Photo by John Williams

NCBW Newsroom - Resources

The National & International Scene | Regional and Local Actions | The Research Beat | Resources | Jobs, Grants & RFPs

SYSTEMIC PEDESTRIAN SAFETY ANALYSIS
-> The Transportation Research Board published a guidebook that provides a safety analysis method to proactively identify sites for potential safety improvements based on specific risk factors for pedestrians. (Systemic Pedestrian Safety Analysis: http://bit.ly/2FiL643) A systemic approach, as opposed to a "hot-spot" approach, enables transportation agencies to identify, prioritize, and select appropriate countermeasures for locations with a high risk of pedestrian-related crashes, even when crash occurrence data are sparse. The guidebook also provides important insights for the improvement of data collection and data management to better support systemic safety analyses. TRB also provides a PowerPoint presentation summarizing the project: https://bit.ly/2P29jRC.

[See Webinar section for a February 4 webinar based on this report.]

ACCESS MANAGEMENT TREATMENTS & MULTIMODAL USERS
-> The Transportation Research Board released report that describe operational and safety relationships between access management techniques and automobile, pedestrian, bicycle, public transit, and truck modes. (Assessing Interactions Between Access Management Treatments and Multimodal Users: http://bit.ly/2FfUsP6 and Guide for the Analysis of Multimodal Corridor Access Management: http://bit.ly/2FeAnbS) These reports may help select alternative access management techniques based on the safety and operation performance of each affected travel mode. They also examine the interactions between multimodal operations and access management techniques and treatments, and the trade-off decisions that are necessary.

DOWNLOAD PHYSICAL ACTIVITY GUIDELINE FOR AMERICANS, 2ND EDITION
-> Health.gov reports the Physical Activity Guideline for Americans, 2nd edition (http://bit.ly/2RO6iSD) provides evidence-based guidance to help Americans maintain or improve their health through physical activity. This second edition provides science-based guidance to help people ages 3 years and older improve their health through participation in regular physical activity. It reflects the extensive amount of new knowledge gained since the publication of the first edition. This edition of the Guidelines discusses the proven benefits of physical activity and outlines the amounts and types of physical activity recommended for different ages and populations. http://bit.ly/2Rlkzd9

[See Webinar section for the January 14 webinar on this report.]

APTA: TRANSFORMATION OF THE AMERICAN COMMUTER REPORT
-> The American Public Transportation Association released a report based on findings from recent research from the National Academy of Sciences, and new analysis by the APTA Research and Policy Development Department, including the results of APTA's 2018 Mobility Survey. (The Transformation of the American Commuter: http://bit.ly/2GOFOzF) The research shows that consumers view public transportation as pivotal to the future of mobility. The reasons are clear: 1) public transportation can move more people efficiently in less space, 2) as travel options continue to grow, consumers will need a way to make the various travel choices clear and routine, and 3) as consumers recognize growing income inequality and shrinking data privacy, the need to protect the public interest and serve the vulnerable will grow as well. Therefore, public transportation will serve an even larger role in the public life of cities around the nation.

BIKE RACK TO CAPTURE ENERGY CYCLISTS GENERATE WHILE RIDING
-> Springwise reports Dutch designers have devised S-Park, a bike rack system that can use kinetic energy from cycling to charge batteries. The system was proposed as part of Amsterdam's Clean Energy Challenge. As the rider bikes around the city, their front wheel produces kinetic energy, which is stored in batteries on the bicycle. When done riding, cyclists park the bike in a communal bike rack that's connected to the electricity grid. The energy that the batteries stored during the ride is then discharged into the electrical grid. The system includes a front wheel that can be popped into any bike frame. The designers estimate that each bike rack could generate about one kilowatt-hour of energy per day. The designers do not yet have a prototype. http://bit.ly/2FfpTJf