT
-> The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Health in Transportation Working Group examines the agency's policies and programs and their impacts on health-related issues such as air quality, active transportation, environmental review, noise, safety, livable communities, and access to health-related facilities. Working Group members lead and participate in many initiatives that aim to encourage the consideration of health in all aspects of transportation. This report provides an overview of the Working Group's activities and accomplishments in 2014, summarizes other DOT health-related accomplishments, documents its progress toward the recommendations included in the 2013 Annual Report, and offers recommendations for 2015 based on several themes that the Working Group discussed in 2014. [http://1.usa.gov/1JstlYG]

BOOK: SOUTH KOREAN NEIGHBORHOOD—ONE MONTH, NO CARS
-> The book “Neighborhood in Motion” shows how a one-month car-free festival in a neighborhood affects the urban spaces and the mindsets and lifestyles of the residents. In September 2013 a conference and a festival on EcoMobility were organized in Haenggung-dong, a neighborhood of Suwon, in which 1,500 registered cars were blocked from the neighborhood for 30 days. The district’s 4,300 residents were forced to switch over to alternative modes of transport, or ‘EcoMobility’ — walking, cycling, ‘wheeling’, public transport and car-sharing. The idea behind this urban experiment was to prepare the citizens of Suwon for urban life in an era of dwindling fossil resources and therefore make them aware of low-carbon energy supply and how this could look like in real life. [http://bit.ly/1DAa7Me]

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