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COMING SOON: NACTO URBAN STREET STORMWATER GUIDE
-> Later this month NACTO will release its “Urban Street Stormwater Guide,” a first-of-its-kind collaboration between city transportation, public works, and water departments to advance the discussion about how to design and construct sustainable streets. The Urban Street Stormwater Guide will provide cities with national best practices for sustainable stormwater management in the public right-of-way, including core principles about the purpose of streets, strategies for building inter-departmental partnerships around sustainable infrastructure, technical design details for siting and building bioretention facilities, and a visual language for communicating the benefits of such projects. The guide will shed light on effective policy and programmatic approaches to starting and scaling up green infrastructure, provides insight on innovative street design strategies, and proposes a framework for measuring performance of streets comprehensively. http://bit.ly/2t0rdXf

[See Webinar section for a June 29 webinar about the Urban Street Stormwater Guide.]

DESIGN YOUR TOWN ONLINE INTERACTIVE RESOURCE
-> RPA launched Design Your Town – an interactive web-based resource for citizen planners, professionals and anyone concerned about the quality of the villages and landscapes where they live. This website has attractive and sustainable designs for different kinds of places as well as the details, policies and regulations needed for implementation. You can start by picking the kind of place you want to fix – from downtowns to rural villages – or by searching through best practices for landscape design, connectivity and mixed-use development. http://bit.ly/2spCHGr

The most recent US Access Board newsletter provides details of two accessibility resources. (http://bit.ly/2sVix42)

ADA TITLE II ACTION GUIDE FOR STATE & LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
-> 1) The New England ADA Center released its online ADA Title II Action Guide for State and Local Governments (http://bit.ly/2sVC98f) to help public sector entities understand and fulfill their obligations under the law. (Title II, Subtitle A covers all programs, services, and activities of state and local government and Subtitle B contains requirements for public transportation systems such as regional transit authorities.) The guide explains provisions in Title II , including requirements for effective communication and access to facilities and programs. It also describes actions that state and local governments must take, such as appointing an ADA Coordinator, establishing grievance procedures, conducting self-evaluations, and implementing transition plans. The material includes sample documents and self-evaluation forms, answers to frequently asked questions, and best practices.

ANSI STANDARD ON ACCESSIBLE & USABLE BUILDINGS & FACILITIES
-> 2) The American National Standards Institute recently approved the 2017 edition of the ICC A117.1 Standard on Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities. (print copies available later this month: http://bit.ly/2sVnDgT) This voluntary consensus standard, which provides technical provisions for accessible spaces and elements in facilities, is referenced by the International Building Code (IBC). Among other enhanced requirements, the new edition includes new provisions covering components in public rights-of-ways such as curb ramps, blended transitions, detectable warnings, and on-street parking.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PUBLIC TRANSPORT & INNOVATIVE MOBILITY
-> The International Transport Forum released a report that investigates the convergence of public transportation and mobility solutions, such as ride services, car- and bicycle-sharing, app-enabled on-demand micro-bus services, and platforms that connect app-using travelers and drivers. The research examines the role of public authorities in ensuring this convergence supports commercial innovation as well as public policy objectives. It also explores where action may be needed to ensure that this convergence does not lead to reduced mobility options for those that have difficulty using existing transportation modes. “Shaping the Relationship between Public Transport and Innovative Mobility” http://bit.ly/2spy2Vg

DATASETS OF STATE-LEVEL HIA AND HIAP BILLS & LAWS
-> The Policy Surveillance Program provides 4 longitudinal, empirical legal datasets exploring state-level Health Impact Assessments (HIAs) and Health in All Policies (HiAP) bills and laws that were introduced, enacted and/or amended between January 1, 2012 - December 31, 2016. HIAs and HiAP approaches incorporate public health considerations into decision-making across a range of sectors, and identify the potential positive and negative health impacts of a proposed law, development project, plan, or other policy, prior to its final approval and implementation. They examine the impact of proposed decisions on social, physical, and economic factors that can affect health, examine how certain population groups may be disproportionately affected by a given decision, and seek to engage multiple stakeholders (both governmental and nongovernmental) to improve health equity and decision-making. http://bit.ly/2t0AlLk

VIDEOS: VARIATIONS IN PRACTICE OF RUMBLE STRIPS & RUMBLE STRIPES
-> The Transportation Research Board recorded a series of videos in May 2017 that features research from the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)'s “Synthesis 490: Practice of Rumble Strips and Rumble Stripes” (http://bit.ly/2t05LBx). The research summarizes the current practices used by states when installing rumble strips and rumble stripes (pavement marking lines painted on the rumble strips to increase visibility during inclement weather conditions). The series explores variations in practice in terms of design, criteria, locations for installation, maintenance, perceived benefits, communication of benefits, and other issues. The videos are available on-demand at no cost. http://bit.ly/2t0d8sB. The slides are available at: http://bit.ly/2t0auTG.

TRB NEIGHBORHOOD GREENWAYS WORKSHOP RESOURCES
-> Neighborhood greenways (also called "bicycle boulevards", "local street bikeways", "quiet streets", etc) are growing in popularity as a tool for encouraging bike use on low-traffic streets without dedicated bike facilities, while also introducing traffic calming elements to enhance pedestrian comfort and liveability. However, treatments vary and there is little research on the comparative effectiveness of specific elements. At this year’s TRB Annual Meeting in Washington DC (Jan 2017) a half-day workshop was held to review the current state of research and practice for neighborhood greenways in North America and elsewhere in the world. Presentations and workshop notes: http://bit.ly/2srggkk

BEST PRACTICES FOR TRAILS CROSSINGS
-> American Trails reports MN DOT published “Best Practices Synthesis and Guidance in At-Grade Trail-Crossing Treatments.” (http://bit.ly/2srfGD5) It provides guidance on safety treatment applications at trail crossings, which have frequently been the sites of bicycle, pedestrian, and snowmobile crashes. It includes principles of user-friendly trail-crossing designs and a toolbox of categorized treatments widely used in the US.

NATURAL SURFACE TRAILS IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS
-> American Trails reports that Benchmark Trails, Inc. shared its presentation on "Natural Surface Trails in Urban Environments." It includes design and construction details, wetland issues, and many photos. Several case studies on several North Carolina trail systems are included. http://bit.ly/2t0KgR7

TRB PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE SAFETY CONFERENCE SUMMARY
-> The Transportation Research Board published its “Proceedings on the Web 21: Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety: Summary of the 10th University Transportation Centers Spotlight Conference” (http://bit.ly/2srs3yV) held last December. The conference highlighted research associated with pedestrian and bicyclist safety, and included plenary sessions focused on the role of policy and guidance, emerging and future technologies, behavior change, and equity. For PowerPoint presentations and video recordings, click on the title within the Conference Agenda at http://bit.ly/2srKrIj.