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SHARED MOBILITY AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBLIC TRANSIT
-> The Transportation Research Board recently published Shared Mobility and the Transformation of Public Transit (http://bit.ly/2d1yYrM). It examines the relationship of public transportation (including paratransit and demand-responsive services) to shared modes, including bikesharing, carsharing, microtransit, and ridesourcing services provided by companies such as Uber and Lyft. The report also explores issues and opportunities and challenges as they relate to technology-enabled mobility services, including suggesting ways that transit can learn from, build upon, and interface with these new modes.

[See the Webinar section for a September 29 webinar on this publication.]

EUROPEAN MOBILITY WEEK ACTIVITIES
-> Get some new ideas from the European Mobility Week activities people planned in communities around Europe and vote for your favorite: an adult tricycle workshop in Zagreb, a Croatian Bike to Work campaign, manual bike counts in Antwerpen and Flanders, and an intermodal bike-bus street game in Gijón, among many others. http://bit.ly/2cjQgL5

EVERY BODY WALK! COLLABORATIVE: THE SOCIAL JUSTICE TOOLKIT
-> The Every Body Walk! Collaborative has released The Social Justice Toolkit (http://bit.ly/2cQZZuF) to provide the walking movement with resources and guides to help foster equity, fairness and justice within communities. The toolkit includes an introduction and research that links walking and walkability efforts to the promotion of equity and social justice; communication tools, considerations and resources in safety, health and community engagement; and guides to recognizing individual biases and implicit association testing.

SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL IN SMALL RURAL COMMUNITIES
-> The National Center for Safe Routes to School and the Safe Routes to School National Partnership produced an information brief with an overview of challenges and strategies to implementing Safe Routes to School in small rural communities. It describes state outreach, technical assistance, and partnership approaches that support rural communities and highlights two communities that have successfully used Federal funds to improve safety and accessibility for walking and bicycling. Safe Routes to School in Small Rural Communities: Challenges and Strategies to Accessing Funding: http://bit.ly/2ddTHoC

LIVABLE TRANSIT CORRIDORS: METHODS, METRICS, AND STRATEGIES
-> The Transportation Research Board recently published Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies (http://bit.ly/2d4ZjRP). This handbook presents practical planning and implementation strategies to enhance livability in transit corridors. It provides a definition of transit corridor livability and a set of methods, metrics, and strategies—framed within a five-step visioning and improvement process—that communities can use to improve livability in their transit corridors. It includes a set of tools and techniques that can help in planning and building support for corridor improvements, screening alternatives in preparation for environmental review, identifying a corridor’s livability needs, and developing an action-oriented set of strategies for improving transit corridor livability and quality of life.

A spreadsheet-based Transit Corridor Livability Calculator tool (http://bit.ly/2cZ2Thx) and a separate spreadsheet (http://bit.ly/2cm0csi) used for tool testing are also available for download. An instructional file (http://bit.ly/2d1A1rL) accompanies the spreadsheet.

DISCUSSION: CREATING SIDEWALK REGISTRIES
-> Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff are interested in developing a national sidewalk registry with an accompanying application that assists cities/towns in creating sidewalk GIS layers. If you are aware of anyone doing similar work, contact xdh5@cdc.gov. An inquiry about this topic on the H+T—Friends mailing list resulted in these responses.

  • The Institute for Transportation Research and Education helped launch the North Carolina Pedestrian and Bicycle Infrastructure Network for NCDOT. This geodatabase houses all known existing and planned bicycle and pedestrian facilities in the state: http://bit.ly/2d6iAm1
  • FHWA funded a Small Business Innovation Research project to develop an app to gather sidewalk network data. MySidewalk is in Phase II now, and will be piloted in various locations around the country. http://bit.ly/2cRW4fy.
  • FHWA is also starting work with various USDOT offices to develop systematic data formats for nonmotorized networks (i.e. connected facilities) and to develop supporting policy aimed at improving network quality.The latter effort will eventually yield a national database of networked facilities. They want to be able to step up the analysis from simply knowing where there are facilities to understanding how useful (and used) they are. Contact Jeremy.raw@dot.gov.
  • The recent Tools of the Trade conference reported on these tools 1) Sidewalk Scout: A crowdsourcing smartphone app used by agencies and the public to report sidewalk problems: http://b.gatech.edu/2deKCfj, 2) Sidewalk Sentry: A tablet application used to inventory sidewalks and assess sidewalk quality (http://b.gatech.edu/2cBWXJD) , and, 3) The Sidewalk Prioritization Index: http://bit.ly/2dhrwYR.

GUIDE TO TOP BIKESCORE CITIES
-> Walk Score, owned by national real estate brokerage firm Redfin, scored more than 150 large cities nationwide (http://redf.in/2d7W4Jj), and 10,000 neighborhoods, from 0 to 100 based on four "bike-ability" measures: bike lanes, hills, destinations and road connectivity, and share of local workers’ commutes traveled by bicycle. GrindTV provides a guide to the top 5: Minneapolis, MN; San Francisco, CA; Portland, OR; Denver, CO; and Boston, MA. For each the include why the city of likeable, must-ride trails, best seen by bike, most likeable neighborhoods, and a tourist tip. http://bit.ly/2d7VGur

BICYCLING MAGAZINE’S 50 BEST BIKE CITIES OF 2016
-> Every two years, Bicycling Magazine sifts through Census and department of transportation data on more than 100 cities, consults with experts from biking organizations, and talks with bike advocates and everyday riders to identify the 50 most bike-friendly towns in the US. They consider miles of bike lanes to the percentage of cycling commuters who are female—a key indicator of safe bike infrastructure—to the number of cyclist-friendly bars. The goal is not only to help people plan their next relocations but also to inspire riders and municipalities to advocate for change. Easy listing includes a description, population, per mile bicycle facilities, bicycle-friendly business score, people per bike-share bike, median home value and 2014 rank. Here are the top 5: Chicago, IL; San Francisco, CA; Portland, OR; New York, NY; and Seattle, WA. http://bit.ly/2cZ0uVO

AMERICAN DRIVING SURVEY RESULTS
-> The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety has released American Driving Survey 2014–2015 (http://bit.ly/2cOgJmq).This report that outlines responses to a survey in which respondents aged 16 years or older were asked to report all of the driving that they did over a 24-hour period.